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Sample records for emission spectroscopy study

  1. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The studies reported were conducted to gain a fundamental understanding of adhesion and dynamic friction on an atomic or microscopic level. Fundamental aspects of low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger emission spectroscopy (AES), and field ion microscopy (FIM) are discussed. Typical results of studies conducted are considered, giving attention to LEED-AES experiments, pin and disk experiments, and field ion microscope investigations.

  2. Study of atomic and molecular emission spectra of Sr by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Chet R; Alfarraj, Bader; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K; Ghany, Charles; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2015-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal analytical technique for in situ analysis of elemental composition. We have performed a comparative study of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of atomic and molecular emission from LIBS spectra. In our experiments, a mixture of SrCl2 and Al2O3 in powder form was used as a sample. The atomic emission from Sr and molecular emission from SrCl and SrO observed in LIBS spectra were analyzed. The optimum laser energies, gate delays, and gate widths for selected atomic lines and molecular bands were determined from spectra recorded at various experimental parameters. These optimum experimental conditions were used to collect calibration data, and the calibration curves were used to predict the Sr concentration. Limits of detection (LODs) for selected atomic and molecular emission spectra were determined.

  3. Scandium oxide coated polycrystalline tungsten studied using emission microscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Congshang; Vaughn, Joel M; Sadowski, Jerzy T; Kordesch, Martin E

    2012-08-01

    Thermionic electron emission from 200 to 500 nm thick coatings of scandium oxide on tungsten foil have been examined in thermionic emission microscopy, spectroscopic photoelectron microcopy, synchrotron radiation and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). A clear dependence of the scandium oxide-W electron yield on the grain orientation of the polycrystalline tungsten is observed in thermionic emission and photoelectron emission.

  4. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers.

    PubMed

    Cook, D J; Schlemmer, S; Balucani, N; Wagner, D R; Harrison, J A; Steiner, B; Saykally, R J

    1998-02-26

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  5. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  6. A study of carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates using thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenrich, M. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is useful for identifying mineralogies including carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates. Each of these groups of minerals has a distinct emissivity profile that allows for general identification (e.g., carbonate). Laboratory data are being collected that suggest the potential for determining specific composition of these minerals (e.g., calcite, magnesite). Previous studies of Mars suggest that the above groups of minerals should be present. On Mars fine-grained mineralogies are likely to be intimately mixed due to aeolian activity. Mixtures of calcite with palagonite will be studied to determine the volume percent requirement for salt identification and to understand the complexities of fine-grained mixtures observed by thermal emission. Further work with mixtures will include sulfate and phosphate mineralogies.

  7. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  8. [Study on Ammonia Emission Rules in a Dairy Feedlot Based on Laser Spectroscopy Detection Method].

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Wang, Li-ming; Gao, Yan-wei; Xu, Jin-feng; Gao, Zhi-ling; Ma, Wen-qi

    2016-03-01

    It needs on-line monitoring of ammonia concentration on dairy feedlot to disclose ammonia emissions characteristics accurately for reducing ammonia emissions and improving the ecological environment. The on-line monitoring system for ammonia concentration has been designed based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology combining with long open-path technology, then the study has been carried out with inverse dispersion technique and the system. The ammonia concentration in-situ has been detected and ammonia emission rules have been analyzed on a dairy feedlot in Baoding in autumn and winter of 2013. The monitoring indicated that the peak of ammonia concentration was 6.11 x 10(-6) in autumn, and that was 6.56 x 10(-6) in winter. The concentration results show that the variation of ammonia concentration had an obvious diurnal periodicity, and the general characteristic of diurnal variation was that the concentration was low in the daytime and was high at night. The ammonia emissions characteristic was obtained with inverse dispersion model that the peak of ammonia emissions velocity appeared at noon. The emission velocity was from 1.48 kg/head/hr to 130.6 kg/head/hr in autumn, and it was from 0.004 5 kg/head/hr to 43.32 kg/head/hr in winter which was lower than that in autumn. The results demonstrated ammonia emissions had certain seasonal differences in dairy feedlot scale. In conclusion, the ammonia concentration was detected with optical technology, and the ammonia emissions results were acquired by inverse dispersion model analysis with large range, high sensitivity, quick response without gas sampling. Thus, it's an effective method for ammonia emissions monitoring in dairy feedlot that provides technical support for scientific breeding.

  9. Application of 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to studying biocomplexes in frozen solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Kuzmann, E.; Vértes, A.

    2005-09-01

    Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy with the 57Co isotope was used to study very dilute rapidly frozen aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight biomolecules (aromatic amino acids anthranilic acid and L-tryptophan) and within a sophisticated biopolymer, bacterial glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism. The appearance of after-effects of the 57Co→57Fe nuclear transformation as well as the coordination properties of the cation and the ligands in the complexes are discussed on the basis of their Mössbauer parameters.

  10. Adhesion and transfer of PTFE to metals studied by auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum has been studied using Auger emission spectroscopy. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate.

  11. Experimental and theoretical studies of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission from iron oxide: Studies of atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Barefield, J. E.; Judge, E. J.; Campbell, K.; Johns, H. M.; Kilcrease, D. P.; McInroy, R.; Clegg, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements on iron oxide. Measurements have been made of the emission from Fe2O3 under atmospheres of air, He, and Ar, and at different atmospheric pressures. The effect of varying the time delay of the measurement is also explored. Theoretical calculations were performed to analyze the plasma conditions and find that a reasonably consistent picture of the change in plasma temperature and density for different atmospheric conditions can be reached. We also investigate the sensitivity of the OI 777 nm emission lines to the plasma conditions, something that has not been explored in detail in the previous work. Finally, we also show that LIBS can be used to differentiate between FeO and Fe2O3 by examining the ratio of the intensities of selected Fe emission to O emission lines.

  12. Study of radio frequency plasma of silane — Argon mixture by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, P. P.; Chaudhuri, P.

    2000-03-01

    The silane plasma used in the preparation of amorphous silicon based devices by the radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf-PECVD) method may be conveniently characterised with the help of the optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In the present paper we have studied the rf glow discharge plasma of a flowing mixture of silane and argon formed between the capacitor plates of a rf-PECVD chamber by the OES method. Our aim is to find a correlation between the intensity of the emission spectra arising due to the excitation of silane, and the process parameters. The intensity variation of the peak at 414.3 nm arising due to SiH (A2 δ — X2II) transition has been studied with respect to different process parameters like the flow ratio of sinale to argon, applied rf power density and pressure. The theoretical calculations of the evolution of the concentration of SiH* species satisfactorily conform to the intensity variation of the emission spectra of this species. This method makes possible an in-situ control of the quality of the material or device by monitoring the plasma in a non-intrusive way.

  13. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Kenmochi, N.; Otani, Y.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be -20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  14. [Experimental study on flame temperature measurement by double line of atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Xiao-Shu; Fan, Xue-Liang; Shen, Jia-Qi

    2009-12-01

    The flame temperature was measured by the double line of atomic emission spectroscopy according to the spectra of K (766.5 and 769.9 nm) whose relative intensity was obtained by fiber spectrometer. The principles, methods and experiment system were described. The temperature measured by the double line of atomic emission spectroscopy was compared to the results measured by thermal couple under the condition of thermal equilibrium of blackbody furnace. The comparison indicated a good coherence between these two measurement methods. The method was demonstrated on coal powder and timber, and the temperature measured corresponded to reality. PMID:20210126

  15. X-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional study of CO/Fe(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gladh, J.; Oeberg, H.; Li, Jibiao; Ljungberg, M. P.; Matsuda, A.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Oestroem, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Nilsson, A.

    2012-01-21

    We report x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure of the predissociative {alpha}{sub 3} phase of CO bound at hollow sites of Fe(100) as well as of the on-top bound species in the high-coverage {alpha}{sub 1} phase. The analysis is supported by density functional calculations of structures and spectra. The bonding of ''lying down'' CO in the hollow site is well described in terms of {pi} to {pi}* charge transfer made possible through bonding interaction also at the oxygen in the minority spin-channel. The on-top CO in the mixed, high-coverage {alpha}{sub 1} phase is found to be tilted due to adsorbate-adsorbate interaction, but still with bonding mainly characteristic of ''vertical'' on-top adsorbed CO similar to other transition-metal surfaces.

  16. Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy study of the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, V. Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1987-07-01

    Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride samples of different compositions. The Si L23 x-ray emission spectra from these samples are presented and interpreted using a two-phase linear superposition model for the valence-band region. We assumed a model for the valence-band edge and for the emission in the gap region due to trap states and the Si 2p core exciton. The results obtained from these fits are compared with relevant models and other experiments.

  17. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Surface research tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, and field ion microscopy are discussed. Examples of their use in studying adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication presented. These tools have provided considerable insight into the basic nature of solid surface interactions. The transfer of metals from one surface to another at the atomic level has been observed and studied with each of these devices. The field ion microscope has been used to study polymer-metal interactions and Auger analysis to study the mechanism of polymer adhesion to metals. LEED and Auger analysis have identified surface segregation of alloying elements and indicated the influence of these elements in metallic adhesion. LEED and Auger analysis have assisted in adsorption studies in determining the structural arrangement and quantity of adsorbed species present in making an understanding of the influence of these species on adhesion possible. These devices are assisting in the furtherance of understanding of the fundamental mechanism involved in the adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication processes.

  18. [Studies on the remote measurement of the emission of formaldehyde by mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Cheng; Xie, Pin-Hua; Li, Ang; Si, Fu-Qi; Dou, Ke; Liu, Yu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Jie

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compounds that play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and photochemical reactions. Formaldehyde is an important indicator of atmospheric reactivity and urban atmospheric aerosol precursors. In the present paper, the emission of formaldehyde from chemical area was measured using the mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). This instrument uses the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source with successful sampling in the area loop. Vertical column density was retrieved by this system, combined with the meteorological wind field and car speed information, the emission of formaldehyde in the area was estimated. The authors carried out the measuring experiment in one chemical plant in Beijing using this technology. The result showed that the average value of the flux of formaldehyde in this area was 605 kg x h(-1) during the measuring period. PMID:22242505

  19. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of Emission Spectroscopy of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bradley Gray

    1995-01-01

    negligible on Earth. I conclude that the spectral effects created by near-surface thermal gradients are predictable and might even provide an extra source of information about the physical nature of a planetary surface, and mid-IR emission spectroscopy should therefore prove to be useful for remote sensing of airless bodies.

  20. Comparative study of bandwidths in copper delafossites from x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D.; Foord, J. S.; Payne, D. J.; Arnold, T.; Aston, D. J.; Egdell, R. G.; Godinho, K. G.; Scanlon, D. O.; Morgan, B. J.; Watson, G. W.; Mugnier, E.; Yaicle, C.; Rougier, A.; Colakerol, L.; Glans, P. A.; Piper, L. F. J.; Smith, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    The widths of the valence bands in the copper (I) delafossites CuGaO2 , CuInO2 , and CuScO2 have been measured by OK -shell x-ray emission spectroscopy and are compared with previous experimental work on CuAlO2 and CuCrO2 . In agreement with recent density-functional theory calculations it is found that the bandwidth decreases in the series CuAlO2>CuGaO2>CuInO2>CuScO2 . It is shown that states at the top of the valence band are of dominant Cu3dz2 atomic character but with significant mixing with O2p states.

  1. Study of nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmosphere by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-09-21

    We investigate the evolution of the species from both the target and the air, and the plasma parameter distribution of the nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmospheric air. The technique used is spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is argued that the N II from the air, which is distributed over a wider region than the target species in the early stages of the discharge, is primarily formed by the shock wave. The ionized species have a larger expansion velocity than the excited atoms in the first ∼100 ns, providing direct evidence for space-charge effects. The electron density decreases with the distance from the target surface in the early stages of the discharge, and both the electron density and the excited temperature variation in the axial direction are found to become insignificant at later stages.

  2. Dynamics of Bloch State Positronium Emission from MOF Targets Studied via Rydberg TOF Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro Escalera, Alina; Jones, Adric; Mills, Allen

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in the efficient production and detection of Rydberg positronium (Ps) have made it possible to perform energy- and angle- resolved time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy with Ps. We report here TOF measurements of Ps emission from the metal-oxide framework (MOF) targets, MOF-5 and ZIF-8. MOFs are a recently synthesized class of chemical structures, characterized by high long-range order and large surface area to volume ratios (i.e., they are highly porous and uniform, crystalline materials). Ps is found to be emitted predominantly in a series of monoenergetic peaks, providing clear evidence of Ps Bloch states. Measuring the relative populations of the monoenergetic peaks, as a function of implantation energy and target temperature, provides insight into the target-dependent dynamics of Bloch state Ps. Work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation Grants No. PHY 1206100 and No. PHY 1040590 and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Progam (NSF-GRFP). DOE BES DE-FG02-13ER46972 (MOF-5 synthesis and characterization).

  3. Study of diatomic molecules. 2: Intensities. [optical emission spectroscopy of ScO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Femenias, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of perturbations, giving the diatomic effective Hamiltonian, is used for calculating actual molecular wave functions and intensity factors involved in transitions between states arising from Hund's coupling cases a,b, intermediate a-b, and c tendency. The Herman and Wallis corrections are derived, without any knowledge of the analytical expressions of the wave functions, and generalized to transitions between electronic states with whatever symmetry and multiplicity. A general method for studying perturbed intensities is presented using primarily modern spectroscopic numerical approaches. The method is used in the study of the ScO optical emission spectrum.

  4. Optical emission spectroscopy studies of the influence of laserablated mass on dry inductively coupled plasma conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocan, A.C.; Mao, X.L.; Borisov, Oleg V.; Russo, R.E.

    1997-07-01

    The amount of ablated mass can influence the temperature andexcitation characteristics of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) andmust be taken into account to ensure accurate chemical analysis. The ICPelectron number density was investigated by using measurements of the Mgionic to atomic resonant-line ratios during laser ablation of an aluminummatrix. The ICP excitation temperature was measured by using selected Felines during laser ablation of an iron matrix. A Nd:YAG laser (3 ns pulseduration) at 266 nm was used for these ablation-sampling studies. Laserenergy, power density, and repetition rate were varied in order to changethe quantity of ablated mass into the ICP. Over the range of laseroperating conditions studied herein, the ICP was not significantlyinfluenced by the quantity of solid sample. Therefore, analyticalmeasurements can be performed accurately and fundamental studies of laserablation processes (such as ablation mass roll-off, fractionalvaporization) can be investigated using inductively coupled plasma-atomicemission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  5. Study of dynamic emission spectra from lubricant films in an elastohydrodynamic contact using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra were obtained through a diamond window from lubricating fluids in an operating sliding elastohydrodynamic contact and analyzed by comparison with static absorption spectra under similar pressures. Different loads, shear rates and temperatures were used. Most of the spectra exhibited polarization characteristics, indicating directional alignment of the lubricant in the EHD contact. Among the fluids studied were a "traction" fluid, an advanced ester, and their mixtures, a synthetic paraffin, a naphthenic reference fluid (N-1), both neat and containing 1 percent of p-tricresyl phosphate as an anti-wear additive, and a C-ether. Traction properties were found to be nearly proportional to mixture composition for traction fluid and ester mixtures. The anti-wear additive reduced traction and fluid temperature under low loads but increased them under higher loads, giving rise to formation of a friction polymer.

  6. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Study of Competing Phases of Electrons in the Second Landau Level.

    PubMed

    Levy, A L; Wurstbauer, U; Kuznetsova, Y Y; Pinczuk, A; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Manfra, M J; Gardner, G C; Watson, J D

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phases of electrons in the filling factor range 2≤ν≤3 are probed by the weak optical emission from the partially populated second Landau level and spin wave measurements. Observations of optical emission include a multiplet of sharp peaks that exhibit a strong filling factor dependence. Spin wave measurements by resonant inelastic light scattering probe breaking of spin rotational invariance and are used to link this optical emission with collective phases of electrons. A remarkably rapid interplay between emission peak intensities manifests phase competition in the second Landau level.

  7. Vibrational Motions Associated with Primary Processes in Bacteriorhodopsin Studied by Coherent Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Groma, Géza I.; Colonna, Anne; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary energetic processes driving the functional proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin take place in the form of complex molecular dynamic events after excitation of the retinal chromophore into the Franck-Condon state. These early events include a strong electronic polarization, skeletal stretching, and all-trans-to-13-cis isomerization upon formation of the J intermediate. The effectiveness of the photoreaction is ensured by a conical intersection between the electronic excited and ground states, providing highly nonadiabatic coupling to nuclear motions. Here, we study real-time vibrational coherences associated with these motions by analyzing light-induced infrared emission from oriented purple membranes in the 750–1400 cm−1 region. The experimental technique applied is based on second-order femtosecond difference frequency generation on macroscopically ordered samples that also yield information on phase and direction of the underlying motions. Concerted use of several analysis methods resulted in the isolation and characterization of seven different vibrational modes, assigned as C-C stretches, out-of-plane methyl rocks, and hydrogen out-of-plane wags, whereas no in-plane H rock was found. Based on their lifetimes and several other criteria, we deduce that the majority of the observed modes take place on the potential energy surface of the excited electronic state. In particular, the direction sensitivity provides experimental evidence for large intermediate distortions of the retinal plane during the excited-state isomerization process. PMID:21402041

  8. Electronic structure of alkali-intercalated graphite studied by soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Ritsko, J. J.

    1987-02-01

    Carbon K soft-x-ray emission spectra of LiC6, KC8, and CsC8 are presented. An absolute value for the charge transfer from the alkali metal to the carbon π band is obtained. A model fit to the data reveals similar effects on both spectral shape and threshold energy, independent of the choice of the alkali-metal intercalant, and provides a measure of departures from the rigid-band approximation. An enhancement of the soft-x-ray emission spectrum near EF is reported.

  9. Fiber Optic Switch For Broadband Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groot, Wim; Myers, Roger; Zube, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Many high-temperature processes comprise large-scale phenomena. Studying spatial and temporal correlations of physical processes between several locations within characteristic scales provides desired information on macroscopic physical processes. Achieved with emission spectroscopy by use of multiple optical fibers. Simultaneous coupling of light from these fibers into single available spectrometer and/or monochromator not accomplished without added expense of two-dimensional array and increased complexity of calibration. Quasi-simultaneous coupling, while maintaining optimum alignment and maximum throughput of broadband emission, achieved by use of fiber optic multiscanner. Instrument used successfully in study of frozen-flow losses internal to flow of plasma inside nozzle of arc jet. Instrument includes two hollow disks of different sizes and stepping motor.

  10. Modern applications of terahertz emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrel, Shayne Matthew

    Terahertz (THz) emission spectroscopy (TES) is newly developed experimental technique capable of measuring ultrafast dynamics in a variety of systems. Unlike pump-probe spectroscopies where the signals are obtained indirectly, the THz waveform emitted by the dynamical process serves as the signal field. Information about processes involving a time-dependent magnetization, polarization or current is obtained using TES. The detection scheme is polarization sensitive and allows the direction of the dynamical event to be recovered. The role of solvation on intramolecular charge transfer in DMANS (4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrostilbene) is studied using TES in three solvents: benzene, toluene, and 1,3-dichlorobenzene. These solvents have similar molecular structures but different polarities and dielectric constants. The charge transfer dynamics are found to depend on the solvent. A secondary feature in the THz emission appearing 4-6 Ps after the main pulse provides evidence that DMANS may undergo a twisted intramolecular charge transfer state (TICT) upon photoexcitation. The ultrafast magnetization dynamics of polycrystalline Ni and single Fe films ranging in thickness from 5 nm to 60 nm are reported using TES. For samples thicker than the visible optical skin depth, (˜10 nm for Ni and ˜27 nm for Fe), the emission is easily interpreted using Lenz's law. For films thinner than visible optical skin depth, the emission patterns are qualitatively different. These results suggest that there are two generation mechanisms at work: one that arises purely from bulk demagnetization in the thick sample limit and another that is the result of difference frequency generation enhanced by the magnetized surface. A comparative study of the magnetization dynamics of a 40 nm Ni and 40 Fe film shows that the magnetization recovers faster in Fe than in Ni. The dependence of optical rectification and shift currents in unbiased GaAs (111) is reported using TES. It is found that the dependence

  11. Electronic Structure of LiC6 Studied by Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S.

    1987-04-01

    We present and discuss carbon K soft X-ray emission spectra of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and LiC6, stage 1 Li intercalated graphite. These measurements allow us to observe the filling of the carbon π states by the electrons from the donor alkali atoms. By fitting the shape of these donor-filled π states with simple models, we can determine several parameters describing the electronic density of states near the Fermi energy in this material. In addition knowing the charge transfer, and measuring the area under the donor-filled π states allows us to evaluate the intensity enhancement seen in X-ray emission near the Fermi energy relative to the rest of the π band.

  12. [Study of a wire-to-plate positive pulsed corona discharge reactor by emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen-Bing; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Zhao, Lei; Xuan, Jian-Yong; Jiang, Jian-Ping; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2011-11-01

    In order to get extensive knowledge of wire-to-plate pulsed corona discharge reactor, the influences of different diameters of wire electrode, different wire-to-plate and wire-to-wire spacing on OH radical generation were experimentally investigated under atmospheric pressure based on emission spectrum, and the spatial distribution of OH radicals in the electric field was also discussed in detail The results showed that OH radicals decrease along the X-axis, and the activation radius is approximately 20 mm; showing a trend of first increase and then decrease along the Y-axis, with the activation radius being more than 30 mm. OH radical has small change as the diameter of wire electrode changes below 2 mm, with a sharp decline as the diameter continues to increase. OH radical emission intensity increases as wire-to-wire spacing increases and decrease as wire-to-plate spacing increases. PMID:22242480

  13. Emission spectroscopy study of CF{sub 4} decomposition in an Ar-H{sub 2} inductive plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Ricard, A.; Al Ayoubi, S.; Cavvadias, S.; Amouroux, J.

    1995-12-31

    Radiative species in Ar RF plasma torch with addition of H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CF{sub 4} polluting gases have been analyzed by emission spectroscopy. An efficient etching by F atoms of reactor quartz tube is detected from Si atom emission when a few 10{sup {minus}3} CF{sub 4} is introduced into the Ar plasma. The Si emission disappeared with H{sub 2} introduction into the Ar-CF{sub 4} gas mixture which has been correlated with HF formation. From C atomic emission, it is deduced that CF{sub 4} as CH{sub 4} polluting gases are largely dissociated into the Ar plasma torch.

  14. Electronic structure of intercalated graphite studied by soft-x-ray-emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guojiang; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1995-08-01

    Carbon K soft-x-ray-emission (SXE) spectra of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and intercalated graphite with both donor (LiC6) and acceptor (FeCl3) doping are presented and compared. A numerical calculation using partially inverted initial states is carried out and models are constructed to fit these data using this method. It is shown that this approach is able to describe accurately the enhancement of the SXE spectrum near the Fermi energy for LiC6. In the case of graphite intercalated with FeCl3, the model also produces an enhanced Fermi edge while the data show no difference from the spectrum of HOPG. This aspect of the spectra of acceptor compounds is not at present understood.

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy studies of the influence of laser ablated mass on dry inductively coupled plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocan, A. C.; Mao, X. L.; Borisov, Oleg V.; Russo, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    The amount of ablated mass can influence the temperature and excitation characteristics of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and must be taken into account to ensure accurate chemical analysis. The ICP electron number density was investigated by using measurements of the Mg ionic to atomic resonant-line ratios during laser ablation of an aluminum matrix. The ICP excitation temperature was measured by using selected Fe lines during laser ablation of an iron matrix. A Nd:YAG laser (3 ns pulse duration) at 266 nm was used for these ablation-sampling studies. Laser energy, power density, and repetition rate were varied in order to change the quantity of ablated mass into the ICP. Over the range of laser operating conditions studied herein, the ICP was not significantly influenced by the quantity of solid sample. Therefore, analytical measurements can be performed accurately and fundamental studies of laser ablation processes (such as ablation mass roll-off, fractional vaporization) can be investigated using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  16. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Study Ligand Valence Orbitals in Mn Coordination Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Soldatov, Alexander V; Messinger, Johannes; Merz, Kathrin; Weyhermuller, Thomas; Bergmann, Uwe; Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-03-02

    We discuss a spectroscopic method to determine the character of chemical bonding and for the identification of metal ligands in coordination and bioinorganic chemistry. It is based on the analysis of satellite lines in X-ray emission spectra that arise from transitions between valence orbitals and the metal ion 1s level (valence-to-core XES). The spectra, in connection with calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), provide information that is complementary to other spectroscopic techniques, in particular X-ray absorption (XANES and EXAFS). The spectral shape is sensitive to protonation of ligands and allows ligands, which differ only slightly in atomic number (e.g., C, N, O...), to be distinguished. A theoretical discussion of the main spectral features is presented in terms of molecular orbitals for a series of Mn model systems: [Mn(H2O)6]2+, [Mn(H2O)5OH]+, [Mn(H2O)5NH2]+, and [Mn(H2O)5NH3]2+. An application of the method, with comparison between theory and experiment, is presented for the solvated Mn2+ ion in water and three Mn coordination complexes, namely [LMn(acac)N3]BPh4, [LMn(B2O3Ph2)(ClO4)], and [LMn(acac)N]BPh4, where L represents 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, acac stands for the 2,4-pentanedionate anion, and B2O3Ph2 represents the 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-dibora-2-oxapropane-1,3-diolato dianion.

  17. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  18. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results. PMID:27428600

  19. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation. PMID:27314909

  20. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  1. Adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluorethylene to metals studied by Auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum were studied. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron-induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals, such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate.

  2. Field emission spectroscopy of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, K. A.; Trofimov, V. V.; Egorov, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental set up for the natural experiment and measurement model are presented to obtain the feld emission energy distribution spectrum out of silicon carbide in case of the macro-sample having a macroscopic shape of a tip. The prototype of feld emission 6H - SiC monolithic cathode is proposed for spectroscopy measurements, and characterised by current-voltage dependence at macroscale interelectrode distance.

  3. Fourier transform stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Corcoran, T. C.; Connell, L. L.; Hartland, G. V.

    1987-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental results that demonstrate a new technique of non-linear interferometry based on stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy (SEPS) are presented. It is shown that splittings between the initial and final states in SEP processes can be measured by the method. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique relative to spectral domain SEPS are discussed.

  4. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhone, Jason; Cooper, Christopher; Desangles, Victor; Nornberg, Mark; Seidlitz, Blair; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2015-11-01

    An optical emission spectroscopic analysis has been developed to measure electron temperature, neutral burnout, and Zeff in Ar and He plasmas in the Wisconsin plasma astrophysics laboratory (WiPAL). The WiPAL vacuum chamber is a 3 meter diameter spherical vessel lined with 3000 SmCo permanent magnets (B > 3 kG) that create an axisymmetric multi-cusp ring for confining the plasma. WiPAL is designed to study unmagnetized plasmas that are hot (Te > 10 eV), dense (ne >1018), and with high ionization fraction. Electron temperature and density can be measured via Langmuir probes. However, probes can disturb the plasma, be difficult to interpret, and become damaged by large heat loads from the plasma. A low cost non-invasive spectroscopy system capable of scanning the plasma via a linear stage has been installed to study plasma properties. From the neutral particle emission, the neutral burnout and estimated neutral temperature can be inferred. A modified coronal model with metastable states is being implemented to determine Te for Ar plasmas.

  5. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  6. [Optical emission spectroscopy of MPCVD plasma].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-bin; Wu, Jian-peng; Tao, Li-ping; Cao, Wei; Li, Guo-wei; Wang, Jian-hua

    2013-09-01

    The plasma of CH4/H2 was diagnosed with optical emission spectroscopy on a high-pressure microwave plasma apparatus at 2.45 GHz. The existing radicals in the plasma and the influence of the methane concentration on radical concentration and distribution were researched. The results indicate that the radicals of CH, Halpha, Hbeta, Hgamma, C2 and little impurity atom Mo exist in the plasma. The intensity of emission spectrum of the radicals increases with the increase in the methane concentration, especially the intensity of C2 has a notable increase. The ratio of the intensity of the CH to Halpha is unchanging with the increase in methane concentration, while that of C2 to Halpha has a marked increase. The uniformity of the space distribution of the radicals becomes worse with the increase in methane concentration.

  7. Biomimetic mono- and dinuclear Ni(I) and Ni(II) complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuth, N.; Gehring, H.; Horn, B.; Holze, P.; Kositzki, R.; Schrapers, P.; Limberg, C.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Five biomimetic mono- or dinuclear nickel complexes featuring Ni(I) or Ni(II) sites were studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Ni K-edge XANES spectra and Kβ main and satellite emission lines were collected on powder samples. The pre-edge absorption transitions (core-to-valence excitation) and Kβ2,5 emission transitions (valence-to-core decay) were calculated using DFT (TPSSh/TZVP) on crystal structures. This yielded theoretical ctv and vtc spectra in near-quantitative agreement with the experiment, showing the adequacy of the DFT approach for electronic structure description, emphasizing the sensitivity of the XAS/XES spectra for ligation/redox changes at nickel, and revealing the configuration of unoccupied and occupied valence levels, as well as the spin-coupling modes in the dinuclear complexes. XAS/XES-DFT is valuable for molecular and electronic structure analysis of synthetic complexes and of nickel centers in H2 or COx converting metalloenzymes.

  8. Comment on ?Spin crossover in (Mg,Fe)O: A M?ssbauer effect study with an alternative interpretation of x-ray emission spectroscopy data?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J; Struzhkin, V V; Garriliuk, A

    2006-05-23

    Electronic spin-pairing transition of iron in magnesiow{umlt u}stite-(Mg,Fe)O has been recently studied with X-ray emission and M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopies under high pressures. While these studies reported a high-spin to low-spin transition of iron to occur at pressures above approximately 50 GPa, the width of the observed transition varies significantly. In particular, Kantor et al. reported that the transition in (Mg0.8,Fe0.2)O occurs over a pressure range of approximately 50 GPa in high-pressure M{umlt o}ssbauer measurements. To account for the discrepancy in the transition pressure, Kantor et al. reanalyzed the X-ray emission spectra by Lin et al. using a simple spectral decomposition method and claimed that X-ray emission measurements are also consistent with a spin crossover of iron at high pressures. Here we show that the proposed fitting method is inadequate to describe the X-ray emission spectrum of the low-spin FeS2 and would give an erroneous satellite peak (K{sub beta}') intensity, leading to an artificial high-spin component and, consequently, to invalid conclusions regarding the width of the pressure-induced transition in magnesiow{umlt u}stite. Furthermore, we compare Kantor's M{umlt o}ssbauer data with other recent high-pressure M{umlt o}ssbauer studies and show that the width of the transition can be simply explained by different experimental conditions (sample thickness, diameter, and hydrostaticity).

  9. A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    The first quarter of this project to develop a Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy mercury continuous emission monitor involved acquisition and verification of the laser system to be used, initial cavity design, and initial software development for signal processing and data acquisition.

  10. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf, Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-08-22

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour.

  11. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf , Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J.; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour. PMID:27545197

  12. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy detection of laser ablation produced particles: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. Derrick, Jr.; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Choi, Inhee; Ruiz, Javier; Mao, Xianglei; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Russo, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    The use of a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma source as an alternative to conventional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) detection of laser ablation (LA) produced particles using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is demonstrated. This configuration utilizes a 180° geometry, which is different from the 40° geometry that was used to ionize ablated particles followed by mass spectrometric detection. The use of a hollow counter electrode (nickel, 0.3 cm o.d., 0.1 cm i.d.) was implemented to introduce ablated particles directly into the APGD plasma with helium as a carrier gas. The LS-APGD source was optimized using ablated copper as the test sample (helium carrier gas flow rate (0.30 L min- 1 He), discharge current (60 mA), laser power (44 mJ), and solution electrode sheath gas (0.2 L min- 1 He) and solution flow rates (10 μL min- 1 5% HNO3)). Standard brass samples having known Zn/Cu percentages were ablated and analyzed using the LS-APGD source. As a comparison, the established technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the same set of brass standards under similar ablation conditions to the LS-AGPD measurements, yielding comparable results. The Zn/Cu ratio results for the LS-APGD and LIBS measurements showed good similarity to previous measurements using ICP-MS detection. The performance of the LS-APGD-OES microplasma, comparable to well established methods, with lower capital and operational overhead expenses, suggests a great deal of promise as an analytical excitation source.

  13. Spectroscopy of unusual emission-line stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1988-01-01

    New spectroscopic observations are reported for ten stars that have been identified in the literature as having H-alpha emission with suspected F, G, or K spectral types. Three of the stars are shown to be BE stars, two are confirmed as early-type supergiants, three show composite (F or K + B) spectra, one is a 'post-T Tauri' star, and one is an ordinary F star without emission.

  14. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  15. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4: Proton and neutron emission & radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, L. G.; Rudolph, D.

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of a novel combination of existing equipment - JYFLTRAP and the TASISpec decay station - it is possible to perform very clean quantum-state selective, high-resolution particle-γ decay spectroscopy. We intend to study the determination of the branching ratio of the ℓ = 9 proton emission from the Iπ = 19/2-, 3174-keV isomer in the N = Z - 1 nucleus 53Co. The study aims to initiate a series of similar experiments along the proton dripline, thereby providing unique insights into "open quantum systems". The technique has been pioneered in case studies using SHIPTRAP and TASISpec at GSI. Newly available radioactive decay modes in Geant4 simulations are going to corroborate the anticipated experimental results.

  16. Spectroscopy of the 3 micron emission features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geballe, T. R.; Lacy, J. H.; Persson, S. E.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    High-spectral-resolution observations of the 3.3 and 3.4 microns features in the three planetary nebulae NGC 7027, IC 418, and BD +30 deg 3639, in the H II region S106, and in the 'red rectangle' HD 44179 are presented. The profile of the unidentified 3.3 microns emission feature is similar in all five sources. The unidentified feature previously referred to as the 3.4 microns feature actually consists of two components, a low-level emission from 3.35 to 3.60 microns and a narrow emission peak at 3.40 microns. The strength of the latter feature relative to that of the 3.3 microns feature varies by a a factor of three from source to source. The origin and properties of these features may be explained by further development of the small-grain models of Sellgren (1984) and Leger and Puget (1984).

  17. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  18. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  19. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, K.J.

    1997-03-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics. 6 figs.

  20. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics.

  1. Fourier spectroscopy of the stratospheric emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.; Bonetti, A.

    1980-01-01

    Stratospheric emission spectra in the submillimeter range have been recorded with a resolution of 0.0033/cm with a balloon-borne interferometer. Several minor atmospheric constituents have been identified in a preliminary analysis of the spectra; these are water vapor, oxygen, ozone isotopes, nitric acid, nitrous oxide, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and carbon monoxide.

  2. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  3. Interactions of protons with furan molecules studied by collision-induced emission spectroscopy at the incident energy range of 50-1000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J.; Pranszke, Boguslaw

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of the ion-molecule reactions provide insight into many fields ranging from the stellar wind interaction with interstellar media, up to medicine and industrial applications. Besides the applications, the understanding of these processes is itself a problem of fundamental importance. Thus, interactions of protons with the gas-phase furan molecules have been investigated for the first time in the energy range of 50-1000 eV exploiting collision-induced emission spectroscopy. Recorded spectra reveal emission of the atomic H β to H θ lines of the hydrogen Balmer series and the molecular bands of vibrationally and rotationally excited diatomic CH fragments created in the A2 Δ and B2Σ- electronic states. The measurements of the emission yields of the excited fragments by recording their intensities at different projectile energies have been performed. The highest yields have been observed for production of hydrogen atoms which intensities rapidly decreased with increasing principal quantum number n . From the H ( n = 4-7) intensity ratios depopulation factors of hydrogen excited states have been determined at each impact energy and possible collisional mechanisms leading to enhanced production of the hydrogen atoms have been suggested. We compare and discuss our results with improved data set of proton collisions with tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules, the hydrogenated derivatives of furan.

  4. Interactions of protons with furan molecules studied by collision-induced emission spectroscopy at the incident energy range of 50-1000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J.; Pranszke, Boguslaw

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of the ion-molecule reactions provide insight into many fields ranging from the stellar wind interaction with interstellar media, up to medicine and industrial applications. Besides the applications, the understanding of these processes is itself a problem of fundamental importance. Thus, interactions of protons with the gas-phase furan molecules have been investigated for the first time in the energy range of 50-1000 eV exploiting collision-induced emission spectroscopy. Recorded spectra reveal emission of the atomic Hβ to Hθ lines of the hydrogen Balmer series and the molecular bands of vibrationally and rotationally excited diatomic CH fragments created in the A2Δ and B2Σ- electronic states. The measurements of the emission yields of the excited fragments by recording their intensities at different projectile energies have been performed. The highest yields have been observed for production of hydrogen atoms which intensities rapidly decreased with increasing principal quantum number n. From the H (n = 4-7) intensity ratios depopulation factors of hydrogen excited states have been determined at each impact energy and possible collisional mechanisms leading to enhanced production of the hydrogen atoms have been suggested. We compare and discuss our results with improved data set of proton collisions with tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules, the hydrogenated derivatives of furan. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  5. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  6. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  7. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-07

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive “detection” based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  8. Mars exploration via thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Carl F.; Blasius, Karl R.; Christensen, Philip; Silverman, Steven; Ruff, Steven; Wyatt, Michael; Mehall, Greg; Peralta, Richard J.; Bates, Duane

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Arizona State University (ASU), and Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) have executed a series of successful Mars exploration missions. These have recently been publicized on television and the internet with the early 2004 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission geological robots that have revolutionized our detailed knowledge of the planet's geology and atmosphere. This latest mission success has its foundation in missions dating back to 1969. Over the past thirty-five years NASA has demonstrated a long-term commitment to planetary science and solar system exploration that continues with a commitment recently expressed by President Bush and codified in a reorganization of the NASA space sciences mission directorate. This paper reports on a small but exciting aspect of this sweeping NASA program, and illustrates the benefits and efficiency with which planetary and solar system exploration can be accomplished. Key in the success is the vision not only of NASA in general, but of the mission Principal Investigator, in particular. The specific series of missions leading to MER contains an underlying vision of carefully planned geological investigations using remote sensing instrumentation, starting with broad survey, leading to more finely resolved global imaging, and finally to landing instrumentation capable of detailed rock and soil analyses. The mission started with broad and relatively coarse spatial resolution orbital surveys with fine spectral capability focused on identifying the overall geological and atmospheric character of the planet accomplished from 1996 to the present conducted by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). This led to the more detailed global imaging at finer spatial resolution offered by the Mars 2001 Odyssey Mission Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) which identified specific

  9. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  10. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Microplasma Discharge in Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Hatta, Akimitsu; Furuta, Hiroshi; Oh, Jun-Seok; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    We have been investigating microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy. Microplasma discharge in artificial sea water (10ASW) was carried using needle-to-plane platinum electrode system. The gap, between electrodes, was ranged from 10 to 60 microns. The electricity source was impulse generatorwith MOSFET switch and variable capacitance and inductance. The maximum voltage and current for this scheme were respectively 1 kV and 10 A, pulse width 10 μs. It has been confirmed that, using the micro-gap configuration, spark discharges were ignited at the conventional breakdown voltages below 1kV, even in the conductive sea water. Was noted formation of small bubbles before of the plasma ignition process. The mechanism of formation of these bubbles is mostly Joule heating because of high currents. It has been speculated that plasma discharge initiates in bubbles. Optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in sea water was carried. In the spectra, emission peaks for H, O, Na, Mg, Ca, Cl and Pt were clearly detected. Besides the main components of 10ASW, contaminants from the electrodes appeared in the spectra. The characteristics of microplasma discharge in sea water and analysis of the optical emission spectra will be presented. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26600129. The ASW was provided from Prof. Kei Okamura of Kochi University.

  11. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  13. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  14. [Study on optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorbance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-yue; Guo, Wei-dong; Long, Ai-min; Chen, Shao-yong

    2010-09-01

    The optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were determined in rain samples collected in Xiamen Island, during a rainy season in 2007, using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy associated with UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Results showed that the absorbance spectra of CDOM in rain samples decreased exponentially with wavelength. The absorbance coefficient at 300 nm [a(300)] ranged from 0.27 to 3.45 m(-1), which would be used as an index of CDOM abundance, and the mean value was 1.08 m(-1). The content of earlier stage of precipitation events was higher than that of later stage of precipitation events, which implied that anthropogenic sources or atmospheric pollution or air mass types were important contributors to CDOM levels in precipitation. EEMs spectra showed 4 types of fluorescence signals (2 humic-like fluorescence peaks and 2 protein-like fluorescence peaks) in rainwater samples, and there were significant positive correlations of peak A with C and peak B with S, showing their same sources or some relationship of the two humic-like substance and the two protein-like substance. The strong positive correlations of the two humic-like fluorescence peaks with a(300), suggested that the chromophores responsible for absorbance might be the same as fluorophores responsible for fluorescence. Results showed that the presence of highly absorbing and fluorescing CDOM in rainwater is of significant importance in atmospheric chemistry and might play a previously unrecognized role in the wavelength dependent spectral attenuation of solar radiation by atmospheric waters.

  15. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  16. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  17. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  18. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 1. Application to sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Michael T.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Bristow, Thomas F.; Pan, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is used to determine the mineralogy of sandstone and mudstone rocks as part of an investigation of linear spectral mixing between sedimentary constituent phases. With widespread occurrences of sedimentary rocks on the surface of Mars, critical examination of the accuracy associated with quantitative models of mineral abundances derived from thermal emission spectra of sedimentary materials is necessary. Although thermal emission spectroscopy has been previously proven to be a viable technique to obtain quantitative mineralogy from igneous and metamorphic materials, sedimentary rocks, with natural variation of composition, compaction, and grain size, have yet to be examined. In this work, we present an analysis of the thermal emission spectral (~270-1650 cm-1) characteristics of a suite of 13 sandstones and 14 mudstones. X-ray diffraction and traditional point counting procedures were all evaluated in comparison with thermal emission spectroscopy. Results from this work are consistent with previous thermal emission spectroscopy studies and indicate that bulk rock mineral abundances can be estimated within 11.2% for detrital grains (i.e., quartz and feldspars) and 14.8% for all other mineral phases present in both sandstones and mudstones, in comparison to common in situ techniques used for determining bulk rock composition. Clay-sized to fine silt-sized grained phase identification is less accurate, with differences from the known ranging from ~5 to 24% on average. Nevertheless, linear least squares modeling of thermal emission spectra is an advantageous technique for determining abundances of detrital grains and sedimentary matrix and for providing a rapid classification of clastic rocks.

  19. Spectroscopy of Molecular Hydrogen Emission from KH 15D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    We report infrared spectroscopy of the unusual eclipsing pre-main-sequence object KH 15D, obtained using NIRSPEC on Keck II. During eclipse, observations using low spectral resolution (λ/δλ~1000) reveal the presence of prominent molecular hydrogen emission in five lines near 2 μm. The relative line strengths are consistent with thermal excitation at T~2800+/-300 K. Observations out of eclipse, at both low and high spectral resolution (λ/δλ~2×104), show reduced contrast with the stellar continuum. The change in contrast for the strongest line, 1-0 S(1), is consistent with an approximately constant emission line superposed on a variable stellar continuum. Emission in the 1-0 S(1) line is observed to extend by >~4" both east and west of the stellar point-spread function (PSF; >~3000 AU). Observed at high spectral resolution, the velocity and the intensity structure of the 1-0 S(1) profile are both asymmetric. East of the stellar PSF (by 1.1"-2.3") the emission is blueshifted (-63 km s-1) and has significantly greater intensity than the marginally redshifted component (+2 km s-1, approximately consistent with zero) that dominates west of the stellar PSF. The spatial extent of the emission and the excitation temperature suggest shock excitation of ambient gas by a bipolar outflow from the star and/or the disk. However, it is difficult to account for the observed radial velocity unless the outflow axis is inclined significantly to the plane of the sky. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Development of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and the beam emission spectroscopy on the EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Y Y; Fu, J; Lyu, B; Du, X W; Li, C Y; Zhang, Y; Yin, X H; Yu, Y; Wang, Q P; von Hellermann, M; Shi, Y J; Ye, M Y; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics based on a heating neutral beam have recently been installed on EAST to provide local measurements of ion temperature, velocity, and density. The system design features common light collection optics for CXRS and BES, background channels for the toroidal views, multi-chord viewing sightlines, and high throughput lens-based spectrometers with good signal to noise ratio for high time resolution measurements. Additionally, two spectrometers each has a tunable grating to observe any wavelength of interest are used for the CXRS and one utilizes a fixed-wavelength grating to achieve higher diffraction efficiency for the BES system. A real-time wavelength correction is implemented to achieve a high-accuracy wavelength calibration. Alignment and calibration are performed. Initial performance test results are presented.

