Science.gov

Sample records for emission spectroscopy study

  1. Studying Simple Molecular Ionization using Radiation Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Christopher; Lemmer, Kristina; Western Michigan University Aerospace LaboratoryPlasma Experiments Team

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on radiation emission from the formation of simple molecular plasma using a DC glow discharge. The purpose is to measure the emission from argon and molecular nitrogen gas as a function of time with an optical emission spectroscopy system operating in kinetic mode as the gases go from their neutral state to ionized state. The end goal of the research is to develop a diagnostic tool that will be used to study the formation of plasma discharges from complex molecules. The kinetic mode of the CCD camera allows for fast data acquisition so that the species present and their relative concentrations as a function of time can be measured as the plasma is forming. The primary difficulty in the development of this diagnostic tool is designing a device and data analysis technique to allow for kinetic mode operation of the CCD camera. Experimental devices have been designed and built to enable the CCD to operate in kinetic mode, including a fiber optic adapter, camera mount, and twin razor blade system. The twin blades allow for the reduction of exposed pixels on the CCD camera and thereby allow the camera to store data on rows of pixels, rather than imaging the entire camera, allowing for faster data transfer. PhD in Aerospace Engineering.

  2. [Study on optical emission spectroscopy of pulse corona methane plasma].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Ping; Dai, Bin; Fan, Ting

    2009-07-01

    From experiments of methane pulse corona plasma and plasma emission spectrometry, the emission spectra of methane ranging from 370 to 1 100 nm were recorded and marked with CCD (Charge Coupled Device) grating spectrometry. The ionization products of H, C+, CH, C, C2, C3, C4, C5 and hydrocarbon were confirmed through high purity methane (purity 99.99%) ionized by pulse high voltage of 100 kV and 100 Hz under normal temperature and normal pressure. Through analyzing the experimental emission spectrum of methane plasma, the ionization mechanism, i.e. methane gas was ionized into corona plasma by pulse high voltage, was analyzed and the ionization of free radical CHn (n = 3, 2, 1), carbon and hydrocarbons was given as well. Research results show that the dehydrogenation achieved a high level when methane molecules collide inelastically with high energy electrons, and the hydrogen atoms, hydrogen ions and methane free radicals were synthesized into alkenes, alkynes, alkanes and high polymer of carbon with further inelastic collision of high energy electrons. This experimental spectrum and mechanism analysis can be applied to the research on methane conversion.

  3. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The studies reported were conducted to gain a fundamental understanding of adhesion and dynamic friction on an atomic or microscopic level. Fundamental aspects of low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger emission spectroscopy (AES), and field ion microscopy (FIM) are discussed. Typical results of studies conducted are considered, giving attention to LEED-AES experiments, pin and disk experiments, and field ion microscope investigations.

  4. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  5. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  6. Application of optical emission spectroscopy for the SNS H- ion source plasma studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.

    2015-04-01

    The SNS H- ion source is a dual-frequency RF-driven (13.56-MHz low power continuous RF superimposed by 2-MHz high power pulsed RF with ˜1.0 ms pulse length at 60 Hz), Cs-enhanced ion source. This paper discusses the applications of optical emission spectroscopy for the ion source plasma conditioning, cesiation, failure diagnostics, and studies of plasma build-up and outage issues.

  7. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  8. A study of carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates using thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenrich, M. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is useful for identifying mineralogies including carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates. Each of these groups of minerals has a distinct emissivity profile that allows for general identification (e.g., carbonate). Laboratory data are being collected that suggest the potential for determining specific composition of these minerals (e.g., calcite, magnesite). Previous studies of Mars suggest that the above groups of minerals should be present. On Mars fine-grained mineralogies are likely to be intimately mixed due to aeolian activity. Mixtures of calcite with palagonite will be studied to determine the volume percent requirement for salt identification and to understand the complexities of fine-grained mixtures observed by thermal emission. Further work with mixtures will include sulfate and phosphate mineralogies.

  9. A study of carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates using thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenrich, M. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is useful for identifying mineralogies including carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates. Each of these groups of minerals has a distinct emissivity profile that allows for general identification (e.g., carbonate). Laboratory data are being collected that suggest the potential for determining specific composition of these minerals (e.g., calcite, magnesite). Previous studies of Mars suggest that the above groups of minerals should be present. On Mars fine-grained mineralogies are likely to be intimately mixed due to aeolian activity. Mixtures of calcite with palagonite will be studied to determine the volume percent requirement for salt identification and to understand the complexities of fine-grained mixtures observed by thermal emission. Further work with mixtures will include sulfate and phosphate mineralogies.

  10. [Study on Ammonia Emission Rules in a Dairy Feedlot Based on Laser Spectroscopy Detection Method].

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Wang, Li-ming; Gao, Yan-wei; Xu, Jin-feng; Gao, Zhi-ling; Ma, Wen-qi

    2016-03-01

    It needs on-line monitoring of ammonia concentration on dairy feedlot to disclose ammonia emissions characteristics accurately for reducing ammonia emissions and improving the ecological environment. The on-line monitoring system for ammonia concentration has been designed based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology combining with long open-path technology, then the study has been carried out with inverse dispersion technique and the system. The ammonia concentration in-situ has been detected and ammonia emission rules have been analyzed on a dairy feedlot in Baoding in autumn and winter of 2013. The monitoring indicated that the peak of ammonia concentration was 6.11 x 10(-6) in autumn, and that was 6.56 x 10(-6) in winter. The concentration results show that the variation of ammonia concentration had an obvious diurnal periodicity, and the general characteristic of diurnal variation was that the concentration was low in the daytime and was high at night. The ammonia emissions characteristic was obtained with inverse dispersion model that the peak of ammonia emissions velocity appeared at noon. The emission velocity was from 1.48 kg/head/hr to 130.6 kg/head/hr in autumn, and it was from 0.004 5 kg/head/hr to 43.32 kg/head/hr in winter which was lower than that in autumn. The results demonstrated ammonia emissions had certain seasonal differences in dairy feedlot scale. In conclusion, the ammonia concentration was detected with optical technology, and the ammonia emissions results were acquired by inverse dispersion model analysis with large range, high sensitivity, quick response without gas sampling. Thus, it's an effective method for ammonia emissions monitoring in dairy feedlot that provides technical support for scientific breeding.

  11. Application of 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to studying biocomplexes in frozen solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Kuzmann, E.; Vértes, A.

    2005-09-01

    Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy with the 57Co isotope was used to study very dilute rapidly frozen aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight biomolecules (aromatic amino acids anthranilic acid and L-tryptophan) and within a sophisticated biopolymer, bacterial glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism. The appearance of after-effects of the 57Co→57Fe nuclear transformation as well as the coordination properties of the cation and the ligands in the complexes are discussed on the basis of their Mössbauer parameters.

  12. Adhesion and transfer of PTFE to metals studied by auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum has been studied using Auger emission spectroscopy. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate.

  13. Study of the effective inverse photon efficiency using optical emission spectroscopy combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The hydrocarbon impurities formation is inevitable due to wall erosion in a long pulse high performance scenario with carbon-based plasma facing materials in fusion devices. The standard procedure to determine the chemical erosion yield in situ is by means of inverse photon efficiency D/XB. In this work, the conversion factor between CH4 flux and photon flux of CH A → X transition (effective inverse photon efficiency PE-1) was measured directly using a cascaded arc plasma simulator with argon/methane. This study shows that the measured PE-1 is different from the calculated D/XB. We compared the photon flux measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calculated by electron impact excitation of CH(X) which was diagnosed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). It seems that charge exchange and dissociative recombination processes are the main channels of CH(A) production and removal which lead to the inconsistency of PE -1 and D/XB at lower temperature. Meanwhile, the fraction of excited CH(A) produced by dissociative recombination processes was investigated, and we found it increased with Te in the range from 4% to 13% at Te < 1 eV. Our work suggests that the CH spectroscopy should be reinterpreted and the conversion factor should have a new definition instead of D/XB since the electron impact excitation is not the only channel of CH(A) production. These results have an effect on evaluating the yield of chemical erosion in divertor of fusion device.

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission from iron oxide: Studies of atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Barefield, J. E.; Judge, E. J.; Campbell, K.; Johns, H. M.; Kilcrease, D. P.; McInroy, R.; Clegg, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements on iron oxide. Measurements have been made of the emission from Fe2O3 under atmospheres of air, He, and Ar, and at different atmospheric pressures. The effect of varying the time delay of the measurement is also explored. Theoretical calculations were performed to analyze the plasma conditions and find that a reasonably consistent picture of the change in plasma temperature and density for different atmospheric conditions can be reached. We also investigate the sensitivity of the OI 777 nm emission lines to the plasma conditions, something that has not been explored in detail in the previous work. Finally, we also show that LIBS can be used to differentiate between FeO and Fe2O3 by examining the ratio of the intensities of selected Fe emission to O emission lines.

  15. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Kenmochi, N.; Otani, Y.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be -20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  16. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S. Ohshima, S.; Kado, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Otani, Y.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Oishi, T.; Kenmochi, N.

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be −20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  17. Studies on optical emission spectroscopy of nitriding plasma and characterization of nitrided steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manash Kumar

    Plasma in nature is abundant and appears quite beautiful in colour as can be seen in glow of sun and auroras. Plasma produced in laboratories is also quite interesting as a correspondence of the naturally occurring plasmas from a glow discharge to a tokamak. However, plasmas tuned to special conditions have been successfully utilized for material processing, of which, plasma nitriding is one and foremost. The work of the thesis focuses on the setting up of a plasma nitriding system with various diagnostics applied to plasma and plasma treated stainless steels. Emission spectroscopy and probe diagnostics are applied to study the optical and plasma properties whereas austenitic stainless steels are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness test in order to demonstrate the application of the process. The optical and plasma properties during nitriding are motivating, as these properties will lead to conditions for the formation of surface layer. The formation of iron and chromium nitrides is another important asset of the plasma nitriding process, which is tested by XRD technique, while the surface hardness is tested by hardness test. Optical properties are found from optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in terms of emission intensities and wavelengths. Langmuir probe (LP) is used for finding variations of plasma parameters with respect to process parameters and to make a comparison of plasma parameters with those of optical and discharge parameters. A correlation between OES and material characterization properties is sought in order to make a clear understanding of the process. In Chapter 1, introduction to plasma, the possible applications with relevance to plasma nitriding and spectroscopy are described. Plasma nitriding (termed in the title as nitriding plasma for convenience) has emerged as a powerful tool in modifying surface properties of a material without affecting the bulk properties. The various advantages over a conventional gas nitriding

  18. Vibrational spectra of CO on Ni (100) studied by infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    We have developed the technique of infrared emission spectroscopy in order to observe vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on clean, single crystal metal surfaces. A novel apparatus has been constructed which measures the emission from a single crystal sample in thermal equilibrium at room temperature. The apparatus consists of a liquid helium cooled infrared grating spectrometer coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum system equipped with surface preparation and characterization facilities. 3 references, 3 figures.

  19. X-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional study of CO/Fe(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gladh, J.; Oeberg, H.; Li, Jibiao; Ljungberg, M. P.; Matsuda, A.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Oestroem, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Nilsson, A.

    2012-01-21

    We report x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure of the predissociative {alpha}{sub 3} phase of CO bound at hollow sites of Fe(100) as well as of the on-top bound species in the high-coverage {alpha}{sub 1} phase. The analysis is supported by density functional calculations of structures and spectra. The bonding of ''lying down'' CO in the hollow site is well described in terms of {pi} to {pi}* charge transfer made possible through bonding interaction also at the oxygen in the minority spin-channel. The on-top CO in the mixed, high-coverage {alpha}{sub 1} phase is found to be tilted due to adsorbate-adsorbate interaction, but still with bonding mainly characteristic of ''vertical'' on-top adsorbed CO similar to other transition-metal surfaces.

  20. Mode operation of inductively-coupled argon plasmas studied by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, S.; Koleva, I.

    2007-04-01

    Mode operation of inductively driven plasmas in argon gas at low pressures is studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The plasma source is a tandem type source with a driver and an expansion plasma region. The driver region of the discharge is in the classical form of a cylindrically shaped inductive discharge, with a coil positioned over a gas discharge tube. The inductively coupled plasma discharge is maintained at high frequency f = 27 MHz, applied power varied in the limits P = (20-700) W and gas pressure in the range p = (8-260) mTorr. The Ar line intensity dependencies on the applied power injected into the discharge is analysed. With the power increase a mode transition of the discharge regime is not observed. The investigations on the discharge mode operation are supported by theoretical calculations based on kinetic modelling of main processes contributing to the line intensity behaviour.

  1. Electronic transitions and fermi edge singularity in polar heterostructures studied by absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavallini, A.; Gamarra, P.; Poisson, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Optically induced electronic transitions in nitride based polar heterostructures have been investigated by absorption and emission spectroscopy. Surface photovoltage (SPV), photocurrent (PC), and photo luminescence spectroscopy have been applied to high quality InAlN/AlN/GaN structures to study the optical properties of two dimensional electron gas. Energy levels within the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) well at the interface between the GaN and AlN have been directly observed by SPV and PC. Moreover, a strong enhancement of the photoluminescence intensity due to holes recombining with electrons at the Fermi Energy, known as fermi energy singularity, has been observed. These analyses have been carried out on InAlN/AlN/GaN heterojunctions with the InAlN barrier layer having different In content, a parameter which affects the energy levels within the 2DEG well as well as the optical signal intensity. The measured energy values are in a very good agreement with the ones obtained by Schrödinger-Poisson simulations.

  2. [Application of atomic emission spectroscopy analysis in the atmospheric pressure plasma polishing process study].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Ju-Fan; Dong, Shen

    2008-07-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma polishing (APPP) is a novel precision machining technology. It performs the atom scale material removal based on low temperature plasma chemical reactions. As the machining process is chemical in nature, it avoids the surface/subsurface defects usually formed in conventional mechanical machining processes. APPP firstly introduces a capacitance coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma torch to generate reactive plasma and excite chemical reactions further. The removal process is a complicated integrating action which tends to be affected by many factors, such as the gas ratio, the RF power and so on. Therefore, to improve the machining quality, all the aspects should be considered and studied, to establish the foundation for further model building and theoretical analysis. The atomic emission spectroscopy analysis was used to study the process characteristics. A commercial micro spectrometer was used to collect the spectrograms under different parameters, by comparing which the influence of the RF power and gas ratio was initially studied. The analysis results indicate that an increase in RF power results in a higher removal rate within a certain range. The gas ratio doesn't show obvious influence on the removal rate and surface roughness in initial experiments, but the element compositions detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technology on the machined surfaces under different ratios really indicate distinct difference. Then the theoretical analysis revealed the corresponding electron transition orbits of the excited reactive fluorine atoms, which is necessary for further mechanism research and apparatus improvement. Then the initial process optimization was made based on the analysis results, by which the Ra 0.6 nm surface roughness and 32 mm3 x min(-1) removal rate were achieved on silicon wafers.

  3. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Surface research tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, and field ion microscopy are discussed. Examples of their use in studying adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication presented. These tools have provided considerable insight into the basic nature of solid surface interactions. The transfer of metals from one surface to another at the atomic level has been observed and studied with each of these devices. The field ion microscope has been used to study polymer-metal interactions and Auger analysis to study the mechanism of polymer adhesion to metals. LEED and Auger analysis have identified surface segregation of alloying elements and indicated the influence of these elements in metallic adhesion. LEED and Auger analysis have assisted in adsorption studies in determining the structural arrangement and quantity of adsorbed species present in making an understanding of the influence of these species on adhesion possible. These devices are assisting in the furtherance of understanding of the fundamental mechanism involved in the adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication processes.

  4. A study of adulteration in gasoline samples using flame emission spectroscopy and chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    de Paulo, Jaqueline M; Mendes, Gisele; Barros, José E M; Barbeira, Paulo J S

    2012-12-21

    This work presents a low cost system based on Flame Emission Spectroscopy (FES) that enables the prediction of fuel adulteration. The spectral data acquired using FES were associated with chemometric tools--Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Partial Least Squares (PLS), aiming to predict gasoline adulterations with different solvents. The classification of the Brazilian adulterated gasoline samples with turpentine, thinner, kerosene, rubber solvent and ethanol was carried out through a PLS-DA model built using five latent variables (LV) with an accumulated variance of 100% on X and 76.78% on Y. The combination of these techniques provided the discrimination of distinct groups for each one of the studied adulterants. Subsequent to the classification, samples of adulterated gasoline with the same solvents with contents varying from 1 to 50% (v/v) were analyzed through FES and multivariate calibration curves were employed in order to predict the contents of the respective solvents. The results obtained by the combination of FES and PLS provided the determination of gasoline adulterants with small calibration and validation errors and also lower values than the ones reported in the literature using other spectroscopic techniques.

  5. X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We describe the chemical information that can be obtained by means of hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). XES is presented as a technique that is complementary to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and that provides valuable information with respect to the electronic structure (local charge- and spin-density) as well as the ligand environment of a 3d transition metal. We address non-resonant and resonant XES and present results that were recorded on Mn model systems and the Mn(4)Ca-cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. A brief description of the instrumentation is given with an outlook toward future developments.

  6. Optical absorption and emission spectroscopy studies of ammonia-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. J.; Donnelly, V. M.

    2007-05-01

    The chemistry of NH3/Ar/He plasmas was investigated, using a combination of ultraviolet (UV) optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Absolute NH3 number densities in 1 Torr plasmas were measured by OAS as a function of inductively coupled plasma power and substrate heater temperature (Th). OES and actinometry were used to determine semi-quantitative H-atom density. A 'self-actinometry' method was introduced to measure the absolute number density of N2 that formed following the dissociation of NH3 and secondary reactions. In this approach, small amounts of N2 are added to the NH3-containing plasma, leading to an increase in the N2(C 3 Πu → B 3 Πg) emission intensity. This provides an accurate calibration factor for converting relative N2 emission intensities into absolute number densities. The number densities of NH3 were found to decrease with increasing power and Th, reaching >90% dissociation at 400 W and 900 K. N2 densities increased with power and Th. The majority of dissociated NH3 was converted to N2 (i.e. the total nitrogen content was conserved in the sum of these two species). The major hydrogen-containing species appeared to be H2; however, a substantial amount of H-atoms (comparable to H2) was present at the highest powers.

  7. Positronium emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Tuomisaari, M.

    1988-08-01

    Measurements of the intensity, velocity, and angular distribution of positronium emitted from solid samples of metals and insulators have been performed using the intense, pulsed positron beam from the 100 MeV electron linac. From these data it is possible to determine properties of both the surface interactions and volume potentials of the materials studied. Examples of these effects will be given using measurements of positronium time of flight performed with the Livermore intense positron beam. The time of flight data have been augmented by positron lifetime and angular correlation measurements performed with the beam. Measurements resulting in workfunctions, deformation potentials and surface interaction effects will be reported for both metals and insulators. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  8. [Studies on the remote measurement of the emission of formaldehyde by mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Cheng; Xie, Pin-Hua; Li, Ang; Si, Fu-Qi; Dou, Ke; Liu, Yu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Jie

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compounds that play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and photochemical reactions. Formaldehyde is an important indicator of atmospheric reactivity and urban atmospheric aerosol precursors. In the present paper, the emission of formaldehyde from chemical area was measured using the mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). This instrument uses the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source with successful sampling in the area loop. Vertical column density was retrieved by this system, combined with the meteorological wind field and car speed information, the emission of formaldehyde in the area was estimated. The authors carried out the measuring experiment in one chemical plant in Beijing using this technology. The result showed that the average value of the flux of formaldehyde in this area was 605 kg x h(-1) during the measuring period.

  9. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  10. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  11. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-10

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp(2)-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  12. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    DOE PAGES

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; ...

    2017-02-10

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:N x) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH 2) 2 ]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:N x synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in whichmore » each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp 2 -hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:N x . The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.« less

  13. Study of nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmosphere by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-09-21

    We investigate the evolution of the species from both the target and the air, and the plasma parameter distribution of the nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmospheric air. The technique used is spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is argued that the N II from the air, which is distributed over a wider region than the target species in the early stages of the discharge, is primarily formed by the shock wave. The ionized species have a larger expansion velocity than the excited atoms in the first ∼100 ns, providing direct evidence for space-charge effects. The electron density decreases with the distance from the target surface in the early stages of the discharge, and both the electron density and the excited temperature variation in the axial direction are found to become insignificant at later stages.

  14. Electron capture and emission spectroscopy to study surface and interface magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Carl

    1994-07-01

    Electron capture spectroscopy (ECS) and spin-polarized electron emission spectroscopy (SPEES) are extremely sensitive techniques to probe surface magnetic properties. Ultra-thin bct Fe(100)(1×1)/Pd(100) films exhibit 2D Ising critical behavior. The surface electron spin polarization (ESP) follows precisely the exact solution of the 2D Ising model as given by Yang. The average magnetization of the topmost surface layer is enhanced by 32% compared to that of bulk layers. Pd Auger electrons emitted from the Fe/Pd interface are spin-polarized, and the ESP is oriented parallel to that of emitted Fe Auger electrons. At surfaces of 5nm thick hcp Tb(0001)/W(110) films, strong surface magnetic surface anisotropies are found. The onset of ferromagnetism occurs ≈30 K above the bulk Curie temperature (220K) of Tb. For clean Fe and Fe/Pd surfaces, the ESP of low-energy (≈2 eV) emitted electrons is substantially enhanced by Stoner excitations. The existence of a nonzero ESP at O/Fe surfaces demonstrates the absence of a magnetically dead surface layer.

  15. Electronic structure of aluminium trihydride studied using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Saitoh, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Machida, A.; Aoki, K.; Yamagami, H.; Muro, T.; Kato, Y.; Kinoshita, T.

    2011-10-01

    We have performed soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAS) experiments on aluminum hydride α-AlH3. The occupied and unoccupied electronic states of the Al 3p partial density of states are obtained experimentally. By comparing the data from Al metal and α-AlH3, a band gap with a few eV is found for α-AlH3. In addition, the occupied states of α-AlH3 have a larger spectral intensity than that of Al metal, indicating an increase in the number of electrons with the Al 3p character through Al-H bond formations. The results of a band-structure calculation account for the formation of the energy gap and the increase of the Al 3p electrons qualitatively. This suggests that a covalent-like nature is important to the Al-H bond in α-AlH3.

  16. Dynamics of Bloch State Positronium Emission from MOF Targets Studied via Rydberg TOF Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro Escalera, Alina; Jones, Adric; Mills, Allen

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in the efficient production and detection of Rydberg positronium (Ps) have made it possible to perform energy- and angle- resolved time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy with Ps. We report here TOF measurements of Ps emission from the metal-oxide framework (MOF) targets, MOF-5 and ZIF-8. MOFs are a recently synthesized class of chemical structures, characterized by high long-range order and large surface area to volume ratios (i.e., they are highly porous and uniform, crystalline materials). Ps is found to be emitted predominantly in a series of monoenergetic peaks, providing clear evidence of Ps Bloch states. Measuring the relative populations of the monoenergetic peaks, as a function of implantation energy and target temperature, provides insight into the target-dependent dynamics of Bloch state Ps. Work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation Grants No. PHY 1206100 and No. PHY 1040590 and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Progam (NSF-GRFP). DOE BES DE-FG02-13ER46972 (MOF-5 synthesis and characterization).

  17. Study of diatomic molecules. 2: Intensities. [optical emission spectroscopy of ScO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Femenias, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of perturbations, giving the diatomic effective Hamiltonian, is used for calculating actual molecular wave functions and intensity factors involved in transitions between states arising from Hund's coupling cases a,b, intermediate a-b, and c tendency. The Herman and Wallis corrections are derived, without any knowledge of the analytical expressions of the wave functions, and generalized to transitions between electronic states with whatever symmetry and multiplicity. A general method for studying perturbed intensities is presented using primarily modern spectroscopic numerical approaches. The method is used in the study of the ScO optical emission spectrum.

  18. Experimental study of photon induced gamma emission of hafnium-178(m2) by nuclear spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoita, Nicolae Catalin

    The induced release of the energy stored in nuclear isomers in the form of an incoherent gamma burst is of great scientific and technological importance. Powerful sources of induced gamma-ray radiation could be obtained, which would be an intermediary step to the development of a gamma-ray laser. High-energy nuclear isomers with very long lifetimes of the order of years and higher can serve as good active media. For instance, a macroscopic sample of 178Hfm2 isomer stores about 1 GJ/g as excitation energy of the isomeric state. Photonuclear reactions induced by real or virtual photons are the most promising mechanisms to release the energy stored by 178Hfm2 nuclei. The isomeric nucleus is excited to an intermediate level from which cascade to the ground state emitting gamma-photons. The nuclear level density approaches one per keV at those excitation energies. Experimental investigations by nuclear spectroscopy methods conducted in this work revealed that the decay of 178Hfm2 is accelerated when the energies of the incident photons were tuned at about 20,825 keV, 11.15 keV or near the L3 photoionization threshold of atomic hafnium at 9561 keV. In the first case, the presumed mechanism was the direct photoexcitation of the m2 isomeric nucleus to a trigger level at about 2466.9 keV. There was a strong decay branch from this trigger level to the 11- level of the 8 - band that caused the accelerated emission of gamma photons from many of the transitions detected in the unperturbed spontaneous decay. In the second case, a trigger level at about 2457.2 keV, that meant 11.15 keV above the 16+ isomeric level, was mediating the energy release. The direct transition from this level to ground state was observed. Other branches of its decay enhanced the gamma-emission of the ground state band (GSB) members. In the third case, complex electron bridging mechanisms were implied when incident X-ray photons were tuned at energies near the L3 photoionization threshold. Those

  19. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: Experimental study of lead emission intensity dependence on the wavelengths and sample matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscitelli S, V.; Martínez L., M. A.; Fernández C., A. J.; González, J. J.; Mao, X. L.; Russo, R. E.

    2009-02-01

    Lead (Pb) emission intensity (atomic line 405.78 nm) dependence on the sample matrix (metal alloy) was studied by means of collinear double pulse (DP)-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurement of the emission intensity produced by three different wavelength combinations (i.e. I:532 nm-II:1064 nm, I:532 nm-II:532 nm, and I:532 nm-II:355 nm) from three series of standard reference materials showed that the lead atomic line 405.78 nm emission intensity was dependent on the sample matrix for all the combination of wavelengths, however reduced dependency was found for the wavelength combination I:532 nm-II:355 nm. Two series of standard reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and one series from the British Chemical Standards (BCS) were used for these experiments. Calibration curves for lead ablated from NIST 626-630 ("Zn 95Al 4Cu 1") provided higher sensitivity (slope) than those calibration curves produced from NIST 1737-1741 ("Zn 99.5Al 0.5") and with the series BCS 551-556 ("Cu 87Sn 11"). Similar trends between lead emission intensity (calibration curve sensitivities) and reported variations in plasma temperatures caused by the differing ionization potentials of the major and minor elements in these samples were established.

  20. Cobalt(II) complexation with small biomolecules as studied by 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Perfiliev, Yurii D.; Kulikov, Leonid A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Kovács, Krisztina; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő

    2017-02-01

    In the emission (57Co) variant of Mössbauer spectroscopy (EMS), the 57Co radionuclide (with a half-life of 9 months) is used that undergoes a nuclear decay 57Co → 57Fe via electron capture followed by the emission of a γ-quantum, the energy of which is modified by the chemical state and the close coordination environment of the parent 57Co atom. While EMS has been used largely in materials science and nuclear chemistry, its high sensitivity can also be of great advantage in revealing fine structural features and for speciation analysis of biological complexes, whenever the 57Co2 + cation can be used directly as the coordinating metal or as a substitute for native cobalt or other metal ions. As such EMS applications are yet rare, in order to reliably interpret emission spectra of sophisticated 57Co2 +-doped biosystems, model EMS studies of simple cobalt biocomplexes are necessary. In this work, EMS spectroscopic data are analysed and discussed for 57Co2 + complexes with a range of small biomolecules of different structures, including 4-n-hexylresorcinol, homoserine lactone and a few amino acids (spectra measured in rapidly frozen dilute aqueous solutions or in the dried state at T = 80 K). The EMS data obtained are discussed with regard to the available literature data related to the coordination modes of the biocomplexes under study.

  1. Study of dynamic emission spectra from lubricant films in an elastohydrodynamic contact using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra were obtained through a diamond window from lubricating fluids in an operating sliding elastohydrodynamic contact and analyzed by comparison with static absorption spectra under similar pressures. Different loads, shear rates and temperatures were used. Most of the spectra exhibited polarization characteristics, indicating directional alignment of the lubricant in the EHD contact. Among the fluids studied were a "traction" fluid, an advanced ester, and their mixtures, a synthetic paraffin, a naphthenic reference fluid (N-1), both neat and containing 1 percent of p-tricresyl phosphate as an anti-wear additive, and a C-ether. Traction properties were found to be nearly proportional to mixture composition for traction fluid and ester mixtures. The anti-wear additive reduced traction and fluid temperature under low loads but increased them under higher loads, giving rise to formation of a friction polymer.

  2. Aqueous solutions of uranium(VI) as studied by time-resolved emission spectroscopy: a round-robin test.

    PubMed

    Billard, Isabelle; Ansoborlo, Eric; Apperson, Kathleen; Arpigny, Sylvie; Azenha, M Emilia; Birch, David; Bros, Pascal; Burrows, Hugh D; Choppin, Gregory; Couston, Laurent; Dubois, Veronique; Fanghänel, Thomas; Geipel, Gerhard; Hubert, Solange; Kim, Jae I; Kimura, Takaumi; Klenze, Reinhardt; Kronenberg, Andreas; Kumke, Michael; Lagarde, Gerard; Lamarque, Gerard; Lis, Stefan; Madic, Charles; Meinrath, Gunther; Moulin, Christophe; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Parker, David; Plancque, Gabriel; Scherbaum, Franz; Simoni, Eric; Sinkov, Sergei; Viallesoubranne, Carole

    2003-08-01

    Results of an inter-laboratory round-robin study of the application of time-resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) to the speciation of uranium(VI) in aqueous media are presented. The round-robin study involved 13 independent laboratories, using various instrumentation and data analysis methods. Samples were prepared based on appropriate speciation diagrams and, in general, were found to be chemically stable for at least six months. Four different types of aqueous uranyl solutions were studied: (1) acidic medium where UO2(2+)aq is the single emitting species, (2) uranyl in the presence of fluoride ions, (3) uranyl in the presence of sulfate ions, and (4) uranyl in aqueous solutions at different pH, promoting the formation of hydrolyzed species. Results between the laboratories are compared in terms of the number of decay components, luminescence lifetimes, and spectral band positions. The successes and limitations of TRES in uranyl analysis and speciation in aqueous solutions are discussed.

  3. A study of OH radicals in an atmospheric AC discharge plasma using near infrared diode laser cavity ringdown spectroscopy combined with optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, N.; Wang, C.; Dibble, T. S.

    2009-07-01

    Simultaneous measurements of absolute concentrations of H{2}O and OH radicals in an atmospheric AC discharge using continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) are reported. Formation of OH radicals and plasma temperatures are characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. The concentration of OH radical at the edge of the discharge plume at 380 K is measured by the cw-CRDS technique to be 1.1 × 1015 molecule cm-3. Ringdown measurements of the H{2}O (120-000) band and the OH first overtone around 1515 nm enable us to determine an OH generation yield, Φ =frac{N_OH }{NH2 O}, to be 4.8 × 10-3, where N_OH and NH2 O are the number densities of OH and H{2}O, respectively. The minimum detectable absorption coefficient of the cw-CRDS system is 8.9 × 10-9 cm-1, which corresponds to a 1σ detection limit of OH number density of 1.2 × 1013 molecule cm-3 in the discharge. This experimental approach is demonstrated for the first time ever in an AC discharge, and can be applied in general to a variety of atmospheric plasmas to help study OH formation mechanisms and OH-related plasma applications.

  4. Adsorption, X-ray Diffraction, Photoelectron, and Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Benchmark Studies for the Eighth Industrial Fluid Properties Simulation Challenge.

    PubMed

    Ross, Richard B; Aeschliman, David B; Ahmad, Riaz; Brennan, John K; Brostrom, Myles L; Frankel, Kevin A; Moore, Jonathan D; Moore, Joshua D; Mountain, Raymond D; Poirier, Derrick M; Thommes, Matthias; Shen, Vincent K; Schultz, Nathan E; Siderius, Daniel W; Smith, Kenneth D

    2016-02-01

    The primary goal of the eighth industrial fluid properties simulation challenge was to test the ability of molecular simulation methods to predict the adsorption of organic adsorbates in activated carbon materials. The challenge focused on the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon standard BAM-P109 (Panne and Thünemann 2010). Entrants were challenged to predict the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon at a temperature of 273 K and at relative pressures of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6. The relative pressure (P/Po) is defined as that relative to the bulk saturation pressure predicted by the fluid model at a given temperature (273 K in this case). The predictions were judged by comparison to a set of experimentally determined values, which are published here for the first time and were not disclosed to the entrants prior to the challenge. Benchmark experimental studies, described herein, were also carried out and provided to entrants in order to aid in the development of new force fields and simulation methods to be employed in the challenge. These studies included argon, carbon dioxide, and water adsorption in the BAM-P109 activated carbon as well as X-ray diffraction, X-ray microtomography, photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic emission spectroscopy studies of BAM-P109. Several concurrent studies were carried out for the BAM-P108 activated carbon (Panne and Thünemann 2010). These are included in the current manuscript for comparison.