  1. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  2. Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes showing unusual complexation of actinide ions in room temperature ionic liquids: role of ligand structure, radiolytic stability, emission spectroscopy, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Sengupta, Arijit; Iqbal, Mudassir; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-03-01

    Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes (C4DGAs) with varying structural modifications were evaluated for actinide complexation from their extraction behavior toward actinide ions such as UO2(2+), Pu(4+), PuO2(2+), and Am(3+) in the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-n-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (C8mimNTf2). The formation constants were calculated for Am(3+) which showed a significant role of ligand structure, nature of substituents, and spacer length. Although the alkyl substituents on the amidic nitrogen increase the extraction efficiency of americium at lower acidity because of the inductive effect of the alkyl groups, at higher acidity the steric crowding around the ligating site determines the extraction efficiency. All C4DGAs formed 1:1 complexes with Am(3+) while for the analogous Eu(3+) complexes no inner sphere water molecules were detected and the asymmetry of the metal ligand complex differed from one another as proved by time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS). Thermodynamic studies indicated that the extraction process, predominant by the Am(3+)-C4DGA complexation reaction, is exothermic. The unique role of the medium on Am(3+) complexation with the C4DGA molecules with varying spacer length, L-IV and L-V, was noticed for the first time with a reversal in the trend observed in the RTIL compared to that seen in a nonpolar molecular diluent like n-dodecane. Various factors leading to a more preorganized structure were responsible for favorable metal ion complexation. The solvent systems show promise to be employed for nuclear waste remediation, and sustainability options were evaluated from radiolytic stability as well as stripping studies.

  3. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  4. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  5. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H.; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  6. Project 8: Towards cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy on tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertl, Martin; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Project 8 aims to determine the neutrino mass by making a precise measurement of the β--decay of molecular tritium (Q = 18.6 keV) using the recently demonstrated the technique of cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy (CRES). Here we discuss the production of a gas cell that fulfills the stringent requirements for cryogenic operation, safe tritium handling, a non-magnetic design, and a good microwave guide performance. The phased program that allows Project 8 to probe the neutrino mass range accessible using molecular tritium is described. Major financial support by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics to the University of Washington under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020 is acknowledged.

  7. GABI: a compact detector for GRB prompt emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Federici, M.; Fiocchi, M. T.; Lotti, S.; Grindlay, J. E.; Gehrels, N.; Uslenghi, M.; Fiorini, M.; Perotti, F.

    Triggering on sky transient events can be efficiently accomplished by coded mask instruments, which can also provide positions with arcmin or sub-arcmin accuracy, but at the expense of weight and power. On the other hand good broadband spectroscopy is possible using much lighter systems, that could also provide a coarse positioning capability (˜ degrees). We present the concept of a compact, light detector based on NaI(Tl) scintillator, that can be used to complement other soft X-ray or IR/optical telescopes in detecting transients and characterizing them. The Gamma-Ray Burst Imager (GABI) will operate in the energy range 8-1000 keV that is optimal for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB). GABI is being proposed for accomodation on board Lobster, a candidate mission of the NASA Explorer Program.

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon arc for nanomaterial synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2015-11-01

    Arc plasma assisted synthesis of carbon nanostructures is one of the most efficient and simple production methods. In spite of a long time use of this method in materials science research and industrial applications, the role of the plasma in nucleation and growth of nanostructures is not well understood. This is due to complexity of physico-chemical processes governing the plasma nanosynthesis. The objective of this work is to characterize the atmospheric pressure arc plasma used for synthesis of various carbon nanostructures. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to determine the distribution of temperature and density of carbon plasma in the synthesis zone as a function of arc discharge parameters. Accurate and detailed mapping of plasma parameters elucidate the general trend governing the formation of carbon nanostructures. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  10. Characterization and Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Ball Plasmoid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas at atmospheric pressure serve many purposes, from ionization sources for ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) to plasma-assisted wound healing. Of the many naturally occurring ambient plasmas, ball lightning is one of the least understood; there is currently no solid explanation in the literature for the formation and lifetime of natural ball lightning. With the first measurements of naturally occurring ball lightning being reported last year, we have worked to replicate the natural phenomenon in order to elucidate the physical and chemical processes by which the plasma is sustained at ambient conditions. We are able to generate ball-shaped plasmoids (self-sustaining plasmas) that are analogous to natural ball lightning using a high-voltage, high-current, pulsed DC system. Improvements to the discharge electronics used in our laboratory and characterization of the plasmoids that are generated from this system will be described. Infrared emission spectroscopy of these plasmoids reveals emission from water and hydroxyl radical -- fitting methods for these molecular species in the complex experimental spectra will be presented. Rotational temperatures for the stretching and bending modes of H2O along with that of OH will be presented, and the non-equilibrium nature of the plasmoid will be discussed in this context. Cen, J.; Yuan, P,; Xue, S. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 035001. Dubowsky, S.E.; Friday, D.M.; Peters, K.C.; Zhao, Z.; Perry, R.H.; McCall, B.J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 376, 39-45.

  11. Indirect determination of cations by ion chromatography and anions by atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, A.M.; Panayappan, R.; Cooper, J.C.

    1988-11-01

    A method for the indirect determination of cations by Ion Chromatography (IC) and anions by Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (DCP) is described. The method allows for quantification of suspected impurities in aqueous systems where multiple analyses are desired. The described method is based on the selection of a precipitating agent for the desired analyte. In this study, silver(I) and barium(II) were analyzed indirectly by IC, and chloride and sulfate, by DCP.

  12. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  13. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  14. Surface Raman spectroscopy with and without reverse Kretschmann configuration: Effect of evanescent-wave-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Cheng, Jin; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Evanescent-wave-coupled emission has been used for reverse Kretschmann fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies with high collection efficiency. However, it has a negative effect on the common surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy without the reverse Kretschmann configuration because the coupling of a large fraction of light power into the substrate impairs the Raman signal backscattered in air. A rough core layer can significantly weaken evanescent-wave-coupled emission, which is conducive to enhancing the backscattered Raman signal. In this work, we theoretically investigate the surface-plasmon-coupled emission and its effects on surface Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Plasma control using neural network and optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byungwhan; Bae, Jung Ki; Hong, Wan-Shick

    2005-03-01

    Due to high sensitivity to process parameters, plasma processes should be tightly controlled. For plasma control, a predictive model was constructed using a neural network and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce OES dimensionality. This approach was applied to an oxide plasma etching conducted in a CHF{sub 3}/CF{sub 4} magnetically enhanced reactive ion plasma. The etch process was systematically characterized by means of a statistical experimental design. Three etch outputs (etch rate, profile angle, and etch rate nonuniformity) were modeled using three different approaches, including conventional, OES, and PCA-OES models. For all etch outputs, OES models demonstrated improved predictions over the conventional or PCA-OES models. Compared to conventional models, OES models yielded an improvement of more than 25% in modeling profile angle and etch rate nonuniformtiy. More than 40% improvement over PCA-OES model was achieved in modeling etch rate and profile angle. These results demonstrate that nonreduced in situ data are more beneficial than reduced one in constructing plasma control model.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  17. Deconvolution-based correction of alkali beam emission spectroscopy density profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Pokol, G.; Refy, D.; Por, G.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Schweinzer, J.

    2009-08-15

    A deconvolution-based correction method of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) density profile measurement is demonstrated by its application to simulated measurements of the COMPASS and TEXTOR tokamaks. If the line of sight is far from tangential to the flux surfaces, and the beam width is comparable to the scale length on which the light profile varies, the observation may cause an undesired smoothing of the light profile, resulting in a non-negligible underestimation of the calculated density profile. This effect can be reduced significantly by the emission reconstruction method, which gives an estimate of the emissivity along the beam axis from the measured light profile, taking the finite beam width and the properties of the measurement into account in terms of the transfer function of the observation. Characteristics and magnitude of the mentioned systematic error and its reduction by the introduced method are studied by means of the comprehensive alkali BES simulation code RENATE.

  18. Risk assessment of an old landfill regarding the potential of gaseous emissions--a case study based on bioindication, FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Tintner, Johannes; Smidt, Ena; Böhm, Katharina; Matiasch, Lydia

    2012-12-01

    Risk assessment of two sections (I and II) of an old landfill (ALH) in Styria (Austria) in terms of reactivity of waste organic matter and the related potential of gaseous emissions was performed using conventional parameters and innovative tools to verify their effectiveness in practice. The ecological survey of the established vegetation at the landfill surface (plant sociological relevés) indicated no relevant emissions over a longer period of time. Statistical evaluation of conventional parameters reveals that dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respiration activity (RA(4)), loss of ignition (LOI) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) mostly influence the variability of the gas generation sum (GS(21)). According to Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data and the results of the classification model the reactivity potential of the investigated sections is very low which is in accordance with the results of plant sociological relevés and biological tests. The interpretation of specific regions in the FT-IR spectra was changed and adapted to material characteristics. Contrary to mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) materials, where strong aliphatic methylene bands indicate reactivity, they are rather assigned to the C-H vibrations of plastics in old landfill materials. This assumption was confirmed by thermal analysis and the characteristic heat flow profile of plastics containing landfill samples. Therefore organic carbon contents are relatively high compared to other stable landfills as shown by a prediction model for TOC contents based on heat flow profiles and partial least squares regression (PLS-R). The stability of the landfill samples, expressed by the relation of CO(2) release and enthalpies, was compared to unreactive landfills, archeological samples, earthlike materials and hardly degradable organic matter. Due to the material composition and the aging process the landfill samples are located between hardly degradable, but easily combustible

  19. Risk assessment of an old landfill regarding the potential of gaseous emissions--a case study based on bioindication, FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Tintner, Johannes; Smidt, Ena; Böhm, Katharina; Matiasch, Lydia

    2012-12-01

    Risk assessment of two sections (I and II) of an old landfill (ALH) in Styria (Austria) in terms of reactivity of waste organic matter and the related potential of gaseous emissions was performed using conventional parameters and innovative tools to verify their effectiveness in practice. The ecological survey of the established vegetation at the landfill surface (plant sociological relevés) indicated no relevant emissions over a longer period of time. Statistical evaluation of conventional parameters reveals that dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respiration activity (RA(4)), loss of ignition (LOI) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) mostly influence the variability of the gas generation sum (GS(21)). According to Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data and the results of the classification model the reactivity potential of the investigated sections is very low which is in accordance with the results of plant sociological relevés and biological tests. The interpretation of specific regions in the FT-IR spectra was changed and adapted to material characteristics. Contrary to mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) materials, where strong aliphatic methylene bands indicate reactivity, they are rather assigned to the C-H vibrations of plastics in old landfill materials. This assumption was confirmed by thermal analysis and the characteristic heat flow profile of plastics containing landfill samples. Therefore organic carbon contents are relatively high compared to other stable landfills as shown by a prediction model for TOC contents based on heat flow profiles and partial least squares regression (PLS-R). The stability of the landfill samples, expressed by the relation of CO(2) release and enthalpies, was compared to unreactive landfills, archeological samples, earthlike materials and hardly degradable organic matter. Due to the material composition and the aging process the landfill samples are located between hardly degradable, but easily combustible

  20. Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of natural surfaces: Application to desert varnish coatings on rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Harrison Thliveris, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy has become an increasingly important tool for remote compositional analysis and geologic mapping. Most published laboratory measurements have been obtained in bidirectional reflection or transmission, whereas remotely sensed thermal infrared data are obtained by measuring the emitted energy. Section 2 of this paper describes a laboratory technique for determining calibrated emissivities of natural surfaces. Equations are developed to account for the energy reflected from the environment and to determine directly the sample temperature from measurements of hot and cold blackbody targets. Two methods for determining emissivity are developed: one in which only a hot sample measurement is made and the reflected background energy is removed by modeling, and a second in which the sample is cooled and the reflected energy is measured directly. Relative emissivity can be obtained to approximately 1% and absolute emissivities can be obtained to 2-15%, depending on the validity of the assumption that the emissivity of the sample is unity at some wavelength. The emission data agree well within the hemispherically integrated reflection data but point out probelms associated with bidirectional reflectance measurements. Section 3 applies emissivity measurements to the study of layered surfaces consisting of desert varnish coatings on granite and granodiorite rock suites. Two linear models are developed: the first assumes linear mixing of independent emission from the substrate and varnish (checkerboard model); the second models tansmission through an absorbing/emitting medium. Regardless of whether the varnish is or is not relatively transparant and strongly absorptive, the spectral effect of varnish increases linearly with varnish thickness, indicating that thick patches of varnish dominate the spectral properties. As a result, medium varnish thickness can be determined from spectral measurements. In addition, the composition of a substrate can be

  1. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  2. Transmittance, Reflectance, and Emission Spectroscopy of Meteorites from the UV to the IR Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Koulen, J. M.; Ferrari, S.; Martellato, E.

    2016-08-01

    Transmittance, reflectance, and emissivity Spectra of six meteorites have been collected at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of DLR in Berlin in the whole spectral range from the UV to the IR.

  3. Workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and Analysis of Dust, Disk, and Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, Ann L. (Editor); Lynch, David K. (Editor); Sitko, Michael (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and analysis of Dust, Disks and Regoliths, held April 28-30, 1999, in Houston Texas.

  4. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  5. Gas temperature and electron density profiles in an argon dc microdischarge measured by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Ouk, Tola; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-03-01

    Optical emisssion spectroscopy was employed to study a high pressure (100 s of Torr), slot-type (600 μm interelectrode gap), argon dc microdischarge, with added traces of nitrogen. Spatially resolved gas temperature profiles were obtained by analyzing rovibrational bands of the N2 first positive system. The gas temperature peaked near the cathode and increased with current. The contribution of Stark broadening to the hydrogen Hβ emission lineshape was used to extract the electron density. The axial distribution of electron density as well as visual observation revealed that the microdischarge positive column was highly constricted. The electron density near the sheath edge increased with both pressure and current.

  6. Inferring Temperature Inversions in Hot Jupiters Via Spitzer Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garhart, Emily; Deming, Drake; Mandell, Avi

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic study of 35 hot Jupiter secondary eclipses, including 16 hot Jupiters never before characterized via emission, observed at the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm bandpasses of Warm Spitzer in order to classify their atmospheric structure, namely, the existence of temperature inversions. This is a robust study in that these planets orbit stars with a wide range of compositions, temperatures, and activity levels. This diverse sample allows us to investigate the source of planetary temperature inversions, specifically, its correlation with stellar irradiance and magnetic activity. We correct for systematic and intra-pixel sensitivity effects with a pixel level decorrelation (PLD) method described in Deming et al. (2015). The relationship between eclipse depths and a best-fit blackbody function versus stellar activity, a method described in Knutson et al. (2010), will ultimately enable us to appraise the current hypotheses of temperature inversions.

  7. Local field emission spectroscopy of InSb micrograins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, N. D.; Glukhovskoy, E. G.; Mosiyash, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    Local electron density-of-state spectra and level parameters in indium antimonide (InSb) micrograins have been studied using a tunneling microscope in the field-electron emission regime. The activation energies (ψ) of electron levels and electron lifetimes (τ) on these levels have been determined based on the correspondence of current-voltage characteristics to the probabilities of emission. Several local electron levels in a near-surface region of intrinsic ( i-InSb) micrograins are identified with ψ ˜ 0.73, 1.33, 1.85, 2.15, and 5.1 eV and τ ˜ 5 × 10-8-3 × 10-7 s, respectively. A physical model is proposed, according to which "light" electrons are localized due to the Coulomb interaction and their dimensional quantization takes place in the near-surface zone as determined by the effective mass, energy, and concentration of electrons and the radius of curvature of the micrograin surface.

  8. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  9. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  10. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  11. Monitoring laser cleaning of titanium alloys by probe beam reflection and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, D. J.; Crouse, P. L.; Schmidt, M. J. J.; Li, L.; Turner, M. W.; Smith, A. J. E.

    2008-10-01

    Studies have shown excimer laser cleaning to be an effective non-chemical alternative method for removing contaminants from surfaces of titanium alloys in preparation for electron beam welding and diffusion bonding, with reference to aerospace applications. Among several important criteria for process acceptability, is the absence of oxide formation. This paper investigates the viability of using a probe beam reflection (PBR) system and laser plume emission spectroscopy (PES) for detection of incipient oxide formation on three typical aerospace titanium alloys, viz. Ti64, Ti6246, and IMI834. These diagnostic techniques have been shown to be capable of sensing different components in the emission plume and yield quantitative results. Results from this work correlate closely with previously reported cleaning mechanisms. The oxidation threshold, as well as the operating window for successful decontamination, is discussed.

  12. X-ray emission and photoluminescence spectroscopy of nanostructured silica with implanted copper ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Kortov, V. S.; Kurmaev, É. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Wilks, R. G.; Moewes, A.

    2008-12-01

    Quartz glass samples and compacted SiO2 nanopowders have been studied by x-ray emission (Cu L 2, 3 transition 3 d4 s → 2 p 1/2, 3/2) and photoluminescence spectroscopy following pulsed Cu+ ion implantation (energy, 30 keV; pulse current up to 0.5 A; pulse duration, 400 μs; irradiation doses, 1015, 1016, and 2 × 1017 cm-2). It has been established that ion irradiation gives rise to the formation of glassy and compacted SiO2 samples of nanosized metallic and oxide phases in the structure. An analysis of Cu L x-ray emission spectra has shown that copper nanoparticles are thermodynamically metastable and chemically active because ion beam bombardment transfers them readily to the oxide form. This results from the radiation-stimulated fracture of regular Si-O-Si bonds in amorphous SiO2 and the formation of defective Si-Si bonds, followed by capture of oxygen by copper atoms. The enhanced degree of oxidation of copper ions in SiO2 nanostructured pellets can be reduced by coimplantation and thermal annealing. Optical spectroscopy studies suggest that, in glasses and SiO2 nanostructured pellets, there exist metallic Cu{/n 0} nanoclusters, which at low temperatures exhibit quantum-confined photoluminescence with a characteristic stepped excitation spectrum.

  13. Predicting Reactor Antineutrino Emissions Using New Precision Beta Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wootan, David W.

    2013-05-01

    Neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors are currently vital to the study of neutrino oscillations. The observed antineutrino rates at reactors are typically lower than model expectations. This observed deficit is called the “reactor neutrino anomaly”. A new understanding of neutrino physics may be required to explain this deficit, though model estimation uncertainties may also play a role in the apparent discrepancy. PNNL is currently investigating an experimental technique that promises reduced uncertainties for measured data to support these hypotheses and interpret reactor antineutrino measurements. The experimental approach is to 1) direct a proton accelerator beam on a metal target to produce a source of neutrons, 2) use spectral tailoring to modify the neutron spectrum to closely simulate the energy distribution of a power reactor neutron spectrum, 3) irradiate isotopic fission foils (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu) in this neutron spectrum so that fissions occur at energies representative of a reactor, 4) transport the beta particles released by the fission products in the foils to a beta spectrometer, 5) measure the beta energy spectrum, and 6) invert the measured beta energy spectrum to an antineutrino energy spectrum. A similar technique using a beta spectrometer and isotopic fission foils was pioneered in the 1980’s at the ILL thermal reactor. Those measurements have been the basis for interpreting all subsequent antineutrino measurements at reactors. A basic constraint in efforts to reduce uncertainties in predicting the antineutrino emission from reactor cores is any underlying limitation of the original measurements. This may include beta spectrum energy resolution, the absolute normalization of beta emission to number of fission, statistical counting uncertainties, lack of 238U data, the purely thermal nature of the IIL reactor neutrons used, etc. An accelerator-based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra

  14. Thermal Emissivity-Based Chemical Spectroscopy through Evanescent Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Poole, Zsolt L; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented, with which environmentalchemistry-induced thermal emissivity changes of thin films are extracted with high isolation through evanescent tunneling. With this method the hydrogen-induced emissivity changes of films of TiO2 , Pd-TiO2 , and Au-TiO2 , with properties of high conductivity, hydrogen chemisorption, and plasmonic activity, are characterized in the UV-vis and NIR wavelength ranges, at 1073 K.

  15. Emission spectroscopy for coal-fired cyclone furnace diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A; Boll, David E; Smith, Richard

    2003-08-01

    Using a spectrograph and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, ultraviolet and visible light emission spectra were obtained from a coal-burning electric utility's cyclone furnaces operating at either fuel-rich or fuel-lean conditions. The aim of this effort is to identify light emission signals that can be related to a cyclone furnace's operating condition in order to adjust its air/fuel ratio to minimize pollutant production. Emission spectra at the burner and outlet ends of cyclone furnaces were obtained. Spectra from all cyclone burners show emission lines for the trace elements Li, Na, K, and Rb, as well as the molecular species OH and CaOH. The Ca emission line is detected at the burner end of both the fuel-rich and fuel-lean cyclone furnaces but is not detected at the outlet ends of either furnace type. Along with the disappearance of Ca is a concomitant increase in the CaOH signal at the outlet end of both types of furnaces. The OH signal strength is in general stronger when viewing at the burner end rather than the exhaust end of both the fuel-rich and fuel-lean cyclone furnaces, probably due to high, non-equilibrium amounts of OH present inside the furnace. Only one molecular species was detected that could be used as a measure of air/fuel ratio: MgOH. It was detected at the burner end of fuel-rich cyclone furnaces but not detected in fuel-lean cyclone furnaces. More direct markers of air/fuel ratio, such as CO and O2 emission, were not detected, probably due to the generally weak nature of molecular emission relative to ambient blackbody emission present in the cyclone furnaces, even at ultraviolet wavelengths.

  16. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Mantenieks, M. A.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputtering rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  17. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  18. Identification of microcrystalline rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica deposits on Mars have been discovered from orbit (Holden Crater, Mawrth Vallis) and from landed surface missions to both Gusev Crater (Spirit) and Gale Crater (Curiosity). The character of these silica deposits can be used to understand both the depositional environment (i.e. fumarole vs. sinter) and/or diagenetic process. Initial work has shown that, in the case of opaline silica, there are differences in spectral shape that may be related to surface textural features imparted during formation or post-depositional alteration. Due to the increasing importance of understanding microcrystalline deposits on Mars, here, we study the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro- and macro-crystalline quartz. The spectra of chert and macro-crystalline quartz have significant differences in both spectral contrast, and in the rounded doublet between ~1000-1250 cm-1, which can shift and appear less rounded in microcrystalline samples. We find that microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 micron scale; and that this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands. We find that surface roughness, if rough on the scale of the wavelengths where the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient (k) is large, can cause not only decreased spectral contrast, but also substantial changes in spectral shape. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. We find that my studying the thermal infrared spectral character of the sample, it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity, and thus aid in the potential reconstruction of sedimentary rock diagenesis.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy of a transient species through time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy: The vinyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Letendre, Laura; Liu, Dean-Kuo; Pibel, Charles D.; Halpern, Joshua B.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2000-06-01

    An approach for detecting the vibrational spectrum of transient species is demonstrated on the vinyl radical. Photodissociation of carefully chosen precursors at selected photolysis wavelengths produce highly vibrationally excited radicals. Infrared (IR) emission from these radicals is then measured by time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy with nanosecond time resolution. All nine vibrational bands of the vinyl radical, generated from four different precursors, are obtained and reported here for the first time. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-04-01

    Accurate reporting of mercury concentration requires a detailed model that includes experimental parameters that vary, such as: pressure, temperature, concentration, absorption cross-section, and isotopic structure etc. During this quarter a theoretical model has been developed to model the 253.7 nm mercury transition. In addition, while testing the interferent species SO{sub 2}, SRD was able to determine the absorption cross-section experimentally and add this to the theoretical model. Assuming that the baseline losses are due to the mirror reflectivity and SO{sub 2}, SRD can now determine the concentrations of both mercury and SO{sub 2} from the data taken. For the CRD instrument to perform as a continuous emission monitor it will be required to monitor mercury concentrations over extended periods of time. The stability of monitoring mercury concentrations over time with the CRD apparatus was tested during the past quarter. During a test which monitored the mercury concentration every 2 seconds it was found that the standard deviation, of a signal from about 1.25 ppb Hg, was only 30 ppt. SRD continued interferent gas testing during this past quarter. This included creating a simulated flue gas composed of the gases tested individually by SRD. The detection limits for mercury, although dependent on the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the simulated gas matrix, remained well below the ppb range. It was determined that for the gases tested the only measurable changes in the baseline level occurred for SO{sub 2} and mercury. Speciation studies continued with mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}). This included checking for spectral speciation with both Hg and HgCl{sub 2} present in the CRD cavity. There was no observable spectral shift. Also a pyrolysis oven was incorporated into the gas delivery system both for tests with HgCl{sub 2} as well as atomization of the entire gas stream. The pyrolysis tests conducted have been inconclusive thus far.

  1. Remote sensing of the troposphere by infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Glavich, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a cryogenic IR imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, called the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), designed for observations of the troposphere and lower stratosphere from a near-earth orbit, using natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight. The principal molecular species to be measured by TES are O3, CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, H2O2, NO, NO2, HNO3, NH3, CH4, C2H6, C2H2, SO2, COS, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2. The TES is scheduled for a launch on the second polar platform of the Earth Observing System in 1998.

  2. Light on the 3 μm Emission Band from Space with Molecular Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Mackie, Cameron J.; Candian, Alessandra; Petrignani, Annemieke; Tielens, Xander; Oomens, Jos; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-06-01

    The majority of interstellar objects shows IR emission features also known as unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. These UIR bands are attributed to IR emission of highly-excited gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To understand the physical conditions and chemical evolution of the interstellar environment a precise identification of the emission carriers is desired. The 3 μm UIR feature is represented by a strong band at 3040 cm-1, a plateau from 3150 to 2700 cm-1 and a number of weak features within this plateau. The 3040 cm-1 component is assigned to fundamental CH-stretch vibrations of PAHs, but there still remain many questions on the origin of the other features. In this work we have studied experimentally the 3 μm region of regular, hydrogenated and methylated PAHs (up to 5 rings), combining molecular beam techniques with IR-UV ion dip spectroscopy, and theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) calculations within the harmonic and anharmonic approximation. We find that (a) the 3 μm region of PAHs is dominated by Fermi resonances and thereby cannot be treated within the harmonic approximation; (b) the periphery structure of the molecules strongly affects the shape of the 3 μm band. In particular, the two-component emission interpretation can be explained by the presence of molecules with and without bay-hydrogens; (c) due to strong Fermi resonances of fundamental modes with combination bands regular PAHs can significantly contribute to the 3 μm plateau in the 3150-2950 cm-1, while hydrogenated and methylated species are primarily responsible for features in the 2950-2750 cm-1 region.

  3. Optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using micro-torches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Huang, X.; Li, S.; Lu, Yao; Chen, K.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-03-01

    A cost effective method for optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed in this research. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm was used for sample ablation and plasma generation. A cost effective commercial butane micro-torch was put parallel to the sample surface to generate a small flame above the surface. The laser-induced plasma expanded in the flame environment. The time-resolved optical emission intensity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) have been observed with and without micro torch. For laser with pulse energy of 20 mJ, the relationship between optical emission intensity and delay time indicates that signal intensities have been greatly enhanced in the initial several microseconds when using micro torch. The time-resolved study of signal-to-noise ratio shows that the maximum SNR occurs at the delay time of 2 μs. The laser energy effects on the enhancements of optical emission intensity and SNR have also been analyzed, which indicates that the enhancement factors are both delay time and laser energy dependent. The maximum enhancement factors for both optical emission intensity and SNR gradually decreases with the laser energy increase. The limits of detection (LODs) for aluminum (Al) and molybdenum (Mo) in steel have been estimated, which shows that the detection sensitivity has been improved by around 4 times. The LODs of Al and Mo have been reduced from 18 to 6 ppm and from 110 to 36 ppm in LIBS, respectively. The method of LIBS by a micro torch has been demonstrated to be a cost effective method for detection sensitivity improvement, especially in the situation of low laser pulse energy.

  4. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  5. Modeling and simulation of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for the ITER prototype neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test facility for the development of the neutral beam injection system for ITER is under construction at Consorzio RFX. It will host two experiments: SPIDER, a 100 keV H{sup −}/D{sup −} ion RF source, and MITICA, a prototype of the full performance ITER injector (1 MV, 17 MW beam). A set of diagnostics will monitor the operation and allow to optimize the performance of the two prototypes. In particular, beam emission spectroscopy will measure the uniformity and the divergence of the fast particles beam exiting the ion source and travelling through the beam line components. This type of measurement is based on the collection of the H{sub α}/D{sub α} emission resulting from the interaction of the energetic particles with the background gas. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the spectrum of the collected emissions in order to design this diagnostic and to study its performance. The paper describes the model at the base of the simulations and presents the modeled H{sub α} spectra in the case of MITICA experiment.

  6. Modeling and simulation of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for the ITER prototype neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Barbisan, M; Zaniol, B; Pasqualotto, R

    2014-11-01

    A test facility for the development of the neutral beam injection system for ITER is under construction at Consorzio RFX. It will host two experiments: SPIDER, a 100 keV H(-)/D(-) ion RF source, and MITICA, a prototype of the full performance ITER injector (1 MV, 17 MW beam). A set of diagnostics will monitor the operation and allow to optimize the performance of the two prototypes. In particular, beam emission spectroscopy will measure the uniformity and the divergence of the fast particles beam exiting the ion source and travelling through the beam line components. This type of measurement is based on the collection of the Hα/Dα emission resulting from the interaction of the energetic particles with the background gas. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the spectrum of the collected emissions in order to design this diagnostic and to study its performance. The paper describes the model at the base of the simulations and presents the modeled Hα spectra in the case of MITICA experiment.

  7. [Emission spectroscopy diagnosis of the radicals generated in gas-liquid phases gliding arc discharge].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian-hua; Dai, Shang-li; Li, Xiao-dong; Tu, Xin; Liu, Ya-na; Cen, Ke-fa

    2008-08-01

    Gas-liquid phases gliding arc discharge has been investigated as a potential treatment technology for liquid phase pollution treatment. To further understand the interaction mechanisms of gas-liquid phase gliding arc degradation process for the wastewater treatment, the characteristics of major reactive species (the OH and NO radicals) in a gas-liquid gliding arc at atmospheric pressure have been investigated by using optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical reactions that may lead to the generation of free radicals in the discharge were discussed. The influence of operating conditions (water feed rate, input voltage etc. ) on the relative intensity of radical emission was studied. The results show that axial evolution of the relative emission intensity of both reactive species exhibit the similar tendency under the same operating conditions. In non-thermodynamic equilibrium region of the arc discharge, the intensities of both radicals increase with the input voltage. In addition, the intensity of OH radical increases with the water feed rate, while the opposition phenomena are observed for NO radical.

  8. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy determination of trace element composition of argan oil.

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, A; Ghanjaoui, M E; El Rhazi, M; de la Guardia, M

    2010-02-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave assisted acid digestion has been developed to determine the trace element content of Moroccan argan oil. Limit of detection values equal or lower than few mg/kg were obtained for all elements under study. To assure the accuracy of the whole procedure, recovery studies were carried out on argan oil samples spiked at different concentration levels from 10 to 200 µg/L. Quantitative average recovery values were obtained for all elements evaluated, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology for the determination of trace elements in argan oil samples. Aluminum, calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, lithium, magnesium, sodium, vanadium and zinc were quantitatively determined in Moroccan argan oils being found that their concentration is different of that found in other edible oils thus offering a way for authentication and for the evaluation of possible adulterations.

  9. Prediction of methane emission from lactating dairy cows using milk fatty acids and mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Gastelen, Sanne; Dijkstra, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Enteric methane (CH4 ) production is among the main targets of greenhouse gas mitigation practices for the dairy industry. A simple, robust and inexpensive measurement technique applicable on a large scale to estimate CH4 emission from dairy cattle would therefore be valuable. Milk fatty acids (MFA) are related to CH4 production because of the common biochemical pathway between CH4 and fatty acids in the rumen. A summary of studies that investigated the predictive power of MFA composition for CH4 emission indicated good potential, with predictive power ranging between 47% and 95%. Until recently, gas chromatography (GC) was the principal method used to determine the MFA profile, but GC is unsuitable for routine analysis. This has led to the application of mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. The major advantages of using MIR spectroscopy to predict CH4 emission include its simplicity and potential practical application at large scale. Disadvantages include the inability to predict important MFA for CH4 prediction, and the moderate predictive power for CH4 emission. It may not be sufficient to predict CH4 emission based on MIR alone. Integration with other factors, like feed intake, nutrient composition of the feed, parity, and lactation stage may improve the prediction of CH4 emission using MIR spectra. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26996655

  10. Stratospheric Trace Gas Distributions from Far Infrared Thermal Emission Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing

    1987-09-01

    An inversion algorithm has been developed to retrieve stratospheric trace gas distributions from high resolution far infrared limb thermal emission spectral data. The algorithm follows an onion peel approach and employs a non-linear least-square-fit spectral analysis technique. The infrared radiative transfer model used to compute the spectrum is based on full line-by-line and layer-by-layer calculations and includes curvature and refraction effects. Finite instrument field of view effects have been studied. An inversion algorithm has also been developed to correct observation angles. The spectral measurements were made in the Balloon Intercomparison Campaign (BIC), October, 1982, using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The observed spectra have an unapodized spectral resolution of 0.0033 cm ^{-1}, and cover the spectral region between 20-100 cm^{-1}. Spectral data for selected limb sequences have been calibrated. The instrument line shape function has been empirically determined. The observation angles of the spectra have been corrected from spectral lines of O_2 in the 23 -84 cm^{-1} region to have an accuracy within 4 arc minutes. The vertical profiles of O_3, H_2O, HDO, HCN, ^ {16}O^{16}O ^{18}O, and ^ {16}O^{18}O ^{16}O in the stratosphere have been retrieved with an altitude resolution of about 4-5 km in the 20-37 km range. The results are compared with available measurements in literature. The vertical profiles of O_3, H_2 O, and HDO are retrieved from spectral lines in the 20-100 cm^{-1} region. The variation of the D/H ratio of water vapor is derived. The vertical profile of HCN is retrieved from spectral lines in the 32-56 cm^{-1} region. The volume mixing ratio of HCN is found to be 139 pptv at 20 km, 127 pptv at 25 km, and increasing to 172 pptv at 37 km. The vertical profiles of stratospheric ^ {16}O^{16}O ^{18}O and ^ {16}O^{18}O ^{16}O are retrieved from spectral lines in the 39-76 cm^{-1 } region. The ratio of total heavy isotopic ozone ^{50}O_3 to

  11. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Boni, E. de; Willimann, M.; Safonova, O.; Sa, J.; Smolentsev, G.; Szlachetko, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Schmitt, B.; David, C.; Luecke, A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Jagodzinski, P.

    2012-10-15

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  12. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  13. Combination of optical emission and broadband absorption spectroscopy for diagnostics of HID lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhrmann, Cornelia; Bergner, Andre; Hoebing, Thomas; Mentel, Juergen; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-11-01

    HID lamps are used in several fields of application e.g. in street or automotive lighting as well as in video projection systems. Most of these lamps contain mercury to generate a high pressure buffer gas filling and thereby an appropriate power input into the arc. Due to its toxicity, the replacement of mercury is of particular interest in recent research of HID lamps. Currently, the emission coefficient of a mercury double line is used to determine the plasma temperature and thereby particle densities inside an HID lamp. A combination of optical emission and broadband absorption spectroscopy allows evaluating the plasma temperature without the need of mercury emission lines. It offers in combination with emission spectroscopy the possibility to calculate the total density of atoms and ions of elements also inside a mercury-free HID lamp. In this paper the measuring method is applied to a mercury-containing special research HID lamp (YAG lamp), seeded with rare earth iodines.

  14. Continuous measurements of volcanic gases from Popocatepetl volcano by thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Noemie; Stremme, Wolfgang; Meza, Israel; Grutter, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Passive volcanic gas emissions have been poorly studied despite their impact on the atmospheric chemistry with important consequences on its geochemical cycles and climate change on regional and global scale. Therefore, long-term monitoring of volcanic gas plumes and their composition are of prime importance for climatic models and the estimation of the volcanic contribution to climate change. We present a new measurement and analysis strategy based on remote thermal emission spectroscopy which can provide continuous (day and night) information of the composition of the volcanic plume. In this study we show results from the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico with measurements performed during the year 2015 from the Altzomoni Atmospheric Observatory (19.12N, -98.65W, 3,985 masl). This site, which forms part of the RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx) and NDACC (https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/irwg) networks, is located north of the crater of this active volcano at 12 km distance. Emission spectra were recorded with an FTIR spectrometer (OPAG22, Bruker) at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution and processed using the SFIT4 radiative transfer and profile retrieval code, based on the Optimal Estimation method (Rodgers, 1976; 1990; 2000). This newly improved methodology is intercompared to a former retrieval strategy using measurements from 2008 and recent results of the variability of the SiF4/SO2 composition ratio during 2015 is presented. A discussion of how the new measurements improve the understating of the impact of volcanic gas emissions on the atmosphere on global and regional scale is included.

  15. LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting

    2016-07-01

    LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

  16. Imaging buried organic islands by spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Kuan Eng J; Bannani, A; Troadec, C

    2008-11-01

    The well-known Au/n-Si(111) Schottky interface is modified by a discontinuous pentacene film (∼1.5 nm thick) and studied using spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). The pentacene film introduced subtle changes to the interface which cannot be definitively detected by current-voltage measurements or a standard BEES analysis of the barrier height. In contrast, analyzing the BEES results in a dual-parameter (transmission attenuation and barrier height) space allows the effect of the pentacene film on the Au/n-Si(111) interface to be clearly demonstrated. We found that the pentacene film behaves like a tunneling barrier and increases the distribution of local barrier heights with a tendency toward lower values. Our results highlight the potential of the dual-parameter BEES analysis for understanding local interface modification by molecules.

  17. X-ray absorption/emission line spectroscopy of the Galactic hot gaseous halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    There is an ongoing debate as to whether or not the Milky Way is surrounded by a large-scale, massive corona. Vastly different conclusions as to its extent and mass have been drawn from existing studies based on X-ray absorption and/or emission line spectroscopy. I will discuss my assessment of this issue, focusing on various uncertainties and potential problems in the present data, analyses, results, and interpretations.In particular, I will examine how different assumptions about the temperature distribution of the corona affect the inference of its physical scale. I will also discuss the external perspectives of galactic coronae obtained form observing nearby highly-inclined disk galaxies.

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of Pa-beta and [Fe II] Emission in NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knop, R. A.; Armus, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Matthews, K.; Shupe, D. L.; Soifer, B. T.

    1996-01-01

    We present spatially resolved 1.24-1.30 micron spectroscopy with a resolution of 240 km/s of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. Broad Pa-beta, narrow Pa-beta, and narrow [Fe II] (lambda = 1.2567 micron) emission lines are identified in the spectrum. Additionally, a spatially unresolved narrow component probably due to [S ix] (lambda = 1.25235 micron) is observed on the nucleus. The narrow Pa-beta and [Fe II] lines are observed to be extended over a scale of 5 sec. The spatial variation of the velocity centers of the Pa-beta and [Fe II] lines show remarkable similarity, and additionally show similarities to the velocity structure previously observed in ground based spectroscopy of [O III] emission in NGC 4151. This leads to the conclusion that the [Fe II] emission arises in clouds in the Seyfert narrow line region that are physically correlated with those narrow line clouds responsible for the optical emission. The [Fe II] emission line, however, is significantly wider than the Pa-beta emission line along the full spatial extent of the observed emission. This result suggests that despite the correlation between the bulk kinematics of Pa-beta and [Fe II], there is an additional process, perhaps fast shocks from a wind in the Seyfert nucleus, contributing to the [Fe II] emission.

  20. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  1. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  2. Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Burrows, Adam; Grillmair, Carl J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze all existing secondary eclipse time series spectroscopy of hot Jupiter HD 189733b acquired with the now defunct Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument. We describe the novel approaches we develop to remove the systematic effects and extract accurate secondary eclipse depths as a function of wavelength in order to construct the emission spectrum of the exoplanet. We compare our results with a previous study by Grillmair et al. that did not examine all data sets available to us. We are able to confirm the detection of a water feature near 6 μm claimed by Grillmair et al. We compare the planetary emission spectrum to three model families—based on isothermal atmosphere, gray atmosphere, and two realizations of the complex radiative transfer model by Burrows et al., adopted in Grillmair et al.'s study. While we are able to reject the simple isothermal and gray models based on the data at the 97% level just from the IRS data, these rejections hinge on eclipses measured within a relatively narrow wavelength range, between 5.5 and 7 μm. This underscores the need for observational studies with broad wavelength coverage and high spectral resolution, in order to obtain robust information on exoplanet atmospheres.

  3. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  4. Study of virus by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, K.; Kitamura, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Sawa, M.; Andriana, B. B.; Ohtani, K.; Yagura, T.; Sato, H.

    2013-02-01

    Problem of viruses is very actual for nowadays. Some viruses, which are responsible for human of all tumors, are about 15 %. Main purposes this study, early detection virus in live cell without labeling and in the real time by Raman spectroscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy (mRs) is a technique that uses a Raman spectrometer to measure the spectra of microscopic samples. According to the Raman spectroscopy, it becomes possible to study the metabolites of a live cultured cell without labeling. We used mRs to detect the virus via HEK 293 cell line-infected adenovirus. We obtained raman specters of lives cells with viruses in 24 hours and 7 days after the infection. As the result, there is some biochemical changing after the treatment of cell with virus. One of biochemical alteration is at 1081 cm-1. For the clarification result, we use confocal fluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  5. Infrared emission spectroscopy of atmospheric-pressure ball plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Deutsch, Bradley; Bhargava, Rohit; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-04-01

    We report the first (to our knowledge) infrared emission spectra collected from water-based laboratory ball plasmoid discharges. A "ball plasmoid" results from a unique type of pulsed DC plasma discharge in which a sphere of plasma is seen to grow and eventually separate from a central electrode and last for a few hundred milliseconds without an external power source before dissipating. Typical recombination rates for plasmas at ambient conditions are on the order of a millisecond or less, however ball plasmoids have been observed to last a few hundred milliseconds, and there is no explanation in the literature that fully accounts for this large discrepancy in lifetime. The spectra are dominated by emission from water and from hydroxyl radical; PGOPHER was used to fit the experimental spectra to extract rotational temperatures for these molecules. The temperatures of the bending and stretching modes of H2O were determined to be 1900 ± 300 K and 2400 ± 400 K, respectively and the rotational temperature of OH was found to be 9200 ± 1500 K.

  6. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  7. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Synthetic Allophane and its Potential Formation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is a poorly-crystalline, hydrous aluminosilicate with variable Si/Al ratios approx.0.5-1 and a metastable precursor of clay minerals. On Earth, it forms rapidly by aqueous alteration of volcanic glass under neutral to slightly acidic conditions [1]. Based on in situ chemical measurements and the identification of alteration phases [2-4], the Martian surface is interpreted to have been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical models of altered surfaces detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater suggest the presence of an allophane-like alteration product [3]. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution models are primary tools for determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface [5]. Spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate a global compositional dichotomy, where high latitudes tend to be enriched in a high-silica material [6,7], interpreted as high-silica, K-rich volcanic glass [6,8]. However, later interpretations proposed that the high-silica material may be an alteration product (such as amorphous silica, clay minerals, or allophane) and that high latitude surfaces are chemically weathered [9-11]. A TIR spectral library of pure minerals is available for the public [12], but it does not contain allophane spectra. The identification of allophane on the Martian surface would indicate high water activity at the time of its formation and would help constrain the aqueous alteration environment [13,14]. The addition of allophane to the spectral library is necessary to address the global compositional dichotomy. In this study, we characterize a synthetic allophane by IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to create an IR emission spectrum of pure allophane for the Mars science community to use in Martian spectral models.

  9. Infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy of gallium oxide alpha-GaO(OH) nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing Jeanne; Zhao, Yanyan; Frost, Ray L

    2009-10-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study nano- to micro-sized gallium oxyhydroxide alpha-GaO(OH), prepared using a low temperature hydrothermal route. Rod-like alpha-GaO(OH) crystals with average length of approximately 2.5 microm and width of 1.5 microm were prepared when the initial molar ratio of Ga to OH was 1:3. beta-Ga(2)O(3) nano and micro-rods were prepared through the calcination of alpha-GaO(OH). The initial morphology of alpha-GaO(OH) is retained in the beta-Ga(2)O(3) nanorods. The combination of infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy complimented with dynamic thermal analysis were used to characterise the alpha-GaO(OH) nanotubes and the formation of beta-Ga(2)O(3) nanorods. Bands at around 2903 and 2836 cm(-1) are assigned to the -OH stretching vibration of alpha-GaO(OH) nanorods. Infrared bands at around 952 and 1026 cm(-1) are assigned to the Ga-OH deformation modes of alpha-GaO(OH). A significant number of bands are observed in the 620-725 cm(-1) region and are assigned to GaO stretching vibrations.

  10. Analysis of fertilizers for major, micro, and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. B., Jr.

    The concentrations of nine elements (B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, and Zn) in 34 Magruder Fertilizer Standards were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy, and the results compared favorably with the known concentrations for all the elements. In addition to these nine fertilizer elements, six others (AI, Cd, Cr, Na, Ni, and Pb) were determined in the same analysis, although results could only be compared to similar analyses made by two other laboratories employing ICP. All 15 elements were also determined in 12 spent acids used to manufacture liquid fertilizer and analysis results compared among the three laboratories. Analysis by ICP spectroscopy of fertilizer materials with wide ranges of elemental contents was found to be a rapid analysis technique which can give comparable results with those obtained by the more laborious AOAC procedures as well as the opportunity to determine other than only the important fertilizer elements. Collaborative study is recommended for ICP determination of the elements of importance in fertilizers for adaptation of the ICP technique by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  11. Infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy of gallium oxide alpha-GaO(OH) nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing Jeanne; Zhao, Yanyan; Frost, Ray L

    2009-10-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study nano- to micro-sized gallium oxyhydroxide alpha-GaO(OH), prepared using a low temperature hydrothermal route. Rod-like alpha-GaO(OH) crystals with average length of approximately 2.5 microm and width of 1.5 microm were prepared when the initial molar ratio of Ga to OH was 1:3. beta-Ga(2)O(3) nano and micro-rods were prepared through the calcination of alpha-GaO(OH). The initial morphology of alpha-GaO(OH) is retained in the beta-Ga(2)O(3) nanorods. The combination of infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy complimented with dynamic thermal analysis were used to characterise the alpha-GaO(OH) nanotubes and the formation of beta-Ga(2)O(3) nanorods. Bands at around 2903 and 2836 cm(-1) are assigned to the -OH stretching vibration of alpha-GaO(OH) nanorods. Infrared bands at around 952 and 1026 cm(-1) are assigned to the Ga-OH deformation modes of alpha-GaO(OH). A significant number of bands are observed in the 620-725 cm(-1) region and are assigned to GaO stretching vibrations. PMID:19577510

  12. Kβ Mainline X-ray Emission Spectroscopy as an Experimental Probe of Metal–Ligand Covalency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mainline feature in metal Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has long been recognized as an experimental marker for the spin state of the metal center. However, even within a series of metal compounds with the same nominal oxidation and spin state, significant changes are observed that cannot be explained on the basis of overall spin. In this work, the origin of these effects is explored, both experimentally and theoretically, in order to develop the chemical information content of Kβ mainline XES. Ligand field expressions are derived that describe the behavior of Kβ mainlines for first row transition metals with any dn count, allowing for a detailed analysis of the factors governing mainline shape. Further, due to limitations associated with existing computational approaches, we have developed a new methodology for calculating Kβ mainlines using restricted active space configuration interaction (RAS–CI) calculations. This approach eliminates the need for empirical parameters and provides a powerful tool for investigating the effects that chemical environment exerts on the mainline spectra. On the basis of a detailed analysis of the intermediate and final states involved in these transitions, we confirm the known sensitivity of Kβ mainlines to metal spin state via the 3p–3d exchange coupling. Further, a quantitative relationship between the splitting of the Kβ mainline features and the metal–ligand covalency is established. Thus, this study furthers the quantitative electronic structural information that can be extracted from Kβ mainline spectroscopy. PMID:24914450

  13. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yuma; Fukami, Masaya; Tashiro, Takaharu; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We measured magnetic field dependence of the spin-current emission in the time domain and found that the spectral shape of the ISHE voltage changes with time. The change in the spectral shape is due to field and power dependent temporal oscillation of the spin pumping driven by parametric magnons. The observed oscillating spin-current emission driven by dipole-exchange magnons is well reproduced by a model calculation based on the S theory. In contrast, the spin-current emission driven by short-wavelength exchange magnons cannot be reproduced with this model, illustrating an important role of higher-order nonlinear effects in the spin-current emission.

  15. Surface and waveguide collection of Raman emission in waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate Raman spectroscopy on a high index thin film tantalum pentoxide waveguide and compare collection of Raman emission from the waveguide end with that from the waveguide surface. Toluene was used as a convenient model analyte, and a 40-fold greater signal was collected from the waveguide end. Simulations of angular and spatial Raman emission distributions showed good agreement with experiments, with the enhancement resulting from efficient collection of power from dipoles near the surface into the high-index waveguide film and substrate, combined with long interaction length. The waveguide employed was optimized at the excitation wavelength but not at emission wavelengths, and full optimization is expected to lead to enhancements comparable to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in robust low-cost metal-free and nanostructure-free chips.

  16. Surface and waveguide collection of Raman emission in waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate Raman spectroscopy on a high index thin film tantalum pentoxide waveguide and compare collection of Raman emission from the waveguide end with that from the waveguide surface. Toluene was used as a convenient model analyte, and a 40-fold greater signal was collected from the waveguide end. Simulations of angular and spatial Raman emission distributions showed good agreement with experiments, with the enhancement resulting from efficient collection of power from dipoles near the surface into the high-index waveguide film and substrate, combined with long interaction length. The waveguide employed was optimized at the excitation wavelength but not at emission wavelengths, and full optimization is expected to lead to enhancements comparable to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in robust low-cost metal-free and nanostructure-free chips. PMID:27607994

  17. Noninvasive, real-time measurements of plasma parameters via optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2013-03-15

    Plasma process control applications require acquisition of diagnostic data at a rate faster than the characteristic timescale of perturbations to the plasma. Diagnostics based on optical emission spectroscopy of intense emission lines permit rapid noninvasive measurements with low-resolution ({approx}1 nm), fiber-coupled spectrographs, which are included on many plasma process tools for semiconductor processing. Here the authors report on rapid analysis of Ar emissions with such a system to obtain electron temperatures, electron densities, and metastable densities in argon and argon/mixed-gas (Ar/N{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, Ar/H{sub 2}) inductively coupled plasmas. Accuracy of the results (compared to measurements made by Langmuir probe and white-light absorption spectroscopy) are typically better than {+-}15% with a time resolution of 0.1 s, which is more than sufficient to capture the transient behavior of many processes, limited only by the time response of the spectrograph used.

  18. Infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy of the zinc carbonate mineral smithsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Martens, Wayde N.; Wain, Daria L.; Hales, Matt C.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared emission and infrared spectroscopy has been used to study a series of selected natural smithsonites from different origins. An intense broad infrared band at 1440 cm -1 is assigned to the ν CO 32- antisymmetric stretching vibration. An additional band is resolved at 1335 cm -1. An intense sharp Raman band at 1092 cm -1 is assigned to the CO 32- symmetric stretching vibration. Infrared emission spectra show a broad antisymmetric band at 1442 cm -1 shifting to lower wavenumbers with thermal treatment. A band observed at 870 cm -1 with a band of lesser intensity at 842 cm -1 shifts to higher wavenumbers upon thermal treatment and is observed at 865 cm -1 at 400 °C and is assigned to the CO 32-ν mode. No ν bending modes are observed in the Raman spectra for smithsonite. The band at 746 cm -1 shifts to 743 cm -1 at 400 °C and is attributed to the CO 32-ν in phase bending modes. Two infrared bands at 744 and around 729 cm -1 are assigned to the ν in phase bending mode. Multiple bands may be attributed to the structural distortion ZnO 6 octahedron. This structural distortion is brought about by the substitution of Zn by some other cation. A number of bands at 2499, 2597, 2858, 2954 and 2991 cm -1 in both the IE and infrared spectra are attributed to combination bands.

  19. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy study of Mn and Co valence and spin states in TbM n1 -xC oxO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuartero, V.; Lafuerza, S.; Rovezzi, M.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, E.

    2016-10-01

    The valence and spin state evolution of Mn and Co on TbM n1 -xC oxO3 series is precisely determined by means of soft and hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and K β x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Our results show the change from M n3 + to M n4 + both high-spin (HS) together with the evolution from C o2 + HS to C o3 + low-spin (LS) with increasing x . In addition, high energy resolution XAS spectra on the K pre-edge region are interpreted in terms of the strong charge transfer and hybridization effects along the series. These results correlate well with the spin values of Mn and Co atoms obtained from the K β XES data. In this paper, we determine that Co enters into the transition metal sublattice of TbMn O3 as a divalent ion in HS state, destabilizing the Mn long-range magnetic order since very low doping compositions (x ≤0.1 ). Samples in the intermediate composition range (0.4 ≤x ≤0.6 ) adopt the crystal structure of a double perovskite with long-range ferromagnetic ordering which is due to M n4 + -O-C o2 + superexchange interactions with both cations in HS configuration. Ferromagnetism vanishes for x ≥0.7 due to the structural disorder that collapses the double perovskite structure. The spectroscopic techniques reveal the occurrence of M n4 + HS and a fluctuating valence state C o2 + HS/C o3 + LS in this composition range. Disorder and competitive interactions lead to a magnetic glassy behavior in these samples.

  20. [Detection of Lead in Water by Electrolyte Cathode Atmospheric Glow Discharge Emission Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Pei-chao; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Jin-mei; Wang, Xiao-meng; Liu, Hong-di; Yang, Rui

    2015-07-01

    A device based on electrolyte cathode atmospheric glow discharge atomic emission spectroscopy (ELCAD-AES) has been developed to determine the metal ion Pb in water. The emission intensity of Ph was significantly enhanced with the increase concentration of Pb, and the emission intensity has a linear relationship with concentration while the concentration of Pb in the range of 10-80 mg x L(-1). The effects of discharge current and easily ionizable elements on the emission spectral of Pb were investigated, and the emission intensity reached greatest when the discharge current increased to 70 mA, and the easily ionizable elements generated weak effect on the emission spectral of Pb. The effect of acidification regent on emission spectral of Pb was discussed. It was found that it perform best when acidified with HNO3, and reducing the pH can improve the emission intensity of Pb effectively. The emission intensity of Pb at different region was detected near cathode region, thus obtained the best detection position. Under the optimized experimental parameters, the detection limit of Ph was 0.7 mg x L(-1) and relative standard deviation was 1.7%. The recovery of samples was 95%-106%, result and shows that this method has better accuracy. These results provide an available method for further research of detection trace heavy mental elements in water using ELCAD-AES. PMID:26717769

  1. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  2. Emission Spectroscopy Following the Multiphoton Photolysis of Halomethanes at Near-Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Nan; Liao, Hsiang-Fu; Hou, Guang-Yi; Yang, Shi-Xing; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Emission spectroscopy including nascent emission and laser-induced dispersed fluorescence was adopted to investigate the multiphoton photolysis mechanism of halomethanes at near-ultraviolet wavelengths in a slow flow system. In the 266 nm photolysis of the interested halomethanes (CHBr_3, CHBr_2Cl, CHBrCl_2, CH_2Br_2, CHI_3, CH_2I_2, and CH_3I), several excited species such as CH (A^2Δ, B^2Σ^-, and C^2Σ^+), atomic Br or I, and C_2 (d^3Π_g) were observed in the nascent emission spectra. Halomethylenes (CHX, X= Br, Cl, I), the reactive intermediates, were not observed in nascent emission spectra, but they can be found using laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy following excitation of their ~A1A' '(0,v_2,0)←~X1A^'(0,0,0) transitions. Interestingly, CHBr was seen only in the photolysis of CHBr_3, whereas CHCl was only discovered when the precursor is CHBr_2Cl or CHBrCl_2. The photolysis laser power dependence and emission waveform measurements were also conducted. In addition, nascent emission spectra following the photolysis at longer near-ultraviolet wavelengths (280 nm and 355 nm) were acquired. The results show the distinctive differences between the photolysis of bromomethanes (CHBr_3, CHBr_2Cl, CHBrCl_2, and CH_2Br_2) and that of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, and CH_3I). Our recent progress will be presented.

  3. Applications of Spectroscopy to Studying Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, W. R.; Apodaca, R.; Carlson, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Spectroscopic techniques are finding increased applications in studies of atmospheric chemistry because of inherent advantages in the techniques and technological improvements in optical and computer components. There are many advantages of using spectroscopy for study of chemistry. Spectroscopy is absolutely calibrated and thus requires only validation, reducing the need for consumable standards and reducing size and weight. Generally, spectroscopic instruments can be built from inexpensive solid-state components with few or no moving parts, improving long-term reliability. Huge advances in optoelectronic components, such as availability of diode lasers, cheap imaging detectors, light emitting diodes, have widened the breadth of applications and reduced costs. In this presentation, we discuss two recent applications of atmospheric spectroscopy that exploit these advantages. In the first application, our group has used off-axis Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (oaCRDS) to make a small and inexpensive detector for nitrate radicals (NO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), which are atmospherically important nitrogen oxides the dominate reactivity during nighttime. This instrument fits in a small waterproof case that is (98cm x 40cm x 15cm), weighs less than 25kg, and uses an inexpensive diode laser. The instrument was recently incompared to a number of other techniques for measuring these gases and showed excellent performance. In a second application, we have used multiple-axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAXDOAS) to measure halogen oxides and other UV-absorbing gases at remote locations. This instrument will be a part of an autonomous chemical-measuring buoy that will be deployed on the Arctic Ice. The instrument will make measurements and telemeter the data back via an iridium satellite modem. Our MAXDOAS instrument is very small, inexpensive, and uses only 2 watts of power, allowing long life when operating on batteries. Many features were built into

  4. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1991-10-01

    Carbon dioxide presents a great challenge to spectroscopy because of its propensity toward dissociation in all of its excited states. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy is usually not applicable to the study of dissociating molecules because the dissociation competes effectively with ionization, resulting in no signal. We reasoned, however, that with high enough laser fluence, ionization could compete with dissociation in the longer lived states, exposing them for study from the continuous spectral background resulting from rapidly dissociating states. We describe the various spectroscopic and photophysical effects found through the multiphoton ionization and multiphoton photoelectron spectra. A recently developed variant of threshold ionization spectroscopy, usually called ZEKE, has shown a great deal of usefulness in providing the same information as traditional photoelectron spectroscopy but with higher resolution and much better signal-to-noise when using standard laboratory lasers. Threshold ionization techniques locate the states of an ion by scanning a light source across the ionization continuum of a neutral and somehow detecting when electrons are produced with no kinetic energy. We chose to develop our capabilities in threshold ionization spectroscopy using aromatic molecules because of their importance and because their electronic structure allows a pump-probe type of excitation scheme which avoids the use of vacuum ultraviolet laser beams. Among aromatics, the azines are noted for their small S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} energy gap which give them unique and interesting photophysical properties. We have continued our work on the multiphoton spectrum of metastable nitrogen produced by an electric discharge in supersonic beam. We have been able to assign more of the lines and simulated their rotational structure but many peaks remain unassigned.

  5. Multi-epoch Spectroscopy of Dwarf Galaxies with AGN Signatures: Identifying Sources with Persistent Broad Hα Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Reines, Amy E.; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny E.; Graur, Or; Geha, Marla; Hainline, Kevin; Carroll, Christopher M.; Hickox, Ryan C.

    2016-09-01

    We use time-domain optical spectroscopy to distinguish between broad emission lines powered by accreting black holes (BHs) and stellar processes (i.e., supernovae) for 16 galaxies identified as active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates by Reines et al (2013). Our study is primarily focused on those objects with narrow emission line ratios dominated by star formation, for which the origin of the broad Hα emission was unclear. Based on follow-up spectroscopy, we find that the broad Hα emission has faded or was ambiguous for all of the star-forming objects (14/16), over baselines ranging from 5-14 years, suggesting a transient stellar process was responsible for the broad emission in previous Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations. For the two objects in our follow-up sample with narrow-line AGN signatures (RGG 9 and RGG 119), we find persistent broad Hα emission consistent with an AGN origin. Additionally, we use high spectral resolution observations to measure stellar velocity dispersions for 15 objects in the Reines et al. (2013) sample, all with narrow-line ratios indicating the presence of an AGN. Stellar masses range from ˜ 5× {10}8 to 3× {10}9 M ⊙, and we measure {σ }* in the range of 28{--}71 {km} {{{s}}}-1. These {σ }* correspond to some of the lowest-mass galaxies with optical signatures of AGN activity. We show that RGG 119, the one object that has both a measured {σ }* and persistent broad Hα emission, falls near the extrapolation of the {\\text{}}{M}{BH}-{σ }\\star relation to the low-mass end.

  6. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  7. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-06-30

    Previous work on the detection of mercury using the cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has concentrated on the detection and characterization of the desired mercury transition. Interferent species present in flue gas emissions have been tested as well as a simulated flue gas stream. Additionally, work has been done on different mercury species such as the elemental and oxidized forms. The next phase of the effort deals with the actual sampling system. This sampling system will be responsible for acquiring a sample stream from the flue gas stack, taking it to the CRD cavity where it will be analyzed and returning the gas stream to the stack. In the process of transporting the sample gas stream every effort must be taken to minimize any losses of mercury to the walls of the sampling system as well as maintaining the mercury in its specific state (i.e. elemental, oxidized, or other mercury compounds). SRD first evaluated a number of commercially available sampling systems. These systems ranged from a complete sampling system to a number of individual components for specific tasks. SRD engineers used some commercially available components and designed a sampling system suited to the needs of the CRD instrument. This included components such as a pyrolysis oven to convert all forms of mercury to elemental mercury, a calibration air source to ensure mirror alignment and quality of the mirror surfaces, and a pumping system to maintain the CRD cavity pressure from atmospheric pressure (760 torr) down to about 50 torr. SRD also began evaluating methods for the CRD instrument to automatically find the center of a mercury transition. This procedure is necessary as the instrument must periodically measure the baseline losses of the cavity off of the mercury resonance and then return to the center of the transition to accurately measure the mercury concentration. This procedure is somewhat complicated due to the isotopic structure of the 254 nm mercury transition. As a result of

  8. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Sensitive Continuous Emission Monitor for Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, George P.

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) as an ultra-sensitive technique for trace analysis of metals. Potential applications of CRDS meeting the Department of Energy needs include: Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor Multi-Metal Emissions Monitor Radionuclide Detector and Monitor CRDS is based upon the measurement of the rate of light absorption in a closed optical cavity. A laser pulse is injected into a stable optical cavity through one of the cavity mirrors. This light pulse is trapped between the mirror surfaces and decays exponentially over time at a rate determined by the round trip losses within the cavity. When used for trace analysis, the primary loss mechanisms governing the decay time are mirror reflectivity losses, atomic absorption from the sample, and Rayleigh scattering from air in the cavity. The decay time is given by t= d c 1- R ( )+ als + bd [ ] (1) where d is the cavity length, R is the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors, a is the familiar Beer's Law absorption coefficient of a sample in the cavity, ls is the length of the optical path through the sample (i.e., approximately the graphite furnace length), b is the wavelength-dependent Rayleigh scattering attenuation coefficient, and c is the speed of light. Thus, variations in a caused by changes in the sample concentration are reflected in the ringdown time. As the sample concentration increases (i.e., a increases), the ringdown time decreases yielding an absolute measurement for a. With the use of suitable mirrors, it is possible to achieve thousands of passes through the sample resulting in a significant increase in sensitivity. An additional benefit is that it is not subject to collisional quenching, the branching of fluorescence emission into multiple transitions, and the ability to detect only a fraction of the fluorescence photons that occur in laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAFS). One other advantage of the ringdown technique is the ability to use

  9. [Detection of metal residue in aqueous solutions by electrolyte cathode atmospheric glow discharge emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Pei-chao; Wang, Hong-mei; Li, Jian-quan; Han, Hai-yan; Xi, Xiao-qin; Chu, Yan-nan

    2010-07-01

    Toxic metal elements in waters and wastewaters contaminate the environment and greatly threaten the health of human beings, therefore developing a rapid monitor for metal residues in aqueous solutions is urgently required. In the present work, a new homemade apparatus of electrolyte cathode atmospheric glow discharge emission spectroscopy was developed and described. It can detect and discriminate many kinds of trace mental elements by atomic emission spectrum from atmospheric pressure liquid cathode glow discharge. In order to estimate the analytical performance of the present atmospheric pressure electrolyte cathode glow discharge emission spectroscopy system, the detection limit values for Na, Li, Cu, Pb and Mn were obtained based on 3sigma of the background signal, and the current limits of detection were 0.008, 0.005, 1.1, 2.06 and 1.95 mg L(-1), respectively. It demonstrates that the atmospheric pressure electrolyte cathode glow discharge emission spectroscopy has a promising application in real time measurements of metal residues in aqueous solutions. PMID:20828006

  10. Optical emission spectroscopy characterization of oxygen plasma during degradation of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujošević, D.; Mozetič, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Krstulović, N.; Milošević, S.

    2007-05-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during sterilization of substrates contaminated with bacteria. The amount of 1010/ml cells of Escherichia coli was carefully applied to glass substrates and exposed to oxygen plasma glow discharge at different pressures between 30 and 200Pa. Plasma was created in a glass discharge tube by an inductively coupled rf generator at the frequency of 27.12MHz and output power of about 250W. The electron temperature and plasma density were estimated with a double Langmuir probe. They were between 3 and 5eV and 2 and 35×1015m-3. Density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured with a catalytic probe, and was between 2 and 6×1021m-3. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed with a low resolution spectrometer. The emission from carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecules was used to monitor the evolution of bacteria degradation. Both signals expressed a well defined maximum corresponding to peak erosion of bacteria by plasma radicals. As the sterilization was accomplished, both CO and N2 lines fell below the detection limit of the spectrometer. The bacteria degradation was also monitored by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and culturing. The SEM images corresponded well with the evolution of CO and N2 lines so the optical emission spectroscopy found a reliable tool for monitoring the sterilization process.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy characterization of oxygen plasma during degradation of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Vujosevic, D.; Mozetic, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Krstulovic, N.; Milosevic, S.

    2007-05-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during sterilization of substrates contaminated with bacteria. The amount of 10{sup 10}/ml cells of Escherichia coli was carefully applied to glass substrates and exposed to oxygen plasma glow discharge at different pressures between 30 and 200 Pa. Plasma was created in a glass discharge tube by an inductively coupled rf generator at the frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power of about 250 W. The electron temperature and plasma density were estimated with a double Langmuir probe. They were between 3 and 5 eV and 2 and 35x10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. Density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured with a catalytic probe, and was between 2 and 6x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed with a low resolution spectrometer. The emission from carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecules was used to monitor the evolution of bacteria degradation. Both signals expressed a well defined maximum corresponding to peak erosion of bacteria by plasma radicals. As the sterilization was accomplished, both CO and N{sub 2} lines fell below the detection limit of the spectrometer. The bacteria degradation was also monitored by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and culturing. The SEM images corresponded well with the evolution of CO and N{sub 2} lines so the optical emission spectroscopy found a reliable tool for monitoring the sterilization process.

  12. Nitrogen termination of single crystal (100) diamond surface by radio frequency N{sub 2} plasma process: An in-situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and secondary electron emission studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, Maneesh E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il

    2015-09-14

    In this letter, we report the electronic and chemical properties of nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) single crystal (100) diamond surface, which is a promising candidate for shallow NV{sup −} centers. N-termination is realized by an indirect RF nitrogen plasma process without inducing a large density of surface defects. Thermal stability and electronic property of N-terminated diamond surface are systematically investigated under well-controlled conditions by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron emission. An increase in the low energy cut-off of the secondary electron energy distribution curve (EDC), with respect to a bare diamond surface, indicates a positive electron affinity of the N-terminated diamond. Exposure to atomic hydrogen results in reorganization of N-terminated diamond to H-terminated diamond, which exhibited a negative electron affinity surface. The change in intensity and spectral features of the secondary electron EDC of the N-terminated diamond is discussed.

  13. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires, light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Surface sensitivity of ion-induced Auger electron emission (IAE) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verucchi, R.; Altieri, S.; Valeri, S.

    1995-07-01

    We investigated the electron emission induced by energetic sputter-deposited Si particles during ion beam sputter deposition of Si on Ge substrate. Electron emission is strictly similar to the ion-induced Auger (IAE) Si spectra and originates in SiSi collisions. Monitoring this "IAE-like" Si yield during the Si layer-by-layer growth, we measured the surface sensitivity of particle-induced electron emission for different energies of the involved particles and for different experimental geometries. We found that the depth sampled by IAE spectroscopy critically depends on the experimental parameters. The surface sensitivity of IAE is, in several cases, larger than that of the corresponding, conventional electron-induced Auger electron emission.

  15. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, M-C; Nikolich, G; Etyemezian, V; Dubois, D W; King, J; Shafer, D; Gamboa da Costa, G; Hinton, J F; Kavouras, I G

    2013-10-01

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking.

  16. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  17. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  18. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  19. Investigation of microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-07-01

    Microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy was investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode system. The electrodes of a Pd needle and a Pt plate were placed with a gap of 25 µm in typical artificial sea water or locally sampled natural deep sea water. A pulse current source, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the sea water between the electrodes, was used. The circuit parameters were optimized to decrease the breakdown voltage and the spark duration to suppress erosion of the electrodes. Using a microgap configuration, spark discharges were reproducibly ignited in the highly conductive sea water at low breakdown voltages. The ignition of spark discharges required not only a critical voltage sufficient for breakdown, but also a critical energy for preheating of the sea water, sufficient for bubble formation. The possibility of using optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in water is shown for identifying elemental composition of sea water.

  20. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    PubMed

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control.

  1. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2003-09-30

    The work performed during this quarter by SRD scientists and engineers focused on a number of tasks. The initial acquisition of some hardware needed and the actual construction of the sampling system have begun. This sampling system will contain the pyrolysis oven to atomize the sample gas stream needed for total gaseous mercury measurements, the CRD cavity to acquire the ring-down signal needed to obtain the mercury concentration, various tubing, and temperature and pressure measurement equipment. The amount of tubing and valves have been cut to a minimum to try and reduce the resident time the sample flue gas stream is in the sampling system and minimize the possibility that the gases in the sample gas stream will react with the elements of the sampling system and change the component mixture contained in the flue gas. In an effort to minimize the equipment that needs to be close to the actual sampling port, SRD scientists decided to fiber optically couple the laser to the CRD cavity. However, the ultra-violet (UV) light needed for the mercury transition presents a problem as fiber optics can be solarized by the UV radiation thereby changing the transmission characteristics. SRD has obtained a solarization-resistant fiber. SRD scientists were then able to couple the UV laser light into the fiber and inject the output of the fiber into the CRD cavity and obtain a ring-down signal. Long-term effects of the UV radiation on the fiber optic are being monitored to detect any change in the transmission of the laser light to the cavity. Additional requirements of the mercury CRD monitor will be to not only monitor the mercury concentration continuously but also perform the measurements over extended periods of time. SRD has extended some previously performed shorter-term studies to longer time intervals. The results of these initial long-term studies are very promising.

  2. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  3. GROUND-BASED NEAR-INFRARED EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF HD 189733B

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Drossart, P.; Swain, M. R.; Deroo, P.; Griffith, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the K- and L-band dayside emission of the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b with three nights of secondary eclipse data obtained with the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. The observations for each of these three nights use equivalent instrument settings and the data from one of the nights have previously been reported by Swain et al. We describe an improved data analysis method that, in conjunction with the multi-night data set, allows increased spectral resolution (R {approx} 175) leading to high-confidence identification of spectral features. We confirm the previously reported strong emission at {approx}3.3 {mu}m and, by assuming a 5% vibrational temperature excess for methane, we show that non-LTE emission from the methane {nu}{sub 3} branch is a physically plausible source of this emission. We consider two possible energy sources that could power non-LTE emission and additional modeling is needed to obtain a detailed understanding of the physics of the emission mechanism. The validity of the data analysis method and the presence of strong 3.3 {mu}m emission are independently confirmed by simultaneous, long-slit, L-band spectroscopy of HD 189733b and a comparison star.

  4. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  5. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  6. Low-energy electro- and photo-emission spectroscopy of GaN materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Piccardo, Marco; Weisbuch, Claude; Iveland, Justin; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; Martinelli, Lucio Peretti, Jacques; Choi, Joo Won

    2015-03-21

    In hot-electron semiconductor devices, carrier transport extends over a wide range of conduction states, which often includes multiple satellite valleys. Electrical measurements can hardly give access to the transport processes over such a wide range without resorting to models and simulations. An alternative experimental approach however exists which is based on low-energy electron spectroscopy and provides, in a number of cases, very direct and selective information on hot-electron transport mechanisms. Recent results obtained in GaN crystals and devices by electron emission spectroscopy are discussed. Using near-band-gap photoemission, the energy position of the first satellite valley in wurtzite GaN is directly determined. By electro-emission spectroscopy, we show that the measurement of the electron spectrum emitted from a GaN p-n junction and InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under electrical injection of carriers provides a direct observation of transport processes in these devices. In particular, at high injected current density, high-energy features appear in the electro-emission spectrum of the LEDs showing that Auger electrons are being generated in the active region. These measurements allow us identifying the microscopic mechanism responsible for droop which represents a major hurdle for widespread adoption of solid-state lighting.

  7. Pressure effect on the electronic structure of iron in (Mg,Fe)(Al,Si)O3 perovskite: A combined synchrotron M?ssbauer and x-ray emission spectroscopy study up to 100 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J; Sturhahn, W; Jackson, J; Struzhkin, V V; Lin, J F; Zhao, J; Mao, H K; Shen, G

    2006-01-23

    We investigated the valence and spin state of iron in an Al-bearing ferromagnesian silicate perovskite sample, (Mg{sub 0.88}Fe{sub 0.09})(Si{sub 0.94}Al{sub 0.10})O{sub 3}, at 300 K and up to 100 GPa, using diamond-anvil cells and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy techniques. Under elevated pressures, our Moessbauer time spectra are sufficiently fitted by a ''three-doublet'' model, which assumes two ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) iron types and one ferric (Fe{sup 3+}) iron type with distinct hyperfine parameters. At pressures above 20 GPa, the fraction of the ferric iron, Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe, is about 75% and remains unchanged to the highest pressure, indicating a fixed valence state of iron within this pressure range. Between 20 and 100 GPa, the quadruple splittings of all three iron types do not change with pressure, while the isomer shift between the Fe{sup 3+} types and the Fe{sup 2+} type increases continuously with increasing pressure. In conjunction with previous x-ray emission data on the same sample, the unchanging quadruple splittings and increasing isomer shift suggest that Fe{sup 2+} undergoes a broad spin crossover towards the low-spin state at 100 GPa, while Fe{sup 3+} remains in the high-spin state. The essentially constant quadruple splittings of Fe{sup 2+} can also be taken as an indication for strong resistance against further distortion of the local iron environment after initial compression.

  8. Analysis of aircraft exhausts with Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heland, J; Schäfer, K

    1997-07-20

    Because of the worldwide growth in air traffic and its increasing effects on the atmospheric environment, it is necessary to quantify the direct aircraft emissions at all altitudes. In this study Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy as a remote-sensing multi-component-analyzing technique for aircraft exhausts was investigated at ground level with a double pendulum interferometer and a line-by-line computer algorithm that was applied to a multilayer radiative transfer problem. Initial measurements were made to specify the spectral windows for traceable compounds, to test the sensitivity of the system, and to develop calibration and continuum handling procedures. To obtain information about the radial temperature and concentration profiles, we developed an algorithm for the analysis of an axial-symmetric multilayered plume by use of the CO(2) hot band at approximately 2400 cm(-1). Measurements were made with several in-service engines. Effects that were due to engine aging were detected but have to be analyzed systematically in the near future. Validation measurements were carried out with a conventional propane gas burner to compare the results with those obtained with standard measurement equipment. These measurements showed good agreement to within +/-20% for the CO and NO(x) results. The overall accuracy of the system was found to be +/-30%. The detection limits of the system for a typical engine plume (380 degrees C, ? = 50 cm) are below 0.1% for CO(2), ~0.7% for H(2)O, ~20 ppmv (parts per million by volume) for CO, and ~90 ppmv for NO.

  9. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Sensitive Continuous Emission Monitor for Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, George P.

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) as an ultrasensitive technique for trace analysis of metals. Potential applications of CRDS to meet stated Department of Energy needs include: Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor Multi-Metal Emissions Monitor Radionuclide Detector and Monitor A full description of the technique can be found in Ref. 1. Briefly, CRDS is based upon the measurement of the rate of light absorption in a closed optical cavity. PMT Cavity Mirror Sample Cavity Mirror Laser Pulse A laser pulse is injected into a stable optical cavity through one of the cavity mirrors. This light pulse is trapped between the mirror surfaces and decays exponentially over time at a rate determined by the round trip losses within the cavity. When used for trace analysis, the primary loss mechanisms governing the decay time are mirror reflectivity losses, atomic absorption from the sample, and Rayleigh scattering from air in the cavity. The decay time is given by t = d c 1- R ( ) +als + bd [ ] (1) where d is the cavity length, R is the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors, a is the familiar Beer's Law absorption coefficient of a sample in the cavity, ls is the length of the optical path through the sample (i.e., approximately the graphite furnace length), b is the wavelength-dependent Rayleigh scattering attenuation coefficient, and c is the speed of light. Thus, variations in a caused by changes in the sample concentration are reflected in the ringdown time. As the sample concentration increases (i.e., a increases), the ringdown time decreases yielding an absolute measurement for a. With the use of suitable mirrors, it is possible to achieve thousands of passes through the sample. This results in an effective path length reaching into the kilometers and a corresponding increase in sensitivity. An additional benefit is that it is not subject to collisional 2 quenching and the branching that occur in techniques such as laser-excited atomic

  10. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  11. Analysis of aircraft exhausts with Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heland, J; Schäfer, K

    1997-07-20

    Because of the worldwide growth in air traffic and its increasing effects on the atmospheric environment, it is necessary to quantify the direct aircraft emissions at all altitudes. In this study Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy as a remote-sensing multi-component-analyzing technique for aircraft exhausts was investigated at ground level with a double pendulum interferometer and a line-by-line computer algorithm that was applied to a multilayer radiative transfer problem. Initial measurements were made to specify the spectral windows for traceable compounds, to test the sensitivity of the system, and to develop calibration and continuum handling procedures. To obtain information about the radial temperature and concentration profiles, we developed an algorithm for the analysis of an axial-symmetric multilayered plume by use of the CO(2) hot band at approximately 2400 cm(-1). Measurements were made with several in-service engines. Effects that were due to engine aging were detected but have to be analyzed systematically in the near future. Validation measurements were carried out with a conventional propane gas burner to compare the results with those obtained with standard measurement equipment. These measurements showed good agreement to within +/-20% for the CO and NO(x) results. The overall accuracy of the system was found to be +/-30%. The detection limits of the system for a typical engine plume (380 degrees C, ? = 50 cm) are below 0.1% for CO(2), ~0.7% for H(2)O, ~20 ppmv (parts per million by volume) for CO, and ~90 ppmv for NO. PMID:18259296

  12. [Studies on Cancer Diagnosis by Using Spectroscopy Combined with Chemometrics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong

    2015-09-01

    Studies on cancer diagnosis using various spectroscopic methods combined with chemometrics are briefly reviewed. Elemental contents in serum samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), bidirectional associative memory (BAM) networks were used to establish diagnosis models for the relationships between elemental contents and lung cancer, liver cancer, and stomach cancer, respectively. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-destructive detection technology. Near infrared spectra of endometrial carcinoma samples were determined and spectral features were extracted by chemoometric methods, a fuzzy rule-based expert system (FuRES) was used for establishing diagnosis model, satisfactory results were obtained. We also proposed a novel variable selection method based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) for near infrared spectra of endometrial carcinoma samples. Spectra with optimized variable were then modeled by support victor machine (SVM). Terahertz technology is an emerging technology for non-destructive detection, which has some unique characteristics. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used for cervical carcinoma measurement. Absorption coefficients were calculated from the measured time domain spectra and then processed with derivative, orthogonal signal correction (PC-OSC) to reduce interference components, and then fuzzy rule-based expert system (FuRES), fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM), support victor machine (SVM), and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used for diagnosis model establishment. The above results provide useful information for cancer occurring and development, and provide novel approaches for early stage diagnosis of various cancers. PMID:26669135

  13. Perturbation Facilitated Dispersed Fluorescence and Stimulated Emission Pumping Spectroscopies of HCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Haruki; Muramoto, Yasuhiko; Namai, Masahito; Mikami, Naohiko

    2011-06-01

    Perturbations among molecular rovibronic levels provide us with mainly two benefits. Perturbations themselves are characteristic features of structure and dynamics of molecules. We have been investigating dynamics of highly excited vibrational levels of HCP in the tilde{X} ^1Σ^+ state by dispersed fluorescence (DF) and stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectroscopies of the tilde{C} ^1A^' - tilde{X} ^1Σ^+ transition. In the case of tilde{X} ^1Σ^+ HCP, its vibrational dynamics is well described by the Fermi resonance between the bend and the CP stretch modes. Based on the analysis of the Fermi resonance, we have succeeded in revealing the change in character of the bending motion in highly excited vibrational levels. In addition, perturbations enable us to explore rovibrational levels into much wider region that cannot be accessed under limits of selection rules. Jacobson and Child showed that the Coriolis interaction becomes very strong in the highly excited levels near and the above the CPH barrier. For the experimental confirmation of their prediction, the observation of the VCH≠0 and the ℓ'' ≠ 0 levels are necessary. However, due to the selection rules and the Franck-Condon selectivity, only the VCH=0 and the ℓ''=0 levels had been observed. In the course of our study, we have found a perturbed level in the tilde{C} state. In general, a very clear even-v_2 progression appears in the DF spectra of HCP. However, in the DF spectra measured by using the perturbed level as the intermediate both the odd- and even-v_2 levels are observed. Moreover, several VCH=1 levels are observed in the spectra. The perturbation-facilitated DF and SEP spectroscopies are very powerful tools to exploring the highly excited vibrational levels of HCP. Details of the perturbation-facilitated DF and SEP spectroscopies are presented in the paper. H. Ishikawa, et al. J. Chem. Phys. 109, 492 (1998); H. Ishikawa, et al. Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 50, 443 (1999). M. P. Jacobson and M. S

  14. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  15. The use of a hairpin resonator probe and emission spectroscopy to determine instabilities during silicon etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, David; Morshed, Mohammed; Daniels, Stephen

    2008-10-01

    The hairpin resonator probe is a diagnostic method which determines electron density. The probe was placed in a capacitively coupled plasma SF6 plasma during the etching of silicon and the steady state electron density determined. Due to the absence of substrate cooling, the temperature increase in the chamber as the etch process progressed begins to heat and damage the photoresist. As a result the photoresist begins to desorb and outgas, releasing organic polymers into the discharge. These effluents react with the bulk plasma chemistry and have the effect of reducing the electron density measured by the probe. Optical emission spectroscopy was also used to monitor emissions from the plasma. Emissions from non process gasses were also observed as a result of the photoresist heating. These results allow for the consideration of the hairpin resonator probe as a diagnostic for plasma process monitoring

  16. United States Environmental Protection Agency Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy test program for emissions measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, L.T.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) November 15, 1990. Title 3 of the CAA amendments included a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for which emission test procedures must be established. An extractive emission test method, using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, is being developed for measuring HAP compounds. The FTIR procedure has the potential to detect over 100 of the listed compounds plus additional compounds such as criteria pollutants. This procedure has the ability to detect multiple compounds simultaneously and will provide near real-time data. Since the development of the extractive FTIR procedure, many source categories have been screened for HAP emissions using this technique. Modifications to the procedure have been made and validation testing has been performed. Currently, this technique is being used to collect data for maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standard development.

  17. Spectroscopy of optically selected BL Lac objects and their γ-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrinelli, A.; Treves, A.; Farina, E. P.; Landoni, M.; Falomo, R.; Foschini, L.; Sbarufatti, B.

    2013-12-01

    We present Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of nine BL Lac objects of unknown redshift belonging to the list of optically selected radio-loud BL Lac candidates. We explore their spectroscopic properties and possible link with gamma-ray emission. From the new observations we determine the redshifts of four objects from faint emission lines or from absorption features of their host galaxies. In three cases we find narrow intervening absorptions from which a lower limit to the redshift is inferred. For the remaining two featureless sources, lower limits to the redshift are deduced from the absence of spectral lines. A search for γ counterpart emission shows that six out of the nine candidates are Fermi γ-ray emitters and we find two new detections. Our analysis suggests that most of the BL Lac objects still lacking redshift information are most likely located at high redshifts.

  18. Characteristics of in-situ chamber cleaning for DPS+ metal etcher by using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yonghwan; Cho, Woojin; Lee, Yongwoo; Chae, Minchul; Kwon, Sungun; Hwang, Jaeseung

    2006-10-01

    Plasma enhanced in-situ chamber cleaning (ICC) is generally used for plasma processes such as plasma etching system and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. It is generally believed that ICC makes a chamber condition to be constant and be able to extend wet cleaning period. We have studied ICC characteristics for DPS+ metal etcher by using the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) as a function of the source power, the chamber pressure and the composition and total flow rate of the gases used. We observe that the higher source power and the lower pressure are more efficient for the ICC and also investigate the effects of the additional gases. We have applied our ICC condition to the patterned wafers and concluded that the chamber condition is maintained in a stable way. However, ICC treatment to the chamber result in some process changes such as the profile of the metal line and the oxide recess and the etch selectivity of the metal line to the oxide hard mask.

  19. Thermal emission spectroscopy of microcrystalline sedimentary phases: Effects of natural surface roughness on spectral feature shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Distinguishing between microcrystalline and macrocrystalline mineral phases can help constrain the conditions under which those minerals formed or the degree of postdepositional alteration. This study demonstrates the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro and macrocrystalline phases of the two most common minerals on Earth, quartz and calcite. Given the characteristic depositional and environmental conditions under which microcrystalline minerals form, and the recent observations of high-silica deposits on Mars, it is important to understand how these unique materials can be identified using remote infrared spectroscopy techniques. We find that (a) microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 µm scale; and that (b) this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands of each mineral. These spectral differences occur for surfaces that are rough on the wavelength scale, where the absorption coefficient (k) is large. Specifically, the wavelength positions of the Reststrahlen features for microcrystalline phases are narrowed and shifted compared to macrocrystalline counterparts. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. Petrographic and topographic analyses of microcrystalline samples suggest a relationship between crystal size and surface roughness. Together, these observations suggest it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity from the thermal infrared spectral character of samples, which could aid in reconstructions of sedimentary rock diagenesis where corresponding petrographic or microimaging is not available.

  20. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe; Bordage, Amélie; Cammarata, Marco; Canton, Sophie E; Dohn, Asmus O; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Fritz, David M; Galler, Andreas; Glatzel, Pieter; Harlang, Tobias; Kjær, Kasper S; Lemke, Henrik T; Møller, Klaus B; Németh, Zoltán; Pápai, Mátyás; Sas, Norbert; Uhlig, Jens; Zhu, Diling; Vankó, György; Sundström, Villy; Nielsen, Martin M; Bressler, Christian

    2016-02-18

    In liquid phase chemistry dynamic solute-solvent interactions often govern the path, ultimate outcome, and efficiency of chemical reactions. These steps involve many-body movements on subpicosecond time scales and thus ultrafast structural tools capable of capturing both intramolecular electronic and structural changes, and local solvent structural changes are desired. We have studied the intra- and intermolecular dynamics of a model chromophore, aqueous [Fe(bpy)3](2+), with complementary X-ray tools in a single experiment exploiting intense XFEL radiation as a probe. We monitored the ultrafast structural rearrangement of the solute with X-ray emission spectroscopy, thus establishing time zero for the ensuing X-ray diffuse scattering analysis. The simultaneously recorded X-ray diffuse scattering patterns reveal slower subpicosecond dynamics triggered by the intramolecular structural dynamics of the photoexcited solute. By simultaneous combination of both methods only, we can extract new information about the solvation dynamic processes unfolding during the first picosecond (ps). The measured bulk solvent density increase of 0.2% indicates a dramatic change of the solvation shell around each photoexcited solute, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with ∼1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us to directly observe the structure of the excited solute molecules well before the solvent contributions become dominant. PMID:26783685

  1. X-ray emission spectroscopy of bulk liquid water in "no-man's land"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellberg, Jonas A.; McQueen, Trevor A.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kennedy, Brian; Nordlund, Dennis; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schlesinger, Daniel; Tokushima, Takashi; Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Eckert, Sebastian; Segtnan, Vegard H.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Kubicek, Katharina; Techert, Simone; Bergmann, Uwe; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Schlotter, William F.; Harada, Yoshihisa; Bogan, Michael J.; Wernet, Philippe; Föhlisch, Alexander; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bulk liquid water was recently probed by x-ray scattering below the temperature limit of homogeneous nucleation (TH) of ˜232 K [J. A. Sellberg et al., Nature 510, 381-384 (2014)]. Here, we utilize a similar approach to study the structure of bulk liquid water below TH using oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Based on previous XES experiments [T. Tokushima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 460, 387-400 (2008)] at higher temperatures, we expected the ratio of the 1b1' and 1b1″ peaks associated with the lone-pair orbital in water to change strongly upon deep supercooling as the coordination of the hydrogen (H-) bonds becomes tetrahedral. In contrast, we observed only minor changes in the lone-pair spectral region, challenging an interpretation in terms of two interconverting species. A number of alternative hypotheses to explain the results are put forward and discussed. Although the spectra can be explained by various contributions from these hypotheses, we here emphasize the interpretation that the line shape of each component changes dramatically when approaching lower temperatures, where, in particular, the peak assigned to the proposed disordered component would become more symmetrical as vibrational interference becomes more important.