  5. Adsorption, X-ray Diffraction, Photoelectron, and Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Benchmark Studies for the Eighth Industrial Fluid Properties Simulation Challenge*+

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Richard B.; Aeschliman, David B.; Ahmad, Riaz; Brennan, John K.; Brostrom, Myles L.; Frankel, Kevin A.; Moore, Jonathan D.; Moore, Joshua D.; Mountain, Raymond D.; Poirier, Derrick M.; Thommes, Matthias; Shen, Vincent K.; Schultz, Nathan E.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of the eighth industrial fluid properties simulation challenge was to test the ability of molecular simulation methods to predict the adsorption of organic adsorbates in activated carbon materials. The challenge focused on the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon standard BAM-P109 (Panne and Thünemann 2010). Entrants were challenged to predict the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon at a temperature of 273 K and at relative pressures of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6. The relative pressure (P/Po) is defined as that relative to the bulk saturation pressure predicted by the fluid model at a given temperature (273 K in this case). The predictions were judged by comparison to a set of experimentally determined values, which are published here for the first time and were not disclosed to the entrants prior to the challenge. Benchmark experimental studies, described herein, were also carried out and provided to entrants in order to aid in the development of new force fields and simulation methods to be employed in the challenge. These studies included argon, carbon dioxide, and water adsorption in the BAM-P109 activated carbon as well as X-ray diffraction, X-ray microtomography, photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic emission spectroscopy studies of BAM-P109. Several concurrent studies were carried out for the BAM-P108 activated carbon (Panne and Thünemann 2010). These are included in the current manuscript for comparison. PMID:27840543

  6. Modern applications of terahertz emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrel, Shayne Matthew

    Terahertz (THz) emission spectroscopy (TES) is newly developed experimental technique capable of measuring ultrafast dynamics in a variety of systems. Unlike pump-probe spectroscopies where the signals are obtained indirectly, the THz waveform emitted by the dynamical process serves as the signal field. Information about processes involving a time-dependent magnetization, polarization or current is obtained using TES. The detection scheme is polarization sensitive and allows the direction of the dynamical event to be recovered. The role of solvation on intramolecular charge transfer in DMANS (4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrostilbene) is studied using TES in three solvents: benzene, toluene, and 1,3-dichlorobenzene. These solvents have similar molecular structures but different polarities and dielectric constants. The charge transfer dynamics are found to depend on the solvent. A secondary feature in the THz emission appearing 4-6 Ps after the main pulse provides evidence that DMANS may undergo a twisted intramolecular charge transfer state (TICT) upon photoexcitation. The ultrafast magnetization dynamics of polycrystalline Ni and single Fe films ranging in thickness from 5 nm to 60 nm are reported using TES. For samples thicker than the visible optical skin depth, (˜10 nm for Ni and ˜27 nm for Fe), the emission is easily interpreted using Lenz's law. For films thinner than visible optical skin depth, the emission patterns are qualitatively different. These results suggest that there are two generation mechanisms at work: one that arises purely from bulk demagnetization in the thick sample limit and another that is the result of difference frequency generation enhanced by the magnetized surface. A comparative study of the magnetization dynamics of a 40 nm Ni and 40 Fe film shows that the magnetization recovers faster in Fe than in Ni. The dependence of optical rectification and shift currents in unbiased GaAs (111) is reported using TES. It is found that the dependence

  7. Vibrational Motions Associated with Primary Processes in Bacteriorhodopsin Studied by Coherent Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Groma, Géza I.; Colonna, Anne; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary energetic processes driving the functional proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin take place in the form of complex molecular dynamic events after excitation of the retinal chromophore into the Franck-Condon state. These early events include a strong electronic polarization, skeletal stretching, and all-trans-to-13-cis isomerization upon formation of the J intermediate. The effectiveness of the photoreaction is ensured by a conical intersection between the electronic excited and ground states, providing highly nonadiabatic coupling to nuclear motions. Here, we study real-time vibrational coherences associated with these motions by analyzing light-induced infrared emission from oriented purple membranes in the 750–1400 cm−1 region. The experimental technique applied is based on second-order femtosecond difference frequency generation on macroscopically ordered samples that also yield information on phase and direction of the underlying motions. Concerted use of several analysis methods resulted in the isolation and characterization of seven different vibrational modes, assigned as C-C stretches, out-of-plane methyl rocks, and hydrogen out-of-plane wags, whereas no in-plane H rock was found. Based on their lifetimes and several other criteria, we deduce that the majority of the observed modes take place on the potential energy surface of the excited electronic state. In particular, the direction sensitivity provides experimental evidence for large intermediate distortions of the retinal plane during the excited-state isomerization process. PMID:21402041

  8. Vibrational motions associated with primary processes in bacteriorhodopsin studied by coherent infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Groma, Géza I; Colonna, Anne; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2011-03-16

    The primary energetic processes driving the functional proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin take place in the form of complex molecular dynamic events after excitation of the retinal chromophore into the Franck-Condon state. These early events include a strong electronic polarization, skeletal stretching, and all-trans-to-13-cis isomerization upon formation of the J intermediate. The effectiveness of the photoreaction is ensured by a conical intersection between the electronic excited and ground states, providing highly nonadiabatic coupling to nuclear motions. Here, we study real-time vibrational coherences associated with these motions by analyzing light-induced infrared emission from oriented purple membranes in the 750-1400 cm(-)(1) region. The experimental technique applied is based on second-order femtosecond difference frequency generation on macroscopically ordered samples that also yield information on phase and direction of the underlying motions. Concerted use of several analysis methods resulted in the isolation and characterization of seven different vibrational modes, assigned as C-C stretches, out-of-plane methyl rocks, and hydrogen out-of-plane wags, whereas no in-plane H rock was found. Based on their lifetimes and several other criteria, we deduce that the majority of the observed modes take place on the potential energy surface of the excited electronic state. In particular, the direction sensitivity provides experimental evidence for large intermediate distortions of the retinal plane during the excited-state isomerization process.

  9. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masenda, H.; Geburt, S.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Naidoo, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Ronning, C.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope 57Mn+ ( T 1/2= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of 57Fe atoms produced in the 57Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe3+ with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with 56Fe to fluences of 2×1013, 5×10 13 and 8 × 1013 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe3+ on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe3+ at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  10. Theoretical and experimental studies on the analytical applications of flame infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, C.K.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the temperature dependence of the flame/furnace infrared emission (FIRE) produced by the antisymmetric stretching vibration of carbon dioxide. The model can be used to predict the detector performance as a function of the temperature of the excitation source. Thermospray and cross-flow pneumatic nebulizers were studied for interfacing a FIRE radiometer to a high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). Due to the large quantities of liquid mobile phase introduced into the burner, the temperature of the H[sub 2]/air flame was changed significantly. The detector could be configured in carbon- or chlorine-specific modes. When the carbon-specific mode was employed, the mobile phase was restricted to deionized water. With the chlorine-specific mode, combustible organic mobile phases could be used and the detector could selectively determine mixtures of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Flame background caused by the combustion of carbon-containing mobile phases could be electronically subtracted by using dual channel FIRE radiometer. Typical detection limits for both kinds of interface are in the range of [mu]g s[sup [minus]1]. The FIRE radiometer can be interfaced to an HPLC to form dissolved carbon dioxide which is then purged by H[sub 2] gas through a special purge chamber. Sodium peroxydisulfate (Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 8]), in the presence of silver nitrate, was employed as an oxidizing agent to oxidize carboxylic acids and sugars to carbon dioxide. The specially designed purge chamber can also be used in both process analysis and flow injection analysis (FIA) for the determination of total inorganic carbon, purgeable organic carbon in aqueous samples and the available chlorine in bleach liquors. Nonvolatile organics can be determined by means of sample pretreatment with sodium peroxydisulfate catalyzed with silver at elevated temperature. Hydrogen/nitrous oxide was investigated as an alternative fuel/oxidant mixture.

  11. Midinfrared spectroscopy of synthetic olivines: Thermal emission, specular and diffuse reflectance, and attenuated total reflectance studies of forsterite to fayalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Melissa D.; Glotch, Timothy D.; Dyar, M. Darby; Pieters, Carle M.; Klima, Rachel; Hiroi, Takahiro; Bishop, Janice L.; Sunshine, Jessica

    2011-08-01

    Synthetic olivine samples ranging in composition from forsterite to fayalite are analyzed in the midinfrared using thermal emission, specular and diffuse reflectance, and attenuated total reflectance spectroscopies to study the spectral effects of Mg-Fe solid solution. For each method, fundamental bands gradually change in position and strength from Mg2SiO4 at larger wave numbers to Fe2SiO4 at smaller wave numbers. Each spectrum is diagnostic of chemistry within the continuum, as previously noted. In this study, 10 identified fundamental bands are traceable across the solid solution series for each technique. In pelletized sample spectra, the 10 bands shift approximately linearly in position by as little as 11 to as much as 64 cm-1. In powdered sample spectra, the bands shift by as little as 12 to as much as 74 cm-1 (disregarding one outlier point). Moreover, for every spectral technique, an even larger linear shift is identified of a specific emissivity maximum/reflectivity minimum (the flection position). From forsterite to fayalite, this flection position shifts by at least 88 cm-1, which is, on average, 48% more than the largest fundamental band shift within the same data set for the pelletized spectra and 44% more for the powdered spectra. Also the R2 and 2σ values of the best fit line for the flection position shift (versus Fo#) generally were as good as or routinely better than those of the fundamental bands. Thus, the flection position should be considered as a means of determining Mg-Fe olivine composition when using thermal emission, specular reflectance, diffuse reflectance, or attenuated total reflectance spectroscopic data.

  12. Transient surface photoconductivity of GaAs emitter studied by terahertz pump-emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yulei; Zhou, Qing-li; Zhang, Cunlin

    2010-11-01

    The ultrafast carrier dynamics and surface photoconductivity of unbiased semi-insulating GaAs have been investigated in detail by using terahertz pump-emission technique. Through theoretical modeling based on Hertz vector potential, it is found that transient photoconductivity plays a very important role in the temporal waveform of terahertz radiation pulse. Anomalous enhancement in both terahertz radiation and transient photoconductivity is observed subsequent to the excitation of pump pulse, and our modeling gives successful analyses for the dynamics of photogenerated carriers in the GaAs. We attribute these phenomena to carrier capture in the EL2 centers. Moreover, the pump power- and temperaturedependent measurements are also performed to verify this model.

  13. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-05

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  14. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; Yang, Clayton S.-C.; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6 μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10 μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5 μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  15. Infrared emission spectroscopy of HBr

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, V. . Centre for Molecular Beams and Laser Chemistry); Bernath, P.F. . Centre for Molecular Beams and Laser Chemistry Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-10-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectrum of HBr was recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. Line positions for the 1-0 and 2-1 bands were measured for both H[sup 79]Br and H[sup 81]Br. A pure rotation emission spectrum of HBr was also obtained, and rotational lines for v = 0 were measured. The two sets of data, when combined with previously measured submillimeter-wave pure rotational transitions, yielded a set of improved rotational constants for H[sup 79]Br and H[sup 81]Br.

  16. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Study Ligand Valence Orbitals in Mn Coordination Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Soldatov, Alexander V; Messinger, Johannes; Merz, Kathrin; Weyhermuller, Thomas; Bergmann, Uwe; Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-03-02

    We discuss a spectroscopic method to determine the character of chemical bonding and for the identification of metal ligands in coordination and bioinorganic chemistry. It is based on the analysis of satellite lines in X-ray emission spectra that arise from transitions between valence orbitals and the metal ion 1s level (valence-to-core XES). The spectra, in connection with calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), provide information that is complementary to other spectroscopic techniques, in particular X-ray absorption (XANES and EXAFS). The spectral shape is sensitive to protonation of ligands and allows ligands, which differ only slightly in atomic number (e.g., C, N, O...), to be distinguished. A theoretical discussion of the main spectral features is presented in terms of molecular orbitals for a series of Mn model systems: [Mn(H2O)6]2+, [Mn(H2O)5OH]+, [Mn(H2O)5NH2]+, and [Mn(H2O)5NH3]2+. An application of the method, with comparison between theory and experiment, is presented for the solvated Mn2+ ion in water and three Mn coordination complexes, namely [LMn(acac)N3]BPh4, [LMn(B2O3Ph2)(ClO4)], and [LMn(acac)N]BPh4, where L represents 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, acac stands for the 2,4-pentanedionate anion, and B2O3Ph2 represents the 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-dibora-2-oxapropane-1,3-diolato dianion.

  17. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  18. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhone, Jason; Cooper, Christopher; Desangles, Victor; Nornberg, Mark; Seidlitz, Blair; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2015-11-01

    An optical emission spectroscopic analysis has been developed to measure electron temperature, neutral burnout, and Zeff in Ar and He plasmas in the Wisconsin plasma astrophysics laboratory (WiPAL). The WiPAL vacuum chamber is a 3 meter diameter spherical vessel lined with 3000 SmCo permanent magnets (B > 3 kG) that create an axisymmetric multi-cusp ring for confining the plasma. WiPAL is designed to study unmagnetized plasmas that are hot (Te > 10 eV), dense (ne >1018), and with high ionization fraction. Electron temperature and density can be measured via Langmuir probes. However, probes can disturb the plasma, be difficult to interpret, and become damaged by large heat loads from the plasma. A low cost non-invasive spectroscopy system capable of scanning the plasma via a linear stage has been installed to study plasma properties. From the neutral particle emission, the neutral burnout and estimated neutral temperature can be inferred. A modified coronal model with metastable states is being implemented to determine Te for Ar plasmas.

  19. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532 nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064 nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532 nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064 nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064 nm excitation.

  20. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluorethylene to metals studied by Auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum were studied. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron-induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals, such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Haijun; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Michio; Kuraseko, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    The optical emission behaviors of Ar, He, and Ar+He plasmas generated in air using an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma source have been studied employing optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Emissions from various source gas species and air were observed. The variations in the intensities and intensity ratios of specific emissions as functions of the microwave power and gas flow rate were analyzed to investigate the relationship between the emission behavior and the plasma properties. We find that dependence of the emission behavior on the input microwave power is mainly determined by variations in electron density and electron temperature in the plasmas. On the other hand, under different gas flow rate conditions, changes in the density of the source gas atoms also significantly affect the emissions. Interestingly, when plasma is generated using an Ar+He mixture, emissions from excited He atoms disappear while a strong H{sub {alpha}} signal appears. The physics behind these behaviors is discussed in detail.

  3. Laser-Induced-Emission Spectroscopy In Hg/Ar Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lutfollah; Blasenheim, Barry J.; Janik, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced-emission (LIE) spectroscopy used to probe low-pressure mercury/argon discharge to determine influence of mercury atoms in metastable 6(Sup3)P(Sub2) state on emission of light from discharge. LIE used to study all excitation processes affected by metastable population, including possible effects on excitation of atoms, ions, and buffer gas. Technique applied to emissions of other plasmas. Provides data used to make more-accurate models of such emissions, exploited by lighting and laser industries and by laboratories studying discharges. Also useful in making quantitative measurements of relative rates and cross sections of direct and two-step collisional processes involving metastable level.

  4. Study on Emission Spectral Lines of Iron, Fe in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on Soil Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Nasrullah; Lahna, Kurnia; Fadhli; Ramli, Muliadi

    2017-05-01

    In this work, LIBS technique has been used for detection of heavy metal especially iron, Fe in soil sample. As there are a large number of emission spectral lines due to Fe and other constituents in soil, this study is intended to identify emission spectral lines of Fe and finally to find best fit emission spectral lines for carrying out a qualitative and quantitative analysis. LIBS apparatus used in this work consists of a laser system (Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Nd-YAG: Quanta Ray; LAB SERIES; 1,064 nm; 500 mJ; 8 ns) and an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system consisting of a spectrograph (McPherson model 2061; 1,000 mm focal length; f/8.6 Czerny- Turner) and an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) 1024x256 pixels (Andor I*Star). The soil sample was collected from Banda Aceh city, Aceh, Indonesia. For spectral data acquisition, the soil sample has been prepared by a pressing machine in the form of pellet. The laser beam was focused using a high density lens (f=+150 mm) and irradiated on the surface of the pellet for generating luminous plasma under 1 atmosphere of air surrounding. The plasma emission was collected by an optical fiber and then sent to the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system for acquisition of the emission spectra. It was found that there are many Fe emission lines both atomic lines (Fe I) and ionic lines (Fe II) appeared in all detection windows in the wavelength regions, ranging from 200 nm to 1000 nm. The emission lines of Fe with strong intensities occurs together with emission lines due to other atoms such as Mg, Ca, and Si. Thus, the identification of emission lines from Fe is complicated by presence of many other lines due to other major and minor elements in soil. Considering the features of the detected emission lines, several emission spectral lines of Fe I (atomic emission line), especially Fe I 404.58 nm occurring at visible range are potential to be good candidate of analytical lines in relation to detection

  5. Characterization of Cd1- x Mg x Te film and plasma diagnostic studies by optical emission spectroscopy during sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Compaan, A. D.

    2009-06-01

    Cd1- x Mg x Te is an attractive II-VI semiconductor alloy candidate for obtaining energy gaps wider than 1.5 eV of CdTe needed for the top junction absorber layer in a polycrystalline thin-film tandem solar cell. We have shown that these alloy films can easily be prepared by sputtering, however, the sputtering rate is substantially lower than for CdTe and the attainable cell performance has been poor, both before and after activation treatments with chlorine-containing vapors. In this work we have applied optical emission spectroscopy (OES) using selected peaks of ArII, CdII, MgI, TeII and correlated the results with crystallographic and morphological characteristics of the deposited films. Results were obtained as a function of rf sputter power and sputter gas pressure.

  6. Fractionally Charged Excitations in Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylak, Pawel

    2008-03-01

    We discuss recent experiments and theory of the signatures of fractionally charged excitations in optical emission spectroscopy of two dimensional electrons subjected to a high magnetic field [1]. We show that the two flux quanta in a composite fermion interacting with an exciton lead to filling factor dependent features in optical emission spectrum symmetric around filling factor 1/2 while fractionally charged excitations lead to fractionally charged exciton. In the vicinity of the incompressible filling factor 1/3 state we observe a doublet structure in the emission line, corresponding to excitations of the incompressible fluid. At filling factors lower then 1/3 , corresponding to the transition to a compressible, metallic state, a new emission line appears which is attributed to the fractionally charged quasi-exciton. These observations are supported by extensive numerical calculations of the emission spectrum of finite number of electrons and holes on a Haldane sphere. [1] M. Byszewski, B. Chwalisz, D.K. Maude, M.L. Sadowski, M. Potemski, T. Saku, and Y. Hirayama, S. Studenikin, D. G. Austing, A.S. Sachrajda, and P. Hawrylak, Nature Physics 2, 239 (2006).

  7. THz Emission Spectroscopy for THz Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarik Huisman, Thomas; Rasing, Theo

    2017-01-01

    Spintronics is used as the standard for the readout of magnetically stored data and also has commercial applications for writing data. The generation, control and detection of spin-polarized currents, spin-dependent electric transport, and pure spin currents on the subpicosecond (10-12 s) timescale are the next challenges in spintronics. Terahertz (THz, 1012 Hz) emission spectroscopy has proven to be an excellent tool for investigating these challenges. In this short review, we outline the functioning of this spectroscopic technique and its recent applications to spintronics.