  2. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  3. Characterization of an atmospheric helium plasma jet by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; González, Manuel Á.; Leys, Christophe; Pei Lu, Xin

    2013-02-01

    The characteristics of plasma temperatures (gas temperature and electron excitation temperature) and electron density in a pulsed-dc excited atmospheric helium plasma jet are studied by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy (OES). High-resolution OES is performed for the helium and hydrogen lines for the determination of electron density through the Stark broadening mechanism. A superposition fitting method composed of two component profiles corresponding to two different electron densities is developed to fit the investigated lines. Electron densities of the orders of magnitude of 1021 and 1020 m-3 are characterized for the center and edge regions in the jet discharge when the applied voltage is higher than 13.0 kV. The atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of helium demonstrates that the discharge deviates from the Boltzmann-Saha equilibrium state, especially for the helium lower levels, which are significantly overpopulated. Local electron excitation temperatures T13 and Tspec corresponding to the lower and upper parts of the helium ASDF are defined and found to range from 1.2 eV to 1.4 eV and 0.2 eV to 0.3 eV, respectively. A comparative analysis shows that the Saha balance is valid in the discharge for helium atoms at high excited states.

  4. Laser Ablation Solid Sampling processes investigated usinginductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.L.; Ciocan, A.C.; Borisov, O.V.; Russo, R.E.

    1997-07-01

    The symbiotic relationship between laser ablation mechanismsand analytical performance using inductively coupled plasma-atomicemission spectroscopy are addressed in this work. For both cases, it isimportant to ensure that the ICP conditions (temperature and electronnumber density) are not effected by the ablated mass. By ensuring thatthe ICP conditions are constant, changes in spectral emission intensitywill be directly related to changes in laser ablation behavior. Mg ionicline to atomic line ratios and excitation temperature were measured tomonitor the ICP conditions during laser-ablation sample introduction. Thequantity of ablated mass depends on the laser pulse duration andwavelength. The quantity of mass removed per unit energy is larger whenablating with shorter laser wavelengths and pulses. Preferential ablationof constituents from a multicomponent sample was found to depend on thelaser beam properties (wavelength and pulse duration). Fornanosecond-pulsed lasers, thermal vaporization dominates the ablationprocess. For picosecond-pulsed lasers, a non-thermal mechanism appears todominate the ablation process. This work will describe the mass ablationbehavior during nanosecond and picosecond laser sampling into the ICP.The behavior of the ICP under mass loading conditions is firstestablished, followed by studies of the ablation behavior at variouspower densities. A thermal vaporization model is used to explainnanosecond ablation, and a possible non-thermal mechanism is proposed toexplain preferential ablation of Zn and Cu from brass samples duringpicosecond ablation.

  5. Emission spectroscopy of anharmonic vibrational series for micro-hollow cathode discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano F., A.; Juárez, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    The field of micro plasmas is currently very active, due to the useful properties and potential applications of micro-hollow cathode discharges.Our group is currently developing these discharge characterization techniques and, as a first obvious starting point, we are performing emission spectroscopy in normal discharges. The focus of this particular contribution is to present a study of vibrational eigenvalues of Morse potential for diatomic molecules. We performed the experimental measurements of these eigenvalues using a high resolution optical monochromator and a parallel plate nitrogen discharge in the glow regime. In particular we determined using this simple arrangement the ro-vibration transitions in N2, between the electronic states C3Πu -B1Πg . Moreover, we evaluated theoretically the anharmonic eigenvalues of these transitions using Wigner function for a Morse potential. Based on experimental measurements and making use of the calculated Franck-Condon factors it is possible to extract energy potential parameters of these energy states directly from measured transitions. In particular we have calculated the internuclear separation between the excited states associated with the vibrational transitions observed. This work was funded by the grant DGAPA-PAPIIT IT100613.

  6. Layer-Resolved Evolution of Organic Thin Films Monitored by Photoelectron Emission Microscopy and Optical Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and differential (optical) reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) have proven independently to be versatile analytical tools for monitoring the evolution of organic thin films during growth. In this paper, we present the first experiment in which both techniques have been applied simultaneously and synchronously. We illustrate how the combined PEEM and DRS results can be correlated to obtain an extended perspective on the electronic and optical properties of a molecular film dependent on the film thickness and morphology. As an example, we studied the deposition of the organic molecule α-sexithiophene on Ag(111) in the thickness range from submonolayers up to several monolayers. PMID:26523159

  7. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium batterymaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Augustsson, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  8. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  9. Synthesis, structure, and emission spectroscopy of luminescent Pt(COD)(dithiolate) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, J.M.; Zuleta, J.A.; Eisenberg, R.

    1993-08-18

    The synthesis, characterization, X-ray structure determination and emission spectroscopy of two Pt(COD)(S-S) complexes are reported where COD = 1,5-cycloctadiene (COD) and S-S is maleonitriledithiolate (mnt) for complex 1 and 1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-1-cyanoethylene-2,2-dithiolate (ecda) for complex 2. Both complexes are isolated in high yield from the reaction of Pt(COD)Cl{sub 2} and the corresponding dianionic dithiolate salt. Orange crystals of 1 (C{sub 12}H{sub 12}N{sub 2}PtS{sub 2}) are monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n (No. 14). Each complex possess a square planar structure with chelating diolefin and dithiolate ligands. Proton NMR spectroscopy shows that the solid-state structures are maintained in solution. The complexes are luminescent at low temperature in the solid state and in frozen glasses. In the solid state at 77 K, Pt(COD)(mnt) exhibits a highly structured emission ({lambda}{sub max} = 560 nm, 17.9 kcm{sup {minus}1}) with a vibronic progression of {approximately}1400 cm{sup {minus}1}, whereas for Pt(COD)(ecda), the emission is broad and featureless ({lambda}{sub max} = 525 nm, 19.0 kcm{sup {minus}1}). The emissive state for both complexes is assigned as a metal-to-dithiolate charge transfer with differences in the structure and energy of the emissions resulting from differences in the {pi}*{sub dithiolate} orbital of the mnt and ecda ligands.

  10. Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

  11. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  12. Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from outdoor-stored broiler litter using tunable-diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, William Harrison

    Handling and storage of a variety of types of agricultural wastes results in the formation and release of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) gases to the atmosphere. These gases contribute to climate change through the greenhouse effect. Few studies have examined evolution of these gases from stored poultry litter in North America. Although N 2O is a by-product of nitrification, it is largely produced as an intermediate product of denitrification and is produced most intensely when both aerobic and anaerobic conditions are present. CH4 emissions, however, are typically associated with anaerobic reactions. Outdoor storage of broiler litter provides an excellent media for which both aerobic and anaerobic zones can coexist, particularly when the litter is of varying ages from multiple broiler flocks (cycles). It provides a large amount of nitrogen for bacterial nitrification/denitrification processes as well as Carbon to support anaerobic bacterial fermentation. The objective of the study was to quantify N 2O and CH4 emissions for broiler litter stored in an uncovered, outdoor bunker by conducting small-scale dynamic flux chamber studies and full-scale field experiments. The field experiments used a modified micrometeorological mass balance approach to monitor emissions from stored broiler litter in a three-walled concrete bunker. Atmospheric concentrations of N2O and CH4 were measured using tunable-diode laser spectroscopy. Field experiments over the course of approximately four months yielded average emission rates of 14+/-17mug m-2 s -1 and 84+/-61 mug m-2 s-1 for N2O and CH4 respectively that agreed well with the trends of emission rates observed in the dynamic flux chamber experiments. The primary drivers of emissions of both CH4 and N2O appeared to be temperature and moisture content while organic carbon and organic nitrogen (loss on ignition, nitrate concentrations) contents were also important factors.

  13. Metal nanofilms studied with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahsold, Gerhard; Priebe, Andreas; Pucci, Annemarie; Otto, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    Metal films with thickness in the nanometer range are optically transparent. In the IR range their transmittance may show both the Drude-type behaviour of coalesced islands and the tail of the plasmon absorption of single islands. Therefore, IR transmittance spectroscopy is a sensitive tool for in-situ studies of metal-film growth on insulating substrates and of the film conductivity. With IR transmittance spectroscopy the in-plane film conductivity and its correlation to the film-growth process can be determined without electrical contacts. Adsorbate induced changes can be observed well. Their analysis may give insight into the adsorbate-metal bonding. Depending on the film's roughness the IR lines of adsorbate-vibration modes may be strongly modified because of their interaction with electronic excitations of the film. The atomic roughness of cold-condensed metal films produces additional IR activity: strong IR activity of Raman lines of centrosymmetric adsorbate molecules is observed in those cases where the adsorbate has states close to the Fermi level.

  14. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  15. Excitation–emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation–emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann–Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 – 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  16. Excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann-Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 - 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  17. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) investigations of gastrointestinal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts.; Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Penkov, N.; Keremedchiev, M.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this report we will present our recent investigations of the fluorescence properties of lower part gastrointestinal tissues using excitation-emission matrix and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy measurement modalities. The spectral peculiarities observed will be discussed and the endogenous sources of the fluorescence signal will be addressed. For these fluorescence spectroscopy measurements the FluoroLog 3 system (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) was used. It consists of a Xe lamp (300 W, 200-650 nm), a double mono-chromators, and a PMT detector with a work region at 220- 850 nm. Autofluorescence signals were detected in the form of excitation-emission matrices for the samples of normal mucosa, dysphasia and colon carcinoma and specific spectral features for each tissue were found. Autofluorescence signals from the same samples are observed through synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, which is a novel promising modality for fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of bio-samples. It is one of the most powerful techniques for multicomponent analysis, because of its sensitivity. In the SFS regime, the fluorescence signal is recorded while both excitation λexc and emission wavelengths λem are simultaneously scanned. A constant wavelength interval is maintained between the λexc and λem wavelengths throughout the spectrum. The resulted fluorescence spectrum shows narrower peak widths, in comparison with EEMs, which are easier for identification and minimizes the chance for false determinations or pretermission of specific spectral feature. This modality is also faster, than EEMs, a much smaller number of data points are required.1 In our measurements we use constant wavelength interval Δλ in the region of 10-200 nm. Measurements are carried out in the terms of finding Δλ, which results in a spectrum with most specific spectral features for comparison with spectral characteristics observed in EEMs. Implementing synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy in optical

  18. Experimental detection of iron overload in liver through neutron stimulated emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, A J; Tourassi, G D; Sharma, A C; Crowell, A S; Kiser, M R; Howell, C R

    2008-05-21

    Iron overload disorders have been the focus of several quantification studies involving non-invasive imaging modalities. Neutron spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated great potential in detecting iron concentrations within biological tissue. We are developing a neutron spectroscopic technique called neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT), which has the potential to diagnose iron overload in the liver at clinically acceptable patient dose levels through a non-invasive scan. The technique uses inelastic scatter interactions between atomic nuclei in the sample and incoming fast neutrons to non-invasively determine the concentration of elements in the sample. This paper discusses a non-tomographic application of NSECT investigating the feasibility of detecting elevated iron concentrations in the liver. A model of iron overload in the human body was created using bovine liver tissue housed inside a human torso phantom and was scanned with a 5 MeV pulsed beam using single-position spectroscopy. Spectra were reconstructed and analyzed with algorithms designed specifically for NSECT. Results from spectroscopic quantification indicate that NSECT can currently detect liver iron concentrations of 6 mg g(-1) or higher and has the potential to detect lower concentrations by optimizing the acquisition geometry to scan a larger volume of tissue. The experiment described in this paper has two important outcomes: (i) it demonstrates that NSECT has the potential to detect clinically relevant concentrations of iron in the human body through a non-invasive scan and (ii) it provides a comparative standard to guide the design of iron overload phantoms for future NSECT liver iron quantification studies.

  19. Quantitative Determination of Dielectric Thin-Film Properties Using Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.E.; Haaland, D.M.; Niemczyk, T.M.; Zhang, S.

    1998-10-14

    We have completed an experimental study to investigate the use of infrared emission spectroscopy (IRES) for the quantitative analysis of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) thin films on silicon monitor wafers. Experimental parameters investigated included temperatures within the range used in the microelectronics industry to produce these films; hence the potential for using the IRES technique for real-time monitoring of the film deposition process has been evaluated. The film properties that were investigated included boron content, phosphorus content, film thickness, and film temperature. The studies were conducted over two temperature ranges, 125 to 225 *C and 300 to 400 *C. The later temperature range includes realistic processing temperatures for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of the BPSG films. Partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration methods were applied to spectral and film property calibration data. The cross-validated standard errors of prediction (CVSEP) fi-om the PLS analysis of the IRES spectraof21 calibration samples each measured at 6 temperatures in the 300 to 400 "C range were found to be 0.09 wt. `?40 for B, 0.08 wt. `%0 for P, 3.6 ~m for film thickness, and 1.9 *C for temperature. By lowering the spectral resolution fi-om 4 to 32 cm-l and decreasing the number of spectral scans fi-om 128 to 1, we were able to determine that all the film properties could be measured in less than one second to the precision required for the manufacture and quality control of integrated circuits. Thus, real-time in-situ monitoring of BPSG thin films formed by CVD deposition on Si monitor wafers is possible with the methods reported here.

  20. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment.

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Cone, Michael T.; Hokr, Brett H.; Mason, John D.; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-01-01

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  2. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  3. Applying light-emitting diodes with narrowband emission features in differential spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sihler, Holger; Kern, Christoph; Pöhler, Denis; Platt, Ulrich

    2009-12-01

    LEDs are a promising new type of light source for differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Varying differential structures in the emission spectrum of LEDs, however, display a potentially severe problem. We show that the structures, which originate from a Fabry-Pérot etalon, may be removed by tilting the emitter, which at the same time increases the radiant flux coupled into the subsequent optical system. The results of long-path DOAS measurements, where we apply our method on a blue LED for the suppression of periodic structures, are also presented. PMID:19953172

  4. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; MacGearailt, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Turner, Miles M.; Cullen, P. J.

    2013-04-28

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  5. [Study on terahertz spectroscopy of Hotan jade].

    PubMed

    Maimaitiming; Ainiwaer; Xiong, Wei; Guo, Xue-jiao; Shen, Jing-ling

    2010-10-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) technique has a wide range of applications including illicit drugs and explosive detection, and organic molecules recognition. In the present paper, the spectral features of three kinds of Hotan jade were studied experimentally by THz-TDS technique and the characteristic absorption spectra and refractive index were obtained in the range of 0.2 to 2.6 THz. The experimental results show that different samples have different absorption characters, and the refractive index is 2.4-2.7 in the range of 0.2-2.6 THz. The results indicate that it is feasible to apply THz-TDS technique to identification of Hotan jade, which provides a new approach to the nondestructive examination of Hotan jade.

  6. Corrosion Study Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion is a common phenomenon. It is the destructive result of chemical reaction between a metal or metal alloy and its environment. Stainless steel tubing is used at Kennedy Space Center for various supply lines which service the orbiter. The launch pads are also made of stainless steel. The environment at the launch site has very high chloride content due to the proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Also, during a launch, the exhaust products in the solid rocket boosters include concentrated hydrogen chloride. The purpose of this project was to study various alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in corrosive environments similar to the launch sites. This report includes data and analysis of the measurements for 304L, 254SMO and AL-6XN in primarily neutral 3.55% NaCl. One set of data for 304L in neutral 3.55%NaCl + 0.1N HCl is also included.

  7. Physical Properties of Emission-Line Galaxies at 2 from Near-Infrared Spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel C.; McCarthy, P. J.; Malkan, M. A.; Siana, B. D.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Atek, H.; Henry, A. L.; WISP Team

    2014-01-01

    We present results from near-infrared spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE of 26 strong emission-line galaxies at 2.2 and 1.5. The sample was selected from the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) survey, which uses the near-infrared grism capability of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect emission-line galaxies over 0.5 < z < 2.3. High-resolution ( 5000) follow-up spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE over 1.0--2.5 microns resolves important rest-frame optical emission lines, allowing us to measure physical properties such as dust obscuration, metal abundance, star formation rate, ionization parameter, and emission line kinematics. We also analyze the properties of composite spectra derived from the FIRE-observed sample. With this relatively large sample of rest-frame optical spectra we can make statistical inferences about the population of emission-line galaxies at 2. We find that the galaxies are low metallicity ( 1/5-1/2 Z_solar) as determined from the R23 calibration. The galaxies are low dust extinction on average (E(B-V 0.2) but with significant scatter. The dust-corrected H-alpha star formation rates range from ~10--150 M_sun yr^-1 with a mean of 50 M_su yr^-1. The average ionization parameter for the sample, log U ~ -2.5, is higher than typically found for star-forming galaxies in the local universe but consistent with those found in more intense starbursting regions in galaxies such as M82. Emission line velocity dispersions are measured to be 71 +- 38 km s^-1, in good agreement with other studies that have probed the H-alpha kinematics of star-forming galaxies at similar redshift. The galaxies are compact, with half-light radii of < 2 kpc, and ~50% show evidence for multiple structures or asymmetries in the WFC3 imaging. Based on the line velocity dispersions and the location of the galaxies on BPT diagnostic plots, there is little evidence for significant AGN contribution to most emission-line galaxies at 2.

  8. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  9. Real-time tissue differentiation based on optical emission spectroscopy for guided electrosurgical tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Spether, Dominik; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Neugebauer, Alexander; Nüßle, Daniela; Fischer, Klaus; Zappe, Hans; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Seifert, Andreas; Enderle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Complete surgical removal of cancer tissue with effective preservation of healthy tissue is one of the most important challenges in modern oncology. We present a method for real-time, in situ differentiation of tissue based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) performed during electrosurgery not requiring any biomarkers, additional light sources or other excitation processes. The analysis of the optical emission spectra, enables the differentiation of healthy and tumorous tissue. By using multi-class support vector machine (SVM) algorithms, distinguishing between tumor types also seems to be possible. Due to its fast reaction time (0.05s) the method can be used for real-time navigation helping the surgeon achieve complete resection. The system’s easy realization has been proven by successful integration in a commercial electro surgical unit (ESU). In a first step the method was verified by using ex vivo tissue samples. The histological analysis confirmed, 95% of correctly classified tissue types. PMID:25909025

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  11. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster). PMID:26647056

  12. Optical Emission Spectroscopy for CO2 Dissociation using a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (VADER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindon, Michael; Scime, Earl; Gallagher, Michael; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Bergen, Mike; Berry, Dave

    2010-11-01

    VADER (the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric barrier discharge ExpeRiment) operates at atmospheric pressure and employs high voltage pulses across a quartz dielectric spanning an anode-cathode pair to create a high density, non-thermal, cool plasma in a variety of gasses. In CO2 plasmas, energetic electrons from the tail of the non-thermal electron distribution excite CO2 molecular states and provide a pathway for CO2 dissociation that requires less energy per molecule than conventional thermal dissociation processes. CO2 dissociation by-products can then be used as feedstock gasses for chemical synthesis. Here we have used optical emission spectroscopy in the reaction zone of VADER to monitor the density of reaction products and optimize the dissociation process. The optical emission measurements are correlated with real-time residual gas analyzer (RGA) measurements of the discharge exhaust gas.

  13. Single and double core-hole ion emission spectroscopy of transient neon plasmas produced by ultraintense x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Single core-hole (SCH) and double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon gas in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the laser-produced highly transient plasmas. The plasma density effects on level populations are demonstrated with an x-ray photon energy of 2000 eV. For laser photon energy in the range of 937 - 1360 eV, resonant absorptions (RA) of 1s-np (n> = 2) transitions play important roles in time evolution of the population and DCH emission spectroscopy. For x-ray photon energy larger than 1360 eV, no RA exist and transient plasmas show different features in the DCH spectroscopy.

  14. Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy for properties measurements of delaminating thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Fengling; Bennett, Ted D.

    2005-11-15

    Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy is developed for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coating (TBC) in the presence of thermal contact resistance between the coating and the substrate. In this method, a TBC sample is heated using a periodically modulated laser and the thermal emission from the coating is collected using an infrared detector. The phase difference between the heating signal and the emission signal is measured experimentally. A mathematical model is developed to predict the phase difference between the laser and the measured emission, which considers the coating properties and the thermal contact resistance of the interface. An electron-beam physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coating with local regions delaminated by laser shock is characterized using this technique. The measurements are made on two regions of the coating, one where good thermal contact between the coating and substrate exists and the other where the interface has been damaged by laser shock. The results for the thermal properties and thermal contact resistance of the interface are presented and compared.

  15. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Cagri; Tegin, Cuneyt; O'Connor, Lauren; Du, Fei; Ahat, Ezgi; Cohen, Bruce M; Ongur, Dost

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P MRS) allows in vivo quantification of phosphorus metabolites that are considered to be related to membrane turnover and energy metabolism. In schizophrenia (SZ), (31)P MRS studies found several abnormalities in different brain regions suggesting that alterations in these pathways may be contributing to the pathophysiology. In this paper, we systematically reviewed the (31)P MRS studies in SZ published to date by taking patient characteristics, medication status and brain regions into account. Publications written in English were searched on http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/, by using the keywords 'phosphomonoester', 'phosphodiester', 'ATP', 'phosphocreatine', 'phosphocholine', 'phosphoethanolamine','glycerophosphocholine', 'glycerophosphoethanolamine', 'pH', 'schizophrenia', and 'MRS'. Studies that measured (31)P metabolites in SZ patients were included. This search identified 52 studies. Reduced PME and elevated PDE reported in earlier studies were not replicated in several subsequent studies. One relatively consistent pattern was a decrease in PDE in chronic patients in the subcortical structures. There were no consistent patterns for the comparison of energy related phosphorus metabolites between patients and controls. Also, no consistent pattern emerged in studies seeking relationship between (31)P metabolites and antipsychotic use and other clinical variables. Despite emerging patterns, methodological heterogeneities and shortcomings in this literature likely obscure consistent patterns among studies. We conclude with recommendations to improve study designs and (31)P MRS methods in future studies. We also stress the significance of probing into the dynamic changes in energy metabolism, as this approach reveals abnormalities that are not visible to steady-state measurements. PMID:26228415

  16. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: initial test with elemental Hg.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p (3)P(0) in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10(9) (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10(6) (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p (3)P(0) is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10(12) (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min(-1); the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the

  17. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji

    2012-09-15

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements

  18. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    PubMed

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control. PMID:27041327

  19. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy offers unique chemical bonding insights: revisiting the electronic structure of ferrocene.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Kyle M; Finkelstein, Kenneth D; DeBeer, Serena

    2011-07-18

    Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is emerging as a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding. Analyses of the Kβ XES of ferrocene (Fc) and ferrocenium (Fc(+)) are presented as further demonstrations of the capabilities of the technique. Assignments of the valence to core (V2C) region of these spectra as electric dipole-allowed cyclopentadienyl (Cp) → Fe 1s transitions demonstrate that XES affords electronic structural insight into the energetics of ligand-based molecular orbitals (MOs). Combined with K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we show that XES can provide analogous information to photoemission spectroscopy (PES). Density functional theory (DFT) analyses reveal that the V2C transitions in Fc/Fc(+) derive their intensity from Fe 4p admixture (on the order of 5-10%) into the Cp-based MOs from which they originate. These 4p admixtures confer bonding character to the Cp-based a(2u) and e(1u) MOs to at least the extent of backbonding contributions to frontier MOs from higher-lying Cp π* MOs.

  20. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  1. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies of X-bridged diiron phthalocyanine complexes (FePc)2X (X = C, N, O) combined with DFT study of (FePc)2X and their high-valent diiron oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Colomban, Cedric; Kudrik, Evgenij V; Briois, Valerie; Shwarbrick, Janine C; Sorokin, Alexander B; Afanasiev, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    μ-Nitrido diiron phthalocyanine [PcFe(+3.5)NFe(+3.5)Pc](0) is an efficient catalyst, able to catalyze the oxidation of methane under near-ambient conditions. In this work, we compared the properties of structurally similar μ-carbido (1), μ-nitrido (2), and μ-oxo (3) dimers of iron phthalocyanine. The goal was to discern the structural and electronic differences between these complexes and to propose a rationale for the exceptional activity of 2. Extended X-ray fine-structure spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering were applied to study the geometry and electronic structure of iron species in the series 1-3. The data provided by core hole spectroscopies were compared to the results of DFT calculations and found to coherently describe the structural and electronic properties of 1-3 as having equivalent iron centers with formal iron oxidation degrees of 3, 3.5, and 4 for the μ-oxo, μ-nitrido, and μ-carbido dimers, respectively. However, the bond length to the bringing atom changed in an unexpected sequence Fe-O > Fe-N < Fe-C, indicating redox non-innocence of the brigding μ-carbido ligand in 1. According to the X-ray emission spectroscopy, the μ-nitrido dimer 2 is a low-spin compound, with the highest covalency in the series 1-3. The DFT-calculated geometry and electronic structures as well as core hole spectra of hypothetical high-valent oxo complexes of 1-3 were compared, in order to explain the particular catalytic activity of 2 and to estimate the prospects of spectroscopic observation of such species. It appears that the terminal Fe═O bond is the longest in the oxo complex of 2, due to the strong trans-effect of the nitrido ligand. The corresponding LUMO of the μ-nitrido diiron oxo complex has the lowest energy among the three oxo complexes. Therefore, the oxo complex of 2 is expected to have the highest oxidative power. PMID:25338225

  2. Laser Induced Emission Spectroscopy of Cold and Isolated Neutral PAHs and PANH: Implications for the red rectangle emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Blue luminescence (BL) in the emission spectra of the red rectangle centered on the bright star HD44179 is recently reported by Vijh et al [1]. This results is consistent with the broad band polarization measurements obtained in 1980 by Schmidt et al. Both experimental and theoretical studies support that BL emission could be attributed the luminescence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) excited with ultraviolet light from the center of the star [4 and reference therein]. The abundance on N to C in the interstellar medium suggest also that nitrogen substituted PAH (PANH) are likely abundant in the interstellar medium [3]. They exhibit similar features as PAHs and could contribute to the unidentified spectral bands. Comparing the BL to laboratory spectra obtained on similar environment is crucial for the identification of interstellar molecules. We present in this works the absorption and the laser induced emission spectra of several isolated and cold PAHs and PANHs. Laser induced emission was performed first to PAHs and PANHs isolated in Argon matrix at 10 K. Then, measurements are performed with the supersonic jet technique of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames. We focus, here, on the emission spectra (fluorescence and (or) phosphorescence) of these molecules and we discuss their contributions to the blue luminescence emission in the Red Rectangle nebula.[1] Vijh,U.P., Witt. A.N. & Gordon,K.D, APJ, 606, L69 (2004)[2] Schmidt, G. D., Cohen, M. & Margon, B., ApJ, 239L.133S (1980)[3] Spitzer, L., Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium (New York Wiley-Interscience) (1978)[4] Salama, F., Galazutdinov, G. A., Kre lowski, J., Allamandola, L. J., & Musaev, F. A. ApJ, 526,(1999)

  3. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  4. Study of infrared emission spectroscopy for the B1Δg-A1Πu and B'1Σg+-A1Πu systems of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Bernath, Peter F.; Tang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen bands for the B1Δg-A1Πu system and eleven bands for the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system of C2 were identified in the Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of hydrocarbon discharges. The B'1Σg+ v = 4 and the B1Δg v = 6, 7, and 8 vibrational levels involved in nine bands were studied for the first time. A direct global analysis with Dunham parameters was carried out satisfactorily for the B1Δg-A1Πu system except for a small perturbation in the B1Δg v = 6 level. The calculated rovibrational term energies up to B1Δg v = 12 showed that the level crossing between the B1Δg and d3Πg states is responsible for many of the prominent perturbations in the Swan system observed previously. Nineteen forbidden transitions of the B1Δg-a3Πu transition were identified and the off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction constant AdB between d3Πg and B1Δg was derived as 8.3(1) cm-1. For the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system, only individual band analyses for each vibrational level in the B'1Σg+ state could be done satisfactorily and Dunham parameters obtained from these effective parameters showed that the anharmonic vibrational constant ωexe is anomalously small (nearly zero). Inspection of the RKR (Rydberg-Klein-Rees) potential curves for the B'1Σg+ and X1Σg+ states revealed that an avoided crossing or nearly avoided crossing may occur around 30 000 cm-1, which is responsible for the anomalous molecular constants in these two states.

  5. Study of infrared emission spectroscopy for the B(1)Δg-A(1)Πu and B'(1)Σg(+)-A(1)Πu systems of C2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Bernath, Peter F; Tang, Jian

    2016-02-14

    Thirteen bands for the B(1)Δg-A(1)Πu system and eleven bands for the B'(1)Σg(+)-A(1)Πu system of C2 were identified in the Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of hydrocarbon discharges. The B'(1)Σg(+)v = 4 and the B(1)Δg v = 6, 7, and 8 vibrational levels involved in nine bands were studied for the first time. A direct global analysis with Dunham parameters was carried out satisfactorily for the B(1)Δg-A(1)Πu system except for a small perturbation in the B(1)Δg v = 6 level. The calculated rovibrational term energies up to B(1)Δg v = 12 showed that the level crossing between the B(1)Δg and d(3)Πg states is responsible for many of the prominent perturbations in the Swan system observed previously. Nineteen forbidden transitions of the B(1)Δg-a(3)Πu transition were identified and the off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction constant AdB between d(3)Πg and B(1)Δg was derived as 8.3(1) cm(-1). For the B'(1)Σg(+)-A(1)Πu system, only individual band analyses for each vibrational level in the B'(1)Σg(+) state could be done satisfactorily and Dunham parameters obtained from these effective parameters showed that the anharmonic vibrational constant ωexe is anomalously small (nearly zero). Inspection of the RKR (Rydberg-Klein-Rees) potential curves for the B'(1)Σg(+) and X(1)Σg(+) states revealed that an avoided crossing or nearly avoided crossing may occur around 30,000 cm(-1), which is responsible for the anomalous molecular constants in these two states. PMID:26874482

  6. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  7. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  8. Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordgren, J.; Bray, G.; Cramm, S.; Nyholm, R.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Wassdahl, N.

    1989-07-01

    Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy is a common tool for the study of the electronic structure of molecules and solids. However, the interpretation of spectra is sometimes made difficult by overlaying lines due to satellite transitions or close-lying core holes. Also, irrelevant inner core transitions may accidentally fall in the wavelength region under study. These problems, which often arise for spectra excited with electrons or broadband photon sources can be removed by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. In addition, one achieves other advantages as well, such as the ability to study resonant behavior. Another important aspect is the softness of this excitation agent, which allows chemically fragile compounds to be investigated. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of using monochromatized synchrotron radiation to excite soft x-ray spectra. We also show new results which have been accomplished as a result of the selectivity of the excitation. The work has been carried out using the Flipper I wiggler beamline at HASYLAB in Hamburg using a new grazing incidence instrument designed specifically for this experiment. The photon flux at the Flipper I station (typically 5×1012 photons per second on the sample with a 1% bandpass) is enough to allow soft x-ray fluorescence spectra to be recorded at relatively high resolution and within reasonable accumulation times (typically, the spectra presented in this work were recorded in 30 min). The spectrometer is based on a new concept which allows the instrument to be quite small, still covering a large wavelength range (10-250 Å). The basic idea involves the use of several fixed mounted gratings and a large two-dimensional detector. The grating arrangement provides simple mounting within a limited space and, in particular, large spectral range. The detector can be moved in a three-axis coordinate system in order to cover the different Rowland curves defined by the different gratings. The arrangement permits

  9. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  10. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  11. Alpha Coincidence Spectroscopy studied with GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-11-02

    Abstract The high-energy side of peaks in alpha spectra, e.g. 241Am, as measured with a silicon detector has structure caused mainly by alpha-conversion electron and to some extent alphagamma coincidences. We compare GEANT4 simulation results to 241Am alpha spectroscopy measurements with a passivated implanted planar silicon detector. A large discrepancy between the measurements and simulations suggest that the GEANT4 photon evaporation database for 237Np (daughter of 241Am decay) does not accurately describe the conversion electron spectrum and therefore was found to have large discrepancies with experimental measurements. We describe how to improve the agreement between GEANT4 and alpha spectroscopy for actinides of interest by including experimental measurements of conversion electron spectroscopy into the photon evaporation database.

  12. Out On The Ice (OOTI): Studies of Bromine Monoxide (BrO) and ozone (O3) in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic Marine Boundary Layer by Multiple Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAXDOAS): Local Emissions or Transport Processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netcheva, S.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Staebler, R. M.; Steffen, A.

    2009-12-01

    BrO is an important tropospheric trace gas species in the marine boundary layer with potentially harmful effects on the polar environment. It changes the atmospheric oxidizing capacity by altering normally O3 dominating oxidation pathways via a series of autocatalytic heterogeneous O3 destroying reactions. There have been many reports of elevated BrO concentrations in the Polar atmospheric boundary layer by ground based and satellite DOAS measurements since the first positive identification by Hausmann and Platt in 1994 at Alert, Canada. Satellite acquired data revealed that enhanced tropospheric BrO concentrations in the spring are a widespread, reoccurring phenomena in the polar regions, and that they are possibly linked to the spatial distribution of first year sea ice. While the main source of bromine in the marine boundary layer is clearly sea salt, the processes of migration from the ocean surface to the air, and mechanisms of activation, are not fully understood. Conceivably these processes operate on a much smaller spatial scale than satellite measurements suggest In a study under the OASIS-Canada program funded by the Canadian Federal Program Office for the International Polar Year, ground based measurements of BrO and O3 over the ice of the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay, were compared with concurrent BrO satellite measurements, ice conditions, back trajectory and meteorological surface analyses to identify BrO source regions and to estimate the influence of transport on the evolution of enhanced BrO events. Conducting measurements directly on ice surfaces enabled us to improve the understanding of the chemistry involved because we could directly target reactive halogen emission and try to assess the role of various ocean surfaces during halogen activation and propagation. Some of the recorded events were characterised by fast decreases of O3 during the night, which clearly indicates transport rather than local chemistry. Other events required more

  13. Electronic Structure of the ID Conductor K0.3MoO3 studied using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Learmonth, T.; Glans, P.-A.; McGuinness, C.; Plucinski, L.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, J.-H.; Greenblatt, M.; Smith, K.E.

    2008-09-24

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one dimensional conductor K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured using high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data is compared to that from the related two dimensional insulator {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. Scattering features are observed from both oxides that are explained in terms of the band momentum selectivity of the scattering process, allowing a comparison of the scattering data to recent band structure calculations.

  14. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  15. Gas recognition using a neural network approach to plasma optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Mark; Mariotti, Davide; Dubitzky, Werner; McLaughlin, James A.; Maguire, Paul

    2000-10-01

    A system has been developed which enables the detection and recognition of various gases. Plasma emission spectroscopy has been used to record spectra from volatile species of acetone, vinegar, and coffee beans, along with air and nitrogen spectra. The spectra have been uniquely processed and fed into an artificial neural network program for training and recognition of unknown gases. The system as a whole can be grouped into the emerging and diverse area of artificial nose technology. The sy stem has shown to provide a solution to the recognition of simple gases and odours (air, nitrogen, acetone) and could also satisfactorily recognise more complex samples (vinegar and coffee beans). Recognition is performed in seconds; this being a positive aspect for many artificial nose applications.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  17. Analysis of edge density fluctuation measured by trial KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovacsik, A.

    2012-10-15

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system based on direct imaging avalanche photodiode (APD) camera has been designed for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) and a trial system has been constructed and installed for evaluating feasibility of the design. The system contains two cameras, one is an APD camera for BES measurement and another is a fast visible camera for position calibration. Two pneumatically actuated mirrors were positioned at front and rear of lens optics. The front mirror can switch the measurement between edge and core region of plasma and the rear mirror can switch between the APD and the visible camera. All systems worked properly and the measured photon flux was reasonable as expected from the simulation. While the measurement data from the trial system were limited, it revealed some interesting characteristics of KSTAR plasma suggesting future research works with fully installed BES system. The analysis result and the development plan will be presented in this paper.

  18. Multielement analysis of geologic materials by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, O.D.; Kroneman, R.L.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    Atomic emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source permits the rapid acquisition of multielement geochemical data from a wide variety of geologic materials. Rocks or other solid samples are taken into solution with a four acid digestion procedure and introduced directly into the plasma; fluid samples are acidified or analyzed directly. The entire process is computer-controlled, fully-automated, and requires less than five minutes per sample for quantitative determination of 37 elements. The procedures and instrumentation employed at the ESL for multielement ICP analysis of geologic materials are described and these are intended as a guide for evaluating analytic results reported from this laboratory. The quality of geochemical data can be characterized by precision, limits of quantitative determination, and accuracy. Precision values are a measure of the repeatability of analyses. In general, major element and analyses have precision of better than 5% and trace elements of better than 10% of the amount present. (MHR)

  19. Measurement of the stratospheric hydrogen peroxide concentration profile using far infrared thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Jucks, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The first unequivocal measurement of hydrogen peroxide in the stratosphere have been made, a concentration profile obtained from a balloon platform using Fourier transform thermal emission spectroscopy in the far infrared. Measurements were made using the 112/cm R-Q5 branch of the rotational-torsional spectrum, with some confirmation from the 94/cm R-Q4 branch. The volume mixing ratio of H2O2 is 1.6 x 10 to the -10th at 38.4 km, decreasing to 0.6 x 10 to the -10th at 23.8 km, with uncertainties of about 16 percent. These measurements are compared to a recent stratospheric model calculation.

  20. A novel von Hamos spectrometer for efficient X-ray emission spectroscopy in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anklamm, Lars Schlesiger, Christopher; Malzer, Wolfgang; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Kanngießer, Birgit

    2014-05-15

    We present a novel, highly efficient von Hamos spectrometer for X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) in the laboratory using highly annealed pyrolitic graphite crystals as the dispersive element. The spectrometer covers an energy range from 2.5 keV to 15 keV giving access to chemical speciation and information about the electronic configuration of 3d transition metals by means of the Kβ multiplet. XES spectra of Ti compounds are presented to demonstrate the speciation capabilities of the instrument. A spectral resolving power of E/ΔE = 2000 at 8 keV was achieved. Typical acquisition times range from 10 min for bulk material to hours for thin samples below 1 μm.

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-01

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Guszejnov, D; Pokol, G I; Pusztai, I; Refy, D; Zoletnik, S; Lampert, M; Nam, Y U

    2012-11-01

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  3. Angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy signature of the resonant excitonic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, X.; Kloss, T.; Pépin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) signature of the resonant excitonic state (RES) that was proposed as the pseudo-gap state of cuprate superconductors (Kloss T. et al., arXiv:1510.03038 (2015)). This new state can be described as a set of excitonic (particle-hole) patches with an internal checkerboard modulation. Here, we modelize the RES as a charge order with 2\\textbf{p}F wave vectors, where 2\\textbf{p}F is the ordering vector connecting two opposite sides of the Fermi surface. We calculate the spectral weight and the density of states in the RES and we find that our model correctly reproduces the opening of the PG in Bi-2201.

  4. Measurement of lanthanum and technetium in uranium fuels by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, K.; Crane, P.; Cummings, D.; Krsul, J.; McKnight, R.

    1999-06-10

    An important parameter in characterizing an irradiated nuclear fuel is determining the amount of uranium fissioned. By determining the amount of uranium fissioned in the fuel a burnup performance parameter can be calculated, and the amount of fission products left in the fuel can be predicted. The quantity of uranium fissioned can be calculated from the amount of lanthanum and technetium present in the fuel. Lanthanum and technetium were measured in irradiated fuel samples using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) instrument and separation equipment located in a shielded glove-box. A discussion of the method, interferences, detection limits, quality control and a comparison to other work will be presented.

  5. Temperature Effect on the Optical Emission Intensity in Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Super Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbani, S. M. R.; Ghezelbash, M.; Majd, A. E.; Soltanolkotabi, M.; Saghafifar, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of heating and cooling samples on the optical emission spectra and plasma parameters of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for Titanium 64, Inconel 718 super alloys, and Aluminum 6061 alloy is investigated. Samples are uniformly heated up to approximately 200°C and cooled down to -78°C by an external heater and liquid nitrogen, respectively. Variations of plasma parameters like electron temperature and electron density with sample temperature are determined by using Boltzmann plot and Stark broadening methods, respectively. Heating the samples improves LIBS signal strength and broadens the width of the spectrum. On the other hand, cooling alloys causes fluctuations in the LIBS signal and decrease it to some extent, and some of the spectral peaks diminish. In addition, our results show that electron temperature and electron density depend on the sample temperature variations.

  6. Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy and its Unique Application to Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1970's the infrared heterodyne technique has evolved into a powerful tool for the study of molecular constituents, temperatures, and dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Its extremely high spectral resolution (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda/>10(exp 6)) and highly accurate frequency measurement (to 1 part in 10(exp 8)) enabled the detection of nonthermal/natural lasing phenomena on Mars and Venus; direct measurements of winds on Venus, Mars, and Titan; study of mid-infrared aurorae on Jupiter; direct measurement of species abundances on Mars (ozone, isotopic CO2), hydrocarbons on Jupiter, Saturn., Neptune, and Titan, and stratospheric composition in the Earth's stratosphere (O3, CIO, N2O, CO2 ....). Fully resolved emission and absorption line shapes measured by this method enabled the unambiguous retrieval of molecular abundances and local temperatures and thermal structure in regions not probed by other techniques. The mesosphere of Mars and thermosphere of Venus are uniquely probed by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy. Results of these studies tested and constrained photochemical and dynamical theoretical models describing the phenomena measured. The infrared heterodyne technique will be described. Highlights in its evolution to today's instrumentation and resultant discoveries will be presented, including work at Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Koln. Resultant work will include studies supporting NASA and ESA space missions and collaborations between instrumental and theoretical groups.

  7. Diagnostics of a see-through hollow cathode discharge by emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nicholas

    Atomic line filters have been suggested to be attractive in areas of Doppler velocimetry, resonance fluorescence detection, and resonance ionization detection. They are based on the resonant absorption of photons by an atomic vapor, and allow all other radiation to pass. This allows the detection of very low levels of light superimposed on a large optical background. Several elements have been studied for use as atomic line filters, such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, and thallium. As previously recognized, thallium is especially attractive since the 535.046 nm metastable transition overlaps with the second harmonic output of an Nd:La2Be2O 5 (BEL) laser (1070 nm). This makes thallium ideal for certain applications as an atomic line filter. Recently a see-through hollow cathode lamp, or galvatron (Hamamatsu), was made commercially available. The galvatron geometry is unique compared to traditional hollow cathode lamps since the cathode and cell are oriented in a T-shape, with the cathode bored completely through to allow the propagation of a light source through the cathode. This allows multi-step excitation of the atomic vapor, not easily accomplished with a traditional hollow cathode lamp. The advantages that a galvatron offers over conventional atomic reservoirs make it an attractive candidate for the application as an atomic line filter; however, little spectroscopic data have been found in the literature. For this reason, Doppler temperatures, number densities, quantum efficiencies, and lifetimes have been determined in order to characterize this atomic reservoir as a potential atomic line filter. These parameters are determined by use of various spectroscopic techniques which include emission, absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and time-resolved laser-induced saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. From these measurements, it has been demonstrated that a galvatron is an attractive atomic reservoir for applications as an atomic line filter. The

  8. SPATIALLY RESOLVED HST GRISM SPECTROSCOPY OF A LENSED EMISSION LINE GALAXY AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Brenda L.; Hurley, Mairead; Bowen, David V.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Sharon, Keren; Straughn, Amber; Coe, Dan; Broadhurst, Tom; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-20

    We take advantage of gravitational lensing amplification by A1689 (z 0.187) to undertake the first space-based census of emission line galaxies (ELGs) in the field of a massive lensing cluster. Forty-three ELGs are identified to a flux of i{sub 775} = 27.3 via slitless grism spectroscopy. One ELG (at z = 0.7895) is very bright owing to lensing magnification by a factor of Almost-Equal-To 4.5. Several Balmer emission lines (ELs) detected from ground-based follow-up spectroscopy signal the onset of a major starburst for this low-mass galaxy (M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) with a high specific star formation rate ( Almost-Equal-To 20 Gyr{sup -1}). From the blue ELs we measure a gas-phase oxygen abundance consistent with solar (12+log(O/H) = 8.8 {+-} 0.2). We break the continuous line-emitting region of this giant arc into seven {approx}1 kpc bins (intrinsic size) and measure a variety of metallicity-dependent line ratios. A weak trend of increasing metal fraction is seen toward the dynamical center of the galaxy. Interestingly, the metal line ratios in a region offset from the center by {approx}1 kpc have a placement on the blue H II region excitation diagram with f ([O III])/f (H{beta}) and f ([Ne III])/f (H{beta}) that can be fitted by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). This asymmetrical AGN-like behavior is interpreted as a product of shocks in the direction of the galaxy's extended tail, possibly instigated by a recent galaxy interaction.