  8. Photoelectron Emission Spectroscopy of Liquid Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    correlated to solvation free energies for H2O+(aq) and OH (aq)., DD ,FO*M 1473 EDITIOOF INOV so iS OBSOLETE Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...Photoelectron spectroscopy Reorganization free energy Water, liquid 20. ABSTRACT (Chlnw am ef We, aid* it nooe"mr and 1iEru’h hr 190k le 6) The threshold... energy Et a 10.06 eV (0.002 @V standard deviation) is detemined for phot~oelectron emission by litquid water and is correlated with Et a 8.45 eV for

  9. Automated plasma control with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.P.

    1995-08-01

    Plasma etching and desmear processes for printed wiring board (PWB) manufacture are difficult to predict and control. Non-uniformity of most plasma processes and sensitivity to environmental changes make it difficult to maintain process stability from day to day. To assure plasma process performance, weight loss coupons or post-plasma destructive testing must be used. These techniques are not real-time methods however, and do not allow for immediate diagnosis and process correction. These tests often require scrapping some fraction of a batch to insure the integrity of the rest. Since these tests verify a successful cycle with post-plasma diagnostics, poor test results often determine that a batch is substandard and the resulting parts unusable. These tests are a costly part of the overall fabrication cost. A more efficient method of testing would allow for constant monitoring of plasma conditions and process control. Process anomalies should be detected and corrected before the parts being treated are damaged. Real time monitoring would allow for instantaneous corrections. Multiple site monitoring would allow for process mapping within one system or simultaneous monitoring of multiple systems. Optical emission spectroscopy conducted external to the plasma apparatus would allow for this sort of multifunctional analysis without perturbing the glow discharge. In this paper, optical emission spectroscopy for non-intrusive, in situ process control will be explored along with applications of this technique to for process control, failure analysis and endpoint determination in PWB manufacture.

  10. Comment on ``Spin crossover in (Mg,Fe)O: A Mössbauer effect study with an alternative interpretation of x-ray emission spectroscopy data''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vankó, György; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2007-05-01

    In a recent paper, Kantor presented Mössbauer spectroscopy data on the pressure dependence of the Fe spin state in Mg1-xFexO [Phys. Rev. B 73, 100101(R) (2006)] and found that the transition was completed at significantly higher pressures than what had been found by x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) studies. In order to account for the discrepancy, the authors reanalyzed the XES spectra using a simple spectral decomposition and achieved good agreement for the two types of data. In this paper, we show that the proposed alternative analysis of the XES spectra is inadequate, prove that previous XES work had correctly identified the low-spin state at the highest pressures, and provide a complete reanalysis of the XES data.

  11. Applications of UV Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy for High Spectral Resolution Studies of Diffuse Emission Line Sources in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W.; Roesler, F.; Mierkiewicz, E.; Corliss, J.

    2003-05-01

    A Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) instrument combines high etendue and high spectral resolution in a compact package that is very effective for the study of diffuse low surface brightness emissions. SHS instruments require no telescope to achieve high sensitivity on extended sources and may be designed with fields of view exceeding 1 degree and spectral resolutions exceeding 100000. This combination makes them well suited to many solar system targets including comets, the interplanetary medium, and planetary atmospheres/coronas, using platforms from sounding rockets to remote probes. We are currently developing two variations of the SHS. The first of these is a new form of all-reflective, common-path SHS optimized for the study of FUV emission lines where transmitting optics will introduce an unacceptable attenuation of the incident beam. Secondly we are developing a multiorder variation of the SHS, where a customized high order grating is used to overlap integer orders of multiple target emission lines that can then be separated using a transform technique or with order separation filters. In this presentation we will describe the basic SHS technique, the design variations we are pursuing, and their rationale, both technical and scientific.

  12. Plant species discrimination using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, Gilles; Gerhards, Max; Schlerf, Martin; Hecker, Christoph; Udelhoven, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). At high SNR, the TIR data (Overall Accuracy (OAA) = 92.26%) outperformed the VSWIR data (OAA = 80.28%). This study demonstrates that TIR imaging spectroscopy allows for fast and spatial measurements of spectral plant emissivity with accuracies comparable to laboratory measurement. This innovative technique offers a valuable addition to VSWIR spectroscopy as it provides complimentary information for plant species discrimination.

  13. Plasma process control with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.P.

    1995-04-01

    Plasma processes for cleaning, etching and desmear of electronic components and printed wiring boards (PWB) are difficult to predict and control. Non-uniformity of most plasma processes and sensitivity to environmental changes make it difficult to maintain process stability from day to day. To assure plasma process performance, weight loss coupons or post-plasma destructive testing must be used. The problem with these techniques is that they are not real-time methods and do not allow for immediate diagnosis and process correction. These methods often require scrapping some fraction of a batch to insure the integrity of the rest. Since these methods verify a successful cycle with post-plasma diagnostics, poor test results often determine that a batch is substandard and the resulting parts unusable. Both of these methods are a costly part of the overall fabrication cost. A more efficient method of testing would allow for constant monitoring of plasma conditions and process control. Process failures should be detected before the parts being treated. are damaged. Real time monitoring would allow for instantaneous corrections. Multiple site monitoring would allow for process mapping within one system or simultaneous monitoring of multiple systems. Optical emission spectroscopy conducted external to the plasma apparatus would allow for this sort of multifunctional analysis without perturbing the glow discharge. In this paper, optical emission spectroscopy for non-intrusive, in situ process control will be explored. A discussion of this technique as it applies towards process control, failure analysis and endpoint determination will be conducted. Methods for identifying process failures, progress and end of etch back and desmear processes will be discussed.

  14. Study of the hyperfine structure of emission lines of I{sub 2} molecules by the method of three-level laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matyugin, Yu A; Okhapkin, M V; Skvortsov, M N; Ignatovich, S M; Bagaev, S N

    2008-08-31

    It is proposed to use narrow optical resonances, corresponding to the hyperfine structure components of emission transitions in I{sub 2}, as frequency references to stabilise laser radiation frequency in the spectral range from 0.8 to 1.3 {mu}m. To obtain such resonances and investigate the hyperfine structure of emission transitions, an experimental setup is built which consists of a saturated absorption laser spectrometer and a three-level laser spectrometer. Excitation is performed by the second harmonic of a cw Nd:YAG laser and probe radiation in the range from 968 to 998 nm is generated by an external cavity diode laser. The radiation beams from both lasers are combined in a cell with iodine vapour, excitation in the cell being performed in the regime of two counterpropagating waves. It is shown that upon phase modulation of exciting radiation, narrow resonances, having the form of the dispersion dependence, appear at the centre of Doppler lines in absorption and emission. These resonances can be used as references to stabilise the laser frequency. The results of the study of the hyperfine structure of emission lines at the (J' = 57, v' = 32) {yields} (J'' = 58, v'' = 48) transition upon excitation at the (J'' = 56, v'' = 0) {yields} (J' = 57, v'' = 32) transition are presented. (laser spectroscopy)

  15. Monitoring of laser welding process by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruncko, Jaroslav; Uherek, Frantisek; Michalka, Miroslav

    2003-07-01

    Technological processes including laser welding that use a laser beam are typically accompanied with the occurrence of laser-induced plasma. This physical phenomenon is investigated by many different monitoring methods and optical emission spectroscopy is the most common. The recent advert of miniature fibre optic spectrometers and relative cheap and powerful computers has provided a very promising tool for on-line spectral analyzing of laser-induced plasma. The contribution deals with the on-line monitoring of a laser-induced plasma during laser beam welding by optical emission spectroscopy. In this study a continuous-wave CO2 laser with output power up to 3 kW was used. Circumstances of partial and full penetration of welded specimen material and the relation with spectroscopic parameters of laser-induced plasma were investigated.

  16. Electronic structure of hemin in solution studied by resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Atak, Kaan; Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Suljoti, Edlira; Pflüger, Mika; Brandenburg, Tim; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-08-21

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra at the iron L-edge from hemin in dimethyl sulfoxide liquid solution are reported. Our experiments, which are interpreted with the help of electronic structure calculations, support earlier assignments of hemin-solvent interactions, including the iron spin state and the role of the chloride ligand obtained from a total fluorescence yield study. The analysis of the explicit radiative relaxation channels of 2p core-level excited iron, explored in the present work, allows for a rather quantitative assignment of the orbitals involved in the excitation-deexcitation process of the core-excited hemin in solution. We specifically distinguish between contributions of partially and fully occupied valence orbitals to the broad X-ray emission band. In addition, our calculations reveal a detailed picture of the character of these orbitals.

  17. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy study of CaF 2(film)/Si(111): non-destructive buried interface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwami, M.; Kusaka, M.; Hirai, M.; Tagami, R.; Nakamura, H.; Watabe, H.

    1997-06-01

    A soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) study under an energetic electron irradiation is first applied to a non-destructive buried interface analysis of a CaF 2(film ˜ 40 nm)/Si(111) contact system, where the energy of primary electrons, Ep, is ≤ 5 keV. The present work has explored the usefulness of the application of the SXES method to the interface study to give rise to the following findings: the CaF 2/Si(111) interface shows rather sharp transition from the top CaF 2 to the substrate Si, there certainly is a Ca-silicide layer at the CaF 2/Si(111) interface, the thickness of the silicide layer is estimated to be less than several nm, and the e-beam excited SXES non-destructive study is very powerful to analyze a specimen with rather thick top film (> 40 nm) and thin interface layer (< several nm).

  18. Photolysis of n-butyl nitrite and isoamyl nitrite at 355 nm: A time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy and ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Min; Zhen Junfeng; Zhang Qun; Chen Yang

    2009-05-07

    We report on the photodissociation dynamics study of n-butyl nitrite and isoamyl nitrite by means of time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (TR-FTIR) emission spectroscopy. The obtained TR-FTIR emission spectra of the nascent NO fragments produced in the 355 nm laser photolysis of the two alkyl nitrite species showed an almost identical rotational temperature and vibrational distributions of NO. In addition, a close resemblance between the two species was also found in the measured temporal profiles of the IR emission of NO and the recorded UV absorption spectra. The experimental results are consistent with our ab initio calculations using the time-dependent density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which indicate that the substitution of one of the two {gamma}-H atoms in n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}ONO with a methyl group to form (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 3}H{sub 5}ONO has only a minor effect on the photodissociation dynamics of the two molecules.

  19. 5 f -shell correlation effects in dioxides of light actinides studied by O 1s x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Modin, A; Suzuki, M-T; Vegelius, J; Yun, Y; Shuh, D K; Werme, L; Nordgren, J; Oppeneer, P M; Butorin, S M

    2015-08-12

    Soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopic data are reported for the O 1s region of a single crystal of UO2, a polycrystalline NpO2 sample, and a single crystal of PuO2. The experimental data are interpreted using first-principles correlated-electron calculations within the framework of the density functional theory with added Coulomb U interaction (DFT+U). A detailed analysis regarding the origin of different structures in the x-ray emission and x-ray absorption spectra is given and the effect of varying the intra-atomic Coulomb interaction-U for the 5 f electrons is investigated. Our data indicate that O 1s x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies can, in combination with DFT+U calculations, successfully be used to study 5 f -shell Coulomb correlation effects in dioxides of light actinides. The values for the Coulomb U parameter in these dioxides are derived to be in the range of 4-5 eV.

  20. 5 f -Shell correlation effects in dioxides of light actinides studied by O 1s x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modin, A.; Suzuki, M.-T.; Vegelius, J.; Yun, Y.; Shuh, D. K.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Butorin, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopic data are reported for the O 1s region of a single crystal of UO2, a polycrystalline NpO2 sample, and a single crystal of PuO2. The experimental data are interpreted using first-principles correlated-electron calculations within the framework of the density functional theory with added Coulomb U interaction (DFT+U). A detailed analysis regarding the origin of different structures in the x-ray emission and x-ray absorption spectra is given and the effect of varying the intra-atomic Coulomb interaction-U for the 5 f electrons is investigated. Our data indicate that O 1s x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies can, in combination with DFT+U calculations, successfully be used to study 5 f -shell Coulomb correlation effects in dioxides of light actinides. The values for the Coulomb U parameter in these dioxides are derived to be in the range of 4-5 eV.

  1. Thermal Emission Spectroscopy of Laboratory Regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C.

    2000-03-01

    The interpretation of emission spectra of planetary objects requires laboratory measurements for comparison. Emissivity measurements carried out at atmospheric pressure give not always a true analogue for the actual spectra of airless planetary objects, but they still provide valuable and practically indispensable results. The present study provides emissivity spectra of ten feldspars in the wavelength range from 6.3 to 17.5 μm, in dependence on the samples' grain size. The grain size is varied in the range from < 25 to 180 μm. Moreover, emissivity spectra are given for several binary mixtures of feldspar and pyroxene. It was found that linear mixing (i.e., linear combination of the component spectra, according to the components' volume percentages) provides a good approximation for the measured mixture spectrum. This was found not only for the wet-sieved coarser grain size fractions, where reflectance and emittance are dominated by surface scattering, but also for the grain size fractions < 63 μm, whose spectra reveal a significant contribution of volume scattering, and where the mixing was therefore expected to be nonlinear.

  2. Comment on ?Spin crossover in (Mg,Fe)O: A M?ssbauer effect study with an alternative interpretation of x-ray emission spectroscopy data?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J; Struzhkin, V V; Garriliuk, A

    2006-05-23

    Electronic spin-pairing transition of iron in magnesiow{umlt u}stite-(Mg,Fe)O has been recently studied with X-ray emission and M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopies under high pressures. While these studies reported a high-spin to low-spin transition of iron to occur at pressures above approximately 50 GPa, the width of the observed transition varies significantly. In particular, Kantor et al. reported that the transition in (Mg0.8,Fe0.2)O occurs over a pressure range of approximately 50 GPa in high-pressure M{umlt o}ssbauer measurements. To account for the discrepancy in the transition pressure, Kantor et al. reanalyzed the X-ray emission spectra by Lin et al. using a simple spectral decomposition method and claimed that X-ray emission measurements are also consistent with a spin crossover of iron at high pressures. Here we show that the proposed fitting method is inadequate to describe the X-ray emission spectrum of the low-spin FeS2 and would give an erroneous satellite peak (K{sub beta}') intensity, leading to an artificial high-spin component and, consequently, to invalid conclusions regarding the width of the pressure-induced transition in magnesiow{umlt u}stite. Furthermore, we compare Kantor's M{umlt o}ssbauer data with other recent high-pressure M{umlt o}ssbauer studies and show that the width of the transition can be simply explained by different experimental conditions (sample thickness, diameter, and hydrostaticity).

  3. Comment on ``Spin crossover in (Mg,Fe)O: A Mössbauer effect study with an alternative interpretation of x-ray emission spectroscopy data''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Gavriliuk, Alexander G.; Lyubutin, Igor

    2007-05-01

    Electronic spin-pairing transition of iron in ferropericlase-(Mg,Fe)O has been recently studied with x-ray emission and Mössbauer spectroscopies under high pressures. While these studies reported a high-spin to low-spin transition of iron to occur at pressures above approximately 50GPa , the width of the observed transition varies significantly. In particular, Kantor [Phys. Rev. B 73, 100101(R) (2006)] reported that the transition in (Mg0.8,Fe0.2)O occurs over a pressure range of approximately 50GPa in high-pressure Mössbauer measurements. To account for the discrepancy in the transition pressure, Kantor reanalyzed the x-ray emission spectra by Lin [Nature (London) 436, 377 (2005)] using a simple spectral decomposition method and claimed that x-ray emission measurements are also consistent with a spin crossover of iron at high pressures. Here, we show that the proposed fitting method is inadequate to describe the x-ray emission spectrum of the low-spin FeS2 and would result in an erroneous satellite peak (Kβ') intensity, leading to an artificial high-spin component and, consequently, to invalid conclusions regarding the width of the pressure-induced transition in ferropericlase. Furthermore, we show that an energy decrease of ˜1.6eV in the Kβ1,3 main peak was observed across the spin transition in ferropericlase, which can be used as an additional line of evidence for the electronic spin-pairing transition of iron in (Mg,Fe)O.

  4. Valence Band Density of States of Cu3Si Studied by Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy and a First-Principle Molecular Orbital Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhenlian; Kamezawa, Chihiro; Hirai, Masaaki; Kusaka, Masahiko; Iwami, Motohiro

    2002-12-01

    A systematic study of the valence band structure of Cu3Si has been performed by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy and a first-principle molecular orbital calculation using the discrete-variational (DV)-Xα cluster model. The existence of Cu 4s, 4p states in the valence band and their important contributions to the valence band as that of Cu 3d are indicated together with previously reported ones. The high-binding energy peak in the Si L2,3 emission spectrum is considered to originate mainly from the Si-Si 3s bonding state but also have a certain contribution of Si 3s bonding state with Cu 4s, 4p. On the other hand, the low-binding energy peaks in the Si L2,3 emission band are attributed to both the antibonding states of Si 3s and the bonding states of Si 3d with Cu 4s, 4p and Cu 3d. The bonding states of Si 3s with Cu 4s, 4p and Cu 3d are expected to exist in the lower part of the valence band for η\\prime-Cu3Si on the basis of the theoretical calculations. As for Si p states, the high-binding energy peak and the low-binding energy peak in the Si Kβ emission spectrum should be attributed to the Si 3p bonding state and antibonding state with Cu 3d and Cu 4s, 4p, respectively, according to the theoretical calculations. A comparison is made between experimental spectra and theoretical density of states.