  9. Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Tohru; Higuchi, T.; Liu, Y.-S.; Yao, P.; Glans, P.-A.; Guo, Jinghua; Chang, C.; Wu, Z.; Sakamoto, W.; Itoh, N.; Shimura, T.; Yogo, T.; Hattori, T.

    2008-07-11

    The electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} has been studied using soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra exhibit that the valence band is mainly composed of O 2p state hybridized with Fe 3d state. The band gap corresponding to the energy separation between the top of the O 2p valence band and the bottom of the Fe 3d conduction band is 1.3 eV. The soft-X-ray Raman scattering reflects the features due to charge transfer transition from O 2p valence band to Fe 3d conduction band. These findings are similar to the result of electronic structure calculation by density functional theory within the local spin-density approximation that included the effect of Coulomb repulsion between localized d states.

  10. Study of Infrared Emission Spectroscopy for the B1Δg-A1Πu and B'1Σg+-A1Πu Systems of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Wang; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we carried out the perturbation analysis of C_2 spectra and identified forbidden singlet-triplet intersystem transitions, which aroused further interest in other C_2 spectra for the many low-lying electronic states of this fundamental molecule. In 1988, the B1Δg-A1Πu and B'1Σg+-A1Πu band systems were discovered by Douay et al., who observed eight bands of the B1Δg-A1Πu system with v up to 5 for the B1Δg state and six bands of the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system with v up to 3 for the B'1Σg+ state in the Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of hydrocarbon discharges. In the work presented here, we identified twenty-four bands of the two systems, among which the B'1Σg+ v = 4 and the B1Δg v = 6, 7 and 8 vibrational levels involved in nine bands were studied for the first time. A direct global analysis with Dunham parameters was carried out satisfactorily for the B1Δg-A1Πu system except for a small perturbation in the B1Δg v = 6 level. The calculated rovibrational term energies up to B1Δg v = 12 showed that the level crossing between the B1Δg and d3Πg states is responsible for many of the prominent perturbations in the Swan system observed previously. Nineteen lines of the B1Δg-a3Πu forbidden transitions were identified and the off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction constant AdB between d3Πg and B1Δg was derived as 8.3(1) wn. For the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system, only individual band analyses for each vibrational level in the B'1Σg+ state could be done satisfactorily and Dunham parameters obtained from these effective parameters showed that the anharmonic vibrational constant ω_e x_e is anomalously small (nearly zero). Inspection of the RKR potential curves for the B'1Σg+ and X1Σg+ states revealed that an avoided crossing may occur around 30000 wn, which is responsible for the anomalous molecular constants in these two states. W. Chen, K. Kawaguchi, P. F. Bernath, and J. Tang, J. Chem. Phys., 141, 064317 (2015) M. Douay, R. Nietmann and P. F. Bernath

  11. Emission spectroscopy and energy transfer in Tm 3+, Tm 3+-Ho 3+ and Tm 3+-Yb 3+ doped tellurite fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy; Shen, Shaoxiong; Jha, Animesh

    2006-09-01

    This paper examines the steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy of Tm 3+ doped and Tm 3+-Ho 3+, Tm 3+-Yb 3+ co-doped tellurite fibers for mid-IR fiber laser design which find applications for lidar. These doped fibers show promising properties for compact and tunable laser sources in the visible and mid-IR when pumped at 800 nm, 980 nm and 1480 nm which can be used for remote chemical sensing and atmospheric monitoring. Tellurite glass has a lower cut-off phonon energy than silica glass and is more environmentally stable than fluoride glass, and coupling these properties with its high rare-earth ion solubility and high refractive index make this glass a very interesting material in which to study the fluorescence properties of these rare earth ions. We have measured the mid-IR fluorescence properties in varying lengths of multi-mode and single-mode fiber for the 3H 4- 3H 6 (~1.85 μm), 3H 4- 3F 4 (~1.46 μm) transitions in Tm 3+ and the 5I 7- 5I 8 (~2.05 μm) transition in Ho 3+. We have also measured the visible emission from these fibers due to excited state absorption (ESA) as there is blue and green emission in Tm 3+ and Tm 3+-Ho 3+ doped fibers respectively when pumped at 800 nm, and strong red and blue emission in the Tm 3+-Yb 3+ when pumped at 980 nm. These results in fiber are compared to bulk glass results and are used to describe the pumping schemes and energy transfer mechanisms of these rare earth ions in tellurite fiber.

  12. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties. PMID:26233377

  13. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Réfy, D.; Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  14. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Nam, Y. U.

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  15. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  16. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Rupke, David S. N.; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M.; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.

    2016-09-01

    We present lzifu (LaZy-IFU), an idl toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. lzifu is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. lzifu has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of lzifu, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying lzifu to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line profiles presented in IFS data. The code is made available to the astronomy community through github. lzifu will be further developed over time to other IFS instruments, and to provide even more accurate line and uncertainty estimates.

  17. Far-red to near infrared emission and scattering spectroscopy for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang

    2001-06-01

    The thesis investigates the far-red and near infrared (NIR) spectral region from biomedical tissue samples for monitoring the state of tissues. The NIR emission wing intensity is weak in comparison to the emission in the visible spectral region. The wing emission from biomedical samples has revealed meaningful information about the state of the tissues. A model is presented to explain the shape of the spectral wing based on a continuum of energy levels. The wing can be used to classify different kinds of tissues; especially it can be used to differentiate cancer part from normal human breast tissues. The research work of the far-red emission from thermal damaged tissue samples shows that the emission intensity in this spectral region is proportional to the extent of the thermal damage of the tissue. Near infrared spectral absorption method is used to investigate blood hemodynamics (perfusion and oxygenation) in brain during sleep-wake transition. The result of the research demonstrates that the continuous wave (CW) type near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device can be used to investigate brain blood perfusion and oxygenation with a similar precision with frequency domain (FD) type device. The human subject sleep and wake transition, has been monitored by CW type NIRS instrument with traditional electroencephalograph (EEG) method. Parallel change in oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb is a discrete event that occurs in the transition from both sleep to wakefulness and wakefulness to sleep. These hemodynamic switches are generally about few seconds delayed from the human decided transition point between sleep and wake on the polygraph EEG recording paper. The combination of NIRS and EEG methods monitor the brain activity, gives more information about the brain activity. The sleep apnea investigation was associated with recurrent apneas, insufficient nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the different response of the peripheral and central compartments to breathing

  18. Bevalac studies of magnet Cerenkov spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The attempt was made to identify the various contributions to the velocity resolution of Cerenkov detectors such as might be used in Astromag, to measure the magnitude of these contributions and assess their effect on the mass resolution of an isotope spectrometer for Astromag, and to perform Bevalac tests of magnet/Cerenkov spectroscopy. A first version of a new 5 in. photomultiplier tube was also tested that is designed for use in large magnetic fields.

  19. Laser ablation plume thermalization dynamics in background gases: Combined imaging, optical absorption and emission spectroscopy, and ion probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A. |

    1995-02-01

    Combined diagnostic measurements are employed to characterize the penetration of energetic ablation plumes through background gases during a key transitional regime in which the ion flux is observed to split into distinct fast and slowed components. This apparently general phenomenon occurs over a limited range of distances at ambient pressures typically used for PLD (pulsed laser deposition) and may be important to film growth by PLD because a ``fast`` component of ions can arrive at the probe (or substrate) with little or no delay compared to propagation in vacuum. At longer distances, this ``fast`` component is completely attenuated, and only slowed distributions of ions are observed. Interestingly, this ``fast`` component is easily overlooked in imaging studies because the bright plume luminescence occurs in the slowed distribution. Time- and spatially-resolved optical absorption and emission spectroscopy are applied to experimentally determine the composition of the ``fast`` and ``slow`` propagating plume components for a single-component target ablation (yttrium) into an inert gas (argon) for correlation with quantitative imaging and ion probe measurements. The yttrium/argon system was chosen because optical absorption spectroscopy of both Y and Y+ was simultaneously possible and the inert nature of argon. Experimental results for several other systems, including Si/Ar, Si/He, YBCO/O{sub 2} are presented to illustrate variations in scattering mechanisms.

  20. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  1. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  2. MEASURING ORGANIC MOLECULAR EMISSION IN DISKS WITH LOW-RESOLUTION SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Henning, Thomas E-mail: najita@noao.edu E-mail: pascucci@stsci.edu E-mail: henning@mpia.de

    2011-06-10

    We explore the extent to which Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra taken at low spectral resolution can be used in quantitative studies of organic molecular emission from disks surrounding low-mass young stars. We use Spitzer IRS spectra taken in both the high- and low-resolution modules for the same sources to investigate whether it is possible to define line indices that can measure trends in the strength of the molecular features in low-resolution data. We find that trends in the HCN emission strength seen in the high-resolution data can be recovered in low-resolution data. In examining the factors that influence the HCN emission strength, we find that the low-resolution HCN flux is modestly correlated with stellar accretion rate and X-ray luminosity. Correlations of this kind are perhaps expected based on recent observational and theoretical studies of inner disk atmospheres. Our results demonstrate the potential of using the large number of low-resolution disk spectra that reside in the Spitzer archive to study the factors that influence the strength of molecular emission from disks. Such studies would complement results for the much smaller number of circumstellar disks that have been observed at high resolution with IRS.

  3. Results of the air emission research study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air quality was monitored in beef mono-slope barns. The objectives of the study were 1) to gather baseline data for the levels of gas emissions and particulate matter from beef mono-slope facilities, 2) evaluate the effect of two different manure handling systems on air quality, and 3) provide infor...

  4. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  6. First hydrogen operation of NIO1: Characterization of the source plasma by means of an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Barbisan, M; Baltador, C; Zaniol, B; Cavenago, M; Fantz, U; Pasqualotto, R; Serianni, G; Vialetto, L; Wünderlich, D

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a compact and flexible radio frequency H(-) ion source, developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL. The aim of the experimentation on NIO1 is the optimization of both the production of negative ions and their extraction and beam optics. In the initial phase of its commissioning, NIO1 was operated with nitrogen, but now the source is regularly operated also with hydrogen. To evaluate the source performances, an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic was installed. The system includes a low resolution spectrometer in the spectral range of 300-850 nm and a high resolution (50 pm) one, to study, respectively, the atomic and the molecular emissions in the visible range. The spectroscopic data have been interpreted also by means of a collisional-radiative model developed at IPP Garching. Besides the diagnostic hardware and the data analysis methods, the paper presents the first plasma measurements across a transition to the full H mode, in a hydrogen discharge. The characteristic signatures of this transition in the plasma parameters are described, in particular, the sudden increase of the light emitted from the plasma above a certain power threshold. PMID:26932047

  7. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously.

  8. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H.; Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G.; Villalobos, S.

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  9. The binuclear nickel center in the A-cluster of acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and two biomimetic dinickel complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapers, P.; Mebs, S.; Ilina, Y.; Warner, D. S.; Wörmann, C.; Schuth, N.; Kositzki, R.; Dau, H.; Limberg, C.; Dobbek, H.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is involved in the bacterial carbon oxide conversion pathway. The binuclear nickel sites in ACS enzyme and two biomimetic synthetic compounds containing a Ni(II)Ni(II) unit (1 and 2) were compared using XAS/XES. EXAFS analysis of ACS proteins revealed similar Ni-N/O/S bond lengths and Ni-Ni/Fe distances as in the crystal structure in oxidized ACS, but elongated Ni-ligand bonds in reduced ACS, suggesting more reduced nickel species. The XANES spectra of ACS and the dinickel complexes showed overall similar shapes, but less resolved pre-edge and edge features in ACS, attributed to more distorted square-planar nickel sites in particular in reduced ACS. DFT calculation of pre-edge absorption and Kβ2,5 emission features reproduced the experimental spectra of the synthetic complexes, was sensitive even to the small geometry differences in 1 and 2, and indicated low-spin Ni(II) sites. Comparison of nickel sites in proteins and biomimetic compounds is valuable for deducing structural and electronic differences in response to ligation and redox changes.

  10. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy of point-plane corona and back-corona discharges in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, T.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Jaworek, A.

    2011-12-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigations and current-voltage characteristics of corona discharge and back discharge on fly-ash layer, generated in point-plane electrode geometry in air at atmospheric pressure are presented in the paper. The characteristics of both discharges are similar but differ in the current and voltage ranges of all the discharge forms distinguished during the experiments. Three forms of back discharge, for positive and negative polarity, were investigated: glow, streamer and low-current back-arc. In order to characterize ionisation and excitation processes in back discharge, the emission spectra were measured and compared with those obtained for normal corona discharge generated in the same electrode configuration but with fly ash layer removed. The emission spectra were measured in two discharge zones: near the tip of needle electrode and near the plate. Visual forms of the discharge were recorded with digital camera and referred to current-voltage characteristics and emission spectra. The measurements have shown that spectral lines emitted by back discharge depend on the form of discharge and the discharge current. From the comparison of the spectral lines of back and normal discharges an effect of fly ash layer on the discharge morphology can be determined. The recorded emission spectra formed by ionised gas and plasma near the needle electrode and fly ash layer are different. It should be noted that in back arc emission, spectral lines of fly ash layer components can be distinguished. On the other hand, in needle zone, the emission of high intensity N2 second positive system and NO γ lines can be noticed. Regardless of these gaseous lines, also atomic lines of dust layer were present in the spectrum. The differences in spectra of back discharge for positive and negative polarities of the needle electrode have been explained by considering the kind of ions generated in the crater in fly ash layer. The aim of these studies is to better

  12. Deep level study of Mg-doped GaN using deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Amano, Hiroshi; Monemar, Bo; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl

    2016-07-01

    Deep levels in Mg-doped GaN grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), undoped GaN grown by MOCVD, and halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE)-grown GaN have been studied using deep level transient spectroscopy and minority charge carrier transient spectroscopy on Schottky diodes. One hole trap, labeled HT1, was detected in the Mg-doped sample. It is observed that the hole emission rate of the trap is enhanced by increasing electric field. By fitting four different theoretical models for field-assisted carrier emission processes, the three-dimensional Coulombic Poole-Frenkel (PF) effect, three-dimensional square well PF effect, phonon-assisted tunneling, and one-dimensional Coulombic PF effect including phonon-assisted tunneling, it is found that the one-dimensional Coulombic PF model, including phonon-assisted tunneling, is consistent with the experimental data. Since the trap exhibits the PF effect, we suggest it is acceptorlike. From the theoretical model, the zero field ionization energy of the trap and an estimate of the hole capture cross section have been determined. Depending on whether the charge state is -1 or -2 after hole emission, the zero field activation energy Ei 0 is 0.57 eV or 0.60 eV, respectively, and the hole capture cross section σp is 1.3 ×10-15c m2 or 1.6 ×10-16c m2 , respectively. Since the level was not observed in undoped GaN, it is suggested that the trap is associated with an Mg related defect.

  13. Terahertz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz DES) - ‘ALMA in the Lab’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile Auriacombe, Olivier Bruno Jacques; Fraser, Helen; Ellison, Brian; Ioppolo, Sergio; Rea, Simon

    2016-06-01

    ALMA is revolutionising our scope to identify and locate molecules that have been desorbed from ices, particularly complex organic molecules (COMS), which provide a vital link between interstellar and prebiotic chemistry. Explaining the existence of these molecules in star-forming regions relies on an empirical understanding of the chemistry that underpins their formation:- do COMS form predominantly in the solid-phase and then desorb to the gas phase, or do only “smaller” species, radials or ions desorb and then undergo gas-phase chemical reactions to generate larger COMS?-are the rotational state populations in COMS only attributable to equilibrium chemistry, or could their formation mechanisms and desorption processes affect the rotational state occupancy of these molecules, thereby directly tying certain species to solid-state origins?We have developed a novel laboratory method - THz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz-DES) that combines “traditional” laboratory astrophysics high-vacuum ice experiments with a sensitive high-spectral-resolution terahertz total-power heterodyne radiometer 1,2, partially mirroring the spectral range of ALMA band 7 (275- 373 GHz). Ices are grown in situ on a cold-plate, situated in a vacuum cell, then (thermally) desorbed. The sub-mm emission spectra of the resultant gas-phase molecules are detected as a function of time, temperature, or distance from the surface. Our first THz DES results will be shown for pure and binary ice systems including H2O, N2O and CH3OH. They show good correlation with established methods e.g. TPD, with the advantage of exploiting the molecular spectroscopy to unravel surface dynamics, state-occupancy, and unequivocal molecular identification, as well as concurrently measuring desorption barriers and molecular yields. We will extend our technique to a broader frequency range, enabling us to detect radical and ion desorption, to differentiate between A and E populations of CH3OH or ortho

  14. Terahertz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz DES) – ‘ALMA in the Lab’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile Auriacombe, Olivier Bruno Jacques; Fraser, Helen; Ellison, Brian; Ioppolo, Sergio; Rea, Simon

    2016-06-01

    ALMA is revolutionising our scope to identify and locate molecules that have been desorbed from ices, particularly complex organic molecules (COMS), which provide a vital link between interstellar and prebiotic chemistry. Explaining the existence of these molecules in star-forming regions relies on an empirical understanding of the chemistry that underpins their formation:- do COMS form predominantly in the solid-phase and then desorb to the gas phase, or do only “smaller” species, radials or ions desorb and then undergo gas-phase chemical reactions to generate larger COMS?-are the rotational state populations in COMS only attributable to equilibrium chemistry, or could their formation mechanisms and desorption processes affect the rotational state occupancy of these molecules, thereby directly tying certain species to solid-state origins?We have developed a novel laboratory method - THz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz-DES) that combines “traditional” laboratory astrophysics high-vacuum ice experiments with a sensitive high-spectral-resolution terahertz total-power heterodyne radiometer 1,2, partially mirroring the spectral range of ALMA band 7 (275– 373 GHz). Ices are grown in situ on a cold-plate, situated in a vacuum cell, then (thermally) desorbed. The sub-mm emission spectra of the resultant gas-phase molecules are detected as a function of time, temperature, or distance from the surface. Our first THz DES results will be shown for pure and binary ice systems including H2O, N2O and CH3OH. They show good correlation with established methods e.g. TPD, with the advantage of exploiting the molecular spectroscopy to unravel surface dynamics, state-occupancy, and unequivocal molecular identification, as well as concurrently measuring desorption barriers and molecular yields. We will extend our technique to a broader frequency range, enabling us to detect radical and ion desorption, to differentiate between A and E populations of CH3OH or ortho

  15. Characterisation of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for THz emission using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kristof J. P.; Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Ohnishi, Dai; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) provide high speed current oscillation which is applicable to THz generation when coupled to a suitably designed antenna. For this purpose, the InGaAs/AlAs/InP materials have been used, as this system offers high electron mobility, suitable band-offsets, and low resistance contacts. However for high current density operation (~MA/cm2) the epitaxial structure is challenging to characterize using conventional techniques as it consists of a single, very thin AlAs/InGaAs quantum well (QW). Here, we present a detailed low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopic study of high current density RTDs that allow the non-destructive mapping of a range of critical parameters for the device. We show how the doping level of the emitter/collector and contact layers in the RTD structure can be measured using the Moss-Burstein effect. For the full device structure, we show how emission from the QW may be identified, and detail how the emission changes with differing indium composition and well widths. We show that by studying nominally identical, un-doped structures, a type-II QW emission is observed, and explain the origin of the type-I emission in doped devices. This observation opens the way for a new characterization scheme where a "dummy" RTD active element is incorporated below the real RTD structure. This structure allows significantly greater control in the epitaxial process.

  16. Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy of the Low-Lying Electronic States of NbN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, R. S.; Bernath, P. F.

    2000-06-01

    The high-resolution spectrum of NbN has been investigated in emission in the 3000-15 000 cm-1 region using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The bands were excited in a microwave discharge through a mixture of NbCl5 vapor, ∼5 mTorr of N2, and 3 Torr of He. Numerous bands observed in the near-infrared region have been classified into the following transitions: f1Φ-c1Γ, e1Π-a1Δ, C3Π0+-A3Σ-1, C3Π0--A3Σ-1, C3Π1-a1Δ, C3Π1-A3Σ-0, d1Σ+-A3Σ-0, and d1Σ+-b1Σ+. These observations are consistent with the energy level diagram provided by laser excitation and emission spectroscopy [Y. Azuma, G. Huang, M. P. J. Lyne, A. J. Merer, and V. I. Srdanov, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4138-4155 (1993)]. The missing d1Σ+ state has been observed for the first time and its spectroscopic parameters are consistent with the theoretical predictions of S. R. Langhoff and W. Bauschlicher, Jr. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 143, 169-179 (1990)]. Rotational analysis of a number of bands has been obtained and improved spectroscopic parameters have been extracted for the low-lying electronic states. The observation of several vibrational bands with v = 1 has enabled us to determine the vibrational intervals and equilibrium bond lengths for the A3Σ-0, a1Δ, b1Σ+, d1Σ+, and C3Π1 states.

  17. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perring, Loïc; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99+/-5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. PMID:12324843

  18. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado, Utah, and Texas using mobile isotopic methane analysis based on Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Chris; Winkler, Renato; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Crosson, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation, provided that the fugitive emissions of methane are kept under control. A key step in assessing these emissions in a given region is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis, using the isotopic carbon signature to distinguish between natural gas and landfills or ruminants. We present measurements of methane using a mobile spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in three intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah, and the Barnett Shale in Texas. Performance of the CRDS isotope analyzer is presented, including precision, calibration, stability, and the potential for measurement bias due to other atmospheric constituents. Mobile isotope measurements of individual sources and in the nocturnal boundary layer have been combined to establish the fraction of the observed methane emissions that can be attributed to natural gas activities. The fraction of total methane emissions in the Denver-Julesburg basin attributed to natural gas emissions is 78 +/- 13%. In the Uinta basin, which has no other significant sources of methane, the fraction is 96% +/- 15%. In addition, results from the Barnett shale are presented, which includes a major urban center (Dallas / Ft. Worth). Methane emissions in this region are spatially highly heterogeneous. Spatially-resolved isotope and concentration measurements are interpreted using a simple emissions model to

  19. Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed discharges in atmospheric-pressure N2 and N2/H2O mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Verreycken, T.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution, nanosecond pulsed discharges in N2 and N2/0.9% H2O at atmospheric pressure (at 300 K) are studied with time-resolved imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering. A 170 ns high-voltage pulse is applied across two pin-shaped electrodes at a frequency of 1 kHz. The discharge consists of three phases: an ignition phase, a spark phase and a recombination phase. During the ignition phase the emission is mainly caused by molecular nitrogen (N2(C-B)). In the spark and recombination phase mainly atomic nitrogen emission is observed. The emission when H2O is added is very similar, except the small contribution of Hα and the intensity of the molecular N2(C-B) emission is less. The gas temperature during the ignition phase is about 350 K, during the discharge the gas temperature increases and is 1 µs after ignition equal to 750 K. The electron density is obtained by the broadening of the N emission line at 746 nm and, if water is added, the Hα line. The electron density reaches densities up to 4 × 1024 m-3. Addition of water has no significant influence on the gas temperature and electron density. The diagnostics used in this study are described in detail and the validity of different techniques is compared with previously reported results of other groups.

  20. Trace Gas Emissions From Global Biomass Burning Measured by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschi, I.; Yokelson, R. J.; Christian, T. J.; Field, R. J.; Ward, D. E.; Hao, W.

    2001-05-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of CO(2), CO, CH(4), NO(x), non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), and particles in the global atmosphere. In recent field experiments we have used airborne Fourier transform infrared (AFTIR) spectroscopy in Africa, North Carolina, and Alaska. These in-situ measurements have included observations of the rate of ozone and organic acid production, NH(3) losses, and cloud processing in down-wind plumes. In addition, we used AFTIR measurements to characterize the immense mixed haze layers prevalent during the southern Africa dry season and probed the chemistry of two ship plumes off the Namibian coastline. Our airborne measurements of biomass fire emissions were supplemented by ground-based open-path FTIR measurements of the emissions from domestic fuel production and use in African villages and of the post-convection smoldering emissions from African fires. Our ground and airborne measurements both include a suite of important compounds produced from biomass burning sources and from the photochemistry of slightly aged smoke plumes. This suite of compounds includes; O(3), CO(2), CO, CH(4), non-methane VOCs (C(2)H(2), C(2)H(4), C(2)H(6), C(3)H(6)), NO(x), HCN, NH(3), and OVOCs (CH(2)O, HCOOH, CH(3)OH, CH(3)COOH, HOCH(2)COOH, C(6)H(6)O, C(4)H(4)O) that are important HO(x) (OH and HO(2)) precursors. Recently, African and Indonesian fuels were burned in a joint laboratory experiment with the Max-Planck Institute of Chemistry that featured our open-path FTIR and their proton-transfer mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). The research described above consistently shows that biomass fires emit significant concentrations of OVOCs at levels much higher than previously thought. Our laboratory and field findings have been incorporated in a photochemical model that shows the OVOCs in smoke have significant effects on ozone production, HO(x) concentrations, H(2)O(2) production, NO(x) lifetime, and

  1. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, A; Khilchenko, A; Khilchenko, V; Kvashnin, A; Zubarev, P

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D(α) or H(α) lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10(6) s(-1) per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D(α) light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented. PMID:26724090

  2. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, A; Khilchenko, A; Khilchenko, V; Kvashnin, A; Zubarev, P

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D(α) or H(α) lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10(6) s(-1) per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D(α) light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  3. Two-temperature modelling and optical emission spectroscopy of a constant current plasma arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, M.; Colombo, V.; Ghedini, E.; Gherardi, M.; Sanibondi, P.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a plasma arc welding process with constant current in the range 25-70 A operating in pure Ar is characterized by means of both thermo-fluid-dynamic modelling under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and two-temperature thermal non-equilibrium modelling (2T), allowing a comparison of the LTE temperature fields with electron and heavy particle temperature fields: thermal non-equilibrium is strongest in the fringes of the arc and upstream the plasma flow even though a temperature difference between electrons and heavy particles is also found in the arc core in the nozzle orifice, due to the high velocity of the gas. Also, excitation temperature of Ar atoms is obtained from optical emission spectroscopy measurements using a new method (called hybrid method) that extends the usability of the Boltzmann plot method to spatial regions where the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral lines adopted in the calculation is poor. Good agreement is obtained between the modelling predicted electron temperature and the measured excitation temperature in the whole investigated spatial region.

  4. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  5. Updates on the Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Thomson Scattering Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Azzari, Phillip; Royce, James; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Stutzman, Brooke; Zuniga, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) have set up spectral probes to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Raw data collected will be used to measure the plasma's relative density, temperature, structure, and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of the plasma's properties can be determined through modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic field structure to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time and space. In addition, the Thomson Scattering (TS) device will measure internal temperature and density data as the HPX plasma transitions through capacitive and inductive modes while developing into helicon plasma. Currently CGAPL is focused on building its laser beam transport and scattered light collection optical systems. Recently, HPX has acquired an Andor ICCD spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Data collected by the TS system will be logged in real time by CGAPL's Data Acquisition (DAQ) system with LabView remote access. Further progress on HPX will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  6. Updates on Optical Emission Spectroscopy & Langmuir Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; Frank, John; Azzari, Phillip; Hopson, Jordan; James, Royce; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Eva; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    HPX is developing a to shorter lifetime (20 - 30 ns) more reproducible plasma at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). Once achieved, spectral and particle probes will help to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Once corrections for the RF field are in place for the Langmuir probe, raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of plasma properties can be determined with modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, both using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the implementation of the OES and Langmuir probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  7. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  8. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Barbisan, M.

    2012-04-15

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H{sup -} or D{sup -} particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H{sup -} (D{sup -}) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H{sub {alpha}} (D{sub {alpha}}) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  9. Ultra-nonlocality in density functional theory for photo-emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uimonen, A.-M.; Stefanucci, G.; Leeuwen, R. van

    2014-05-14

    We derive an exact expression for the photocurrent of photo-emission spectroscopy using time-dependent current density functional theory (TDCDFT). This expression is given as an integral over the Kohn-Sham spectral function renormalized by effective potentials that depend on the exchange-correlation kernel of current density functional theory. We analyze in detail the physical content of this expression by making a connection between the density-functional expression and the diagrammatic expansion of the photocurrent within many-body perturbation theory. We further demonstrate that the density functional expression does not provide us with information on the kinetic energy distribution of the photo-electrons. Such information can, in principle, be obtained from TDCDFT by exactly modeling the experiment in which the photocurrent is split into energy contributions by means of an external electromagnetic field outside the sample, as is done in standard detectors. We find, however, that this procedure produces very nonlocal correlations between the exchange-correlation fields in the sample and the detector.

  10. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER.

    PubMed

    Zaniol, B; Pasqualotto, R; Barbisan, M

    2012-04-01

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H(-) or D(-) particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H(-) (D(-)) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H(α) (D(α)) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  11. Emission spectroscopy of a microhollow cathode discharge plasma in helium-water gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Yamasaki, T.; Hane, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Kozue, K.; Takiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    A dc microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasma was generated inflowing helium gas containing water vapor. The cathode hole diameters were 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 mm, each with a length of 2.0 mm. Emission spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the discharge mode and to determine the plasma parameters. For the 0.3-mm cathode, stable MHCDs in an abnormal glow mode existed at pressures up to 100 kPa, whereas for larger diameters, a plasma was not generated at atmospheric pressure. An analysis of the lineshapes relevant to He at 667.8 nm and to H{alpha} at 656.3 nm implied an electron density and gas temperature of 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1100 K, respectively, for a 100-kPa discharge in the negative glow region. The dependence of the OH band, and H{alpha} intensities on the discharge current exhibited different behaviors. Specifically, the OH spectrum had a maximum intensity at a certain current, while the H atom intensity kept increasing with the discharge current. This observation implies that a high concentration of OH radicals results in quenching, leading to the production of H atoms via the reaction OH + e{sup -}{yields} O + H + e{sup -}.

  12. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  13. Imaging molecular adsorption and desorption dynamics on graphene using terahertz emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Kawayama, I; Tabata, M; Salek, K A; Murakami, H; Wang, M; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Kono, J; Tonouchi, M

    2014-01-01

    Being an atomically thin material, graphene is known to be extremely susceptible to its environment, including defects and phonons in the substrate on which it is placed as well as gas molecules that surround it. Thus, any device design using graphene has to take into consideration all surrounding components, and device performance needs to be evaluated in terms of environmental influence. However, no methods have been established to date to readily measure the density and distribution of external perturbations in a quantitative and non-destructive manner. Here, we present a rapid and non-contact method for visualizing the distribution of molecular adsorbates on graphene semi-quantitatively using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging. We found that the waveform of terahertz bursts emitted from graphene-coated InP sensitively changes with the type of atmospheric gas, laser irradiation time, and ultraviolet light illumination. The terahertz waveform change is explained through band structure modifications in the InP surface depletion layer due to the presence of localized electric dipoles induced by adsorbed oxygen. These results demonstrate that terahertz emission serves as a local probe for monitoring adsorption and desorption processes on graphene films and devices, suggesting a novel two-dimensional sensor for detecting local chemical reactions. PMID:25116593

  14. The emission spectroscopy of the B2Σ- -X2 Π system of CD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, W.; Zachwieja, M.; Hakalla, R.

    2016-06-01

    The visible spectrum of CD has been investigated at high resolution between 24,500 and 27,500 cm-1 using a high accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy technique. The CD molecules were produced and excited in a stainless steel hollow-cathode lamp with two anodes and filled with a mixture of He buffer gas and CD4. The emission from the discharge was observed with a plane grating spectrograph and recorded by a photomultiplier tube. The 0-0, 1-0 and 1-1 bands of the B2Σ- -X2 Π transition have been registered and measured, while 2-0 and 2-1 absorption bands (Herzberg and Johns, 1969) have been reanalyzed. The current data were elaborated with help of recent X2 Π ground state parameters reported by Zachwieja et al. (2012) from investigation of the A2 Δ -X2 Π transition. This way, the improved spectroscopic constants for the B2Σ- state of CD have been provided as follows: νe = 26,050.787 (11) cm-1, ωe = 1653.019 (25) cm-1, ωexe = 123.899 (12) cm-1, Be = 7.08296 (32) cm-1, αe = 0.30741 (84) cm-1, and γe = - 0.10727 (42) cm-1.

  15. Emission spectroscopy of a microhollow cathode discharge plasma in helium-water gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, S.; Yamasaki, T.; Hane, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Kozue, K.; Takiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    A dc microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasma was generated inflowing helium gas containing water vapor. The cathode hole diameters were 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 mm, each with a length of 2.0 mm. Emission spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the discharge mode and to determine the plasma parameters. For the 0.3-mm cathode, stable MHCDs in an abnormal glow mode existed at pressures up to 100 kPa, whereas for larger diameters, a plasma was not generated at atmospheric pressure. An analysis of the lineshapes relevant to He at 667.8 nm and to Hα at 656.3 nm implied an electron density and gas temperature of 2 × 1014 cm-3 and 1100 K, respectively, for a 100-kPa discharge in the negative glow region. The dependence of the OH band, and Hα intensities on the discharge current exhibited different behaviors. Specifically, the OH spectrum had a maximum intensity at a certain current, while the H atom intensity kept increasing with the discharge current. This observation implies that a high concentration of OH radicals results in quenching, leading to the production of H atoms via the reaction OH + e- → O + H + e-.

  16. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy on single MEH-PPV chains at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Feist, Florian A; Basché, Thomas

    2008-08-14

    Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra of single MEH-PPV polymer molecules dispersed in thin PMMA films have been recorded at 1.2 and 20 K. We observe single as well as multichromophore emission in single chain emission spectra, whereby the relative fractions depend on the two different molecular weights (50 and 350 kDa) studied. The molecular weight also affects the distribution of peak emission maxima, which is monomodal (bimodal) for the low (high) molecular weight. The appearance of an additional "red" subpopulation for the high molecular weight sample is attributed to interactions of multiple chromophores from a sufficiently flexible single chain. The comparison of emission spectra appearing in the "blue" as well as "red" subpopulations suggests that these intrachain interactions rather lead to ground-state aggregates than excimers. Independent of the molecular weight, large variations in spectral shape and apparent line width in the emission spectra have been observed. Occasionally, we find very narrow purely electronic zero-phonon lines both in emission and in excitation spectra, with line widths down to the instrumental resolution. In accordance with earlier literature data it is argued that linear electron-phonon coupling should be quite strong for MEH-PPV in PMMA, leading to only a small fraction of chromophores exhibiting zero-phonon lines. In addition, spectral diffusion, which manifests itself by several time-dependent line shifting and broadening phenomena, contributes to the substantial variations of spectral shapes. Excitation experiments with particularly stable chromophores provide an upper limit for the optical line width (approximately 0.1 cm(-1)), which at 1.2 K can actually approach the lifetime-limited homogeneous width. Raising the temperature to 20 K leads to line broadening and typically, to disappearance of zero-phonon lines. The failure to observe zero-phonon lines of chromophores supposedly serving as donors in intramolecular

  17. Advanced Low Emissions Subsonic Combustor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Reid

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in commercial and military aircraft gas turbines have yielded significant improvements in fuel efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, due in large part to increased combustor operating pressures and temperatures. However, the higher operating conditions have increased the emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), which is a pollutant with adverse impact on the atmosphere and environment. Since commercial and military aircraft are the only important direct source of NOx emissions at high altitudes, there is a growing consensus that considerably more stringent limits on NOx emissions will be required in the future for all aircraft. In fact, the regulatory communities have recently agreed to reduce NOx limits by 20 percent from current requirements effective in 1996. Further reductions at low altitude, together with introduction of limits on NOx at altitude, are virtual certainties. In addition, the U.S. Government recently conducted hearings on the introduction of federal fees on the local emission of pollutants from all sources, including aircraft. While no action was taken regarding aircraft in this instance, the threat of future action clearly remains. In these times of intense and growing international competition, the U.S. le-ad in aerospace can only be maintained through a clear technological dominance that leads to a product line of maximum value to the global airline customer. Development of a very low NOx combustor will be essential to meet the future needs of both the commercial and military transport markets, if additional economic burdens and/or operational restrictions are to be avoided. In this report, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) presents the study results with the following specific objectives: Development of low-emissions combustor technologies for advances engines that will enter into service circa 2005, while producing a goal of 70 percent lower NOx emissions, compared to 1996 regulatory levels. Identification of solution approaches to

  18. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  19. Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy Used to Study Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Durian, Douglas J.

    2000-01-01

    The white appearance of familiar objects such as clouds, snow, milk, or foam is due to the random scattering of light by the sample. As we all know, pure water is clear and easily passes a beam of light. However, tiny water droplets, such as those in a cloud, scatter light because the air and water droplet have different indexes of refraction. When many droplets, or scattering sites, are present, the incident light is scattered in random directions and the sample takes on a milky white appearance. In a glass of milk, the scattering is due to small colloidal particles. The white appearance of shaving cream, or foam, is due to the scattering of light at the water-bubble interface. Diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) is a laser light-scattering technique used to noninvasively probe the particle dynamics in systems that strongly scatter light. The technique takes advantage of the diffuse nature of light, which is reflected or transmitted from samples such as foams, dense colloidal suspensions (such as paint and milk), emulsions, liquid crystals, sandpiles, and even biological tissues.

  20. VIMOS integral field spectroscopy of blue compact galaxies. I. Morphological properties, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairós, L. M.; Caon, N.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Blue compact galaxies (BCG) are gas-rich, low-luminosity, low-metallicity systems that undergo a violent burst of star formation. These galaxies offer us a unique opportunity to investigate collective star formation and its effects on galaxy evolution in a relatively simple environment. Spatially resolved spectrophotometric studies of BCGs are essential for a better understanding of the role of starburst-driven feedback processes on the kinematical and chemical evolution of low-mass galaxies near and far. Aims: We carry out an integral field spectroscopic study of a sample of BCGs, with the aim of probing the morphology, kinematics, dust extinction, and excitation mechanisms of their warm interstellar medium. Methods: Eight BCGs were observed with the VIMOS integral field unit at the Very Large Telescope using blue and orange grisms in high-resolution mode. At a spatial sampling of 0''&dotbelow;67 per spaxel, we covered about 30″ × 30″ on the sky, with a wavelength range of 4150...7400 Å. Emission lines were fitted with a single Gaussian profile to measure their wavelength, flux, and width. From these data we built two-dimensional maps of the continuum and the most prominent emission-lines, as well as diagnostic line ratios, extinction, and kinematic maps. Results: An atlas has been produced with the following: emission-line fluxes and continuum emission; ionization, interstellar extinction, and electron density maps from line ratios; velocity and velocity dispersion fields. From integrated spectroscopy, it includes tables of the extinction corrected line fluxes and equivalent widths, diagnostic-line ratios, physical parameters, and the abundances for the brightest star-forming knots and for the whole galaxy. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 079.B-0445.The reduced datacubes and their error maps (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp

  1. Charge-Transfer Satellite in Ce@C82 Probed by Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Kotani, Akio; Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Vlaicu, Aurel Mihai; Oohashi, Hirofumi; Tochio, Tatsuki; Ito, Yoshiaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of metallofullerene Ce@C82 is probed by resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Ce L3 absorption edge. We observed a satellite structure in x-ray absorption and resonant emission spectra for Ce@C82, which, we show, corresponds to the charge transfer induced by the core--hole potential in the final state, similarly to Pr@C82. This charge-transfer satellite may be a common feature in metallofullerenes. The temperature dependence of the electronic structure is also investigated.

  2. Electrochemical emission and impedance spectroscopies of passive iron and carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun

    A high fidelity in situ technique for measuring electrochemical noise data on carbon steel in alkaline solutions, referred to as Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy (EES), or Electrochemical Noise Measurement (ENM), has been developed in this thesis as a means of monitoring general corrosion and pitting corrosion on carbon steel in simulated DOE nuclear waste storage systems and to develop a better understanding of the corrosion processes of carbon steel in these environments. The data acquisition system is essential to the accuracy of voltage and current measurements and the validity of experimental data for further analysis. Time and frequency domain analyses display different characteristics for general corrosion and pitting corrosion. DOE raw noise data analysis shows that the penetration corrosion rate in liquid/sludge phases is in the order of 10-2--10-3 mm/year for the carbon steel-lined tanks in the DOE waste environments. In addition, good correlation has been observed between EES and traditional Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) method in detecting the corrosion rates of carbon steel. The passive state on iron in EDTA (ethylene diammine tetra acetic acid, disodium salt, C10H14N2Na2O 8)-containing borate buffer solutions of pH ranging from 8.15 to 12.87 at ambient temperature has been explored using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), another powerful in situ electrochemical method for investigating steady-state electrochemical and corrosion systems. It has been found that frequency sweep range, perturbation voltage amplitude, solution pH, and film formation voltage are important factors to influence the impedance of passive iron. The steady-state passive films formed on iron have been shown to satisfy the conditions of linearity, causality, stability and finiteness, on the basis of the good agreement observed between the experimental impedance data and the Kramers-Kronig transforms calculated data over most of the frequency range employed

  3. A Chemical Detector for Gas Chromatography Using Pulsed Discharge Emission Spectroscopy on a Microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Zhu, W.; Mitra, B.; Liu, J.; Liu, T.; Fan, X.; Gianchandani, Y.

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in miniaturized systems for chemical analysis in harsh environments. Chemical detection by emission spectroscopy of on-chip microdischarges [1-3] can be performed at >200°C [4], suggesting utility inspace exploration, volcanic monitoring, and oil well monitoring. This abstract describes the first use of pulsed microdischarge spectroscopy for gas chromatography (GC).This effort supports NASA interests in monitoring closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The microdischarge occurs on a 1cm2 glass chip (Fig. 1a), with thin-film Ni electrodes separated by 160μm. A glass lid with a grooved gas-flow channel, and inlet/outlet capillary tubes are epoxy-sealed to the chip. Located downstream of the 1.7m-long, RTX-1-coated, GC separation column, the microdischarge chip is read by a spectrometer. In a typical experiment (Fig. 1b), a mixture of acetone 3.6μg, 1-hexanol 2.8μg and nitrobenzene 3.0μg, is injected, with He carrier gas at 1.56sccm, through the GC. Acetone elutes quickly while nitrobenzene is slower. Microdischarges are triggered at 0.5Hz for 6 min., and 0.04Hz thereafter. Each microdischarge consumes ≈8mJ; the average power is ≈1.14mW. The spectrum (Fig. 1b, inset) shows that the 388nm peak, representing CN/CH fragments [5], is enhanced by carbon compounds. Its strength relative to the 588nm peak of He provides a chromatogram. Fig. 1b also shows a benchmark result from a commercial flame ionization detector (FID). The differences in elution time are attributed to differences in the gas flow paths for the two detectors [1]. REFERENCES [1] Eijkel et al, Anal. Chem, 2000 [2] Mitra et al, IEEE Trans Plasma Sci, 2008 [3] Mitra et al, IEEE Sensors, 2008 [4] Wright et al, APL, 2009 [5] Pearse et al, The Identification of Molecular Spectra, 1963

  4. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - III. Properties of the circumnuclear gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2015-08-01

    Many early-type galaxies have ionized gas emission in their centres that extends to scales of ˜1 kpc. The majority of such objects are classified as low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs), but the nature of their ionizing source is still not clear. The kinematics associated with these gaseous structures usually shows deviations from a pure rotational motion due to non-gravitational effects (e.g. outflows) or to non-axisymmetric potentials (e.g. bars or tri-axial systems). This is the third of a series of papers that describes a sample of 10 nearby (d < 30 Mpc) and massive (σ > 200 km s-1) early-type galaxies observed with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph in Integral Field mode installed on the Gemini-South telescope. In Paper II, we performed spectral synthesis to subtract the stellar components from the data cubes of the sample galaxies in order to study their nuclear spectra. In this work, we analyse the circumnuclear gas emission (scales of ˜100 pc) of the sample galaxies and we compare the results with those obtained with Principal Component Analysis Tomography in Paper I. We detected circumnuclear gas emission in seven galaxies of the sample, all of them classified as LINERs. Pure gaseous discs are found in three galaxies. In two objects, gaseous discs are probably present, but their kinematics are affected by non-Keplerian motions. In one galaxy (IC 5181), we detected a spiral structure of gas that may be caused either by a non-axisymmetric potential or by an outflow together with a gaseous disc. In NGC 3136, an ionization bicone is present in addition to five compact structures with LINER-like emission. In galaxies with a gaseous disc, we found that ionizing photons emitted by an active galactic nucleus are not enough to explain the observed Hα flux along this structure. On the other hand, the Hα flux distribution and equivalent width along the direction perpendicular the gaseous disc suggest the presence of low-velocity ionized gas

  5. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  6. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.; Stafford, L.

    2014-03-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C2 molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH3)x and O-Si-(CH3)x bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O2 in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiOx. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O2 in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the average size of the titanate nanoparticles was smaller

  7. The Secret IR Lives of Cepheids: Spitzer IRS Spectroscopy of Circumstellar Envelopes, Winds and Chromospheric Emissions in Nearby Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Evans, Nancy; Harper, Graham; Marenago, Massimo

    2007-05-01

    We are carrying out an intensive study of the physical and evolutionary properties of Classical Cepheids, known as the 'Secret Lives of Cepheids' (SLiC) program. This program covers a wide range of periods and pulsation amplitudes, and makes use of X-ray/UV/optical observations. The major science goals of our proposed Spitzer program are to investigate two recently discovered characteristics of Classical Cepheids, hitherto unknown. These are the presence of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around three nearby Cepheids (Polaris, delta Cep and L Car - all SLiC program stars), and the existence of O VI (1032/36A) and C III (977A) emission lines in the far-UV spectra of two program stars - Polaris and beta Dor. These lines form in the chromospheres/transition regions of the Cepheids and, in the case of beta Dor, show variations that correlate to the pulsations of the star. We propose SST/IRS high-resolution spectroscopy of these four nearby, bright Classical Cepheids, three of which have been found, from long-baseline near-IR interferometry, to have CSEs ~0.5-3.0 AU from the central star. From the proposed IRS spectra, we will determine the physical characteristics of the circumstellar material/envelopes, likely arising from mass loss or, given the young ages of Cepheids, debris disks. Also, we will use the IRS spectra to explore the presence of emission lines related to those discovered in the far-UV. Possible low density He I and H I wind lines will also be measured, if present. As in the case of the FUSE far-UV observations, SST/IRS also provides the opportunity to observe and measure these emission lines at wavelengths where the Cepheid photospheric continua are very low. In the near-UV to near-IR regions, emission lines are overwhelmed by the photospheric continua. With the modest amount of time requested (~1.86-hours), the proposed IRS observations will be crucial in understanding these newly discovered characteristics of Astronomy's most important and 'best

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Stafford, L.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.

    2014-03-21

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C{sub 2} molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} and O-Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O{sub 2} in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiO{sub x}. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O{sub 2} in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the

  9. Preparation of gold tips suitable for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and light emission by electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bin; Picardi, Gennaro; Pettinger, Bruno

    2004-04-01

    We describe a method of preparing gold scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips by direct current electrochemical etching in concentrated HCl and ethanol solution. Gold tips with tip apex radius lower than 30 nm can be reproducibly prepared by this method. The influence of the solution composition, etching voltage on the surface structure, and sharpness has been investigated. These tips can be efficiently used for STM imaging, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and light emission investigations on the same sample.

  10. Open-path Fourier transform spectroscopy of gas emissions from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Clive; Burton, Mike R.; Durieux, Jacques; Pyle, David M.

    2002-02-01

    We report here novel field spectroscopic measurements of the proportions of H 2O, CO 2, CO and SO 2 in gas emissions from Oldoinyo Lengai, the world's unique, active carbonatite volcano. We found that CO 2 constitutes <40 mol% of emissions from a lava lake, and 25 mol% from a cooler fumarole vent. These results suggest that H 2O is the predominant gas phase rather than CO 2, as reported in previous studies based on conventional sampling (Trans. Am. Geophys. Union 69 (1998) 1466; J. Geophys. Res. 101 (1996) 13819), though it is possible that water is introduced by remelting of older hydrated lava flows. We also observed rapid variations in CO 2/CO molar ratios (between 450 and 750 in 1 h) in the lava lake emissions, which could reflect mixing of gases exsolved from deep and shallow magma. Lengai's measured CO 2 flux (J. Geophys. Res. 101 (1996) 13819; Geology 23 (1995) 933) exceeds the time-averaged magma discharge rate, suggesting efficient separation of carbon and water-rich fluids from unerupted silicate magma. This may play an important role in parental magma differentiation.

  11. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-07-01

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3-8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  12. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-07-21

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3–8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  13. [Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of CDOM from Yundang Lagoon and its indication for organic pollution].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Jian-Fu; Guo, Wei-Dong; Deng, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Ling-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) combined with absorption spectroscopy were applied to study the optical properties of CDOM samples from highly-polluted Yundang Lagoon in Xiamen in order to demonstrate the feasibility of using these spectral properties as a tracer of the degree of organic pollution in similar polluted coastal waters. Surface water samples were collected from 13 stations 4 times during April and May, 2008. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was used to resolve the EEMs of CDOM. Five separate fluorescent components were identified, including two humic-like components (C1: 240, 325/422 nm; C5: 260, 380/474 nm), two protein-like components (C2: 225, 275/350 nm; C4: 240, 300/354 nm) and one xenobiotic-like component (C3: 225/342 nm), which could be used as a good tracer for the input of the anthropogenic organic, pollutants. The concentrations of component C3 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are much higher near the inlet of sewage discharge, demonstrating that the discharge of surrounding sewage is a major source of organic pollutants in Yundang Lagoon. CDOM absorption coefficient alpha (280) and the score of humic-like component C1 showed significant linear relationships with COD(Mn), and a strong positive correlation was also found between the score of protein-like component C2 and BOD5. This suggested that the optical properties of CDOM may provide a fast in-situ way to monitor the variation of the water quality in Yundang Lagoon and that of similar polluted coastal waters. PMID:20707146

  14. [Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of CDOM from Yundang Lagoon and its indication for organic pollution].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Jian-Fu; Guo, Wei-Dong; Deng, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Ling-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) combined with absorption spectroscopy were applied to study the optical properties of CDOM samples from highly-polluted Yundang Lagoon in Xiamen in order to demonstrate the feasibility of using these spectral properties as a tracer of the degree of organic pollution in similar polluted coastal waters. Surface water samples were collected from 13 stations 4 times during April and May, 2008. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was used to resolve the EEMs of CDOM. Five separate fluorescent components were identified, including two humic-like components (C1: 240, 325/422 nm; C5: 260, 380/474 nm), two protein-like components (C2: 225, 275/350 nm; C4: 240, 300/354 nm) and one xenobiotic-like component (C3: 225/342 nm), which could be used as a good tracer for the input of the anthropogenic organic, pollutants. The concentrations of component C3 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are much higher near the inlet of sewage discharge, demonstrating that the discharge of surrounding sewage is a major source of organic pollutants in Yundang Lagoon. CDOM absorption coefficient alpha (280) and the score of humic-like component C1 showed significant linear relationships with COD(Mn), and a strong positive correlation was also found between the score of protein-like component C2 and BOD5. This suggested that the optical properties of CDOM may provide a fast in-situ way to monitor the variation of the water quality in Yundang Lagoon and that of similar polluted coastal waters.

  15. Characterization of a high current pulsed arc using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Zaepffel, C.; Chemartin, L.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation realized on an experimental setup that simulates an arc column subjected to the transient phase of a lightning current waveform in laboratory conditions. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to assess space- and time-resolved properties of this high current pulsed arc. Different current peak levels are utilised in this work, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with a peak time around 15 µs. Ionic lines of nitrogen and oxygen are used to determine the radial profiles of temperature and electron density of the arc channel over time from 2 µs to 36 µs. A combination of 192 N II and O II lines is considered in the calculation of the bound-bound contribution of the absorption coefficient of the plasma channel. Calculations of the optical thickness showed that self-absorption of these ionic lines in the arc column is important. To obtain temperature and electron density profiles in the arc, we solved the radiative transfer equation across the channel under an axisymmetric assumption and considering the channel formed by uniform concentric layers. For the 100 kA current peak level, the temperature reaches more than 38 000 K and the electron density reaches 5  ×  1018 cm-3. The pressure inside the channel is calculated using the air plasma composition at local thermodynamic equilibrium, and reaches 45 bar. The results are discussed and utilised to estimate the electrical conductivity of the arc channel.

  16. Application of Raman spectroscopy technology to studying Sudan I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping; Chen, Chen

    2006-06-01

    Being an industrial dye, the Sudan I may have a toxic effect after oral intake on the body, and has recently been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice and rabbits. Because China and some other countries have detected the Sudan I in samples of the hot chilli powder and the chilli products, it is necessary to study the characteristics of this dye. As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is characterized by the frequency excursion caused by interactions of molecules and photons. The frequency excursion reflects the margin between certain two vibrational or rotational energy states, and shows the information of the molecule. Because Raman spectroscopy can provides quick, easy, reproducible, and non-destructive analysis, both qualitative and quantitative, with no sample preparation required, Raman spectroscopy has been a particularly promising technique for analyzing the characteristics and structures of molecules, especially organic ones. Now, it has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial applications. This paper firstly introduces Sudan I dye and the Raman spectroscopy technology, and then describes its application to the Sudan I. Secondly, the fingerprint spectra of the Sudan I are respectively assigned and analyzed in detail. Finally, the conclusion that the Raman spectroscopy technology is a powerful tool to determine the Sudan I is drawn.

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy and laser induced infrared emission spectroscopy of nitromethane and optical properties of laser-induced carriers on semiconductor surfaces probed by a 10.6 micron wavelength carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yoshimasa

    This work consists of two parts, (1) Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and laser-induced infrared emission spectroscopy of nitromethane and (2) optical properties of laser-induced carriers on semiconductor surfaces probed by a 10.6 mum wavelength CO2 laser. In the spectroscopic study of nitromethane, previously unreported low resolution rotational-torsional spectra in the THz frequency were obtained by a Bruker IFS 66 v/S Fourier transform spectrometer. The acquired spectra were then compared with a calculation based on a rotational-torsional Hamiltonian which includes centrifugal distortions and rotational-torsional coupling terms. Even though the constants used in the calculation were a result of fitting the microwave spectrum, a discrepancy was observed between the calculated and the experimentally obtained spectrum. In addition, gaseous nitromethane was irradiated with a c.w. CO 2 laser (˜20 W cm-2 intensity, 10.6 mum wavelength) and the laser-induced steady state emission spectrum was analyzed with the IFS 66 v/S spectrometer. The laser-induced emission spectrum showed the characteristics consistent with the laser-heated thermal emission. The decay constant of the emission followed by a 100 ms CO2 laser pulse was measured with a pyroelectric detector and determined to be 0.3 s. In part II, several polycrystalline semiconductors [silicon (Si), germanium (Ge), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and cadmium telluride (CdTe)] were irradiated with a 150 Ps Nd:YAG laser (532/1064 nm wavelength) and induced changes in the optical properties were monitored by measuring the time-resolved reflectance and transmittance of a low power CO2 laser incident on the samples at the Brewster angle. The experimental results showed a sub-nanosecond increase in the reflectance and a longer increase in the absorption as a result of electron-hole pairs (i.e. carriers) generated by absorption of the incident Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  18. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Smith, D.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff.

  19. X-ray emission spectroscopy with a laser-heated diamond anvil cell: a new experimental probe of the spin state of iron in the Earth's interior

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.-F.; Struzhkin, V.V.; Jacobsen, S.D.; Shen, G.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Mao, H.-K.; Hemley, R.J.

    2010-07-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is well suited to probing the local electronic structure of 3d transition metals such as Fe and Mn in their host phases. The laser-heated diamond anvil cell technique is uniquely capable of generating ultra-high static pressures and temperatures in excess of 100 GPa and 3000 K. Here X-ray emission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been interfaced with the laser-heated diamond cell for studying the electronic spin states of iron in magnesiowuestite-(Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O and its crystal structure under lower-mantle conditions. X-ray emission spectra of the ferrous iron in a single crystal of magnesiowuestite-(Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O indicate that a high-spin to low-spin transition of ferrous iron occurs at 54 to 67 GPa and 300 K and the ferrous iron remains in the high-spin state up to 47 GPa and 1300 K. This pilot study points to the unique capability of the synchrotron-based XES and X-ray diffraction techniques for addressing the issue of electronic spin transition or crossover in 3d transition metals and compounds under extreme high-P-T conditions.

  20. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X. Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2014-02-15

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H{sup −} ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  1. Estimation of the amount of tropospheric ozone in a cloudy sky by ground-based Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spänkuch, D; Döhler, W; Güldner, J; Schulz, E

    1998-05-20

    The problem of retrieving minor concentrations of constituents by ground-based Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy is addressed by means of the concept of differential optical emission spectroscopy in analogy to the concept of differential optical absorption spectroscopy. Using the prominent nu3 ozone feature at 1043 cm(-1), we show that the strength of the spectral signature depends not only on the amount of ozone but also on the atmospheric thermal structure. This dependence can be described by a rather accurate approximation, which was used to construct a simple diagram to estimate the amount of column ozone between the instrument site and a cloud deck as well as to determine the detection limit. The detection limit is shown to depend on cloud base height. For a given thermal lapse rate it was found that the lower the detection limit, the higher the cloud base altitude. However, as shown in a case study with variable cloud base height, the concept fails for semitransparent clouds. Multiple scattering of the emitted radiation within the clouds yielded a path enhancement that simulated an enhanced amount of constituent. The path enhancement was estimated to be 2.4-4 km at 1000 cm(-1) for low-level clouds, equivalent to an enhancement factor of 6-21. The multiple scattering effect has considerable consequences for ground-based as well as for nadir satellite retrieval techniques in cloudy skies.

  2. Diagnostic of 13.56 MHz RF sustained Ar-N{2} plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, F. U.; Rehman, N. U.; Naseer, S.; Naveed, M. A.; Qayyum, A.; Khattak, N. A. D.; Zakaullah, M.

    2009-01-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) is used to investigate the effect of argon gas mixing on the electron temperature, the degree of nitrogen dissociation and the active species concentration in a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) sustained nitrogen plasma. The electron temperature is determined from Ar-I emission line intensities by using the modified Boltzmann's plot method and is found to be increased with argon mixing in nitrogen plasma. The concentration of active species N_2(C ^3Piu) and N_2+ (B ^2Σu^+) is monitored in terms of the emission intensities of nitrogen (0-0) bands of the second positive and the first negative systems respectively. The concentration of N2 (C^3Piu) active species along with the degree of N{2}-dissociation is appreciably enhanced by argon mixing signifying the role of argon metastables in the excitation and dissociation processes.

  3. An investigation of micro-hollow cathode glow discharge generated optical emission spectroscopy for hydrocarbon detection and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Gaddam, Chethan K; Kulis, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The analytical utility of a micro-hollow cathode glow discharge plasma for detection of varied hydrocarbons was tested using acetone, ethanol, heptane, nitrobenzene, and toluene. Differences in fragmentation pathways, reflecting parent compound molecular structure, led to differences in optical emission patterns that can then potentially serve as signatures for the species of interest. Spectral simulations were performed emphasizing the CH (A(2)Δ-X(2)Π), CH (C(2)Σ-X(2)Π), and OH (A(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π) electronic systems. The analytical utility of selected emission lines is demonstrated by a linear relationship between optical emission spectroscopy and parent compound concentration over a wide range, with detection limits extending down to parts per billion (ppb) levels.

  4. Measurements @ Sub-Mm Spectroscopy Laboratory of Bologna: Rotational Spectroscopy Applied to Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The physico-chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere has been one of the main subjects of studies over last years. In particular, the composition of the atmosphere is indeed very important to understand chemical processes linked to depletion of stratospheric ozone and greenhouse effect. The vertical concentration profiles of atmospheric gases can be provided by remote sensing measurements, but they require the accurate knowledge of the parameters involved: line positions, transition intensities, pressure-broadened half-widths, pressure-induced frequency shifts and their temperature dependence. In particular, the collisional broadening parameters have a crucial influence on the accuracy of spectra calculations and on reduction of remote sensing data. Rotational spectroscopy, thanks to its intrinsic high resolution, is a powerful tool for providing most of the information mentioned above: accurate or even very accurate rotational transition frequencies, accurate spectroscopic as well as hyperfine parameters, accurate pressure-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence. With respect to collisional phenomena and line shape analysis studies, by applying the source frequency modulation technique it has been found that rotational spectroscopy may provide very good results: not only this technique does not produce uncontrollable instrumental distortions or broadenings, but also, having an high sensitivity, it is particularly suitable for this kind of investigations. A number of examples will be presented to illustrate the work carried out at the Laboratory of Millimeter/submillimeter-wave Spectroscopy of Bologna in the field of atmospheric studies.

  5. Analytical study of spacecraft deposition contamination by internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of ten individual contaminant materials and four binary mixtures of these have been studied using the internal reflection spectroscopy technique. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on these contaminants has also been studied. It has been observed that all siloxanes, silanes, and esters are drastically affected by ultraviolet irradiation. In most cases polymerization and tar formation results.

  6. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization and their ratio monitored using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremme, W.; Krueger, A.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2011-09-01

    The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a save distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006-2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS). The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm-1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume, animation and determination of its propagation speed. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 which was confirmed from the strong ash emission registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time) and a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered. Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential imagees is used to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  7. Chemical speciation of chlorine in atmospheric aerosol samples by high-resolution proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zsófia; Furu, Enikő; Kavčič, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine is a main elemental component of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). The knowledge of the chemical form of chlorine is of primary importance for source apportionment and for estimation of health effects of APM. In this work the applicability of high-resolution wavelength dispersive proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy for chemical speciation of chlorine in fine fraction atmospheric aerosols is studied. A Johansson-type crystal spectrometer with energy resolution below the natural linewidth of Cl K lines was used to record the high-resolution Kα and Kβ proton induced spectra of several reference Cl compounds and two atmospheric aerosol samples, which were collected for conventional PIXE analysis. The Kα spectra which refers to the oxidation state, showed very minor differences due to the high electronegativity of Cl. However, the Kβ spectra exhibited pronounced chemical effects which were significant enough to perform chemical speciation. The major chlorine component in two fine fraction aerosol samples collected during a 2010 winter campaign in Budapest was clearly identified as NaCl by comparing the high-resolution Cl Kβ spectra from the aerosol samples with the corresponding reference spectra. This work demonstrates the feasibility of high-resolution PIXE method for chemical speciation of Cl in aerosols.

  8. Characterization of low-pressure microwave and radio frequency discharges in oxygen applying optical emission spectroscopy and multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Styrnoll, Tim; Mitschker, Felix; Bienholz, Stefan; Nikita, Bibinov; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and multipole resonance probe (MRP) are adopted to characterize low-pressure microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen. In this context, both discharges are usually applied for the deposition of permeation barrier SiOx films on plastic foils or the inner surface of plastic bottles. For technological reasons the MW excitation is modulated and a continuous wave (cw) RF bias is used. The RF voltage produces a stationary low-density plasma, whereas the high-density MW discharge is pulsed. For the optimization of deposition process and the quality of the deposited barrier films, plasma conditions are characterized using OES and MRP. To simplify the comparison of applied diagnostics, both MW and RF discharges are studied separately in cw mode. The OES and MRP diagnostic methods complement each other and provide reliable information about electron density and electron temperature. In the MW case, electron density amounts to ne = (1.25 ± 0.26) × 1017 m-3, and kTe to 1.93 ± 0.20 eV, in the RF case ne = (6.8 ± 1.8)×1015 m-3 and kTe = 2.6 ± 0.35 eV. The corresponding gas temperatures are 760±40 K and 440±20 K.

  9. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature. PMID:25971011

  10. A Review of MR Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, D.G.; Hellem, T.L.; Shi, X.-F.; Sung, Y.H.; Prescot, A.P.; Kim, T.S.; Huber, R.S.; Forrest, L.N.; Renshaw, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness whose pathophysiology is poorly understood and for which there is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and treatment. MR spectroscopy is a neuroimaging method capable of in vivo measurement of neurochemicals relevant to bipolar disorder neurobiology. MR spectroscopy studies of adult bipolar disorder provide consistent evidence for alterations in the glutamate system and mitochondrial function. In bipolar disorder, these 2 phenomena may be linked because 85% of glucose in the brain is consumed by glutamatergic neurotransmission and the conversion of glutamate to glutamine. The purpose of this article is to review the MR spectroscopic imaging literature in pediatric bipolar disorder, at-risk samples, and severe mood dysregulation, with a focus on the published findings that are relevant to glutamatergic and mitochondrial functioning. Potential directions for future MR spectroscopy studies of the glutamate system and mitochondrial dysfunction in pediatric bipolar disorder are discussed. PMID:24557702

  11. Gas temperature and electron temperature measurements by emission spectroscopy for an atmospheric microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Davide; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    A microplasma suitable for material processing at atmospheric pressure in argon and argon-oxygen mixtures is being studied here. The microplasma is ignited by a high voltage dc pulse and sustained by low power (1-5W) at 450MHz. the mechanisms responsible for sustaining the microplasma require a more detailed analysis, which will be the subject of further study. Here it is shown that the microplasma is in nonequilibrium and appears to be in glow mode. The effect of power and oxygen content is also analyzed in terms of gas temperature and electron temperature. Both the gas temperature and the electron temperature have been determined by spectral emission and for the latter a very simple method has been used based on a collisional-radiative model. It is observed that power coupling is affected by a combination of factors and that prediction and control of the energy flow are not always straightforward even for simple argon plasmas. Varying gas content concentration has shown that oxygen creates a preferential energy channel towards increasing the gas temperature. Overall the results have shown that combined multiple diagnostics are necessary to understand plasma characteristics and that spectral emission can represent a valuable tool for tailoring microplasma to specific processing requirements.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J.; Kronberger, M.; Mahner, E.; Schmitzer, C.; Sanchez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Midttun, O.; O'Neil, M.; Pereira, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Myllyperkioe, P.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H{sup -} ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, and H{sub {gamma}} Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  13. Luminescence spectroscopy and microscopy applied to study gem materials: a case study of C centre containing diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainschwang, Thomas; Karampelas, Stefanos; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Notari, Franck

    2013-06-01

    The methods of luminescence spectroscopy and microscopy are widely used for the analysis of gem materials. This paper gives an overview of the most important applications of the analysis of laser and UV excited luminescence by spectroscopy and visually by microscopy with emphasis on diamond, and specifically natural type Ib diamond, little studied so far. Luminescence based techniques are paramount to the gemmological analysis of diamond, in order to determine whether it is natural, treated or synthetic. The great sensitivity of luminescence helps detect some emitting centres that are undetectable by any other analytical method. Hence, especially for diamond, luminescence is an enabling technology, as illustrated by its pioneering use of imagery for the separation of natural and synthetic diamond, and of spectroscopy for the detection of High Pressure-High Temperature treatment. For all other gemstones the applications are at the moment less numerous, but nevertheless they remain highly important. They provide quickly information on the identification of a gem material, and its treatment. Besides the study of broad band emissions caused by various colour centres, the typical PL-causing trace elements (amongst others) are chromium, manganese, uranium and rare earth elements. In pearls the study of broad band luminescence can be useful, and particularly the study of pink to red porphyrin luminescence in pearls from certain species such as Pinctada and Pteria and others can help identify the pearl-producing mollusc, or if a pearl has been dyed or not. Type Ib diamonds are representative of the importance and complexity of the analysis of luminescence by microscopy and spectroscopy. They show a wide range of sometimes very complex emissions that result in luminescence colours from green to yellow to orange or red. These emissions show generally very inhomogeneous distribution. They are caused by a range of defects, however only a few of them are well characterized.

  14. β-delayed neutron emission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Rissanen, J.; Taín, J. L.; Algora, A.; Kratz, K. L.; Lhersonneau, G.; Pfeiffer, B.; Agramunt, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gorlychev, V.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Martínez, T.; Achouri, L.; Calvino, F.; Cortés, G.; Eronen, T.; García, A.; Parlog, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Pretel, C.; Valencia, E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of β-delayed neutron emission plays a major role in different fields such as nuclear technology, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. However the quality of the existing experimental data nowadays is not sufficient for the various technical and scientific applications and new high precision measurements are necessary to improve the data bases. One key aspect to the success of these high precission measurements is the use of a very pure ion beam that ensures that only the ion of interest is produced. The combination of the IGISOL mass separator with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap is an excellent tool for this type of measurement because of the ability to deliver isobarically and even isomerically clean beams. Another key feature of the installation is the non-chemical selectivity of the IGISOL ion source which allows measurements in the important region of refractory elements. This paper summarises the β-delayed neutron emission studies that have been carried out at the IGISOL facility with two different neutron detectors based on 3He counters in a polyethylene moderator: the Mainz neutron detector and the BEta deLayEd Neutron detector.

  15. A Study on N2O Measurement Characteristics Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soyoung; Kim, Seoungjin; Kang, Seongmin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Cho, Chang-Sang; Sa, Jea-Hwan; Jeon, Eui-Chan

    2014-01-01

    N2O, which is emitted mainly from nitrogen decomposition via bacteria, livestock manure, agricultural fertilizer use, fossil fuel combustion and waste incineration, is classified as a substance that causes significant destruction of the ozone layer. The N2O measurement methods for these emission sources may be divided into chromatography, optical, and electrical current measurements. Chromatography has been widely utilized for analyzing N2O. However, up until now, few studies have been conducted on N2O using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate performance of photoacoustic spectroscopy in this regard based on laboratory and field test results. The repeatability of photoacoustic spectroscopy was measured at 1.12%, which is lower than the repeatability of 3.0% suggested by the ISO 1564 standard, so, it has shown an excellent repeatability. The detection limit was determined to be 0.025 ppm, and the response time was confirmed to be 3 min and 26 s. The results of comparison between these measurements and GC show that the latter has superior accuracy, but mobility and convenience are superior for PAS. On the contrary, GC has a continuous measurement limitation, but PAS makes it possible to conduct continuous measurements. Therefore, PAS can be extremely useful to confirm the characteristics of N2O emissions and to quantify their amount. PMID:25106022

  16. A study on N2O measurement characteristics using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS).

    PubMed

    Kang, Soyoung; Kim, Seoungjin; Kang, Seongmin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Cho, Chang-Sang; Sa, Jea-Hwan; Jeon, Eui-Chan

    2014-01-01

    N2O, which is emitted mainly from nitrogen decomposition via bacteria, livestock manure, agricultural fertilizer use, fossil fuel combustion and waste incineration, is classified as a substance that causes significant destruction of the ozone layer. The N2O measurement methods for these emission sources may be divided into chromatography, optical, and electrical current measurements. Chromatography has been widely utilized for analyzing N2O. However, up until now, few studies have been conducted on N2O using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate performance of photoacoustic spectroscopy in this regard based on laboratory and field test results. The repeatability of photoacoustic spectroscopy was measured at 1.12%, which is lower than the repeatability of 3.0% suggested by the ISO 1564 standard, so, it has shown an excellent repeatability. The detection limit was determined to be 0.025 ppm, and the response time was confirmed to be 3 min and 26 s. The results of comparison between these measurements and GC show that the latter has superior accuracy, but mobility and convenience are superior for PAS. On the contrary, GC has a continuous measurement limitation, but PAS makes it possible to conduct continuous measurements. Therefore, PAS can be extremely useful to confirm the characteristics of N2O emissions and to quantify their amount.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 (2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ thymine and PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  18. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  19. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 (2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ thymine and PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment. PMID:26567662

  20. Assessment of the maturity and biological parameters of compost produced from dairy manure and rice chaff by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Zhenhua; Yu, Guanghui; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of maturity and biological parameters is important in the composting process. In this study, excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to evaluate the maturity and biological parameters of compost produced from the co-composting of dairy and rice chaff. The results from a Pearson correlation analysis between traditional physico-chemical maturity indices and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) parameters showed that among the FRI parameters, P(V,n)/P(III,n) and P(V,n) were suitable for the assessment of compost maturity. Moreover, the FRI parameters could be used to evaluate biological parameters including the germination index (GI) and ribotype evolution which indicate the bacterial community structure and dynamics. P(IV,n) was the most suitable indicator for revealing the community structure and dynamics during the composting process. Fluorescence spectroscopy combined with the FRI analysis could be used as a sensitive and efficient tool for assessing compost maturity and biological parameters. PMID:22342088

  1. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy of astronomical and laboratory sources at 8.5 micron. [absorption line profiles of nitrogen oxide and black body emission from Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M.; Kostiuk, T.; Cohen, S.; Buhl, D.; Vonthuna, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The first infrared heterodyne spectrometer using tuneable semiconductor (PbSe) diode lasers has been constructed and was used near 8.5 micron to measure absorption line profiles of N2O in the laboratory and black body emission from the Moon and from Mars. Spectral information was recorded over a 200 MHz bandwidth using an 8-channel filter bank. The resolution was 25 MHz and the minimum detectable (black body) power was 1 x 10 to the minus 16th power watts for 8 minutes of integration. The results demonstrate the usefulness of heterodyne spectroscopy for the study of remote and local sources in the infrared.

  2. The relationship between gasoline composition and vehicle hydrocarbon emissions: a review of current studies and future research needs.

    PubMed Central

    Schuetzle, D; Siegl, W O; Jensen, T E; Dearth, M A; Kaiser, E W; Gorse, R; Kreucher, W; Kulik, E

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current studies concerning the relationship of fuel composition to vehicle engine-out and tail-pipe emissions and to outline future research needed in this area. A number of recent combustion experiments and vehicle studies demonstrated that reformulated gasoline can reduce vehicle engine-out, tail-pipe, running-loss, and evaporative emissions. Some of these studies were extended to understand the fundamental relationships between fuel composition and emissions. To further establish these relationships, it was necessary to develop advanced analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons in fuels and vehicle emissions. The development of real-time techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser diode spectroscopy, and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry were useful in studying the transient behavior of exhaust emissions under various engine operating conditions. Laboratory studies using specific fuels and fuel blends were carried out using pulse flame combustors, single- and multicylinder engines, and vehicle fleets. Chemometric statistical methods were used to analyze the large volumes of emissions data generated from these studies. Models were developed that were able to accurately predict tail-pipe emissions from fuel chemical and physical compositional data. Some of the primary fuel precursors for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and C2-C4 alkene emissions are described. These studies demonstrated that there is a strong relationship between gasoline composition and tail-pipe emissions. PMID:7529705

  3. Francium Spectroscopy for Weak Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Francium, a radioactive element, is the heaviest alkali. Its atomic and nuclear structure makes it an ideal laboratory to study the weak interaction. Laser trapping and cooling in-line with the superconducting LINAC accelerator at Stony Brook opened the precision study of its atomic structure. I will present our proposal and progress towards weak interaction measurements at TRIUMF, the National Canadian Accelerator in Vancouver. These include the commissioning run of the Francium Trapping Facility, hyperfine anomaly measurements on a chain of Fr isotopes, the nuclear anapole moment through parity non-conserving transitions in the ground state hyperfine manifold. These measurements should shed light on the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction. This work is done by the FrPNC collaboration: S. Aubin College of William and Mary, J. A. Behr TRIUMF, R. Collister U. Manitoba, E. Gomez UASLP, G. Gwinner U. Manitoba, M. R. Pearson TRIUMF, L. A. Orozco UMD, M. Tandecki TRIUMF, J. Zhang UMD Supported by NSF and DOE from the USA; TRIUMF, NRC and NSERC from Canada; and CONACYT from Mexico

  4. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  5. IFU Spectroscopy of 10 ETG nuclei: Properties of the circumnuclear gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.

    2015-09-01

    LINERs are galactic nuclei containing spectra with prominence of low-ionization lines. Several ionization sources are able to produce a LINER-like spectra (e.g. shocks, low-luminosity AGNs, pAGB stars). In this work, we will present an analysis performed on a sample of 10 massive ETGs with distances up to 30 Mpc. This sample was observed with the GMOS-IFU installed on the Gemini-South Telescope. The data cubes of the galaxies have a FOV of 3.5 - 5 arcsec2 and a spatial resolution of about 0.6 -- 1.0 arcsec. After subtracting the stellar component of the galaxies by means of spectral synthesis, we studied the emission lines all over the FOV of the data cubes. In galaxies where an AGN was clearly detected, we found ionized gaseous discs and also a low-velocity extended emission perpendicular to the gas discs. We concluded that only ionizing photons emerging from the AGNs are not enough to photoionize the gaseous discs of the galaxies. On the other hand, it seems to be responsible for the photoionization of the low-velocity extended gas perpendicular to the discs. We propose a scheme where some collimating agent, somehow aligned to the gaseous discs, may be present in some LINER-like AGNs in the local universe.

  6. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A micro-air corona discharge, which is one of the plasmas successfully used for gene transfection in terms of high transfection and cell viability rates, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. This non-equilibrium low temperature plasma is generated from the tip of a pulsed high voltage micro-tube (0.2 mm inner diameter and 0.7 mm for outer diameter) placed 2 mm in front of a petri dish containing deionized water and set on a grounded copper plate. The electron temperature, equal to about 6.75 eV near the electrode tip and decreased down to 3.4 eV near the plate, has been estimated, with an error bar of about 30%, from an interesting approach based on the experimental ratio of the closest nitrogen emission spectra of \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm and N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm. This is based on one hand on a balance equation between creations and losses of the excited upper levels of these two UV spectra and on the other hand on the electron impact rates of the creation of these upper levels calculated from solution of the multi-term Boltzmann equation. Then using the measured Hα spectrum, electron density n e has been estimated from Stark broadening versus the inter-electrode position with an average error bar of about 50%. n e  ≈  1  ×  1015 cm-3 is near the tip coherent with the usual magnitude of electron density in the streamer head developed near the tip of the corona discharges. Rotational temperatures, estimated from comparison of synthetic and experimental spectra of OH(A  -  X), \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm, and N2(SPS) at 337 nm are respectively equal to 2350 K, 2000 K and 700 K in the gap space. This clearly underlines a thermal non-equilibrium of the corresponding excited species generated inside the thin streamer filaments. But, due to the high dilution of these species in the background gas, these high rotational temperatures do not affect the mean gas temperature that remains close to 300

  7. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A micro-air corona discharge, which is one of the plasmas successfully used for gene transfection in terms of high transfection and cell viability rates, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. This non-equilibrium low temperature plasma is generated from the tip of a pulsed high voltage micro-tube (0.2 mm inner diameter and 0.7 mm for outer diameter) placed 2 mm in front of a petri dish containing deionized water and set on a grounded copper plate. The electron temperature, equal to about 6.75 eV near the electrode tip and decreased down to 3.4 eV near the plate, has been estimated, with an error bar of about 30%, from an interesting approach based on the experimental ratio of the closest nitrogen emission spectra of \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm and N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm. This is based on one hand on a balance equation between creations and losses of the excited upper levels of these two UV spectra and on the other hand on the electron impact rates of the creation of these upper levels calculated from solution of the multi-term Boltzmann equation. Then using the measured Hα spectrum, electron density n e has been estimated from Stark broadening versus the inter-electrode position with an average error bar of about 50%. n e  ≈  1  ×  1015 cm‑3 is near the tip coherent with the usual magnitude of electron density in the streamer head developed near the tip of the corona discharges. Rotational temperatures, estimated from comparison of synthetic and experimental spectra of OH(A  ‑  X), \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm, and N2(SPS) at 337 nm are respectively equal to 2350 K, 2000 K and 700 K in the gap space. This clearly underlines a thermal non-equilibrium of the corresponding excited species generated inside the thin streamer filaments. But, due to the high dilution of these species in the background gas, these high rotational temperatures do not affect the mean gas temperature that remains close to 300

  8. Ion implantation in semiconductors studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.

    1989-03-01

    The application of Mössbauer spectroscopy as an extremely sensitive characterization technique for ion-implanted semiconductors, is illustrated. Factors influencing the final landing site of implanted ions are first reviewed, as well as ion beam induced material modifications. Recent applications of Mössbauer spectroscopy in this field are then discussed including the study of supersaturated solutions of Sb and Sn in Si, the formation of epitaxial and buried silicides and the search for the DX-center in GaAs.

  9. Optical spectroscopy study of Weyl Semimetal NbP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeremy; Jiang, Yuxuan; Dun, Zhiling; Zhou, Haidong; Smirnov, Dmitry; Jiang, Zhigang

    Weyl semimetals have attracted much interest lately because of its unique band structure, where conduction band and valence band touch at discrete points. Here, we report on optical spectroscopy study of Weyl semimetal NbP, seeking evidence for the existence of Weyl fermions. Specifically, using Raman spectroscopy we investigate the anisotropic response of Raman-active phonon modes in NbP and compare with Quantum Espresso simulations. Using magneto-infrared spectroscopy in a high magnetic field up to 17.5T, we observe several Landau level transitions and compare with the theoretical model of three-dimensional massless Dirac/Weyl fermions. By combining our data with low-temperature magneto-transport measurement, the magnetic field dispersion of Landau levels in NbP is obtained.

  10. Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Normal and Burned Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnani, Faranak; Maass, David; Idris, Ahamed; Glosser, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Burn injuries are a significant medical problem, and need to be treated quickly and precisely. Burned skin needs to be removed early, within hours (less than 24 hrs) of injury, when the margins of the burn are still hard to define. Studies show that treating and excising burn wounds soon after the injury prevents the wound from becoming deeper, reduces the release of proinflammatory mediators, and reduces or prevents the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome. Also, removing burned skin prepares the affected region for skin grafting. Raman spectroscopy could be used as an objective diagnostic method that will assist burn surgeons in removing burned skin precisely. As a first step in developing a diagnostic tool, we present Raman spectroscopy information from normal and burned ex vivo rat skin, and a comparison of our findings. Raman spectroscopy is explored for its specificity and sensitivity.

  11. Social Perception in Infancy: A Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Blasi, Anna; Volein, Agnes; Everdell, Nick; Elwell, Claire E.; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to engage and communicate in a social world is one of the defining characteristics of the human species. While the network of regions that compose the social brain have been the subject of extensive research in adults, there are limited techniques available for monitoring young infants. This study used near infrared spectroscopy to…

  12. Rotational Mobility in a Crystal Studied by Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionisio, Madalena S. C.; Diogo, Herminio P.; Farinha, J. P. S.; Ramos, Joaquim J. Moura

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate physical chemistry courses that uses the experimental technique of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy to study molecular mobility in a crystal is proposed. An experiment provides an excellent opportunity for dealing with a wide diversity of important basic concepts in physical chemistry.

  13. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin; Liao, Shanshan

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  14. Simulating Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Complexes with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Khalil, Munira; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-11-09

    Valence-to-core (VtC) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has emerged as a power- ful technique for the structural characterization of complex organometallic compounds in realistic environments. Since the spectrum represents electronic transitions from the ligand molecular orbitals to the core holes of the metal centers, the approach is more chemically sensitive to the metal-ligand bonding character compared with con- ventional X-ray absorption techniques. In this paper we study how linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) can be harnessed to simulate K-edge VtC X-ray emission spectra reliably. LR-TDDFT allows one to go beyond the single-particle picture that has been extensively used to simulate VtC-XES. We con- sider seven low- and high-spin model complexes involving chromium, manganese and iron transition metal centers. Our results are in good agreement with experiment.

  15. Probing valence orbital composition with iron Kbeta X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nicole; Petrenko, Taras; Bergmann, Uwe; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2010-07-21

    A systematic study of 12 ferric and ferrous Kbeta X-ray emission spectra (XES) is presented. The factors contributing to the Kbeta main line and the valence to core region of the spectra are experimentally assessed and quantitatively evaluated. While the Kbeta main line spectra are dominated by spin state contributions, the valence to core region is shown to have greater sensitivity to changes in the chemical environment. A density functional theory (DFT) based approach is used to calculate the experimental valence spectra and to evaluate the contributions to experimental intensities and energies. The spectra are found to be dominated by iron np to 1s electric dipole allowed transitions, with pronounced sensitivity to spin state, ligand identity, ligand ionization state, hybridization state, and metal-ligand bond lengths. These findings serve as an important calibration for future applications to iron active sites in biological and chemical catalysis. Potential applications to Compound II heme derivatives are highlighted.

  16. Determination of the electron temperature by optical emission spectroscopy in a 13.56 MHz dusty methane plasma: Influence of the power

    SciTech Connect

    Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2009-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is applied to the study of a radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) discharge in methane used to obtain hydrogenated carbon films and particles. The methane dissociation allows the creation of species in the plasma bulk as H{sub 2}, H, and CH. The emission lines of these species are studied as a function of time and of incident rf power. The electron temperature is determined from the two line radiance ratio method and the corona balance model using the Balmer lines (H{sub alpha}, H{sub beta}, and H{sub gamma}). The incident rf power enhancement in the range 40-120 W leads to the increase in the emission line intensities as the electron temperature decreases. The temporal variations of CH and hydrogen emission lines, of the dc self-bias voltage, and of the electron temperature are correlated both with the particle behavior and growth in the plasma, and with the coating that grows onto the powered electrode.

  17. Study of Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  18. Estimation of vehicular emissions using dynamic emission factors: A case study of Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Dhirendra; Goyal, P.

    2014-12-01

    The estimation of vehicular emissions depends mainly on the values of emission factors, which are used for the development of a comprehensive emission inventory of vehicles. In this study the variations of emission factors as well as the emission rates have been studied in Delhi. The implementation of compressed natural gas (CNG), in the diesel and petrol, public vehicles in the year 2001 has changed the complete air quality scenario of Delhi. The dynamic emission factors of criteria pollutants viz. carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10) for all types of vehicles have been developed after, which are based on the several factors such as regulated emission limits, number of vehicle deterioration, vehicle increment, vehicle age etc. These emission factors are found to be decreased continuously throughout the study years 2003-2012. The International Vehicle Emissions (IVE) model is used to estimate the emissions of criteria pollutants by utilizing a dataset available from field observations at different traffic intersections in Delhi. Thus the vehicular emissions, based on dynamic emission factors have been estimated for the years 2003-2012, which are found to be comparable with the monitored concentrations at different locations in Delhi. It is noticed that the total emissions of CO, NOx, and PM10 are increased by 45.63%, 68.88% and 17.92%, respectively up to the year 2012 and the emissions of NOx and PM10 are grown continuously with an annual average growth rate of 5.4% and 1.7% respectively.

  19. Lasing dynamics study by femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence non-collinear optical parametric amplification spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dang; Qing, Liao; Peng-Cheng, Mao; Hong-Bing, Fu; Yu-Xiang, Weng

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence non-collinear optical parametric amplification spectroscopy (FNOPAS) is a versatile technique with advantages of high sensitivity, broad detection bandwidth, and intrinsic spectrum correction function. These advantages should benefit the study of coherent emission, such as measurement of lasing dynamics. In this letter, the FNOPAS was used to trace the lasing process in Rhodamine 6G (R6G) solution and organic semiconductor nano-wires. High-quality transient emission spectra and lasing dynamic traces were acquired, which demonstrates the applicability of FNOPAS in the study of lasing dynamics. Our work extends the application scope of the FNOPAS technique. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20925313 and 21503066), the Innovation Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJCX2-YW-W25), the Postdoctoral Project of Hebei University, China, and the Project of Science and Technology Bureau of Baoding City, China (Grant No. 15ZG029).

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy of laser emission from dye-doped droplets.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A; Latifi, H; Armstrong, R L; Pinnick, R G

    1989-02-15

    Micrometer-sized droplets of Rhodamine 6G solution in water and ethanol are irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. Coupling of the spontaneous fluorescence emission with natural resonant modes of the spherical droplets results in stimulated emission, with each droplet behaving like a laser cavity. Spectral observations suggest that droplet lasing emission is supported by resonances of a single mode order. The emission exhibits faster rise times and is shorter lived than corresponding bulk-liquid fluorescence. Lasing in droplets is generally initiated almost simultaneously with elastic scattering, unlike stimulated Raman scattering, which is significantly delayed.