  5. Site-specific intermolecular interaction in α-phase crystalline films of phthalocyanines studied by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamane, H; Hatsui, T; Iketaki, K; Kaji, T; Hiramoto, M; Kosugi, N

    2011-07-21

    The local electronic structures of crystalline and amorphous films of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and metal-free phthalocyanine (H(2)Pc) have been studied by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). We found a clear crystalline structure dependence of the elastic-peak shape in the resonant XES spectra. The elastic peaks of both ZnPc and H(2)Pc are found to show an asymmetric shape due to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the nitrogen sites for the α-crystalline films, but not for the amorphous films. The observed RIXS feature is ascribed to the charge transfer excitation due to the Raman-active intermolecular interaction, which dominates the excited-electron dynamics in α-crystalline phthalocyanine films.

  6. Pressure induced high spin-low spin transition in FeSe superconductor studied by x-ray emission spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Yuming; Baker, Jason; Cornelius, Andrew; Veeramalai, Sathishkumar; Chow, Paul; Chen, Changfeng; Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-09-20

    FeSe is a simple binary system in the iron based superconducting family and exhibits a significant pressure induced increase in the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}). In addition to pressure effect, spin fluctuations, magnetic ordering, and crystal structure all play vital roles in altering T{sub c}. Even though various experiments and theoretical simulations explain the connection among them and superconductivity, the interplay between these important parameters is still not clearly understood. Here, we report the pressure effect on the spin state of Fe in FeSe superconductor studied using synchrotron x-ray emission spectroscopy at ambient and low temperatures down to 8 K near T{sub c}. Pressure induced high spin to low spin transition was observed at both ambient and low temperatures with continuous suppression of Fe magnetic moments under increasing pressure. The spin transition is closely related to the pressure induced tetragonal to orthorhombic structural transition.

  7. Absorption/emission spectroscopy and applications using shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1988-09-01

    A historical overview is presented about the important contributions made by Penner, his co-workers, and his students to the application of shock-tube techniques for quantitative emission and absorption spectroscopy and its applications to chemical kinetics studies in high-temperature gases. The discussions address critical aspects related to valid determinations of quantitative spectroscopic data and chemical rate parameters and stress the requirements for uniformly heated gas samples, temperature determinations, gas-mixture preparations, selection of useful spectral intervals, verification of LTE conditions, time resolutions for concentration histories, uniqueness of kinetic measurements, as well as accuracies and reproducibilities of measurement results.The potential of absorption spectroscopy by molecule and/or radical resonance radiation and by laser transmission techniques is highlighted for kinetic studies in mixtures with very small reactant concentrations.Besides the work by the honoree and his school, the references include books, monographs and key articles related to the subjects discussed.

  8. A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    The first quarter of this project to develop a Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy mercury continuous emission monitor involved acquisition and verification of the laser system to be used, initial cavity design, and initial software development for signal processing and data acquisition.

  9. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  10. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf , Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J.; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour. PMID:27545197

  11. Study of the electronic structures of high T c cuprate superconductors by electron energy loss and secondary electron emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, V.; Kulkarni, G. U.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1989-10-01

    Energy loss spectra of superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 6.9' Bi 1.5Pb 0.5Ca 2.5Sr 1.5Cu 3O 10+δ and Tl 2CaBa 2Cu 3O 8 obtained at primary electron energies in the 170-310 eV range show features reflecting the commonalities in their electronic structures. The relative intensity of the plasmon peak shows a marked drop across the transition temperature. Secondary electron emission spectra of the cuprates also reveal some features of the electronic structure.

  12. Emission Spectroscopy of the Super-Earth 55 Cnc e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Line, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent surveys have revealed an extraordinary and unexplained diversity of low-mass exoplanets. The main frontier for constraining the nature and origins of these planets is atmospheric characterization to reveal their detailed physical properties. Previous spectroscopic observations of small exoplanets have been focused on transmission measurements, but these studies are often limited by clouds. We are turning small exoplanet characterization in a new direction with multi-wavelength observations (Warm Spitzer and HST WFC3) of the dayside of 55 Cnc e, a quintessential super-Earth in a tight orbit and transiting a nearby star. We will present the first dayside emission spectrum of a super-Earth, which we use to distinguish between different atmospheric compositions and constrain the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. Our results for 55 Cnc e will guide JWST emission spectroscopy of a much larger sample of small close-in transiting exoplanets.

  13. Probing Pulsar Emission on Short Timescales: Rotating Radio Transients, Cyclic Spectroscopy, and Single-Pulse Studies of Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni Tharaka

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs) are neutron stars are that characterized by the emission of strong sporadic bursts. We have analysed the long- and short-term time dependence of the pulse arrival times and the pulse detection rates for eight RRAT sources from the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). We find significant periodicities in the individual pulse arrival times from six RRATs. These periodicities range from ˜30 minutes to 2100 days and from one to 16 independent (i.e. non-harmonically related) periodicities are detected for each RRAT. In addition, we find that pulse emission is a random process on short (hour-long) time scales but that most of the objects exhibit longer term (months-years) non-random behaviour. We find that PSRs J1819--1458 and J1317--5759 emit more doublets (two consecutive pulses) and triplets (three consecutive pulses) than is expected in random pulse distributions. No evidence for such an excess is found for the other RRATs. There are several different models for RRAT emission depending on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors which are consistent with these properties. Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of an array of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups routinely correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover pulse broadening functions (PBFs), such as those that would be introduced

  14. Reply to ``Comments on `Spin crossover in (Mg,Fe)O: A Mössbauer effect study with an alternative interpretation of x-ray emission spectroscopy data' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, Innokenty; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; McCammon, Catherine

    2007-05-01

    We address the issues raised in the preceding Comments by Vankó and de Groot [Phys. Rev. B 75, 177101 (2007)] and Lin [Phys. Rev. B 75, 177102 (2007)] regarding possible ways to analyze x-ray emission spectroscopy data and determine the actual spin state of (Mg,Fe)O at high pressures. We show that there are significant pressure-induced changes in the x-ray emission spectra of (Mg,Fe)O that are not coupled with spin changes and that traditional methods of spin state determination have limited application. Our experimental results from nuclear forward scattering confirm the conventional Mössbauer spectroscopy results reported in Kantor [Phys. Rev. B 73, 100101(R) (2006)].

  15. Local optical emission spectroscopy of excited species effused from an evaporation cell and a sputter source into dense plasmas - Basic studies for the deposition of thin gradient films.

    PubMed

    Bolt, H; Hemel, V; Koch, F; Nickel, H

    1996-06-01

    Space resolved optical emission spectroscopy has been applied to determine the distribution of excited species in dense plasmas which are used for the deposition of thin coatings. Typical electron densities and electron temperatures in the plasma facility PETRA ( Plasma Engineering and Technology Research Assembly) are in the range of n(e) = 10(12) cm(-3) and T(e) = 10 eV. During the deposition process material (Al) is evaporated from a vapour cell under controlled conditions. The vapour stream is guided into a dense plasma which is composed of inert gas, Ar or He, and hydrocarbon species produced from the dissociation of C(2)H(2). The evaporated Al-stream which travels with thermal velocity into a plasma of high electron density, is nearly completely ionized due to the short mean free path for electron impact ionization in the above mentioned parameter range. Optical emission spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the interaction processes between the vapour stream and the plasma as well as the transport of the ionized Al along the applied magnetic field. For the measurements space resolved optical emission spectroscopy with an in-situ translation mechanism of the optical fibre has been used to measure the local concentrations of excited Al neutrals and ions as well as the concentration of the background plasma species.

  16. Electronic structure of KD2xH2(1-x)PO4 studied by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S O; Bostedt, C F; van Buuren, T; Willey, T M; Land, T A; Terminello, L J; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Demos, S G; Nelson, A J

    2004-04-27

    The surface and bulk electronic structure of tetragonal (at 300 K) and orthorhombic (at 77 K) KD{sub 2x}H{sub 2(1-x)}PO{sub 4} single crystals (so-called KDP and DKDP), with a deuteration degree x of 0.0, 0.3, and 0.6, is studied by soft x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and non-resonant soft x-ray emission (XES) spectroscopies. High-resolution O K-edge, P L{sub 2,3}-edge, and K L{sub 2,3}-edge XANES and XES spectra reveal that the element-specific partial density of states in the conduction and valence bands is essentially independent of deuteration x. We give assignment of XANES and XES peaks based on previous molecular orbital and band-structure calculations. Projected densities of states in the conduction band also appear to be essentially identical for tetragonal (at 300 K) and orthorhombic (at 77 K) phases, consistent with previous band structure calculations. However, a decrease in sample temperature from 300 to 77 K results in an {approx} 0.5 eV shift in the valence band edge (probed by XES), with negligible changes to the conduction band edge (probed by XANES). Results also show that high-intensity x-ray irradiation results in decomposition of these hydrogen-bonded materials into water and KPO{sub 3} cyclo- and polyphosphates.

  17. Cobalt Kβ valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy: a study of low-spin octahedral cobalt(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Schwalenstocker, Katarina; Paudel, Jaya; Kohn, Alexander W; Dong, Chao; Van Heuvelen, Katherine M; Farquhar, Erik R; Li, Feifei

    2016-09-28

    Kβ valence-to-core (V2C) X-emission spectroscopy (XES) has gained prominence as a tool for molecular inorganic chemists to probe the occupied valence orbitals of coordination complexes, as illustrated by recent evaluation of Kβ V2C XES ranging from titanium to iron. However, cobalt Kβ V2C XES has not been studied in detail, limiting the application of this technique to probe cobalt coordination in molecular catalysts and bioinorganic systems. In addition, the community still lacks a complete understanding of all factors that dictate the V2C peak area. In this manuscript, we report experimental cobalt Kβ V2C XES spectra of low-spin octahedral Co(iii) complexes with different ligand donors, in conjunction with DFT calculations. Cobalt Kβ V2C XES was demonstrated to be sensitive to cobalt-ligand coordination environments. Notably, we recognize here for the first time that there is a linear correlation between the V2C area and the spectrochemical series for low-spin octahedral cobalt(iii) complexes, with strong field π acceptor ligands giving rise to the largest V2C area. This unprecedented correlation is explained by invoking different levels of π-interaction between cobalt p orbitals and ligand orbitals that modulate the percentage of cobalt p orbital character in donor MOs, in combination with changes in the average cobalt-ligand distance.

  18. [Spectroscopy technique and ruminant methane emissions accurate inspecting].

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhan-Huan; Guo, Xu-Sheng; Long, Rui-Jun

    2009-03-01

    The increase in atmospheric CH4 concentration, on the one hand through the radiation process, will directly cause climate change, and on the other hand, cause a lot of changes in atmospheric chemical processes, indirectly causing climate change. The rapid growth of atmospheric methane has gained attention of governments and scientists. All countries in the world now deal with global climate change as an important task of reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, but the need for monitoring the concentration of methane gas, in particular precision monitoring, can be scientifically formulated to provide a scientific basis for emission reduction measures. So far, CH4 gas emissions of different animal production systems have received extensive research. The methane emission by ruminant reported in the literature is only estimation. This is due to the various factors that affect the methane production in ruminant, there are various variables associated with the techniques for measuring methane production, the techniques currently developed to measure methane are unable to accurately determine the dynamics of methane emission by ruminant, and therefore there is an urgent need to develop an accurate method for this purpose. Currently, spectroscopy technique has been used and is relatively a more accurate and reliable method. Various spectroscopy techniques such as modified infrared spectroscopy methane measuring system, laser and near-infrared sensory system are able to achieve the objective of determining the dynamic methane emission by both domestic and grazing ruminant. Therefore spectroscopy technique is an important methane measuring technique, and contributes to proposing reduction methods of methane.

  19. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4: Proton and neutron emission & radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, L. G. Rudolph, D.

    2016-07-07

    With the aid of a novel combination of existing equipment – JYFLTRAP and the TASISpec decay station – it is possible to perform very clean quantum-state selective, high-resolution particle-γ decay spectroscopy. We intend to study the determination of the branching ratio of the ℓ = 9 proton emission from the I{sup π} = 19/2{sup −}, 3174-keV isomer in the N = Z − 1 nucleus {sup 53}Co. The study aims to initiate a series of similar experiments along the proton dripline, thereby providing unique insights into “open quantum systems”. The technique has been pioneered in case studies using SHIPTRAP and TASISpec at GSI. Newly available radioactive decay modes in Geant4 simulations are going to corroborate the anticipated experimental results.

  20. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics.

  1. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, K.J.

    1997-03-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics. 6 figs.

  2. Fourier spectroscopy of the stratospheric emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.; Bonetti, A.

    1980-01-01

    Stratospheric emission spectra in the submillimeter range have been recorded with a resolution of 0.0033/cm with a balloon-borne interferometer. Several minor atmospheric constituents have been identified in a preliminary analysis of the spectra; these are water vapor, oxygen, ozone isotopes, nitric acid, nitrous oxide, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and carbon monoxide.

  3. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  4. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  5. Steelmaking process control using remote ultraviolet atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Samuel

    Steelmaking in North America is a multi-billion dollar industry that has faced tremendous economic and environmental pressure over the past few decades. Fierce competition has driven steel manufacturers to improve process efficiency through the development of real-time sensors to reduce operating costs. In particular, much attention has been focused on end point detection through furnace off gas analysis. Typically, off-gas analysis is done with extractive sampling and gas analyzers such as Non-dispersive Infrared Sensors (NDIR). Passive emission spectroscopy offers a more attractive approach to end point detection as the equipment can be setup remotely. Using high resolution UV spectroscopy and applying sophisticated emission line detection software, a correlation was observed between metal emissions and the process end point during field trials. This correlation indicates a relationship between the metal emissions and the status of a steelmaking melt which can be used to improve overall process efficiency.

  6. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  7. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  8. Controlled variation of the information depth by angle dependent soft X-ray emission spectroscopy: A study on polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönig, H.; Lauermann, I.; Grimm, A.; Camus, C.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Pistor, P.; Jung, Ch.; Kropp, T.; Lux-Steiner, M. C.; Fischer, Ch.-H.

    2008-12-01

    Angle dependent X-ray emission spectroscopy (AXES) is introduced as a tool for depth dependent composition analysis. A controlled variation of the information depth is demonstrated by changing the geometry from grazing exit to grazing incidence geometry. First results are presented from Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe)-based polycrystalline thin film solar cell bi-layer components. A mathematical model explains changes in relative intensity due to the absorption and emission behavior of thin CdS and Zn(S,O) cover layers. The fact that the presented data can be modelled by ideal bi-layer structures, provides both, proof of concept in general and the proof of applicability to the relatively rough layered structures based on CIGSe. In bare CIGSe a homogeneous distribution of Cu and Ga is found in a depth range between 22 and 470 nm.

  9. Electronic structure of Al-doped ZnO transparent conductive thin films studied by x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W. H.; Sun, S. J.; Chiou, J. W.; Chou, H.; Chan, T. S.; Lin, H.-J.; Kumar, Krishna; Guo, J.-H.

    2011-11-15

    This study used O K-, Zn L{sub 3}-, Zn K-, and Al K-edges x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and O K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements to investigate the electronic structure of transparent Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin film conductors. The samples were prepared on glass substrates at a low temperature near 77 K by using a standard RF sputtering method. High-purity Ne (5N) was used as the sputtering gas. The crystallography of AZO thin films gradually transformed from the ZnO wurtize structure to an amorphous structure during sample deposition, which suggests the suitability to grow on flexible substrates, eliminating the severe degradation due to fragmentation by repeated bending. The O K- and Zn L{sub 3}-edges XANES spectra of AZO thin films revealed a decrease in the number of both O 2p and Zn 3d unoccupied states when the pressure of Ne was increased from 5 to 100 mTorr. In contrast, Al K-edges XANES spectra showed that the number of unoccupied states of Al 3p increased in conjunction with the pressure of Ne, indicating an electron transfer from Al to O atoms, and suggesting that Al doping increases the negative effective charge of oxygen ions. XES and XANES spectra of O 2p states at the O K-edge also revealed that Al doping not only raised the conduction-band-minimum, but also increased the valence-band-maximum and the band-gap. The results indicate that the reduction in conductivity of AZO thin films is due to the generation of ionic characters, the increase in band-gap, and the decrease in density of unoccupied states of oxygen.

  10. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  11. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  12. Time-Resolved Emission Spectroscopy of Field Reversed Configuration Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-31

    Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) thrusters are candidates for next generation high -powered electric propulsion (EP) • Advantages over competing...16468 Introduction • Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) thrusters are candidates for next generation high -powered electric propulsion (EP) • Advantages...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06 September 2016 - 01 November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Time-Resolved Emission Spectroscopy of Field

  13. Nanoscale coupling of photons to vibrational excitation of Ag nanoparticle 2D array studied by scanning tunneling microscope light emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Katano, Satoshi; Toma, Koji; Toma, Mana; Tamada, Kaoru; Uehara, Yoichi

    2010-11-28

    Scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) spectroscopy has been utilized to elucidate the luminescence phenomena of Ag nanoparticles capped with myristate (myristate-capped AgNP) and 2-methyl-1-propanethiolate (C(4)S-capped AgNP) on the dodecanethiol-precovered Au substrate. The STM imaging revealed that myristate-capped AgNPs form an ordered hexagonal array whereas C(4)S-capped AgNPs show imperfect ordering, indicating that a shorter alkyl chain of C(4)S-capped AgNP is not sufficient to form rigid interdigitation. It should be noted that such a nanoparticle ordering affects the luminescence properties of the Ag nanoparticle. We found that the STM-LE is only detected from the Ag nanoparticles forming the two-dimensional superlattice. This indicates that the STM-LE of the Ag nanoparticle is radiated via the collective excitation of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spread over the Ag nanoparticles. Note that the STM-LE spectra of the Ag nanoparticles exhibit spike-like peaks superimposed on the broad light emission peak. Using Raman spectroscopy, we concluded that the spike-like structure appearing in the STM-LE spectra is associated with the vibrational excitation of the molecule embedded between Ag nanoparticles.

  14. Thermal emission spectroscopy of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Brasunas, J. C.; Conrath, B. J.; Herman, J. R.; Maguire, W. C.; Massie, S. T.; Abbas, Mian M.

    1990-01-01

    The general objective of this research is to obtain, via remote sensing, simultaneous measurements of the vertical distributions of stratospheric temperature, ozone, and trace constituents that participate in the catalytic destruction of ozone (NO(sub y): NO, NO2, NO3, HNO3, ClONO2, N2O5, HNO4; Cl(sub x): HOCl), and the source gases for the catalytic cycles (H2O, CH4, N2O, CF2Cl2, CFCl3, CCl4, CH3Cl, CHF2Cl, etc.). Data are collected during a complete diurnal cycle in order to test our present understanding of ozone chemistry and its associate catalytic cycles. The instrumentation employed is an emission-mode, balloon-borne, liquid-nitrogen-cooled Michelson interferometer-spectrometer (SIRIS), covering the mid-infrared range with a spectral resolution of 0.020 cm(exp -1). Cryogenic cooling combined with the use of extrinsic silicon photoconductor detectors allows the detection of weak emission features of stratospheric gaseous species. Vertical distributions of these species are inferred from scans of the thermal emission of the limb in a sequence of elevation angles. The fourth SIRIS balloon flight was carried out from Palestine, Texas on September 15-16, 1986 with 9 hours of nighttime data (40 km). High quality data with spectral resolution 0.022 cm(exp -1), were obtained for numerous limb sequences. Fifteen stratospheric species have been identified to date from this flight: five species from the NO(sub y) family (HNO3, NO2, NO, ClONO2, N2O5), plus CO2, O3, H2O, N2O, CH4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CHF2Cl, CF4, and CCl4. The nighttime values of N2O5, ClONO2, and total odd nitrogen have been measured for the first time, and compared to model results. Analysis of the diurnal variation of N2O5 within the 1984 and 1986 data sets, and of the 1984 ClONO2 measurements, were presented in the literature. The demonstrated ability of SIRIS to measure all the major NO(sub y) species, and therefore to determine the partitioning of the nitrogen family over a continuous diurnal cycle, is

  15. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-07

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive “detection” based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  16. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  17. Mars exploration via thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Carl F.; Blasius, Karl R.; Christensen, Philip; Silverman, Steven; Ruff, Steven; Wyatt, Michael; Mehall, Greg; Peralta, Richard J.; Bates, Duane

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Arizona State University (ASU), and Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) have executed a series of successful Mars exploration missions. These have recently been publicized on television and the internet with the early 2004 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission geological robots that have revolutionized our detailed knowledge of the planet's geology and atmosphere. This latest mission success has its foundation in missions dating back to 1969. Over the past thirty-five years NASA has demonstrated a long-term commitment to planetary science and solar system exploration that continues with a commitment recently expressed by President Bush and codified in a reorganization of the NASA space sciences mission directorate. This paper reports on a small but exciting aspect of this sweeping NASA program, and illustrates the benefits and efficiency with which planetary and solar system exploration can be accomplished. Key in the success is the vision not only of NASA in general, but of the mission Principal Investigator, in particular. The specific series of missions leading to MER contains an underlying vision of carefully planned geological investigations using remote sensing instrumentation, starting with broad survey, leading to more finely resolved global imaging, and finally to landing instrumentation capable of detailed rock and soil analyses. The mission started with broad and relatively coarse spatial resolution orbital surveys with fine spectral capability focused on identifying the overall geological and atmospheric character of the planet accomplished from 1996 to the present conducted by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). This led to the more detailed global imaging at finer spatial resolution offered by the Mars 2001 Odyssey Mission Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) which identified specific

  18. Interactions of protons with furan molecules studied by collision-induced emission spectroscopy at the incident energy range of 50-1000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J.; Pranszke, Boguslaw

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of the ion-molecule reactions provide insight into many fields ranging from the stellar wind interaction with interstellar media, up to medicine and industrial applications. Besides the applications, the understanding of these processes is itself a problem of fundamental importance. Thus, interactions of protons with the gas-phase furan molecules have been investigated for the first time in the energy range of 50-1000 eV exploiting collision-induced emission spectroscopy. Recorded spectra reveal emission of the atomic H β to H θ lines of the hydrogen Balmer series and the molecular bands of vibrationally and rotationally excited diatomic CH fragments created in the A2 Δ and B2Σ- electronic states. The measurements of the emission yields of the excited fragments by recording their intensities at different projectile energies have been performed. The highest yields have been observed for production of hydrogen atoms which intensities rapidly decreased with increasing principal quantum number n . From the H ( n = 4-7) intensity ratios depopulation factors of hydrogen excited states have been determined at each impact energy and possible collisional mechanisms leading to enhanced production of the hydrogen atoms have been suggested. We compare and discuss our results with improved data set of proton collisions with tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules, the hydrogenated derivatives of furan.

  19. Spectroscopy of an unusual emission line M star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Greenstein, Jesse L.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Moderate-resolution spectroscopy of an unusual late-type faint emission-line star, PC 0025 + 0047, is reported. A very strong (greater than 250 A equivalent width) an H-alpha emission line was detected by the present automated line search algorithm. The spectrum was found to have two unresolved emission lines (H-alpha and H-beta) near zero velocity, superposed on the absorption spectrum of a very red M dwarf which has strong K I, and relatively weak bands of TiO. From the weakness of the subordinate lines of Na I (8192 A) and other spectral features, it is inferred that it is definitely a cooler, and probably fainter, analog of LHS 2924. The strength of the emission lines indicates that PC 0025 + 0447 is very young and may be a fading predecessor brown drawf at an estimated M(bol) approaching 14m at a distance of about 60 pc.

  20. Absolute Emission Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited Products of Dissociative Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.; Johnsen, R.

    1997-10-01

    We have employed spatially-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in a flowing afterglow plasma to investigate radiations in the 200-400 nm range resulting from electron-ion dissociative recombination. Calibrated emission data combined with Langmuir probe electron-density measurements are analyzed to obtain branching ratios for electronically excited recombination products. In particular, we will report absolute yields of CO(a^3Π) resulting from recombining CO_2^+ ions, NO(B^2Π) from N_2O^+, OH(A^2Σ^+) from HCO_2^+, as well as NH(A^3Π_i), and OH(A^2Σ^+) from the recombination of N_2OH^+ ions.

  1. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-07-27

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process.

  2. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  3. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  4. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Compensation and trapping in CdZnTe radiation detectors studied by thermoelectric emission spectroscopy, thermally stimulated conductivity, and current-voltage measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph B. James

    2000-01-07

    In today's commercially available counter-select-grade CdZnTe crystals for radiation detector applications, the thermal ionization energies of the traps and their types, whether electron or hole traps, were measured. The measurements were successfully done using thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC). For reliability, the electrical contacts to the sample were found to be very important and, instead of Au Schottky contacts, In Ohmic contacts had to be used. For the filling of the traps, photoexcitation was done at zero bias, at 20K and at wavelengths which gave the maximum bulk photoexcitation for the sample. Between the temperature range from 20 to 400 K, the TSC current was found to be on the order of {approximately} 10,000 times or even larger than the TEES current, in agreement with theory, but only TEES could resolve the trap type and was sensitive to the deep traps. Large concentration of hole traps at 0.1 and 0.6 eV were observed and smaller contraction of electron traps at 0.4 eV was seen. These deep traps cause compensation in the material and also cause trapping that degrades the radiation detection measurement.

  6. Excited state structural events of a dual-emission fluorescent protein biosensor for Ca²⁺ imaging studied by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Tang, Longteng; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Oscar, Breland G; Campbell, Robert E; Fang, Chong

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are luminescent biomolecules that emit characteristic hues upon irradiation. A group of calmodulin (CaM)-green FP (GFP) chimeras have been previously engineered to enable the optical detection of calcium ions (Ca(2+)). We investigate one of these genetically encoded Ca(2+) biosensors for optical imaging (GECOs), GEM-GECO1, which fluoresces green without Ca(2+) but blue with Ca(2+), using femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). The time-resolved FSRS data (<800 cm(-1)) reveal that initial structural evolution following 400 nm photoexcitation involves small-scale coherent proton motions on both ends of the chromophore two-ring system with a <250 fs time constant. Upon Ca(2+) binding, the chromophore adopts a more twisted conformation in the protein pocket with increased hydrophobicity, which inhibits excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) by effectively trapping the protonated chromophore in S1. Both the chromophore photoacidity and local environment form the ultrafast structural dynamics basis for the dual-emission properties of GEM-GECO1. Its photochemical transformations along multidimensional reaction coordinates are evinced by distinct stages of FSRS spectral evolution, particularly related to the ∼460 and 504 cm(-1) modes. The direct observation of lower frequency modes provides crucial information about the nuclear motions preceding ESPT, which enriches our understanding of photochemistry and enables the rational design of new biosensors.

  7. Evaluation of infrared emission spectroscopy for mapping the Moon's surface composition from lunar orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Salisbury, John W.; Conel, James E.; Lucey, Paul G.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared thermal emission spectroscopy is evaluated for its possible application to compositional mapping of the Moon's surface from lunar orbit. Principles of the mid-IR (approximately 4-25 microns) technique, previous lunar ground-based observations, and laboratory studies of Moon samples are reviewed and summarized. A lunar thermal emission spectrometer experiment is described, patterned after a similar instrument on the Mars Observer spacecraft. Thermal emission spectrometry from a polar-orbiting lunar spacecraft could provide a valuable mapping tool to aid in exploration for lunar resources and help provide understanding of the origin of the Moon and history of lunar surface processes.

  8. On-line emissions monitoring of chlorobenzene incineration using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Incineration of chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with a heated long-path cell (LPC) to analyze and quantify flue gas emissions in near real time. The effects of operating conditions under stable and decreasing incineration temperatures on the destruction of chlorobenzene were studied. The results from the decreasing temperature experiments were found to be consistent with those from experiments at stable temperatures. This finding demonstrates that the FTIR/LPC, as a continuous emissions monitor, can effectively detect dynamic changes in the incinerator emissions and can contribute significantly to the safety of incinerators.

  9. On-line emissions monitoring of chlorobenzene incineration using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    Incineration of chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with a heated long-path cell (LPC) to analyze and quantify flue gas emissions in near real time. The effects of operating conditions under stable and decreasing incineration temperatures on the destruction of chlorobenzene were studied. The results from the decreasing temperature experiments were found to be consistent with those from experiments at stable temperatures. This finding demonstrates that the FTIR/LPC, as a continuous emissions monitor, can effectively detect dynamic changes in the incinerator emissions and can contribute significantly to the safety of incinerators.

  10. Plasma emission sources in analytical spectroscopy-I.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, S; McGeachin, H M; Smith, P B

    1975-01-01

    A critical survey of plasma emission sources used in analytical spectroscopy, excluding conventional arc and spark sources, has been made. In Part I the concept of temperature applied to high-temperature excitation sources is considered, as are arc plasma jets. Part II will be concerned with microwave and capacitively coupled sources and in Part III inductively coupled sources will be dealt with. In the last part a comparison will also be made of all the sources reviewed, from the point of view of sensitivity, precision and freedom from matrix effects.

  11. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Dennis D.; Rutzke, Michael A.

    Atomic spectroscopy has played a major role in the development of our current database for mineral nutrients and toxicants in foods. When atomic absorption spectrometers became widely available in the 1960s, the development of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods for accurately measuring trace amounts of mineral elements in biological samples paved the way for unprecedented advances in fields as diverse as food analysis, nutrition, biochemistry, and toxicology (1). The application of plasmas as excitation sources for atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) led to the commercial availability of instruments for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) beginning in the late 1970s. This instrument has further enhanced our ability to measure the mineral composition of foods and other materials rapidly, accurately, and precisely. More recently, plasmas have been joined with mass spectrometers (MS) to form inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer ICP-MS instruments that are capable of measuring mineral elements with extremely low detection limits. These three instrumental methods have largely replaced traditional wet chemistry methods for mineral analysis of foods, although traditional methods for calcium, chloride, iron, and phosphorus remain in use today (see Chap. 12).

  12. Gas emission analysis based on Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiaofu; Lian, Xu; Jin, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Solar occultation flux (SOF), a new optical technology to detect the gas based on the traditional Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) developed quickly recently. In this paper, the system and the data analysis is investigated. First a multilayer transmission model of solar radiation is simulated. Then the retrieval process is illustrated. In the proceeding of the data analysis, the Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear square fitting is used to obtain the gas column concentration and the related emission ratio. After the theory certification, the built up system is conducted in a fertilizer plant in Hefei city .The results show SOF is available in the practice and the retrieved gas column concentration can give important information about the pollution emission and dispersion

  13. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  14. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 1. Application to sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Michael T.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Bristow, Thomas F.; Pan, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is used to determine the mineralogy of sandstone and mudstone rocks as part of an investigation of linear spectral mixing between sedimentary constituent phases. With widespread occurrences of sedimentary rocks on the surface of Mars, critical examination of the accuracy associated with quantitative models of mineral abundances derived from thermal emission spectra of sedimentary materials is necessary. Although thermal emission spectroscopy has been previously proven to be a viable technique to obtain quantitative mineralogy from igneous and metamorphic materials, sedimentary rocks, with natural variation of composition, compaction, and grain size, have yet to be examined. In this work, we present an analysis of the thermal emission spectral (~270-1650 cm-1) characteristics of a suite of 13 sandstones and 14 mudstones. X-ray diffraction and traditional point counting procedures were all evaluated in comparison with thermal emission spectroscopy. Results from this work are consistent with previous thermal emission spectroscopy studies and indicate that bulk rock mineral abundances can be estimated within 11.2% for detrital grains (i.e., quartz and feldspars) and 14.8% for all other mineral phases present in both sandstones and mudstones, in comparison to common in situ techniques used for determining bulk rock composition. Clay-sized to fine silt-sized grained phase identification is less accurate, with differences from the known ranging from ~5 to 24% on average. Nevertheless, linear least squares modeling of thermal emission spectra is an advantageous technique for determining abundances of detrital grains and sedimentary matrix and for providing a rapid classification of clastic rocks.

  15. Refining mid-infrared emission spectroscopy as a tool for understanding planetary surface mineralogy through laboratory studies, computational models, and lunar remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Jessica Anne

    Mid-infrared emissivity spectra, while useful for quantifying mineral abundance, are dependent on a variety of other factors, including grain size. At present, scattering models are not fully able reproduce this dependence, especially for very fine-grained powders (d˜<60μm) typical of planetary regolith. Previous studies have modeled emissivity spectra of mineral powders by using Mie single scattering theory coupled with a radiative transfer model, such as Hapke [1993]. Chapter 2 of this work uses multiple scattering T-matrix code (from Mackowski and Mishchenko, 2011) to calculate the scattering coefficients for a cluster of spheres, rather than a single sphere as in Mie theory. I acquired emissivity spectra of highly uniform silica glass spheres, normally used for sieve calibration, for comparison to modeled spectra. Then, I calculated optical constants of the glass from micro-FTIR reflectance spectra of polished grains mounted on a petrographic slide. Modeled emissivity spectra computed with this T-matrix/radiative transfer hybrid method show a marked improvement over Mie-radiative transfer hybrid models, especially for smaller grain sizes. The complex index of refraction (n=n+i k) as a function of wavelength, where n and k are often referred to as optical constants, is an essential input into radiative transfer models. Hence, quantitative estimates of mineral abundance from remote sensing data require that optical constants are known for a comprehensive set of relevant minerals. While many geologically abundant materials are monoclinic or triclinic, due to both the additional complexity of the models needed and the increased effort required to orient these samples, very few sets of optical constants have been measured for lower-symmetry minerals. Chapter 3 describes how optical constants were calculated from polarized mid-infrared reflectance spectra of oriented single-crystals of five natural samples in the monoclinic crystal system, which include four

  16. Impact of oxygen chemistry on the emission and fluorescence spectroscopy of laser ablation plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, K. C.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen present in the ambient gas medium may affect both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) emission through a reduction of emission intensity and persistence. In this study, an evaluation is made on the role of oxygen in the ambient environment under atmospheric pressure conditions in LIBS and laser ablation (LA)-LIF emission. To generate plasmas, 1064 nm, 10 ns pulses were focused on an aluminum alloy sample. LIF was performed by frequency scanning a CW laser over the 396.15 nm (3s24s 2S1/2 → 3s23p 2P°3/2) Al I transition. Time-resolved emission and fluorescence signals were recorded to evaluate the variation in emission intensity caused by the presence of oxygen. The oxygen partial pressure (po) in the atmospheric pressure environment using N2 as the makeup gas was varied from 0 to 400 Torr O2. 2D-fluorescence spectroscopy images were obtained for various oxygen concentrations for simultaneous evaluation of the emission and excitation spectral features. Results showed that the presence of oxygen in the ambient environment reduces the persistence of the LIBS and LIF emission through an oxidation process that depletes the density of atomic species within the resulting laser-produced plasma (LPP) plume.