  1. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    PubMed

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  2. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L. ); Kroutil, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  3. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L.; Kroutil, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H. E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  5. X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF AS1101 WITH CHANDRA, XMM-NEWTON, AND ROSAT: BANDPASS DEPENDENCE OF THE TEMPERATURE PROFILE AND SOFT EXCESS EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Nevalainen, Jukka

    2011-09-10

    We present spatially resolved spectroscopy of the galaxy cluster AS1101, also known as Sersic 159-03, with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT, and investigate the presence of soft X-ray excess emission above the contribution from the hot intracluster medium. In earlier papers we reported an extremely bright soft excess component that reached 100% of the thermal radiation in the R2 ROSAT band (0.2-0.4 keV), using the H I column density measurement by Dickey and Lockman. In this paper we use the newer Leiden-Argentine-Bonn survey measurements of the H I column density toward AS1101, significantly lower than the previous value, and show that the soft excess emission in AS1101 is now at the level of 10%-20% of the hot gas emission, in line with those of a large sample of clusters analyzed by Bonamente et al. in 2002. The ROSAT soft excess emission is detected regardless of calibration uncertainties between Chandra and XMM-Newton. This new analysis of AS1101 indicates that the 1/4 keV band emission is compatible with the presence of warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) filaments connected to the cluster and extending outward into the intergalactic medium; the temperatures we find in this study are typically lower than those of the WHIM probed in other X-ray studies. We also show that the soft excess emission is compatible with a non-thermal origin as the inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons off the cosmic microwave background, with pressure less than 1% of the thermal electrons.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  7. NIR emission studies and dielectric properties of Er3+-doped multicomponent tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajna, M. S.; Thomas, Sunil; Jayakrishnan, C.; Joseph, Cyriac; Biju, P. R.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    Multicomponent tellurite glasses containing altered concentrations of Er2O3 (ranging from 0 to 1 mol%) were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Investigations through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR) emission studies and dielectric measurement techniques were done to probe their compositional, structural, spectroscopic and dielectric characteristics. The broad emission together with the high values of the effective linewidth (~ 63 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (9.67 × 10- 21 cm2) and lifetime (2.56 ms) of 4I13/2 level for 0.5 mol% of Er3+ makes these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the measured capacitance and dissipation factor, the relative permittivity, dielectric loss and the conductivity were computed; which furnish the dielectric nature of the multicomponent tellurite glasses that depend on the applied frequency. Assuming the ideal Debye behavior as substantiated by Cole-Cole plot, an examination of the real and imaginary parts of impedance was performed. The power-law and Cole-Cole parameters were resolved for all the glass samples. From the assessment of the emission analysis and dielectric properties of the glass samples, it was obvious that the Er3+ ion concentration had played a vital role in tuning the optical and dielectric properties and the 0.5 mol% of Er3+ -doped glass was confirmed as the optimum composition.

  8. NIR emission studies and dielectric properties of Er(3+)-doped multicomponent tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Sajna, M S; Thomas, Sunil; Jayakrishnan, C; Joseph, Cyriac; Biju, P R; Unnikrishnan, N V

    2016-05-15

    Multicomponent tellurite glasses containing altered concentrations of Er2O3 (ranging from 0 to 1 mol%) were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Investigations through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR) emission studies and dielectric measurement techniques were done to probe their compositional, structural, spectroscopic and dielectric characteristics. The broad emission together with the high values of the effective linewidth (~63 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (9.67 × 10(-21) cm(2)) and lifetime (2.56 ms) of (4)I13/2 level for 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) makes these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the measured capacitance and dissipation factor, the relative permittivity, dielectric loss and the conductivity were computed; which furnish the dielectric nature of the multicomponent tellurite glasses that depend on the applied frequency. Assuming the ideal Debye behavior as substantiated by Cole-Cole plot, an examination of the real and imaginary parts of impedance was performed. The power-law and Cole-Cole parameters were resolved for all the glass samples. From the assessment of the emission analysis and dielectric properties of the glass samples, it was obvious that the Er(3+) ion concentration had played a vital role in tuning the optical and dielectric properties and the 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) -doped glass was confirmed as the optimum composition. PMID:26967514

  9. NIR emission studies and dielectric properties of Er(3+)-doped multicomponent tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Sajna, M S; Thomas, Sunil; Jayakrishnan, C; Joseph, Cyriac; Biju, P R; Unnikrishnan, N V

    2016-05-15

    Multicomponent tellurite glasses containing altered concentrations of Er2O3 (ranging from 0 to 1 mol%) were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Investigations through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR) emission studies and dielectric measurement techniques were done to probe their compositional, structural, spectroscopic and dielectric characteristics. The broad emission together with the high values of the effective linewidth (~63 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (9.67 × 10(-21) cm(2)) and lifetime (2.56 ms) of (4)I13/2 level for 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) makes these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the measured capacitance and dissipation factor, the relative permittivity, dielectric loss and the conductivity were computed; which furnish the dielectric nature of the multicomponent tellurite glasses that depend on the applied frequency. Assuming the ideal Debye behavior as substantiated by Cole-Cole plot, an examination of the real and imaginary parts of impedance was performed. The power-law and Cole-Cole parameters were resolved for all the glass samples. From the assessment of the emission analysis and dielectric properties of the glass samples, it was obvious that the Er(3+) ion concentration had played a vital role in tuning the optical and dielectric properties and the 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) -doped glass was confirmed as the optimum composition.

  10. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  11. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  12. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  13. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  14. Determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaber, A M Y; Mehanna, N A; Sultan, S M

    2009-06-15

    The continuous flow sample introduction technique with a hydride generator system in conjunction with an inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-AES-HG), is used in this study for quantitative determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen in aqueous and solid samples. Ammonia vapor released from ammonium salt after treatment with concentrated NaOH is transferred by argon to plasma for detection at 174.273 nm using axial argon plasma mode. The calibration curves were linear within a range of 25-1000 mg L(-1)N as ammonium molybdate with correlation coefficients of better than 0.99 and limits of detection of about 10-25mg L(-1)N. The percent recovery of N (25-500 mg L(-1)N) in soft (distilled) water and high salt content (1.7 mol L(-1) NaCl) matrices was found to be in the range of about 97-102% with %RSD in the range of 4.6-0.62. The sensitivity, limit of detection, and blank contribution from the atmospheric nitrogen, were tremendously improved in this method compared with the available ICP-AES spray chamber counterpart. Furthermore, the ICP-AES-HG method gave results for real samples (soil, fertilizer, waste water) containing about 50-1800 mg L(-1)N in good agreement with those obtained by the standard Kjeldahl method. No statistical differences at the 95% confidence level on applying the t-test were observed between the values obtained by the two methods. Thus, the ICP-AES-HG method is reliable and faster than the conventional tedious Kjeldahl method, superior to the ICP-AES spray chamber method, and almost free from matrix interference which is usually a critical factor in atomic emission spectroscopic techniques.

  15. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy for simultaneous measurement of plasma electron density and temperature in a low-pressure microwave induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konjevic, N.; Jovicevic, S.; Ivkovic, M.

    2009-10-15

    The simple optical emission spectroscopy technique for diagnostics of low pressure microwave induced plasma (MIP) in hydrogen or in MIP seeded with hydrogen is described and tested. This technique uses the Boltzmann plot of relative line intensities along Balmer spectral series in conjunction with the criterion for partial local thermodynamic equilibrium for low electron density (N{sub e}) plasma diagnostics. The proposed technique is tested in a low pressure MIP discharge for simultaneous determination of electron density N{sub e} (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and temperature T{sub e}.

  17. Development of advanced electrochemical emission spectroscopy for monitoring corrosion in simulated DOE liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    'Objective of this project is to develop and use Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy (EES) and other electrochemical techniques as in situ tools for exploring corrosion mechanisms of iron and carbon steel in highly alkaline solutions and for continuously monitoring corrosion on structural materials in DOE liquid waste storage system. In particular, the author will explore the fundamental aspects of the passive behavior of pure iron since breakdown of passivity leads to localized corrosion. This report summarizes work after 1 year of a 3 year project.'

  18. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in polymer study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeonju; Noda, Isao; Jung, Young Mee

    2015-01-01

    This review outlines the recent works of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in polymer study. 2DCOS is a powerful technique applicable to the in-depth analysis of various spectral data of polymers obtained under some type of perturbation. The powerful utility of 2DCOS combined with various analytical techniques in polymer studies and noteworthy developments of 2DCOS used in this field are also highlighted. PMID:25815286

  19. Isotope ratio determination of uranium by optical emission spectroscopy on a laser-produced plasma - basic investigations and analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1998-05-01

    We report in this paper, the first determination of the isotope ratio (238/235) in an uranium sample by optical emission spectroscopy on a laser-produced plasma at reduced pressure (2.67 Pa). Investigations aimed at developing a new application of laser ablation for analytical isotope control of uranium are presented. Optimized experimental conditions allow one to obtain atomic emission spectra characterized by the narrowest possible line widths of the order of 0.01 nm for the investigated transition UII 424.437 nm. We show the possibility to achieve a relative precision in the range of 5% for an enrichment of 3.5% 235U. The influence of different relevant plasma parameters on the measured line width is discussed.

  20. Methyl oleate as matrix simulacrum for the simultaneous determination of metals in biodiesel samples by flame atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Conny Cerai; Costa, Letícia Malta; Barbeira, Paulo Jorge Sanches

    2015-06-01

    A measurement procedure for direct and simultaneous quantification of Na, K and Ca in biodiesel by flame atomic emission spectroscopy (FAES) was developed. A lab-made device was constructed by coupling a nebulizer/combustion system from a commercial photometer to a continuous emission detector in a spectral range of 255 to 862 nm. Instrumental optimizations were carried out evaluating the most important variables, such as gas flow rates and sample introduction temperature, indicating that a temperature of 50°C enhances the analytical signals and assures good precision. The direct analysis method was properly validated and presented limits of quantification of 0.09, 0.07 and 0.43 μg kg(-1) for Na, K and Ca, respectively. Accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked by comparing the results with those obtained by the standard procedure described in ABNT NBR 15556 and the standard addition method. PMID:25863364

  1. Remote sensing of temperature and concentration profiles of a gas jet by coupling infrared emission spectroscopy and LIDAR for characterization of aircraft engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offret, J.-P.; Lebedinsky, J.; Navello, L.; Pina, V.; Serio, B.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature data play an important role in the combustion chamber since it determines both the efficiency and the rate of pollutants emission of engines. Air pollution problem concerns the emissions of gases such as CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and also aerosols, soot and volatile organic compounds. Flame combustion occurs in hostile environments where temperature and concentration profiles are often not easy to measure. In this study, a temperature and CO2 concentration profiles optical measurement method, suitable for combustion analysis, is discussed and presented. The proposed optical metrology method presents numerous advantages when compared to intrusive methods. The experimental setup comprises a passive radiative emission measurement method combined with an active laser-measurement method. The passive method is based on the use of gas emission spectroscopy. The experimental spectrometer device is coupled with an active method. The active method is used to investigate and correct complex flame profiles. This method similar to a LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) device is based on the measurement of Rayleigh scattering of a short laser pulse recorded using a high-speed streak camera. The whole experimental system of this new method is presented. Results obtained on a small-scale turbojet are shown and discussed in order to illustrate the potentials deliver by the sophisticated method. Both temperature and concentration profiles of the gas jet are presented and discussed.

  2. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfvénic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate √ {n_α /n_e } driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. More recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. We discuss further prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  3. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-06-05

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfv,nic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate similar ~ √(nα/ne) driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. Recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusionmore » devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. Finally, we discuss prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.« less

  4. Study Of A Formulated Pesticide By Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, S. R.; Mead, D. G.; Vidrine, D. W.

    1981-10-01

    Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the interactions of a carbamate insecticide with a clay carrier. The ability of photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy to measure infrared spectra from opaque samples non-destructively, is particularly valuable in this study where weak bonds might be destroyed by sample grinding. The results of this study show that the strong N-H stretching modes, which appear at approximately 3300 cm-1 in in the pure insecticide, are missing in the subtraction of the N-H group spectrum. This suggests that the hydrogen attached to the nitrogen of the carbamate is forming a reasonably strong bond with the hydrated silicate structure of the clay carrier. This interaction may effect the release rate of the pesticide upon application.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy at the large RF driven negative ion test facility ELISE: Instrumental setup and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Bonomo, F.

    2013-09-15

    One of the main topics to be investigated at the recently launched large (A{sub source}= 1.0 × 0.9 m{sup 2}) ITER relevant RF driven negative ion test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is the connection between the homogeneity of the plasma parameters close to the extraction system and the homogeneity of the extracted negative hydrogen ion beam. While several diagnostics techniques are available for measuring the beam homogeneity, the plasma parameters are determined by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) solely. First OES measurements close to the extraction system show that without magnetic filter field the vertical profile of the plasma emission is more or less symmetric, with maxima of the emission representing the projection of the plasma generation volumes, and a distinct minimum in between. The profile changes with the strength of the magnetic filter field but under all circumstances the plasma emission in ELISE is much more homogeneous compared to the smaller IPP prototype sources. Planned after this successful demonstration of the ELISE OES system is to combine OES with tomography in order to determine locally resolved values for the plasma parameters.

  6. The London low emission zone baseline study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank; Armstrong, Ben; Atkinson, Richard; Anderson, H Ross; Barratt, Ben; Beevers, Sean; Cook, Derek; Green, Dave; Derwent, Dick; Mudway, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul

    2011-11-01

    On February 4, 2008, the world's largest low emission zone (LEZ) was established. At 2644 km2, the zone encompasses most of Greater London. It restricts the entry of the oldest and most polluting diesel vehicles, including heavy-goods vehicles (haulage trucks), buses and coaches, larger vans, and minibuses. It does not apply to cars or motorcycles. The LEZ scheme will introduce increasingly stringent Euro emissions standards over time. The creation of this zone presented a unique opportunity to estimate the effects of a stepwise reduction in vehicle emissions on air quality and health. Before undertaking such an investigation, robust baseline data were gathered on air quality and the oxidative activity and metal content of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution monitors located in Greater London. In addition, methods were developed for using databases of electronic primary-care records in order to evaluate the zone's health effects. Our study began in 2007, using information about the planned restrictions in an agreed-upon LEZ scenario and year-on-year changes in the vehicle fleet in models to predict air pollution concentrations in London for the years 2005, 2008, and 2010. Based on this detailed emissions and air pollution modeling, the areas in London were then identified that were expected to show the greatest changes in air pollution concentrations and population exposures after the implementation of the LEZ. Using these predictions, the best placement of a pollution monitoring network was determined and the feasibility of evaluating the health effects using electronic primary-care records was assessed. To measure baseline pollutant concentrations before the implementation of the LEZ, a comprehensive monitoring network was established close to major roadways and intersections. Output-difference plots from statistical modeling for 2010 indicated seven key areas likely to experience the greatest change in concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (at least 3

  7. X-ray continuum emission spectroscopy from hot dense matter at Gbar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D. Falcone, R. W.; Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Swift, D. C.; Chapman, D. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Neumayer, P.

    2014-11-15

    We have measured the time-resolved x-ray continuum emission spectrum of ∼30 times compressed polystyrene created at stagnation of spherically convergent shock waves within the Gbar fundamental science campaign at the National Ignition Facility. From an exponential emission slope between 7.7 keV and 8.1 keV photon energy and using an emission model which accounts for reabsorption, we infer an average electron temperature of 375 ± 21 eV, which is in good agreement with HYDRA-1D simulations.

  8. Accurate measurement of the H I column density from H I 21 cm absorption-emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Kanekar, Nissim; Roy, Nirupam

    2013-07-01

    We present a detailed study of an estimator of the H I column density, based on a combination of H I 21 cm absorption and H I 21cm emission spectroscopy. This `isothermal' estimate is given by NHI, ISO = 1.823 × 1018 ∫ [τtot × TB / [ 1 - e-τtot]dV, where τtot is the total H I 21cm optical depth along the sightline and TB is the measured brightness temperature. We have used a Monte Carlo simulation to quantify the accuracy of the isothermal estimate by comparing the derived NHI, ISO with the true H I column density NHI. The simulation was carried out for a wide range of sightlines, including gas in different temperature phases and random locations along the path. We find that the results are statistically insensitive to the assumed gas temperature distribution and the positions of different phases along the line of sight. The median value of the ratio of the true H I column density to the isothermal estimate, NHI/NHI, ISO, is within a factor of 2 of unity while the 68.2 per cent confidence intervals are within a factor of ≈3 of unity, out to high H I column densities, ≤5 × 1023 cm-2 per 1 km s-1 channel, and high total optical depths, ≤1000. The isothermal estimator thus provides a significantly better measure of the H I column density than other methods, within a factor of a few of the true value even at the highest columns, and should allow us to directly probe the existence of high H I column density gas in the Milky Way.

  9. Electron Spectroscopy and Computational Studies of Dimethyl Methylphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Head, Ashley R; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Trotochaud, Lena; Eichhorn, Bryan; Kuklja, Maija M; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-03-31

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) is one of the most widely used molecules to simulate chemical warfare agents in adsorption experiments. However, the details of the electronic structure of the isolated molecule have not yet been reported. We have directly probed the occupied valence and core levels using gas phase photoelectron spectroscopy and the unoccupied states using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study the electronic structure, assign the spectral features, and visualize the molecular orbitals. Comparison with parent molecules shows that valence and core-level binding energies of DMMP follow trends of functional group substitution on the P center. The photoelectron and NEXAFS spectra of the isolated molecule will serve as a reference in studies of DMMP adsorbed on surfaces. PMID:26977778

  10. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Goeroge P. Miller; Dr. Christopher B. Winstead

    2001-12-04

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the avsorved signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time.

  11. In-vivo pharmacokinetic study of two fluorescein derivatives by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulie-Begu, Sylvie; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.

    1995-12-01

    We have already demonstrated the ability of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to measure the pH of superficial tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent probes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo behavior of such fluorescent probes. We report the monitoring of tissue fluorescence after injection of two fluorescein derivatives (carboxyfluorescein and biscarboxyethyl-carboxyfluorescein). The in vivo study was performed on anaesthetized adult Wistar rats. After laparotomy, CF or BCECF solution was injected into the penial vein. Fluorescence spectra were recorded during one hour using an optical multichannel analyzer coupled to a CCD camera. Fiber optic was placed alternatively on the liver area or on the skin. Blood samples were collected and fluorescence was measured in vitro. A clear linear relationship between dose and fluorescence intensity was found in liver for these fluorescent markers. Concerning spectral characteristics, it was found that CF and BCECF spectra show a shift compared to in vivo maximum emission peak and BCECF emission peak was different when recorded in the liver and in the skin. Differences of kinetic profiles are also observed between CF and BCECF. The BCECF derivative displays a fluorescence peak in the liver two minutes after injection, while CF fluorescence peak is observed seven minutes after injection. Clearance of skin fluorescence is slower than the plasmatic one indicating that dye elimination in superficial blood vessels does not follow the same pharmacokinetic behavior. Based on these preliminary findings, fluorescence spectroscopy appears as a tool in pharmacokinetic study in situ and in vivo.

  12. Evidence of satellite valley position in GaN by photoexcited field emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Pavlidis, D.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Evtukh, A.; Litovchenko, V.; Semenenko, N.

    2008-06-01

    GaN field emitter rods with nanometer diameter were fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching on a n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated under ultraviolet (UV) illumination. The Fowler-Nordheim plots of the emission current show different slopes for nonilluminated and UV illuminated devices. A model based on the electron emission from valleys having different specific electron affinities is proposed to explain the experimental results. In the absence of illumination, the GaN rods are almost fully depleted and emission takes place only from the lower valley. Upon UV illumination and presence of a high electric field at the emitter tip, the upper valley of the conduction band appears to be occupied by electrons generated at the valence band. The energy difference between the lower and upper valleys was determined to be 1.15eV and is in good agreement with formerly published theoretical and measured values.

  13. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna Fowler

    2008-10-13

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  14. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    ScienceCinema

    Joanna Fowler

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  15. Electronic structure of phospho-olivines LixFePO4 (x=0,1) fromsoft-x-ray-absorption and -emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Augustsson, A.; Zhuang, G.V.; Butorin, S.M.; Osorio-Guillen,J.M.; Dong, C.L.; Ahuja, R.; Chang, C.L.; Ross, P.N.; Nordgren, J.; Guo,J.-H.

    2005-07-17

    The electronic structure of the phospho-olivine LixFePO4 wasstudied using soft-x-ray-absorption (XAS) and emission spectroscopies.Characteristic changes in the valence and conduction bands are observedupon delithation of LiFePO4 into FePO4. In LiFePO4, the Fe-3d states arelocalized with little overlap with the O-2p states. Delithiation ofLiFePO4 gives stronger hybridization between Fe-3d states and O-2p statesleading to delocalization of the O-2p states. The Fe L-edge absorptionspectra yield "fingerprints" of the different valence states of Fe inLiFePO4 and FePO4. Resonant soft-x-ray-emission spectroscopy at the Fe Ledge shows strong contributions from resonant inelastic soft x-rayscattering (RIXS), which is described using an ionic picture of the Fe-3dstates. Together the Fe L-edge XAS and RIXS study reveals a bondingcharacter of the Fe 3d-O2p orbitals in FePO4 in contrast to a nonbondingcharacter in LiFePO4.

  16. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  17. Characterization of RF He-N2/Ar mixture plasma via Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Hussain, S. S.; Zakaullah, M.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.

    2016-08-01

    A Magnetic Pole Enhanced inductively coupled RF H e - N 2 / A r plasma is characterized using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The effect of helium mixing on electron density ( n e ) and temperature ( T e ) , electron energy probability functions (EEPFs), [ N ] atomic density, and N 2 dissociation is investigated. A Langmuir probe and a zero slope method based on trace rare gas-optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES) are employed to measure the electron temperature. It is noted that the electron temperature shows an increasing trend for both methods. However, the temperature measured by a zero slope method T e ( Z . S ) approaches the temperature measured by a Langmuir probe; T e ( L . P ) at 56% and above helium concentration in the discharge. "Advance actinometry" is employed to monitor the variation in [ N ] atomic density with helium concentration and gas pressure. It is noted that [ N ] atomic density increases at 56% and above helium in the discharge, which is consistent with the trend of electron temperature and EEPFs. A drastic enhancement in N 2 dissociation fraction D 1 determined by "advance actinometry" is noted at 56% and above helium concentration in the mixture due to modifications in different population and depopulation mechanisms. However, it is also noted that the dissociation fraction D 2 determined by intensity ratio method increases linearly with helium addition.

  18. Atomic emission and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in the direct current plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Direct Current Plasma (DCP) was investigated as a source for Atomic Emission (AE) and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (AFS). The DCP was optimized for AE analyses using simplex optimization and Box-Behnken partial factorial experimental design, varying argon flows, and plasma position. Results were compared with a univariate search carried out in the region of the simplex optimum. Canonical analysis demonstrated that no true optimum exists for sensitivity, precision, or drift. A stationary ridge, where combinations of conditions gave comparable instrumental responses, was found. The DCP as an excitation source for AFS in a flame was used for diagnostic studies of the DCP. Moving the aerosol introduction tube behind the DCP with respect to the flame improved the characteristics of the DCP as a narrow line source, although self-absorption was observed at high concentrations of metal salt solutions in the DCP. Detection limits for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, and Ni were in the low ng/mL region. Theoretical expressions for scatter correction with a two-line technique were derived, although no correction was necessary to achieve accurate results for standard reference materials.

  19. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 2: Wind propagation and emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Stremme, W.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2013-01-01

    A technique for measuring two-dimensional (2-D) plumes of volcanic gases with thermal emission spectroscopy was described in Part 1 by Stremme et al. (2012a). In that paper the instrumental aspects as well as retrieval strategies for obtaining the slant column images of SO2 and SiF4, as well as animations of particular events observed at the Popocatépetl volcano, were presented. This work focuses on the procedures for determining the propagation speed of the gases and estimating an emission rate from the given image sequences. A 2-D column density distribution of a volcanic gas, available as time-consecutive frames, provides information of a projected wind field and the average velocity at which the volcanic plume is propagating. This information is valuable since the largest uncertainties when calculating emission rates of the gases using remote sensing techniques arise from propagation velocities which are often inadequately assumed. The presented reconstruction method solves the equation of continuity as an ill-posed problem using mainly a Tikhonov-like regularisation. It is observed from the available data sets that if the main direction of propagation is perpendicular to the line-of-sight, the algorithm works well for SO2, which has the strongest signals, and also for SiF4 in some favourable cases. Due to the similarity of the algorithm used here with the reconstruction methods used for profile retrievals based on optimal estimation theory, diagnostic tools like the averaging kernels can be calculated in an analogous manner and the information can be quantified as degrees of freedom. Thus, it is shown that the combination of wind field and column distribution of the gas plume can provide the emission rate of the volcano both during day and night.

  20. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  1. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidler, G. T.; Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ˜5 keV to ˜10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 106-107 photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  2. Nanoparticle microinjection and Raman spectroscopy as tools for nanotoxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Candeloro, Patrizio; Tirinato, Luca; Malara, Natalia; Fregola, Annalisa; Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor; Perozziello, Gerardo; Gentile, Francesco; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Das, Gobind; Liberale, Carlo; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2011-11-01

    Microinjection techniques and Raman spectroscopy have been combined to provide a new methodology to investigate the cytotoxic effects due to the interaction of nanomaterials with cells. In the present work, this novel technique has been used to investigate the effects of Ag and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles on Hela cells. The nanoparticles are microinjected inside the cells and these latter ones are probed by means of Raman spectroscopy after a short incubation time, in order to highlight the first and impulsive mechanisms developed by the cells to counteract the presence of the nanoparticles. The results put in evidence a different behaviour of the cells treated with nanoparticles in comparison with the control cells; these differences are supposed to be generated by an emerging oxidative stress due to the nanoparticles. The achieved results demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method as a new tool for nanotoxicity studies.

  3. Beta-decay studies using total absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GSI-TAS Collaboration; LUCRECIA-TAgS Collaboration; Algora, A.; Batist, L.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cano-Ott, D.; Collatz, R.; Courtin, S.; Dessagne, Ph; Fraile, L. M.; Gadea, A.; Gelletly, W.; Hellström, M.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kirchner, R.; Karny, M.; Le Scornet, G.; Miehé, Ch; Maréchal, F.; Moroz, F.; Nácher, E.; Poirier, E.; Roeckl, E.; Rubio, B.; Rykaczewski, K.; Tain, J. L.; Tengblad, O.; Wittmann, V.

    2003-04-01

    . Beta-decay experiments are a primary source of information for nuclear-structure studies and at the same time complementary to in-beam investigations of nuclei far from stability. Although both types of experiment are mainly based on γ -ray spectroscopy, they face different experimental problems. The so-called Pandemonium effect is a critical problem in β -decay if we are to test theoretically calculated transition probabilities. In this contribution we will present a solution to this problem using total absorption spectroscopy methods. We will also present some examples of experiments carried out with the Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS) at GSI an describe a new device LUCRECIA recently installed at CERN.

  4. [Study on spectral emissivity of C/C composites].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Cao, Wei-Wei; Jing, Min; Dong, Xing-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Guo

    2009-11-01

    Different types of C/C composites were prepared by conventional molding, and the changes in normal spectral emissivity of samples were tested. The testing results show that spectral emissivity of C/C composite reinforced by short cut carbon fibers is generally higher than the sample reinforced by carbon cloth in the entire 2500-13000nm wavelength region. The structure of short cut carbon fibers is relatively loose and the number of material particles is less than other samples in unit volume, which increases the penetration depth of electromagnetic waves. This is the reason for higher normal spectral emissivity and better heat radiation property. Meanwhile, the test results of normal spectral emissivity for fiber perform and C/C composite samples show that the spectral emissivity of resin carbon is better than fiber carbon because of the difference in microstructure for the two kinds of carbon materials. Laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the microstructures of different carbon materials, and the results show that because sp3 and sp2 hybrid states of carbon atoms in resin carbon produced more vibration modes, the resin carbon also has higher normal spectral emissivity and better characteristics of heat radiation.

  5. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  6. UVES and X-Shooter spectroscopy of the emission line AM CVn systems GP Com and V396 Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, T.; Steeghs, D.; Groot, P. J.; Marsh, T. R.; Nelemans, G.; Roelofs, G. H. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the AM CVn-type binaries GP Com and V396 Hya obtained with VLT/X-Shooter and VLT/UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). We fully resolve the narrow central components of the dominant helium lines and determine radial velocity semi-amplitudes of Kspike = 11.7 ± 0.3 km s-1 for GP Com and Kspike = 5.8 ± 0.3 km s-1 for V396 Hya. The mean velocities of the narrow central components show variations from line to line. Compared to calculated line profiles that include Stark broadening we are able to explain the displacements, and the appearance of forbidden helium lines, by additional Stark broadening of emission in a helium plasma with an electron density ne ≃ 5 × 1015 cm-3. More than 30 nitrogen and more than 10 neon lines emission lines were detected in both systems. Additionally, 20 nitrogen absorption lines are only seen in GP Com. The radial velocity variations of these lines show the same phase and velocity amplitude as the central helium emission components. The small semi-amplitude of the central helium emission component, the consistency of phase and amplitude with the absorption components in GP Com as well as the measured Stark effect shows that the central helium emission component, the so-called central-spike, is consistent with an origin on the accreting white dwarf. We use the dynamics of the bright spot and the central-spike to constrain the binary parameters for both systems and find a donor mass of 9.6-42.8 MJupiter for GP Com and 6.1-30.5 MJupiter for V396 Hya. We find an upper limit for the rotational velocity of the accretor of vrot < 46 km s-1 for GP Com and vrot < 59 km s-1 for V396 Hya which excludes a fast rotating accretor in both systems.

  7. Spatially-Resolved HST GRISM Spectroscopy of a Lensed Emission Line Galaxy at Z to approximately 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Brenda L.; Hurley, Mairead; Bowen, David V.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Sharon, Keren; Straughn, Amber; Coe, Dan; Broadhurst, Tom; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-01-01

    We take advantage of gravitational lensing amplification by Abell 1689 (z=0.187) to undertake the first space-based census of emission line galaxies (ELGs) in the field of a massive lensing cluster. Forty-three ELGs are identified to a flux of i(sub 775)=27.3 via slitless grism spectroscopy. One ELG (at z=0.7895) is very bright owing to lensing magnification by a factor of approx = 4.5. Several Balmer emission lines detected from ground-based follow-up spectroscopy signal the onset of a major starburst for this low-mass galaxy (M(sub star) approx = 2 x 10(exp 9)Solar Mass) with a high specific star formation rate (approx = 20/ Gyr). From the blue emission lines we measure a gas-phase oxygen abundance consistent with solar (12+log(O /H)=8.8 +/- O.2). We break the continuous line-emitting region of this giant arc into seven approx 1 kpc bins (intrinsic size) and measure a variety of metallicity dependent line ratios. A weak trend of increasing metal fraction is seen toward the dynamical center of the galaxy. Interestingly, the metal line ratios in a region offset from the center by -lkpc have a placement on the blue HI! region excitation diagram with f([OIII]/ f(H-Beta) and f([NeIII/ f(H-Beta) that can be fit by an AGN. This asymmetrical AGN-like behavior is interpreted as a product of shocks in the direction of the galaxy's extended tail, possibly instigated by a recent galaxy interaction.

  8. The London low emission zone baseline study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank; Armstrong, Ben; Atkinson, Richard; Anderson, H Ross; Barratt, Ben; Beevers, Sean; Cook, Derek; Green, Dave; Derwent, Dick; Mudway, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul

    2011-11-01

    On February 4, 2008, the world's largest low emission zone (LEZ) was established. At 2644 km2, the zone encompasses most of Greater London. It restricts the entry of the oldest and most polluting diesel vehicles, including heavy-goods vehicles (haulage trucks), buses and coaches, larger vans, and minibuses. It does not apply to cars or motorcycles. The LEZ scheme will introduce increasingly stringent Euro emissions standards over time. The creation of this zone presented a unique opportunity to estimate the effects of a stepwise reduction in vehicle emissions on air quality and health. Before undertaking such an investigation, robust baseline data were gathered on air quality and the oxidative activity and metal content of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution monitors located in Greater London. In addition, methods were developed for using databases of electronic primary-care records in order to evaluate the zone's health effects. Our study began in 2007, using information about the planned restrictions in an agreed-upon LEZ scenario and year-on-year changes in the vehicle fleet in models to predict air pollution concentrations in London for the years 2005, 2008, and 2010. Based on this detailed emissions and air pollution modeling, the areas in London were then identified that were expected to show the greatest changes in air pollution concentrations and population exposures after the implementation of the LEZ. Using these predictions, the best placement of a pollution monitoring network was determined and the feasibility of evaluating the health effects using electronic primary-care records was assessed. To measure baseline pollutant concentrations before the implementation of the LEZ, a comprehensive monitoring network was established close to major roadways and intersections. Output-difference plots from statistical modeling for 2010 indicated seven key areas likely to experience the greatest change in concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (at least 3

  9. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  10. Shakeup in soft-x-ray emission. II. Plasmon satellites and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livins, Peteris; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-04-01

    We report the first observation of a plasmon satellite in the K emission spectrum of diamond. The previously identified plasmon satellites of Al and graphite are also presented, and data is compared with an oscillator model applicable to soft-x-ray emission and photoemission. The graphite satellite is shown to exhibit an anomalous location with respect to the parent emission. We report for the Al LI-LII,III core-core transitions a spin-orbit splitting of 0.42+/-0.02 eV with a Lorentzian width of 0.67+/-0.02 eV. The oscillator model applied to x-ray photoemission predicts a shift of the plasmon satellite with respect to the zero loss line as the final-electron kinetic energy is varied.

  11. Sliding wear studies using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, S.; Yu, C. W.; Yau, C. F.

    1993-04-01

    Deformation processes in solids, such as dislocation movements under plastic flow, crack propagation and void crushing, produce stress waves at ultrasonic frequencies, usually described as acoustic emission (AE), which can be detected by sensitive instruments and which are related to the severity and nature of the deformations. The paper discusses the characteristics of the stress waves and their variation with wear rates, wear regimes, and friction forces, as determined during laboratory experiments on metallic specimens in relative sliding motion, both unlubricated and with elastohydrodynamic lubrication. It is shown that there are systematic relationships between the acoustic emissions, the wear rates, the frictional work inputs and established tribological contact variables. The predominant frequencies of the emissions are also evaluated and considered in relation to the materials and wear conditions.

  12. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    PubMed

    Vincent, R K

    1972-09-01

    Spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 degrees and 70 degrees is calculated by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width (Deltalambda approximately 1.5 microm) spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band (Deltalambda approximately 6microm) for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected mediumwidth filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  13. Energy level spectroscopy of InSb quantum wells using quantum-well LED emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenev, T. G.; Palyi, A.; Mirza, B. I.; Nash, G. R.; Fearn, M.; Smith, S. J.; Buckle, L.; Emeny, M. T.; Ashley, T.; Jefferson, J. H.; Lambert, C. J.

    2009-02-01

    We have investigated the low-temperature optical properties of InSb quantum-well (QW) light-emitting diodes, with different barrier compositions, as a function of well width. Three devices were studied: QW1 had a 20 nm undoped InSb quantum well with a barrier composition of Al0.143In0.857Sb , QW2 had a 40 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.077In0.923Sb , and QW3 had a 100 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.025In0.975Sb . For QW1, the signature of two transitions (CB1-HH1 and CB1-HH2) can be seen in the measured spectrum, whereas for QW2 and QW3 the signature of a large number of transitions is present in the measured spectra. In particular transitions to HH2 can be seen, the first time this has been observed in AlInSb/InSb heterostructures. To identify the transitions that contribute to the measured spectra, the spectra have been simulated using an eight-band k.p calculation of the band structure together with a first-order time-dependent perturbation method (Fermi golden rule) calculation of spectral emittance, taking into account broadening. In general there is good agreement between the measured and simulated spectra. For QW2 we attribute the main peak in the experimental spectrum to the CB2-HH1 transition, which has the highest overall contribution to the emission spectrum of QW2 compared with all the other interband transitions. This transition normally falls into the category of “forbidden transitions,” and in order to understand this behavior we have investigated the momentum matrix elements, which determine the selection rules of the problem.

  14. Two-Photon Absorption and Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Depletion Spectroscopy of a New Fluorenyl Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Bondar, Mykhailo V.; Morales, Alma R.; Yue, Xiling; Luchita, Gheorghe; Przhonska, Olga V.; Kachkovsky, Olexy D.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis, comprehensive linear photophysical characterization, two-photon absorption (2PA), steady-state and time-resolved stimulated emission depletion properties of a new fluorene derivative, (E)-1-(2-(di-p-tolylamino)-9,9-diethyl-9H-fluoren-7-yl)-3-(thiophen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (1), are reported. The primary linear spectral properties, including excitation anisotropy, fluorescence lifetimes, and photostability, were investigated in a number of aprotic solvents at room temperature. The degenerate 2PA spectra of 1 were obtained with an open aperture Z-scan and two-photon induced fluorescence methods, using a 1-kHz femtosecond laser system, and maximum 2PA cross-sections of ~400–600 GM were obtained. The nature of the electronic absorption processes in 1 was investigated by DFT-based quantum chemical methods implemented in the Gaussian 09 program. The one- and two-photon stimulated emission spectra of 1 were measured over a broad spectral range using a femtosecond pump probe–based fluorescence quenching technique, while a new methodology for time-resolved fluorescence emission spectroscopy is proposed. An effective application of 1 in fluorescence bioimaging was demonstrated via one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy images of HCT 116 cells containing the dye encapsulated micelles. PMID:22887914

  15. The primary photophysics of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain observed with time-resolved emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T M

    2011-01-01

    The phototropins are blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The primary reactions of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain were investigated by means of time-resolved and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. Synchroscan streak camera experiments revealed a fluorescence lifetime of 2.2 ns in LOV2. A weak long-lived component with emission intensity from 600 to 650 nm was assigned to phosphorescence from the reactive FMN triplet state. This observation allowed determination of the LOV2 triplet state energy level at physiological temperature at 16600 cm(-1). FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed pH-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of 2.7 ns at pH 2 and 3.9-4.1 ns at pH 3-8. Here, too, a weak phosphorescence band was observed. The fluorescence quantum yield of LOV2 increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from 293 to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K in the steady-state emission.

  16. [Near infrared spectroscopy study on water content in turbine oil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with successive projections algorithm (SPA) was investigated for determination of water content in turbine oil. Through the 57 samples of different water content in turbine oil scanned applying near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, with the water content in the turbine oil of 0-0.156%, different pretreatment methods such as the original spectra, first derivative spectra and differential polynomial least squares fitting algorithm Savitzky-Golay (SG), and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were applied for the extraction of effective wavelengths, the correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE) were used as the model evaluation indices, accordingly water content in turbine oil was investigated. The results indicated that the original spectra with different water content in turbine oil were pretreated by the performance of first derivative + SG pretreatments, then the selected effective wavelengths were used as the inputs of least square support vector machine (LS-SVM). A total of 16 variables selected by SPA were employed to construct the model of SPA and least square support vector machine (SPA-LS-SVM). There is 9 as The correlation coefficient was 0.975 9 and the root of mean square error of validation set was 2.655 8 x 10(-3) using the model, and it is feasible to determine the water content in oil using near infrared spectroscopy and SPA-LS-SVM, and an excellent prediction precision was obtained. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of near infrared spectroscopy in on-line monitoring of contamination such as water content in oil.

  17. Polarization Studies in Fast-Ion Beam Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2001-12-20

    In a historical review, the observations and the insight gained from polarization studies of fast ions interacting with solid targets are presented. These began with J. Macek's recognition of zero-field quantum beats in beam-foil spectroscopy as indicating alignment, and D.G. Ellis' density operator analysis that suggested the observability of orientation when using tilted foils. Lastly H. Winter's studies of the ion-beam surface interaction at grazing incidence yielded the means to produce a high degree of nuclear orientation in ion beams.

  18. Study of Chemical Carcinogens by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.; Karasev, A. O.

    2013-11-01

    We have used positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to study the carcinogens C21H20BrN3, C4H7Cl2O4P, CCl4, CHCl3, AlF3, C8H12N4O, C6H4Cl2 and the non-carcinogens H2O, AlCl3, CH2Cl2, C2H6OS. We have established a correlation between the annihilation characteristics of the studied compounds and their degree of carcinogenicity.

  19. Raman spectroscopy study of silicon nanoribbons on Ag(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, E.; Buick, B.; Esser, N.; Richter, W.; Colonna, S.; Cricenti, A.; Ronci, F.

    2014-04-01

    The grating of self-assembled Si nanoribbons at the Ag(110) surface has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. The study, conducted in situ with uncapped samples, resulted in phonon frequencies in disagreement with the results of theoretical calculations reported in literature for freestanding silicene sheets and nanoribbons. These results suggest that the structure of these silicon nanoribbons is very different from the planar and lightly buckled structural models and that the influence of the substrate might be underestimated in the discussed structural models.

  20. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  1. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  2. Tethered bilayer lipid membranes studied by simultaneous attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Erbe, Andreas; Bushby, Richard J.; Evans, Stephen D.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) from unilamelar vesicles of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EggPC) on mixed self–assembled monolayers (SAMs) from varying ratios of 6-mercaptohexanol and EO3Cholesteryl on gold has been monitored by simultaneous attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared (ATR–FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The influence of the lipid orientation (and hence the anisotropy) of lipids on a gold film on the dichroic ratio was studied by simulations of spectra with a matrix method for anisotropic layers. It is shown that for certain tilt angles of the dielectric tensor of the adsorbed anisotropic layer dispersive and negative absorption bands are possible. The experimental data indicates that the structure of the assemblies obtained varies with varying SAM composition. On SAMs with a high content of EO3Cholesteryl, tBLMs with reduced fluidity are formed. For SAMs with high content of 6-mercaptohexanol, the results are consistent with the adsorption of flattened vesicles, while spherical vesicles have been found in a small range of surface compositions. The kinetics of the adsorption process is consistent with the assumption of spherical vesicles as long–living intermediates for surfaces of high 6-mercaptohexanol content. No long–living spherical vesicles have been detected for surfaces with large fraction of EO3Cholesteryl tethers. The observed differences between the surfaces suggest that for the formation of tBLMs (unlike supported BLMs) no critical surface coverage of vesicles is needed prior to lipid bilayer formation. PMID:17388505

  3. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 2: Wind propagation and emission fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Stremme, W.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2012-07-01

    The technique for measuring two-dimensional (2-D) plumes of volcanic gases with thermal emission spectroscopy was described in Part 1 by Stremme et al. (2012). In that paper the instrumental aspects as well as retrieval strategies for obtaining the slant column images of SO2 and SiF4, as well as animations of particular events observed at the Popocatépetl volcano, were presented. This work focuses on the procedures for determining the propagation speed of the gases and estimating an emission flux from the given image sequences. A 2-D column density distribution of a volcanic gas, available as time-consecutive frames, provides information of a wind-field and the average velocity at which the volcanic plume is propagating. The presented reconstruction method solves the equation of continuity as an ill-posed problem using mainly a Tikhonov-like regularization. It is observed from the available data sets that if the main direction of propagation is perpendicular to the line-of-sight, the algorithm works well for SO2 which has the strongest signals, and also for SiF4 in some favourable cases. Due to the similarity of the algorithm used here with the reconstruction methods used for profile retrievals based on optimal estimation theory, diagnostic tools like the averaging kernels can be calculated analogously and the information can be quantified as degrees of freedom. Thus, it is shown that the combination of wind-field and column distribution of the gas plume can provide the emission flux of the volcano both during day and night.

  4. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  5. [The Emission Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Discharge under Low Voltage at Room Temperature].