  17. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  18. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  19. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  20. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  1. Absorption and emission spectroscopy in natural and synthetic corundum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinolo, G.; Palanza, V.; Ledonne, A.; Paleari, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the frame of an extensive project on the optical characterization of the many varieties of corundum (see:www.gemdata.mater.unimib.it ) we reconsidered the current interpretation of the absorption spectra with particular attention to the bands attributed to the IVCT mechanism Fe2+→ Fe3+ and Fe2+→Ti4+. A detailed study was devoted to natural metamorphic and Verneuil synthetic pale blue sapphires . In that paper (I.Fontana et al 2008) we gave experimental evidence that the band at 17500 cm-1 often attributed to Fe2+→Ti4+ IVCT transitions is in reality due to the 4T2 crystal field transition of Cr3+ partially overlapped by the 2E of Ti3+. The results of radio and photoluminescence excitation experiments obtained there, led us to propose that the color of these sapphires is mainly due to Cr in its two valence states ; Ti 3+ and Fe3+ have a minor role. After those encouraging results, we decided to apply the same approach to the study of deep blue and yellow sapphires of magmatic origin. Evaluation of impurity ion concentration by EDXRF revealed that in all these samples the concentration of Fe is quite high (around 1%) while Cr and Ti are barely detectable. Characteristic of the absorption spectra of deep blue samples is the dominant presence of the 5E spin allowed transition of Fe2+; Fe3+ has a minor role due to the fact that all d5 transitions are spin forbidden and ,consequently, very weak. In yellow sapphires Fe is totally in its 3+ valence state. In these cases, the color from yellow to blue, sometimes even within the same sample, depends. on oxidizing or reducing growth conditions. Even if the concentrations of Cr and Ti are very low, their characteristic emissions are the only ones observable down to 10000 cm-1 in radio and photoluminescence spectra. This piece of evidence suggested us to propose for the absorption bands present in the 14000 to 21000 cm-1 range, often attributed to IVCT, the same attribution given to the analogous bands in metamorphic

  2. Development of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and the beam emission spectroscopy on the EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y.; Fu, J.; Lyu, B.; Du, X. W.; Li, C. Y.; Yu, Y.; Wang, Q. P.; Zhang, Y.; Yin, X. H.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Hellermann, M. von; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics based on a heating neutral beam have recently been installed on EAST to provide local measurements of ion temperature, velocity, and density. The system design features common light collection optics for CXRS and BES, background channels for the toroidal views, multi-chord viewing sightlines, and high throughput lens-based spectrometers with good signal to noise ratio for high time resolution measurements. Additionally, two spectrometers each has a tunable grating to observe any wavelength of interest are used for the CXRS and one utilizes a fixed-wavelength grating to achieve higher diffraction efficiency for the BES system. A real-time wavelength correction is implemented to achieve a high-accuracy wavelength calibration. Alignment and calibration are performed. Initial performance test results are presented.

  3. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Qiu, Yishen

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  4. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  5. Analysis of quantum semiconductor heterostructures by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Daniel K.

    1998-09-01

    The microelectronics industry is diligently working to achieve the goal of gigascale integration (GSI) by early in the 21st century. For the past twenty-five years, progress toward this goal has been made by continually scaling down device technology. Unfortunately, this trend cannot continue to the point of producing arbitrarily small device sizes. One possible solution to this problem that is currently under intensive study is the relatively new area of quantum devices. Quantum devices represent a new class of microelectronic devices that operate by utilizing the wave-like nature (reflection, refraction, and confinement) of electrons together with the laws of quantum mechanics to construct useful devices. One difficulty associated with these structures is the absence of measurement techniques that can fully characterize carrier transport in such devices. This thesis addresses this need by focusing on the study of carrier transport in quantum semiconductor heterostructures using a relatively new and versatile measurement technique known as ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). To achieve this goal, a systematic approach that encompasses a set of progressively more complex structures is utilized. First, the simplest BEES structure possible, the metal/semiconductor interface, is thoroughly investigated in order to provide a foundation for measurements on more the complex structures. By modifying the semiclassical model commonly used to describe the experimental BEES spectrum, a very complete and accurate description of the basic structure has been achieved. Next, a very simple semiconductor heterostructure, a Ga1-xAlxAs single-barrier structure, was measured and analyzed. Low-temperature measurements on this structure were used to investigate the band structure and electron-wave interference effects in the Ga1-xAlxAs single barrier structure. These measurements are extended to a simple quantum device by designing, measuring, and analyzing a set of

  6. Analysis and optimization of silver nanoparticles laser synthesis with emission spectroscopy of induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Dadras, Siamak; Torkamany, Mohammad Javad; Jafarkhani, Parvaneh

    2012-04-01

    Emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma is used to characterize the laser synthesis of silver nanoparticles in water via attributing the thermodynamic parameters of the plasma plume to qualitative features of the synthesized nanoparticles. In this approach, effects of the pulse energy and frequency of a pulsedNd:YAGlaser on nanoparticles synthesis yield and size distribution is studied by an analysis on the behavior of electron temperature and total density of the plasma dominant species (neutral Ag atoms; AgI). Variation of these thermodynamic parameters obtained from the time-integrated emission spectroscopy of the induced plasma was found to be in a closed correlation with the mentioned characteristics of the synthesized nanoparticles. Assessment of the qualitative features of nanoparticles was performed by evaluating the particles concentration in liquid, optical absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, the optimum operating conditions for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in pure water is determined by summarizing the results of emission spectroscopy observations attributed to the mentioned characteristics of synthesized nanoparticles.

  7. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  8. Application of optical emission spectroscopy to high current proton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, G.; Mazzaglia, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Mascali, D.; Reitano, R.; Zaniol, B.; Celona, L.; Leonardi, O.; Leone, F.; Naselli, E.; Neri, L.; Torrisi, G.; Gammino, S.

    2017-07-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) represents a very reliable technique to carry out non-invasive measurements of plasma density and plasma temperature in the range of tens of eV. With respect to other diagnostics, it also can characterize the different populations of neutrals and ionized particles constituting the plasma. At INFN-LNS, OES techniques have been developed and applied to characterize the plasma generated by the Flexible Plasma Trap, an ion source used as "testbench" of the proton source built for European Spallation Source. This work presents the characterization of the parameters of a hydrogen plasma in different conditions of neutral pressure, microwave power and magnetic field profile, along with perspectives for further upgrades of the OES diagnostics system.

  9. Infrared-emission spectroscopy of CO on Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.; Tobin, R.G.; Richards, P.L.

    1982-09-01

    We report the first observation of thermally emitted infrared radiation from vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on clean, single-crystal metal surfaces. The observation of emission from CO adsorbed on Ni demonstrates the surface sensitivity of a novel apparatus for infrared vibrational spectroscopy, with a resolution of 1 to 15 cm/sup -1/ over the frequency range from 330 to 3000 cm/sup -1/. A liquid-helium-cooled grating spectrometer measures the thermal radiation from a room-temperature, single-crystal sample, which is mounted in an ultrahigh-vacuum system. Measurements of frequencies and linewidths of CO on a single-crystal Ni sample, as a function of coverage, are discussed.

  10. Project 8: Towards cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy on tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertl, Martin; Project 8 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Project 8 aims to determine the neutrino mass by making a precise measurement of the beta decay of molecular tritium (Q = 18.6 keV) using the recently demonstrated the technique of cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy (CRES). We report on results for calibration measurements performed with Kr-83m in a gas cell that fulfills the stringent requirements for a measurement using tritium: cryogenic operation, safe tritium handling, a non-magnetic design, and a good microwave guide performance. The phased program that allows Project 8 to probe the neutrino mass range accessible using molecular tritium is described. Major financial support by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics to the University of Washington under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020 is acknowledged

  11. Development of beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. J.; Yu, Y.; Chen, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Yuan, B. D.; Gong, S. B.; Yu, Q. J.; Lyu, B.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2017-08-01

    Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic based on Neutron Beam Injection (NBI) on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak has been developed. This system consists of 16 × 8 channels which can diagnose the density fluctuation in a rectangular area of about 20 × 10 cm2 in the cross section, whose radial position is adjustable from the core to edge just by means of changing the angle of the rotation mirror. The spatial resolution is about 1-3 cm according to the diagnosed radial position. The temporal resolution is 1 μs. Space calibration of the diagnostic system is done based on the reversibility of the optical path. The NBI modulation experiment shows the success of BES development.

  12. Wide-field turbulence imaging with beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Yan, Z.; Shafer, M. W.

    2010-10-15

    Imaging of the size, shape, time-averaged, and time-resolved dynamics of long-wavelength density turbulence structures is accomplished with an expanded, high-sensitivity, wide-field beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic on DIII-D. A 64-channel BES system is configured with an 8x8 grid of discrete channels that image an approximately 7x9 cm region at the outboard midplane. The grid covers multiple correlation lengths and each channel shape matches the measured radial-poloidal correlation length asymmetry of turbulent eddies. The wide field 8x8 imaging capability allows for sampling of essentially the full two-dimensional spatial correlation function for typical plasma conditions. The sampled area can be radially scanned over 0.4

  13. Force Spectroscopy in Studying Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools-for example, optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy-have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here, we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case, we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  14. Measurement of elemental concentration of aerosols using spark emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Prasoon K; Kulkarni, Pramod

    A coaxial microelectrode system has been used to collect and analyse the elemental composition of aerosol particles in near real-time using spark emission spectroscopy. The technique involves focused electrostatic deposition of charged aerosol particles onto the flat tip of a microelectrode, followed by introduction of spark discharge. A pulsed spark discharge was generated across the electrodes with input energy ranging from 50 to 300 mJ per pulse, resulting in the formation of controlled pulsed plasma. The particulate matter on the cathode tip is ablated and atomized by the spark plasma, resulting in atomic emissions which are subsequently recorded using a broadband optical spectrometer for element identification and quantification. The plasma characteristics were found to be very consistent and reproducible even after several thousands of spark discharges using the same electrode system. The spark plasma was characterized by measuring the excitation temperature (~7000 to 10 000 K), electron density (~10(16) cm(-3)), and evolution of spectral responses as a function of time. The system was calibrated using particles containing Pb, Si, Na and Cr. Absolute mass detection limits in the range 11 pg to 1.75 ng were obtained. Repeatability of spectral measurements varied from 2 to 15%. The technique offers key advantages over similar microplasma-based techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as: (i) it does not require any laser beam optics and eliminates any need for beam alignment, (ii) pulse energy from dc power supply in SIBS system can be much higher compared to that from laser source of the same physical size, and (iii) it is quite conducive to compact, field-portable instrumentation.

  15. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  16. Ballistic electron emission spectroscopy of magnetic multilayers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, P. N.; Bonetti, J. A.; Guthrie, D. K.; Harrell, L. E.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    1997-04-01

    The giant magnetoresistance observed in magnetic multilayers arises from spin-dependent scattering and transmission of electrons at the Fermi energy. We will describe a method for the measurement of these quantities in a "CPP" geometry at electron energies both above and below the Fermi energy. Initial results will also be presented. The measurements employ ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) to detect the ballistic electron current transmitted through a multilayer as a function of magnetic field and electron energy. The experiments are similar in concept to the "spin-valve transistor,"1 except that the injector is the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. This allows the injection energy to be varied over a wide range, and spectra can be correlated with the local surface morphology on a nanometer scale. Spectral broadening due to sample inhomogeneities is also eliminated. We anticipate that BEES measurements and complementary scanning tunneling spectroscopy will provide information that is easily compared with calculations of the multilayer band structure and the electron transmittance versus energy.

  17. NIR spectroscopy of Palomar emission-line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bluck, Asa; Colina, Luis; Diaz, Ruben; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Flohic, Helene; Gomez, Percy; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Ho, Luis; Jorgensen, Inger; Lemoine-Busserolle, Marie; Levenson, Nancy; Lira, Paulina; McDermid, Richard; Perlman, Eric; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Riffel, Rogerio; Schiavon, Ricardo; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Thanjavur, Karun; Winge, Claudia

    2012-02-01

    We propose GNIRS cross-dispersed spectroscopy of 60 Seyferts and LINERs from the Palomar galaxy sample. The spectra will advance our knowledge of AGN physics and lifecycles by demonstrating whether the accretion disk and nuclear dust properties change as a function of accretion rate, as predicted by theoretical models. They will be used to investigate the contribution of evolved stars to the line emission in LINERs, with implications for AGN demographics, and to make new stellar kinematic measurements for black hole mass estimates. The number and variety of spectral features that will appear in the data are expected to enable a wide range of science besides that highlighted in this proposal. For this reason, we plan a reduced proprietary period and to make the reduced spectra available to the community. We anticipate applying for time to observe the remaining emission-line galaxies in the (near-complete) Palomar sample over the next few semesters. The targets are distributed throughout the northern sky, making Gemini's queue mode ideal for this work. The fairly short observations are easily scheduled and can be carried out in suboptimal observing conditions.

  18. Characterization and Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Ball Plasmoid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas at atmospheric pressure serve many purposes, from ionization sources for ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) to plasma-assisted wound healing. Of the many naturally occurring ambient plasmas, ball lightning is one of the least understood; there is currently no solid explanation in the literature for the formation and lifetime of natural ball lightning. With the first measurements of naturally occurring ball lightning being reported last year, we have worked to replicate the natural phenomenon in order to elucidate the physical and chemical processes by which the plasma is sustained at ambient conditions. We are able to generate ball-shaped plasmoids (self-sustaining plasmas) that are analogous to natural ball lightning using a high-voltage, high-current, pulsed DC system. Improvements to the discharge electronics used in our laboratory and characterization of the plasmoids that are generated from this system will be described. Infrared emission spectroscopy of these plasmoids reveals emission from water and hydroxyl radical -- fitting methods for these molecular species in the complex experimental spectra will be presented. Rotational temperatures for the stretching and bending modes of H2O along with that of OH will be presented, and the non-equilibrium nature of the plasmoid will be discussed in this context. Cen, J.; Yuan, P,; Xue, S. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 035001. Dubowsky, S.E.; Friday, D.M.; Peters, K.C.; Zhao, Z.; Perry, R.H.; McCall, B.J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 376, 39-45.

  19. Valence state of Mn in Ca-doped LaMnO{sub 3} studied by high-resolution MnK{sub {beta}} emission spectroscopy5

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, T.A.; Qian, Q.; Kao, C.; Rueff, J.; de Groot, F.M.; Croft, M.; Cheong, S. |; Greenblatt, M.; Subramanian, M.A.

    1999-08-01

    MnK{sub {beta}} x-ray emission spectra provide a direct method to probe the effective spin state and charge density on the Mn atom and is used in an experimental study of a class of Mn oxides. Specifically, the MnK{sub {beta}} line positions and detailed spectral shapes depend on the oxidation and the spin state of the Mn sites as well as the degree of {ital d} covalency/itinerancy. Theoretical calculations including atomic charge and multiplet effects, as well as crystal-field splittings and covalency effects, are used as a guide to the experimental results. Direct comparison of the ionic system MnF{sub 2} and the covalent system MnO reveals significant changes due to the degree of covalency of Mn within atomic-type MnK{sub {beta}} simulations. Moreover, comparisons of measurement with calculations support the assumed high spin state of Mn in all of the systems studied. The detailed shape and energy shift of the spectra for the perovskite compounds, LaMnO{sub 3} and CaMnO{sub 3}, are, respectively, found to be very similar to the covalent Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Mn{sup 4+}-MnO{sub 2} compounds thereby supporting the identical Mn-state assignments. Comparison to the theoretical modeling emphasizes the strong covalency in these materials. Detailed MnK{sub {beta}} x-ray emission results on the La{sub 1{minus} x} Ca{sub x} MnO{sub 3} system can be well fit by linear superpositions of the end member spectra, consistent with a mixed-valent character for the intermediate compositions. However, an arrested Mn-valence response to the doping in the x{lt} 0.3 range is found. No evidence for Mn{sup 2+} is observed at any {ital x} values seemingly ruling out proposals regarding Mn{sup 3+} disproportionation. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Nanoparticles and nanowires: synchrotron spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, T.K.

    2008-08-11

    This paper reviews the research in nanomaterials conducted in our laboratory in the last decade using conventional and synchrotron radiation techniques. While preparative and conventional characterisation techniques are described, emphasis is placed on the analysis of nanomaterials using synchrotron radiation. Materials of primary interests are metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons. Synchrotron techniques based on absorption spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), which includes X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXFAS), and de-excitation spectroscopy, including X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) are described. We show that the tunability, brightness, polarisation and time structure of synchrotron radiation are providing unprecedented capabilities for nanomaterials analysis. Synchrotron studies of prototype systems such as gold nanoparticles, 1-D nanowires of group IV materials, C, Si and Ge as well as nanodiamond, and compound semiconductors, ZnS, CdS, ZnO and related materials are used to illustrate the power and unique capabilities of synchrotron spectroscopy in the characterisation of local structure, electronic structure and optical properties of nanomaterials.

  1. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H.; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  2. Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes showing unusual complexation of actinide ions in room temperature ionic liquids: role of ligand structure, radiolytic stability, emission spectroscopy, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Sengupta, Arijit; Iqbal, Mudassir; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-03-04

    Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes (C4DGAs) with varying structural modifications were evaluated for actinide complexation from their extraction behavior toward actinide ions such as UO2(2+), Pu(4+), PuO2(2+), and Am(3+) in the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-n-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (C8mimNTf2). The formation constants were calculated for Am(3+) which showed a significant role of ligand structure, nature of substituents, and spacer length. Although the alkyl substituents on the amidic nitrogen increase the extraction efficiency of americium at lower acidity because of the inductive effect of the alkyl groups, at higher acidity the steric crowding around the ligating site determines the extraction efficiency. All C4DGAs formed 1:1 complexes with Am(3+) while for the analogous Eu(3+) complexes no inner sphere water molecules were detected and the asymmetry of the metal ligand complex differed from one another as proved by time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS). Thermodynamic studies indicated that the extraction process, predominant by the Am(3+)-C4DGA complexation reaction, is exothermic. The unique role of the medium on Am(3+) complexation with the C4DGA molecules with varying spacer length, L-IV and L-V, was noticed for the first time with a reversal in the trend observed in the RTIL compared to that seen in a nonpolar molecular diluent like n-dodecane. Various factors leading to a more preorganized structure were responsible for favorable metal ion complexation. The solvent systems show promise to be employed for nuclear waste remediation, and sustainability options were evaluated from radiolytic stability as well as stripping studies.