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-hua; Yu, Chun-xia; Yan, Bei; Zhang, Cheng-xiao

    2015-03-01

    A set of direct current (DC) discharge device of N2 plasma was developed, carbon nanotubes (CNT) modified ITO electrode was used as anode, aluminum plate as cathode, with -80 μm separation between them. Nitrogen emission spectra was observed at room temperature and low DC voltage (less than 150 V), and the emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the active species of the process of nitrogen discharge. Under DC discharge, the strongest energy band N2 (C3π(u)), the weak Gaydon's Green system N2 (H3 -Φ(u)-G3 Δ(g)) and the emission line of nitrogen atoms (4 p-4 p0) at 820 nm were observed. Found that metastable state of nitrogen molecules were the main factors leading to a series of excited state nitrogen atoms and nitrogen ionization. Compared the emission spectra under DC with that under alternating current (AC) (1.1 kV), and it can be seen that under DC the spectra band of nitrogen atoms can be obviously observed, and there was a molecular band in the range of 500 - 800 nm. The effect of oxygen and hydrogen on the emission spectra of nitrogen was investigated. The results showed that the oxygen inhibited the luminescence intensity of nitrogen, but the shape of spectra unchanged. All of the second positive system, Gaydon's Green system and atomic lines of nitrogen can be observed. The second positive system and Gaydon's Green system of nitrogen will be greatly affected when the volume ratio of nitrogen and hydrogen greatly affected is 1 : 1, which was due to the hydrogen. The hydrogen can depresse nitrogen plasma activation, and make the Gaydon's Green System disappeared. CNT modified ITO electrode can reduce the breakdown voltage, and the optical signal generated by the weakly ionized gas can be observed by the photo-multiplier tube at low voltage of 10 V. PMID:26117899

  6. Case study of polychlorinated naphthalene emissions and factors influencing emission variations in secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Guorui; Wang, Mei; Liu, Wenbin; Tang, Chen; Li, Li; Zheng, Minghui

    2015-04-01

    Secondary aluminum production has been recognized as an important source of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs). Large variations in PCN emissions as the smelting process proceeds have not been determined. In this study, solid and gaseous discharges, including fly ash, slag, and stack gas samples collected from four secondary smelting plants during different smelting stages were analyzed for PCNs. The average emission factor of ∑(1-8)PCNs to air was calculated to be 17.4 mg t(-1), with a range of 4.3-29.5 mg t(-1). The average emission factors of ∑(1-8)PCNs from fly ash and slag were 55.5 ng t(-1) and 0.13 ng t(-1), respectively. The derived emission factors may enable a more accurate estimation of annual emissions and a more comprehensive knowledge of the distribution of PCNs emitted from secondary aluminum production. The emission levels and characteristics of PCNs during different smelting stages were compared. Possible factors, including the organic impurities from aluminum scrap, fuel, and chloride additives, which could contribute to variations in PCN emissions and characteristics were discussed. These results may provide useful information for developing better control strategies for reducing PCN emissions in secondary aluminum production.

  7. Measuring one-dimensional and two-dimensional impurity density profiles on TEXTOR using combined charge exchange-beam emission spectroscopy and ultrasoft x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, M.; Jakubowska, K.; Hellermann, M. von; Jaspers, R.; Donné, A. J. H.; Shmaenok, L.

    2004-10-01

    Two techniques are presented that allow us to measure impurity density profiles in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma. The one-dimensional profiles are gathered by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) in combination with beam emission spectroscopy (BES). Combining CXRS and BES eliminate the need for absolute calibration. For two-dimensional profiles an ultrasoft x-ray tomography system has been developed. The system is spectrally resolved and produces local emissivity profiles of several ionization stages of impurities. Both systems are presently being commissioned. They are complementary and give an insight into the impurity distribution and transport in plasmas.

  8. Study of the microwave emissivity characteristics over Gobi Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubao, Qiu; Lijuan, Shi; Wenbo, Wu

    2014-03-01

    The microwave emissivity represents the capacity of the thermal radiation of the surface, and it is the significant parameter for understanding the geophysical processes such as surface energy budget and surface radiation. Different land covers have different emissivity properties, and the Gobi Desert in Central Asia seriously impact the sandstorms occur and develop in China, because of its special geographical environment and surface soil characteristics. In this study half-month averaged microwave emissivity from March 2003 to February 2004 over the Gobi Desert has been estimated. Emissivities in this area at different frequencies, polarization and their seasonal variations are discussed respectively. The results showed that emissivity polarization difference decrease as the frequency increases, and the polarization difference is large (0.03-0.127). The H polarization emissivity increases with increasing frequency, but the V-polarized microwave emissivity is reduced with increasing frequency because of the body scattering. In winter, emissivity decreases sharply in snow covered area, especially for higher frequencies (such as 89GHz). In addition, we compared emissivity with MODIS NDVI data at the same time in the Gobi Desert, and the results indicate that NDVI derived the good negative correlation with microwave emissivity polarization difference at 37GHz.

  9. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Yu, Shu-Cheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, Pei-Lun

    2010-10-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4. Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  10. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy study of thin gate dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Reiner, James W; Cui, Sharon; Liu, Zuoguang; Wang, Miaomiao; Ahn, Charles H; Ma, T P

    2010-07-20

    A broad range of materials is currently being studied for possible use as the insulating layer in next generation metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has become a powerful tool to characterize both the structural and electrical properties of the resulting device structures made from these materials. IETS can address issues related to reactions and intermixing at interfaces, as well as properties related to carrier mobility, such as phonon modes and charge traps, for structures that are difficult to characterize accurately by other techniques.

  11. X-ray Spectroscopy of the most extreme Balmer-line disk-emission AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eracleous, Michael

    2005-10-01

    We propose to obtain simultaneous X-ray and UV observations of the most extreme AGN with double-peaked Balmer emission lines (FWHM > 19000km/s). We will use the XMM-Newton data to measure their X-ray spectral shapes and construct spectral energy distributions. We will combine these with measurements of the optical emission line profiles (from simultaneous HET observations) and luminosities to (a) test models for illumination of the outer disk by the central X-ray source, (b) test models for the structure of the inner accretion disk (radiatively inefficient accretion vs. standard disk), and (c) compare the X-ray-to-optical properties of these broadest Balmer-line objects to those of broad and narrow line AGN to test models for the origin of the low-ionization broad lines.

  12. Communication: IR spectroscopy of neutral transition metal clusters through thermionic emission.

    PubMed

    Lapoutre, Vivike J F; Haertelt, Marko; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André; Bakker, Joost M

    2013-09-28

    The resonant multiple photon excitation of neutral niobium clusters using tunable infrared (IR) radiation leads to thermionic emission. By measuring the mass-resolved ionization yield as a function of IR wavenumber species selective IR spectra are obtained for Nb(n) (n = 5-20) over the 200-350 cm(-1) spectral range. The IR resonance-enhanced multiple photon ionization spectra obtained this way are in good agreement with those measured using IR photodissociation of neutral Nb(n)-Ar clusters. An investigation of the factors determining the applicability of this technique identifies the internal energy threshold towards thermionic emission in combination with a minimum required photon flux that rapidly grows as a function of excitation wavelength.

  13. Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of vanadium oxides andrelated compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    In today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one ''spintronic'' device that exploits both charge and ''spin'' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; and (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 μm thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (< 4 at.%) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn

  14. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  15. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  16. X-ray emission spectroscopy of well-characterised non-LTE plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgaux, A. C.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Marquès, J. R.; Vassura, L.; Vinci, T.; Dorchies, F.; Leguay, P. M.; Chung, H. K.; Bowen, C.; Dervieux, V.; Renaudin, P.; Silvert, V.; Jacquemot, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will present an experimental platform developed on LULI2000 to measure x-ray emission of non-LTE plasmas in well-defined hydrodynamic conditions thanks to implementation of a whole set of diagnostics, including time-resolved electronic and ionic Thomson scattering and self-optical pyrometry. K-, L- and M-shell spectra will be presented and the methodology, that has been developed to analyze them, discussed.

  17. Non-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy provides a powerful segmentation tool on concomitant treatment of characteristic and continuum emission.

    PubMed

    Myakalwar, Ashwin Kumar; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Gundawar, Manoj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of non-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for characterization and classification of organic materials with similar chemical composition. While use of such a system introduces substantive continuum background in the spectral dataset, we show that appropriate treatment of the continuum and characteristic emission results in accurate discrimination of pharmaceutical formulations of similar stoichiometry. Specifically, our results suggest that near-perfect classification can be obtained by employing suitable multivariate analysis on the acquired spectra, without prior removal of the continuum background. Indeed, we conjecture that pre-processing in the form of background removal may introduce spurious features in the signal. Our findings in this report significantly advance the prior results in time-integrated LIBS application and suggest the possibility of a portable, non-gated LIBS system as a process analytical tool, given its simple instrumentation needs, real-time capability and lack of sample preparation requirements. PMID:25084522

  18. Kinetic model of C/H/N/O emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Khachatrian, Ani; Babushok, Valeri I.

    2010-05-01

    A kinetic model to predict the relative intensities of the atomic C/H/N/O emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been developed for organic compounds. The model includes a comprehensive set of chemical processes involving both neutral and ionic chemistry and physical excitation and de-excitation of atomic levels affecting the neutral, ionic, and excited-state species concentrations. The relative excited-state atom concentrations predicted by this modeling are compared with those derived from the observed LIBS intensities for 355 nm ns laser irradiation of residues of two organic compounds on aluminum substrate. The model reasonably predicts the relative excited-state concentrations, as well as their time profiles. Comparison of measured and computed concentrations has also allowed an estimation of the degree of air entrainment.

  19. Non-Gated Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Provides a Powerful Segmentation Tool on Concomitant Treatment of Characteristic and Continuum Emission

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Gundawar, Manoj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of non-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for characterization and classification of organic materials with similar chemical composition. While use of such a system introduces substantive continuum background in the spectral dataset, we show that appropriate treatment of the continuum and characteristic emission results in accurate discrimination of pharmaceutical formulations of similar stoichiometry. Specifically, our results suggest that near-perfect classification can be obtained by employing suitable multivariate analysis on the acquired spectra, without prior removal of the continuum background. Indeed, we conjecture that pre-processing in the form of background removal may introduce spurious features in the signal. Our findings in this report significantly advance the prior results in time-integrated LIBS application and suggest the possibility of a portable, non-gated LIBS system as a process analytical tool, given its simple instrumentation needs, real-time capability and lack of sample preparation requirements. PMID:25084522

  20. Determination of Silicon in Gasoline by Directly Measuring under Organic Phase Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-mei; Wen, Huan; Lü, Huan-ming; Liu, Hui-qin; Lin, Zhi-sheng; Wang, Rong-hua

    2015-03-01

    A simple and accurate method was developed for determining silicon in gasoline using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). For sample inroduction a Burgener nubulizer and a Cyclonic spray chamber were used. A gasoline sample was diluted with isooctane and then introduced into the cooled spray chamber of the ICP-OES. Good linearity was achieved in the silicon concentration range 0.1 - 10.0 mg x kg(-1), and the correlation coefficient was 0.999 96. The detection limit for silicon was 0.012 mg x kg(-1) and the silicon recoveries from gasoline samples were 95.8% - 98.4%, with relative standard deviations of less than 3.0% The method was proved to be simple, reliable and highly sensitive, and suitable for determining silicon in samples of motor gasoline, ethanol-gasoline and methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures those containing not more than 15% (V/V) oxygenates.

  1. Determination of Silicon in Gasoline by Directly Measuring under Organic Phase Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-mei; Wen, Huan; Lü, Huan-ming; Liu, Hui-qin; Lin, Zhi-sheng; Wang, Rong-hua

    2015-03-01

    A simple and accurate method was developed for determining silicon in gasoline using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). For sample inroduction a Burgener nubulizer and a Cyclonic spray chamber were used. A gasoline sample was diluted with isooctane and then introduced into the cooled spray chamber of the ICP-OES. Good linearity was achieved in the silicon concentration range 0.1 - 10.0 mg x kg(-1), and the correlation coefficient was 0.999 96. The detection limit for silicon was 0.012 mg x kg(-1) and the silicon recoveries from gasoline samples were 95.8% - 98.4%, with relative standard deviations of less than 3.0% The method was proved to be simple, reliable and highly sensitive, and suitable for determining silicon in samples of motor gasoline, ethanol-gasoline and methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures those containing not more than 15% (V/V) oxygenates. PMID:26117893

  2. Study of optical materials to be used on Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardello, Marco; Zuccon, Sara; Corso, Alain Jodi; Zuppella, Paola; Gerlin, Francesca; Tessarolo, Enrico; Pelizzo, Maria Guglielmina

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency mission Solar Orbiter (SOLO) is dedicated to the study of the solar atmosphere and heliosphere. As a part of the payload, the instrument METIS (Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) will provide images of the corona, both in the visible range and at the hydrogen Lyman-α emission line (121.6 nm). The realization of optical coatings, based on Al and MgF2, able to reflect/transmit such spectral components is, therefore, necessary. Since optical characteristics of materials in the vacuum ultraviolet range are not well studied and vary greatly with the realization process, we implemented a study of their properties in different deposition conditions. This is aimed to the realization of a custom designed filter able to transmit the 121.6 nm wavelength while reflecting visible light, and thus separating visible from ultraviolet light paths in the METIS instrument.

  3. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  4. Flash Spectroscopy: Emission Lines from the Ionized Circumstellar Material Around <10-Day-Old Type II Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Khazov, Daniel; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Cao, Y.; et al

    2016-02-02

    Supernovae (SNe) embedded in dense circumstellar material (CSM) may show prominent emission lines in their early-time spectra (≤10 days after the explosion), owing to recombination of the CSM ionized by the shock-breakout flash. From such spectra ("flash spectroscopy"), we can measure various physical properties of the CSM, as well as the mass-loss rate of the progenitor during the year prior to its explosion. In this paper, by searching through the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF) SN spectroscopy databases from 2009 through 2014, we found 12 SNe II showing flash-ionized (FI) signatures in their first spectra. All are younger thanmore » 10 days. These events constitute 14% of all 84 SNe in our sample having a spectrum within 10 days from explosion, and 18% of SNe II observed at ages <5 days, thereby setting lower limits on the fraction of FI events. We classified as "blue/featureless" (BF) those events having a first spectrum that is similar to that of a blackbody, without any emission or absorption signatures. It is possible that some BF events had FI signatures at an earlier phase than observed, or that they lack dense CSM around the progenitor. Within 2 days after explosion, 8 out of 11 SNe in our sample are either BF events or show FI signatures. Finally and interestingly, we found that 19 out of 21 SNe brighter than an absolute magnitude MR = -18.2 belong to the FI or BF groups, and that all FI events peaked above MR = -17.6 mag, significantly brighter than average SNe II.« less

  5. The First Detection of Diffuse Interstellar [OII] Emission from the Milky Way using Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Harlander, J. M.; Reynolds, R. J.; Jaehnig, K. P.

    2004-12-01

    Using a newly developed Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS), we have achieved the first detection of diffuse [OII] 372.6 nm and 372.9 nm emission lines from the warm (10,000 K), low density (0.1 cm-3) ionized component of our Galaxy's interstellar medium (WIM). These [OII] lines are a principal coolant for this wide spread, photoionized gas and are a potential tracer of variations in the gas temperature resulting from unidentified interstellar heating processes that appear to be acting within the Galaxy's disk and halo. We have also detected numerous, weak airglow lines, including terrestrial [OII] emission. In our SHS system, Fizeau fringes of wavenumber-dependent spatial frequency are produced by a Michelson interferometer modified by replacing the return mirrors with diffraction gratings. These fringes are recorded on a position sensitive detector and Fourier transformed to recover a spectrum over a limited range centered at the grating Littrow wavenumber. SHS combines interferometric and field-widening gains to achieve sensitivities much larger than conventional grating instruments of similar size and resolving power, and comparable to the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM) Fabry-Perot, but in the near UV where WHAM cannot observe. Our early results confirm the superb performance of the SHS technique for measurements of spatially extended faint emissions, including the first detection of [OII] emission lines extending out to 20 degrees from the Galactic equator in the longitude range of 110 to 150 degrees. [OII] intensities range from tens of Rayleighs near the Galactic plane to less than one Rayleigh at high Galactic latitudes. The [OII] line profiles clearly show structure indicating emission along the lines of sight from both local interstellar gas and more distant gas in the Perseus spiral arm. Preliminary line ratio comparisons with WHAM [NII] (658.4 nm) and Hα (656.3 nm) observations confirm the utility of the [OII] observations as a temperature diagnostic

  6. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  7. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Christopher A; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John

    2013-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome-nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity.

  8. Analysis of the absorption spectra of gas emission of patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by laser optoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, Ekaterina B.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Kistenev, Yurii V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Tuzikov, Sergei A.; Yumov, Evgenii L.

    2013-02-01

    It is important to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer in the early stages of the disease. The method of laser opto-acoustic gas analysis, in this case, can act as a promising tool for diagnostics. The material for this study were the gas emission samples collected from patients and healthy volunteers - samples of exhaled air, swabs from teeth and cheeks. A set of material was formed three groups: healthy volunteers, patients with COPD, lung cancer patients. The resulting samples were analyzed by means of laser opto-acoustic gas analyzers: with intracavity location detector (ILPA-1), with extracavity location detector (LGA-2). Presentation of the results in an easy to visual form was performed using the method of elastic maps, based on the principal component analysis. The results of analysis show potentialities of usage of laser optoacoustic spectroscopy application to assess the status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  9. Current Opportunities and Challenges of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Positron Emission Tomography, and Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Mapping Cancer Metabolism In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yuen-Li

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is known to have unique metabolic features such as Warburg effect. Current cancer therapy has moved forward from cytotoxic treatment to personalized, targeted therapies, with some that could lead to specific metabolic changes, potentially monitored by imaging methods. In this paper we addressed the important aspects to study cancer metabolism by using image techniques, focusing on opportunities and challenges of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRS, positron emission tomography (PET), and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) for mapping cancer metabolism. Finally, we highlighted the future possibilities of an integrated in vivo PET/MR imaging systems, together with an in situ MSI tissue analytical platform, may become the ultimate technologies for unraveling and understanding the molecular complexities in some aspects of cancer metabolism. Such comprehensive imaging investigations might provide information on pharmacometabolomics, biomarker discovery, and disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment response monitoring for clinical medicine. PMID:24724090

  10. Observation of Coriolis Coupling between nu(2) + 4nu(4) and 7nu(4) in Acetylene &Xtilde;(1)Sigma(+)(g) by Stimulated Emission Pumping Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moss; Duan; Jacobson; O'Brien; Field

    2000-02-01

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectroscopy has been used to examine a low energy region (E(vib) approximately 4400 cm(-1)) of &Xtilde;(1)Sigma(+)(g) acetylene at higher resolution than was possible in previous dispersed fluorescence studies. The expected bright state, nu(2) + 4nu(4), is observed to be coupled to the nearly degenerate 7nu(4) state by a Coriolis mechanism. A least-squares analysis yields values for zero-order vibrational energies, rotational constants, and a Coriolis-coupling coefficient that are all consistent with expectations. Calculated relative intensities of SEP transitions, accounting for interference due to axis-switching effects, are also consistent with observations. Implications of the observed Coriolis resonance with regard to global acetylene vibrational dynamics are also discussed. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. [Study on the treatment turquoise using Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan-li; Yuan, Xin-qiang; Chen, Jing-zhong; Qi, Li-jian

    2010-07-01

    Due to a variety of the enhancement and treatment turquoises discovered in gem markets, the identification of turquoise is becoming more and more difficult. By using laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, the characteristics of Raman spectra of the pressed and filled turquoises were studied. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to identify the enhancement and treatment turquoises and the natural ones, moreover, it's a non-destructive testing method. The Raman spectra of the enhancement and treatment turquoises are resulted mainly from the vibrational mode and frequency of water, hydroxyl units, PO4 tetrahedron and CH2 units. Besides, they have the characteristic Raman spectra peaks at 2,937, 2,883 and 1,451 cm(-1) which are attributed to the stretching vibration and the bending vibration of CH2, respectively. These characteristic Raman vibration bands, it will help to distinguish the natural turquoises and the treatment ones. The study provides a new train of thought on the rapid, accurate, and non-destructive identification of turquoise. PMID:20827971

  12. [Study on the treatment turquoise using Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan-li; Yuan, Xin-qiang; Chen, Jing-zhong; Qi, Li-jian

    2010-07-01

    Due to a variety of the enhancement and treatment turquoises discovered in gem markets, the identification of turquoise is becoming more and more difficult. By using laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, the characteristics of Raman spectra of the pressed and filled turquoises were studied. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to identify the enhancement and treatment turquoises and the natural ones, moreover, it's a non-destructive testing method. The Raman spectra of the enhancement and treatment turquoises are resulted mainly from the vibrational mode and frequency of water, hydroxyl units, PO4 tetrahedron and CH2 units. Besides, they have the characteristic Raman spectra peaks at 2,937, 2,883 and 1,451 cm(-1) which are attributed to the stretching vibration and the bending vibration of CH2, respectively. These characteristic Raman vibration bands, it will help to distinguish the natural turquoises and the treatment ones. The study provides a new train of thought on the rapid, accurate, and non-destructive identification of turquoise.

  13. Comparison Between X-rays Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on a Ceramic Envelop Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafitte, Bruno; Aubes, Michel; Zissis, Georges

    2007-12-01

    Burners of metal halide lamps used for illumination are generally made of polycrystalline alumina ceramic (PCA) which is translucent to visible light. We show that the difficulty of selecting a line of sight through the lamp prevents the use of optical emission diagnostic. X-rays photons are mainly absorbed and not scattered by PCA. Absorption by mercury atoms contributing to the discharge allowed us to determine the density of mercury in the lamp. By comparing diagnostic methods, we put in evidence the difficulty of taking into account the scattering of light mathematically.

  14. Selection of operating conditions and analytical procedure in multi-metal analysis of animal tissues by d.c. plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adrian; Petersson, Lars R.

    In order to expand the analytical capacity and achieve better utilization of tissue materials (liver, kidney, etc.) so as to assess the degrees of environmental pollution, a method for simultaneous determination of 14 metals (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, W, and Zn) has been developed by applying d.c. plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The analytical emission lines were chosen after considering the absence of more important interfering emission lines from elements present in the matrix, and taking into account their intensity, background, range of linearity and working range. At increasing ionic buffer concentration most metals seem to have a region of relatively little change in intensity. A 0.25 M LiNO 3 solution was chosen as ionic buffer. Optimization of plasma position to obtain maximum light intensity at each of the analytical wavelengths was studied with both single- and multi-element cassettes. The intention was to find a plasma position with satisfactory light intensity for all metals to be determined simultaneously. Spectral interferences, stray light effects included, from elements present in the matrix were investigated and linear relationships were usually found between the "false" signal contribution and the concentration of the interfering element. These signals were expressed as spectral interference correction coefficients (SICC values) on a concentration equivalent basis, viz. μ ml -1 per μ ml -1. The effect of Ca on the analytical emission lines of Al, Pb, and W was not linear in contrast to the usual relationship. Organ tissues are prepared by automated wet digestion. Transfer of sample solution from the sample tray into the plasma is performed automatically. A microcomputer is used for evaluation of metal contents in the solutions, background correction by use of SICC values, and final calculation of metal concentrations in the tissues.

  15. Heat-induced unfolding of apo-CP43 studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing-Jie; Li, Zai-Geng; Yang, Jiao; He, Qing; Xi, Lei; Du, Lin-Fang

    2015-12-01

    CP43 is a chlorophyll-binding protein, which acts as a conduit for the excitation energy transfer. The thermal stability of apo-CP43 was studied by intrinsic fluorescence, exogenous ANS fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Under heat treatment, the structure of apo-CP43 changed and existed transition state occurred between 56 and 62 °C by the intrinsic, exogenous ANS fluorescence and the analysis of hydrophobicity. Besides, the isosbestic point of the sigmoidal curve was 58.10 ± 1.02 °C by calculating α-helix transition and the Tm was 56.45 ± 0.52 and 55.59 ± 0.68 °C by calculating the unfolded fraction of tryptophan and tyrosine fluorescence, respectively. During the process of unfolding, the hydrophobic structure of C-terminal segment firstly started to expose at 40 °C, and then the hydrophobic cluster adjacent to the N-terminal segment also gradually exposed to hydrophilic environment with increasing temperature. Our results indicated that heat treatment, especially above 40 °C, has an important impact on the structural stability of apo-CP43.

  16. Absorption Spectroscopy, Emissive Properties, and Ultrafast Intersystem Crossing Processes in Transition Metal Complexes: TD-DFT and Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy, emissive properties, and ultrafast intersystem crossing processes in transition metal complexes are discussed in the light of recent developments in time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects, and non-adiabatic excited states dynamics. Methodological highlights focus on spin-orbit and vibronic couplings and on the recent strategies available for simulating ultra-fast intersystem crossings (ISC).The role of SOC in the absorption spectroscopy of third-row transition metal complexes is illustrated by two cases studies, namely Ir(III) phenyl pyridine and Re(I) carbonyl bipyridine complexes.The problem of luminescence decay in third-row transition metal complexes handled by TD-DFT linear and quadratic response theories including SOC is exemplified by three studies: (1) the phosphorescence of Ir(III) complexes from the lowest triplet state; (2) the emissive properties of square planar Pt(II) complexes with bidentate and terdentate ligands characterized by low-lying metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer (MLCT) and metal-centered (MC) states; and (3) the ultra-fast luminescence decay of Re(I) carbonyl bipyridine halides via low-lying singlet and triplet charge transfer states delocalized over the bipyridine and the halide ligands.Ultrafast ISC occurring in spin crossover [Fe (bpy)3]2+, in [Ru (bpy)3]2+, and [Re (Br)(CO)3(bpy] complexes are deciphered thanks to recent developments based on various approaches, namely non-radiative rate theory within the Condon approximation, non-adiabatic surface hopping molecular dynamics, and quantum wave packet dynamics propagation.

  17. A synthetic diagnostic for beam emission spectroscopy in the helically symmetric experiment stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, T. J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) has a number of active spectroscopy diagnostics. Due to the relatively large beam width compared to the plasma minor radius, it is difficult to achieve good spatial resolution at the core of the HSX plasma. This is due to the fact that the optical sightline cuts through many flux surfaces with varying field vectors within the beam. In order to compare the experimental results with theoretical models it is important to accurately model the beam width effects. A synthetic diagnostic has been developed for this purpose. This synthetic diagnostic calculates the effect of spot size and beam width on the measurements of quantities of interest, including radial electric field, flow velocity, and Stark polarization.

  18. Terahertz spectroscopy of low-dimensional nanomaterials: nonlinear emission and ultrafast electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2015-08-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emitters using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?

  19. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Nonlinear Emission and Ultrafast Electrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emittersmore » using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?« less

  20. Emission spectroscopy of laser ablation plasma with time gating by acousto-optic modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Irie, Kyohei; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2011-02-15

    The capability of acousto-optic modulator (AOM) to perform time-gated measurements for laser ablation plasma spectroscopy has been examined. Especially, we focused on the capability of the ''AOM gating'' to exclude the continuum and extremely broadened spectra usually observed immediately after the laser ablation. Final goal of the use of the AOM is to achieve considerable downsizing of the system for in situ and on-site analyses. In the present paper, it is shown that narrow and clear spectral lines can be obtained with the AOM gating even if the target is submerged in water. Also, application of this technique to the targets in air is demonstrated. It has been revealed that the AOM gating is fast enough to exclude the continuum and broadened lines, while effectively acquiring sufficiently narrow atomic lines lasting slightly longer than the continuum.

  1. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Nonlinear Emission and Ultrafast Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emitters using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?

  2. Fast Detection Allows Analysis of the Electronic Structure of Metalloprotein by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Davis, Katherine M; Mattern, Brian A; Pacold, Joseph I; Zakharova, Taisiya; Brewe, Dale; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Graber, Timothy J; Heald, Steve M; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2012-07-19

    The paradigm of "detection-before-destruction" was tested for a metalloprotein complex exposed at room temperature to the high x-ray flux typical of third generation synchrotron sources. Following the progression of the x-ray induced damage by Mn Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy, we demonstrated the feasibility of collecting room temperature data on the electronic structure of native Photosystem II, a trans-membrane metalloprotein complex containing a Mn(4)Ca cluster. The determined non-damaging observation timeframe (about 100 milliseconds using continuous monochromatic beam, deposited dose 1*10(7) photons/µm(2) or 1.3*10(4) Gy, and 66 microseconds in pulsed mode using pink beam, deposited dose 4*10(7) photons/µm(2) or 4.2*10(4) Gy) is sufficient for the analysis of this protein's electron dynamics and catalytic mechanism at room temperature. Reported time frames are expected to be representative for other metalloproteins. The described instrumentation, based on the short working distance dispersive spectrometer, and experimental methodology is broadly applicable to time-resolved x-ray emission analysis at synchrotron and x-ray free-electron laser light sources.

  3. Conceptual Demonstration of Ambient Desorption-Optical Emission Spectroscopy Using a Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Source.

    PubMed

    Marcus, R Kenneth; Paing, Htoo W; Zhang, Lynn X

    2016-06-01

    The concept of ambient desorption-optical emission spectroscopy (AD-OES) is demonstrated using a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma as the desorption/excitation source. The LS-APGD has previously been employed for elemental analysis of solution samples and particulates introduced via laser ablation in both the optical emission and mass spectrometries (OES, MS) modes. In addition, the device has been shown to be effective for the analysis of elemental and molecular species operating in an ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) mode. Proof-of-concept is presented here in the use of the LS-APGD to volatilize three very diverse sample forms (metallic thin films, dry solution residues, and bulk materials), with the liberated material excited within the microplasma and detected via OES, i.e., AD-OES. While the demonstration is principally qualitative at this point, it is believed that the basic approach may find application across a broad spectrum of analytical challenges requiring elemental analysis, including metals, soils, and volume-limited solutions, analogous to what has been seen in the development of the field of ADI-MS for molecular species determinations. PMID:27175512

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy to study dissolved organic matter interactions with agrochemicals applied in Swiss vineyards.

    PubMed

    Daouk, Silwan; Frege, Carla; Blanc, Nicolas; Mounier, Stéphane; Redon, Roland; Merdy, Patricia; Lucas, Yves; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    UV/Vis fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the possible interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with the herbicide glyphosate and copper-based fungicide used in vineyards. The study focused on the role of DOM in the transport of these micropollutants from parcels to surface waters (river, lake). Soil solution and river water samples were collected in the Lavaux vineyard area, western Switzerland. Their fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEM) were decomposed using parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and compared to their content in glyphosate and copper. PARAFAC analysis of EEM of both types of samples showed the contribution of protein-like and humic-like fluorophores. In soil water samples, complexes between fulvic-like and humic-like fluorophores of DOM, copper, and glyphosate were likely formed. In surface water, DOM-copper and glyphosate-copper interactions were observed, but not between glyphosate and DOM.

  5. Impact of Emission Anisotropy on Fluorescence Spectroscopy and FRET Distance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Vassili; Li, Min; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this report is to provide a practical and improved method for estimating Förster resonance energy transfer distance measurement error due to unknown angles in the dipole orientation factor based on emission anisotropy measurements. We improve on the method of Dale et al. (1979), which has minor mistakes and is frequently interpreted in overly optimistic ways in the literature. To facilitate proper fluorescence intensity measurements, we also evaluated instrument parameters that could impact the measurement. The apparent fluorescence intensity of isotropic samples depends on the sample emission anisotropy, fluorometer geometry, and optical apertures. We separate parameters of the sample, and those of the cylindrically symmetric illumination source and detector in the equations describing results of unpolarized and polarized fluorescence intensity measurements. This approach greatly simplifies calculations compared with the more universal method of Axelrod (1989). We provide a full computational method for calculating the Förster resonance energy transfer distance error and present a graph describing distance error in the simplest case. PMID:19651051

  6. Wavelength-resolved emission spectroscopy of the alkoxy and alkylthio radicals in a supersonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Prabhakar; Zhu, Xinming; Hsueh, Ching-Yu; Kamal, Mohammed M.

    1993-01-01

    Wavelength-resolved emission spectra of methoxy (CH3O) and methylthio (CH3S) radicals have been obtained in a supersonic jet environment with a resolution of 0.3 nm by dispersing the total laser-induced fluorescence with a 0.6 m monochromator. A detailed analysis of the single vibronic level dispersed fluorescence spectra yields the following vibrational frequencies for CH3O in the X(2)E state; nu(sub 1 double prime) = 2953/cm, nu(sub 2 double prime) = 1375/cm, nu(sub 3 double prime) = 1062/cm, nu(sub 4 double prime) = 2869/cm, nu(sub 5 double prime) = 1528/cm and nu(sub 6 double prime) = 688/cm. A similar analysis of the wavelength-resolved emission spectra of CH3S provides the following ground state vibrational frequencies: nu(sub 2 double prime) = 1329/cm, nu(sub 3 double prime) = 739/cm and nu(sub 6 double prime) = 601/cm. An experimental uncertainty of 20/cm is estimated for the assigned frequencies.

  7. VUV emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a 14 GHz ECR negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. Ichikawa, T.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Nishiura, M.; Shimozuma, T.

    2015-04-08

    Vacuum Ultra Violet(VUV) emission from a 4 cm diameter 2 cm long compact ion source excited by 14 GHz microwave has been investigated. Intensity ratio of band spectrum emission near Ly-α to Ly-α line spectrum is determined from the measured spectrum. which shows preferential excitation of molecules near the entrance of microwave input power. The ratio does not depend strongly upon pressure nor the input microwave power when the intensity is integrated over the volume of the plasma. The spatial distribution of the spectrum intensity ratio exhibits concentrations near microwave inlet and the opposite side where the microwave matching structure is located. The ratio at these peripheral regions is about two times as high as that of the central region. The ratio increased in proportion to the ion source pressure up to about 3.0 Pa, indicating efficient production of high energy electrons by ECR up to this pressure.

  8. Field emission spectroscopy evidence for dual-barrier electron tunnelling in nanographite

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, D. A.; Kleshch, V. I.; Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2015-06-08

    Nanocarbon films with upstanding flake-like graphite crystallites of nanometre thickness were fabricated by carbon condensation from a methane–hydrogen gas mixture activated by a direct-current discharge. The nanographite (NG) crystallites are composed of a few graphene layers. The adjacent atomic layers are connected partially at the edges of the crystallites to form strongly curved graphene structures. The extraordinary field emission (FE) properties were revealed for the NG films with an average current density of a few mA/cm{sup 2}, reproducibly obtained at a macroscopic applied field of about 1 V/μm. The integral FE current–voltage curves and electron spectra (FEES) of NG cathodes with multiple emitters were measured in a triode configuration. Most remarkably, above a threshold field, two peaks were revealed in FEES with different field-dependent shifts to lower energies. This behaviour evidences electron emission through a dual potential barrier, corresponding to carbon–carbon heterostructure formed as a result of the graphene bending.

  9. Investigation of PTFE transfer films by infrared emission spectroscopy and phase-locked ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, James L.; Bunting, Bruce G.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    When a PTFE sheet was rubbed unidirectionally over a smooth surface of stainless steel an essentially monomolecular transfer film was formed. By ellipsometric and emission infrared spectroscopic techniques it was shown that the film was 10 to 15 A thick and birefringent. From the intensity differences of infrared bands obtained with a polarizer passing radiation polarized in mutually perpendicular planes, it was possible to deduce transfer film orientation with the direction of rubbing. After standing in air for several weeks the transfer films apparently increased in thickness by as much as threefold. At the same time both the index of refraction and the absorption index decreased. Examination of the surfaces by optical and electron microscopies showed that the films had become porous and flaky. These observations were consistent with previous tribological measurements. The coefficients of friction decreased with the formation of the transfer film but increased again as the film developed breaks. The applicability of the ellipsometric and polarized infrared emission techniques to the identification of monomolecular tribological transfer films of polymers such as PTFE has been demonstrated.

  10. Physical Properties of Emission-line Galaxies at z ~ 2 from Near-infrared Spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel; McCarthy, Patrick; Siana, Brian; Malkan, Mathew; Mobasher, Bahram; Atek, Hakim; Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal L.; Rafelski, Marc; Hathi, Nimish P.; Scarlata, Claudia; Ross, Nathaniel R.; Bunker, Andrew J.; Blanc, Guillermo; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Domínguez, Alberto; Colbert, James; Teplitz, Harry; Dressler, Alan

    2014-04-01

    We present results from near-infrared spectroscopy of 26 emission-line galaxies at z ~ 2.2 and z ~ 1.5 obtained with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrometer on the 6.5 m Magellan Baade telescope. The sample was selected from the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels survey, which uses the near-infrared grism of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) to detect emission-line galaxies over 0.3 <~ z <~ 2.3. Our FIRE follow-up spectroscopy (R ~ 5000) over 1.0-2.5 μm permits detailed measurements of the physical properties of the z ~ 2 emission-line galaxies. Dust-corrected star formation rates for the sample range from ~5-100 M ⊙ yr-1 with a mean of 29 M ⊙ yr-1. We derive a median metallicity for the sample of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.34 or ~0.45 Z ⊙. The estimated stellar masses range from ~108.5-109.5 M ⊙, and a clear positive correlation between metallicity and stellar mass is observed. The average ionization parameter measured for the sample, log U ≈ -2.5, is significantly higher than what is found for most star-forming galaxies in the local universe, but similar to the values found for other star-forming galaxies at high redshift. We derive composite spectra from the FIRE sample, from which we measure typical nebular electron densities of ~100-400 cm-3. Based on the location of the galaxies and composite spectra on diagnostic diagrams, we do not find evidence for significant active galactic nucleus activity in the sample. Most of the galaxies, as well as the composites, are offset diagram toward higher [O III]/Hβ at a given [N II]/Hα, in agreement with other observations of z >~ 1 star-forming galaxies, but composite spectra derived from the sample do not show an appreciable offset from the local star-forming sequence on the [O III]/Hβ versus [S II]/Hα diagram. We infer a high nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio from the composite spectrum, which may contribute to the offset of the high-redshift galaxies from the local star

  11. Analysis of dilute aqueous multifluorophoric mixtures using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF) and total synchronous fluorescence (TSF) spectroscopy: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Keshav; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2013-12-15

    Excitation-emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF) and total synchronous fluorescence (TSF) spectroscopy are two conceptually different fluorescence techniques that have been used to map the fluorescence responses of the fluorophores present in a multifluorophoric mixture. EEMF was introduced four decades back and most of the fluorimeters have the suitable computer program which allows the acquisition EEMF spectra. Recently introduced TSF spectroscopy has been shown to possess good application potential in analytical fluorimetry and has started attracting the attention of analytical chemists. TSF data structure, however, is intrinsically different from EEMF data structure and a better understanding of TSF data structure is crucial to utilising its application potential. In the present work, a comprehensive comparative study between EEMF and TSF spectroscopic data set was performed by taking aqueous mixtures containing low concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, and pyrene as test case. The EEMF and TSF data structures were clearly explained by taking pyrene as an example. The effects of Rayleigh and Raman scattering on the quality of EEMF and TSF data sets were studied. EEMF and TSF data sets of dilute aqueous mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, and pyrene were subjected to three chemometric techniques PARAFAC, N-PLS, and MCR-ALS analysis. TSF data set in particular was found to be highly attuned to MCR-ALS analysis. Obtained results of chemometric analyses on EEMF and TSF data sets show that TSF data of dilute aqueous mixtures provides more accurate spectral and concentration information than EEMF data sets. Therefore, TSF spectroscopy could be considered as an alternate to the EEMF for the analyses of dilute multifluorophoric mixtures.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe diagnostics of CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, Erdinc; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-06-07

    A CH{sub 3}F:O{sub 2} (50%:50%) inductively coupled discharge, sustained in a compact plasma reactor, was investigated as a function of power (20-400 W) and pressure (9-30 mTorr), using optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe measurements. The electron density increased linearly with power but only weakly with pressure. The effective electron temperature was nearly independent of power and pressure. The gas temperature, obtained from the rotational structure of N{sub 2} (C {yields} B) optical emission, increased from 400 to 900 K as a function of inductive mode power between 75 and 400 W at 10 mTorr. For constant feed gas flow, the absolute H, F, and O atom densities, estimated by optical emission rare gas actinometry, increased linearly with power. The absolute number density ratios H/Ar, F/Ar, and O/Ar, increased, decreased, and remained constant, respectively, with pressure. The H-atom density was estimated to be 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} at 400 W and 10 mTorr (gas temperature = 900 K), implying a high degree of dissociation of the CH{sub 3}F feedstock gas. The F and O atom number densities were much lower (8.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and 5.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, respectively) for the same conditions, suggesting that most of the fluorine and oxygen is contained in reaction products HF, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and OH. The relative number densities of HF, CO, and CO{sub 2} were observed to first rapidly increase with power, and then reach a plateau or decay slightly at higher power. Reaction mechanisms were proposed to explain the observed behavior of the number density of F and HF vs. power and pressure.

  13. Optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe diagnostics of CH3F/O2 inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-06-01

    A CH3F:O2 (50%:50%) inductively coupled discharge, sustained in a compact plasma reactor, was investigated as a function of power (20-400 W) and pressure (9-30 mTorr), using optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe measurements. The electron density increased linearly with power but only weakly with pressure. The effective electron temperature was nearly independent of power and pressure. The gas temperature, obtained from the rotational structure of N2 (C → B) optical emission, increased from 400 to 900 K as a function of inductive mode power between 75 and 400 W at 10 mTorr. For constant feed gas flow, the absolute H, F, and O atom densities, estimated by optical emission rare gas actinometry, increased linearly with power. The absolute number density ratios H/Ar, F/Ar, and O/Ar, increased, decreased, and remained constant, respectively, with pressure. The H-atom density was estimated to be 5.4 × 1013 cm-3 at 400 W and 10 mTorr (gas temperature = 900 K), implying a high degree of dissociation of the CH3F feedstock gas. The F and O atom number densities were much lower (8.3 × 1012 cm-3 and 5.9 × 1012 cm-3, respectively) for the same conditions, suggesting that most of the fluorine and oxygen is contained in reaction products HF, CO, CO2, H2O, and OH. The relative number densities of HF, CO, and CO2 were observed to first rapidly increase with power, and then reach a plateau or decay slightly at higher power. Reaction mechanisms were proposed to explain the observed behavior of the number density of F and HF vs. power and pressure.

  14. Trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy: nonintrusive method for measuring electron temperatures in low-pressure, low-temperature plasmas.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, M V; Donnelly, V M

    1999-11-01

    Trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES) is a new, nonintrusive method for determining electron temperatures (T(e)) and, under some conditions, estimating electron densities (n(e)) in low-temperature, low-pressure plasmas. The method is based on a comparison of atomic emission intensities from trace amounts of rare gases (an equimixture of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) added to the plasma, with intensities calculated from a model. For Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs), T(e) is determined from the best fit of theory to the experimental measurements. For non-Maxwellian EEDFs, T(e) derived from the best fit describes the high-energy tail of the EEDF. This method was reported previously, and was further developed and successfully applied to several laboratory and commercial plasma reactors. It has also been used in investigations of correlations between high-T(e) and plasma-induced damage to thin gate oxide layers. In this paper, we provide a refined mechanism for the method and include a detailed description of the generation of emission from the Paschen 2p manifold of rare gases both from the ground state and through metastable states, a theoretical model to calculate the number density of metastables (n(m)) of the rare gases, a practical procedure to compute T(e) from the ratios of experimental-to-theoretical intensity ratios, a way to determine the electron density (n(e)), a discussion of the range of sensitivity of TRG-OES to the EEDF, and an estimate of the accuracy of T(e). The values of T(e) obtained by TRG-OES in a transformer-coupled plasma reactor are compared with those obtained with a Langmuir probe for a wide range of pressures and powers. The differences in T(e) from the two methods are explained in terms of the EEDF dependence on pressure.

  15. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  16. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Raman spectroscopy study of calcium oxalate extracted from cacti stems.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Loza-Cornejo, Sofia; Terrazas, Teresa; Terrazas, Tania; Miranda-Beltrán, María de la Luz; Aparicio-Fernández, Xóchitl; López-Macías, Brenda M; Morales-Martínez, Sandra E; Ortiz-Morales, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To find markers that distinguish the different Cactaceae species, by using near infrared Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we studied the occurrence, in the stem, of solid deposits in five Cactaceae species (Coryphantha clavata, Ferocactus latispinus, Opuntia ficus-indica, O. robusta, and O. strepthacantha) collected from their natural habitats from a region of México. The deposits in the tissues usually occurred as spheroidal aggregates, druses, or prismatic crystals. From the Raman spectra, the crystals were identified either as calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC2O4·H2O) or calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC2O4·2H2O). Opuntia species (subfamily Opuntioideae) showed the presence of CaC2O4·H2O, and the deposition of CaC2O4·2H2O was present in C. clavata and F. latispinus (subfamily Cactoideae, Cacteae tribe). As a punctual technique, Raman spectroscopy seems to be a useful tool to identify crystal composition. In addition to allowing the analysis of crystal morphology, this spectroscopic technique can be used to identify Cactaceae species and their chemotaxonomy.

  18. Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Mars Water Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study brine formation on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate has been subjected to the water vapour pressure, background pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~20 Pa, Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide an estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample. At the lower water vapour pressures typically found on Mars ( ~1 Pa), it appears that slower dynamics inhibit the onset of water uptake over relevant time scales. The experimental setup and current results will be presented.

  19. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  20. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288