  3. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  4. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwanke, C; Golnak, R; Xiao, J; Lange, K M

    2014-10-01

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl2 aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  5. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  6. Electronic emission spectroscopy of the 4-methyl-3-azabenzyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightcap, Johnny; Butler, Joseph T.; Goebbert, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    The 4-methyl-3-azabenzyl radical was generated from 2,5-lutidine in a corona excited supersonic expansion, and its fluorescence emission spectrum was recorded. Two possible radical isomers could form by loss of an H atom from either methyl group in 2,5-lutidine. Theoretical studies of both isomers confirmed the only species observed was 4-methyl-3-azabenzyl. The emission spectrum corresponded to the D1 → D0 transition, with a strong origin peak and several vibronic bands. The origin transition is located at 21 401 cm-1, in good agreement with a previous assignment, and calculated vibrational energies were in good agreement experimental vibrational energies.

  7. Bloch Surface Wave-Coupled Emission from Quantum Dots by Ensemble and Single Molecule Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ray, Krishanu; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    We report the spectral properties and spatial distribution of quantum dot (QD575 ) emission on a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC). Our 1DPC substrate consists of multiple layers of dielectrics with a photonic band gap (PBG) near the QD575 emission maximum. The 1DPC was designed to display a surface-trapped electromagnetic state known as a Bloch surface wave (BSW) at the 1DPC-air (sample) interface. Ensemble angle-dependent emission intensities revealed a sharp angular emission peak near 41° from the normal which is consistent with the BSW resonance at 575 nm. We further examined the emission from single QDs on the 1DPC. A notable increase in fluorescence intensity from QD575 particles was observed on BSW substrate compared to the glass substrate from the scanning confocal fluorescence images and from the intensity-time trajectories of single QD575 particles. The intensity-decays showed substantially faster decay (4-fold decrease in emission lifetime) from the single QD575 particles on 1DPC substrate (∼4.8 nsec) as compared to the glass substrate (∼18 nsec). We observed the spectral characteristics of the individual QD575 particles on 1DPC and glass substrates, by recording the single particle emission spectra through the 1DPC. The emission spectra of the single QD575 particles are similar (with emission maxima around 575 nm) on both substrates except a substantial increase in intensity (over 10-fold) on the BSW substrate. Our results demonstrate that quantum dots can interact with Bloch Surface Waves (BSW) on a 1DPC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the single particle fluorescence studies on 1DPC substrate. The 10-fold increase in intensity in combination with 4-fold reduction in emission lifetime suggest 1DPCs with BSW modes have potential use in sensing and single molecule spectroscopy.

  8. Effect of Molecular Guest Binding on the d-d Transitions of Ni(2+) of CPO-27-Ni: A Combined UV-Vis, Resonant-Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy, and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Erik; Gorelov, Evgeny; Guda, Alexander A; Bugaev, Aram L; Bonino, Francesca; Borfecchia, Elisa; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Gianolio, Diego; Chavan, Sachin; Lamberti, Carlo

    2017-10-04

    We used Ni K-edge resonant-valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (RVtC-XES, also referred to as direct RIXS), an element-selective bulk-sensitive synchrotron-based technique, to investigate the electronic structure of the CPO-27-Ni metal-organic framework (MOF) upon molecular adsorption of significant molecular probes: H2O, CO, H2S, and NO. We compare RVtC-XES with UV-vis spectroscopy, and we show that the element selectivity of RVtC-XES is of strategic significance to observe the full set of d-d excitations in Ni(2+), which are partially overshadowed by the low-energy π-π* transitions of the Ni ligands in standard diffuse-reflectance UV-vis experiments. Our combined RVtC-XES/UV-vis approach provides access to the whole set of d-d excitations, allowing us a complete discussion of the changes undergone by the electronic configuration of the Ni(2+) sites hosted within the MOF upon molecular adsorption. The experimental data have been interpreted by multiplet ligand-field theory calculations based on Wannier orbitals. This study represents a step further in understanding the ability of the CPO-27-Ni MOFs in molecular sorption and separation applications.

  9. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunai, D; Zoletnik, S; Sárközi, J; Field, A R

    2010-10-01

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements (≈10(8)-10(10) photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  10. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Biomimetic Mn Coordination Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Scott C; Davis, Katherine M; Sullivan, Brendan; Hartzler, Daniel A; Seidler, Gerald T; Casa, Diego M; Kasman, Elina; Colmer, Hannah E; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A; Pushkar, Yulia

    2017-06-15

    Understanding the function of Mn ions in biological and chemical redox catalysis requires precise knowledge of their electronic structure. X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is an emerging technique with a growing application to biological and biomimetic systems. Here, we report an improved, cost-effective spectrometer used to analyze two biomimetic coordination compounds, [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) and [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+), the second of which contains a key Mn(IV)═O structural fragment. Despite having the same formal oxidation state (Mn(IV)) and tetradentate ligands, XES spectra from these two compounds demonstrate different electronic structures. Experimental measurements and DFT calculations yield different localized spin densities for the two complexes resulting from Mn(IV)-OH conversion to Mn(IV)═O. The relevance of the observed spectroscopic changes is discussed for applications in analyzing complex biological systems such as photosystem II. A model of the S3 intermediate state of photosystem II containing a Mn(IV)═O fragment is compared to recent time-resolved X-ray diffraction data of the same state.

  11. X-ray emission spectroscopy of biomimetic Mn coordination complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Scott C.; Davis, Katherine M.; Sullivan, Brendan; ...

    2017-05-19

    Understanding the function of Mn ions in biological and chemical redox catalysis requires precise knowledge of their electronic structure. X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is an emerging technique with a growing application to biological and biomimetic systems. Here, we report an improved, cost-effective spectrometer used to analyze two biomimetic coordination compounds, [MnIV(OH)2(Me2EBC)]2+ and [MnIV(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)]+, the second of which contains a key MnIV=O structural fragment. Despite having the same formal oxidation state (MnIV) and tetradentate ligands, XES spectra from these two compounds demonstrate different electronic structures. Experimental measurements and DFT calculations yield different localized spin densities for the two complexes resulting frommore » MnIV–OH conversion to MnIV=O. The relevance of the observed spectroscopic changes is discussed for applications in analyzing complex biological systems such as photosystem II. In conclusion, a model of the S3 intermediate state of photosystem II containing a MnIV=O fragment is compared to recent time-resolved X-ray diffraction data of the same state.« less

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  13. Deconvolution-based correction of alkali beam emission spectroscopy density profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Pokol, G.; Refy, D.; Por, G.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Schweinzer, J.

    2009-08-15

    A deconvolution-based correction method of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) density profile measurement is demonstrated by its application to simulated measurements of the COMPASS and TEXTOR tokamaks. If the line of sight is far from tangential to the flux surfaces, and the beam width is comparable to the scale length on which the light profile varies, the observation may cause an undesired smoothing of the light profile, resulting in a non-negligible underestimation of the calculated density profile. This effect can be reduced significantly by the emission reconstruction method, which gives an estimate of the emissivity along the beam axis from the measured light profile, taking the finite beam width and the properties of the measurement into account in terms of the transfer function of the observation. Characteristics and magnitude of the mentioned systematic error and its reduction by the introduced method are studied by means of the comprehensive alkali BES simulation code RENATE.

  14. Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of natural surfaces: Application to desert varnish coatings on rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Harrison Thliveris, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy has become an increasingly important tool for remote compositional analysis and geologic mapping. Most published laboratory measurements have been obtained in bidirectional reflection or transmission, whereas remotely sensed thermal infrared data are obtained by measuring the emitted energy. Section 2 of this paper describes a laboratory technique for determining calibrated emissivities of natural surfaces. Equations are developed to account for the energy reflected from the environment and to determine directly the sample temperature from measurements of hot and cold blackbody targets. Two methods for determining emissivity are developed: one in which only a hot sample measurement is made and the reflected background energy is removed by modeling, and a second in which the sample is cooled and the reflected energy is measured directly. Relative emissivity can be obtained to approximately 1% and absolute emissivities can be obtained to 2-15%, depending on the validity of the assumption that the emissivity of the sample is unity at some wavelength. The emission data agree well within the hemispherically integrated reflection data but point out probelms associated with bidirectional reflectance measurements. Section 3 applies emissivity measurements to the study of layered surfaces consisting of desert varnish coatings on granite and granodiorite rock suites. Two linear models are developed: the first assumes linear mixing of independent emission from the substrate and varnish (checkerboard model); the second models tansmission through an absorbing/emitting medium. Regardless of whether the varnish is or is not relatively transparant and strongly absorptive, the spectral effect of varnish increases linearly with varnish thickness, indicating that thick patches of varnish dominate the spectral properties. As a result, medium varnish thickness can be determined from spectral measurements. In addition, the composition of a substrate can be

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Transient surface photoconductivity of GaAs emitter studied by terahertz pump-emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu-Lei; Zhou, Qing-Li; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2009-10-01

    This paper investigates the ultrafast carrier dynamics and surface photoconductivity of unbiased semi-insulating GaAs in detail by using a terahertz pump-emission technique. Based on theoretical modelling, it finds that transient photoconductivity plays a very important role in the temporal waveform of terahertz radiation pulse. Anomalous enhancement in both terahertz radiation and transient photoconductivity is observed after the excitation of pump pulse and we attribute these phenomena to carrier capture in the EL2 centers. Moreover, the pump power- and temperature-dependent measurements are also performed to verify this trapping model.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of benzyl radicals produced in a radio-frequency plasma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Robson V; Miyao, Yamato; Pessine, Francisco B T

    2006-07-01

    The benzyl radical was studied by optical emission spectroscopy in gas phase. This radical was produced in a radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) discharge, using benzyl alcohol (ØCH(2)OH) as a precursor. The fluorescence from the first excited electronic state 1(2)A(2) to ground state 1(2)B(2) (450 nm) was studied as a function of several external parameters (pressure, RF power, electrodes and mixtures of the inert gases Ar, Ne, He, N(2), with the precursor). We also used a DC discharge to produce this radical but, in this case, the decomposition was fast. We observed changes in the electronic transitions of this radical, and found the best conditions to study it by optogalvanic spectroscopy.

  17. Risk assessment of an old landfill regarding the potential of gaseous emissions--a case study based on bioindication, FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Tintner, Johannes; Smidt, Ena; Böhm, Katharina; Matiasch, Lydia

    2012-12-01

    Risk assessment of two sections (I and II) of an old landfill (ALH) in Styria (Austria) in terms of reactivity of waste organic matter and the related potential of gaseous emissions was performed using conventional parameters and innovative tools to verify their effectiveness in practice. The ecological survey of the established vegetation at the landfill surface (plant sociological relevés) indicated no relevant emissions over a longer period of time. Statistical evaluation of conventional parameters reveals that dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respiration activity (RA(4)), loss of ignition (LOI) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) mostly influence the variability of the gas generation sum (GS(21)). According to Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data and the results of the classification model the reactivity potential of the investigated sections is very low which is in accordance with the results of plant sociological relevés and biological tests. The interpretation of specific regions in the FT-IR spectra was changed and adapted to material characteristics. Contrary to mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) materials, where strong aliphatic methylene bands indicate reactivity, they are rather assigned to the C-H vibrations of plastics in old landfill materials. This assumption was confirmed by thermal analysis and the characteristic heat flow profile of plastics containing landfill samples. Therefore organic carbon contents are relatively high compared to other stable landfills as shown by a prediction model for TOC contents based on heat flow profiles and partial least squares regression (PLS-R). The stability of the landfill samples, expressed by the relation of CO(2) release and enthalpies, was compared to unreactive landfills, archeological samples, earthlike materials and hardly degradable organic matter. Due to the material composition and the aging process the landfill samples are located between hardly degradable, but easily combustible

  18. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  19. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  20. Workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and Analysis of Dust, Disk, and Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, Ann L. (Editor); Lynch, David K. (Editor); Sitko, Michael (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and analysis of Dust, Disks and Regoliths, held April 28-30, 1999, in Houston Texas.

  1. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  2. Lithium-ion battery electrolyte emissions analyzed by coupled thermogravimetric/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertilsson, Simon; Larsson, Fredrik; Furlani, Maurizio; Albinsson, Ingvar; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years the use of Li-ion batteries has increased rapidly, powering small as well as large applications, from electronic devices to power storage facilities. The Li-ion battery has, however, several safety issues regarding occasional overheating and subsequent thermal runaway. During such episodes, gas emissions from the electrolyte are of special concern because of their toxicity, flammability and the risk for gas explosion. In this work, the emissions from heated typical electrolyte components as well as from commonly used electrolytes are characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy and FT-IR coupled with thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, when heating up to 650 °C. The study includes the solvents EC, PC, DEC, DMC and EA in various single, binary and ternary mixtures with and without the LiPF6 salt, a commercially available electrolyte, (LP71), containing EC, DEC, DMC and LiPF6 as well as extracted electrolyte from a commercial 6.8 Ah Li-ion cell. Upon thermal heating, emissions of organic compounds and of the toxic decomposition products hydrogen fluoride (HF) and phosphoryl fluoride (POF3) were detected. The electrolyte and its components have also been extensively analyzed by means of infrared spectroscopy for identification purposes.

  3. Long-wave, infrared laser-induced breakdown (LIBS) spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives sensing and has significant potential for real-time standoff detection and analysis. In this study, LIBS emissions were obtained in the mid-infrared (MIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral regions for potential applications in explosive material sensing. The IR spectroscopy region revealed vibrational and rotational signatures of functional groups in molecules and fragments thereof. The silicon-based detector for conventional ultraviolet-visible LIBS operations was replaced with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector for MIR-LWIR spectral detection. The IR spectral signature region between 4 and 12 μm was mined for the appearance of MIR and LWIR-LIBS emissions directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as dissociated, and/or recombined sample molecular fragments. Distinct LWIR-LIBS emission signatures from dissociated-recombination sample molecular fragments between 4 and 12 μm are observed for the first time.

  4. Laser induced aluminiun plasma analysis by optical emission spectroscopy in a nitrogen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, J. C.; Uzuriaga, J.; Riascos, H.

    2012-06-01

    We studied an Al plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser with a laser fluence of 4 J/cm2, a wavelength of 1064 nm, energy pulse of 500 mJ and 10 Hz repetition rate. We studied their spectral characteristics at various ambient nitrogen pressures by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The N2 gas pressure was varied from 20 mTorr to 150 mTorr. In Al plume, both atomic and ionic spectra were observed. The electron temperature and electron number density of the plume as of the function ambient gas pressure were determined. The electron temperature was calculated by using the Boltzmann-plot method and the number density was calculated considering the stark effect as dominating on the emission lines.

  5. Study and application of new Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiushi; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) is a new type of Raman Spectroscopy technology, which can detect the medium concealed in the opaque or sub-transparent material fast and nondestructively. The article summarized Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy`s international and domestic study and application progress on contraband detecting, medical science (bone ingredient, cancer diagnose etc.), agricultural products, historical relic identification etc. and stated the technology would become an effective measurement which had wide application prospect.

  6. Quantifying Fugitive Methane Emissions at an Underground Coal Fire Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, D.; Gannon, L.; Kim-Hak, D.; Ide, T.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding methane emissions is of utmost importance due to its greenhouse warming potential. Methane emissions can occur from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources which include wetlands, landfills, oil/gas/coal extraction activities, underground coal fires, and natural gas distribution systems. Locating and containing these emissions are critical to minimizing their environmental impacts and economically beneficial when retrieving large fugitive amounts. In order to design a way to mitigate these methane emissions, they must first be accurately quantified. One such quantification method is to measure methane fluxes, which is a measurement technique that is calculated based on rate of gas accumulation in a known chamber volume over methane seepages. This allows for quantification of greenhouse gas emissions at a localized level (sub one meter) that can complement remote sensing and other largescale modeling techniques to further paint the picture of emission points. High performance analyzers are required to provide both sufficient temporal resolution and precise concentration measurements in order to make these measurements over only minutes. A method of measuring methane fluxes was developed using the latest portable, battery-powered Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy analyzer from Picarro (G4301). In combination with a mobile accumulation chamber, the instrument allows for rapid measurement of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes over wide areas. For this study, methane fluxes that were measured at an underground coal fire near the Four Corners region using the Picarro analyzer are presented. The flux rates collected demonstrate the ability for the analyzer to detect methane fluxes across many orders of magnitude. Measurements were accompanied by simultaneously geotagging the measurements with GPS to georeferenced the data. Methane flux data were instrumental in our ability to characterize the extent and the migration of the underground fire. In the future

  7. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  8. Inferring Temperature Inversions in Hot Jupiters Via Spitzer Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garhart, Emily; Deming, Drake; Mandell, Avi

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic study of 35 hot Jupiter secondary eclipses, including 16 hot Jupiters never before characterized via emission, observed at the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm bandpasses of Warm Spitzer in order to classify their atmospheric structure, namely, the existence of temperature inversions. This is a robust study in that these planets orbit stars with a wide range of compositions, temperatures, and activity levels. This diverse sample allows us to investigate the source of planetary temperature inversions, specifically, its correlation with stellar irradiance and magnetic activity. We correct for systematic and intra-pixel sensitivity effects with a pixel level decorrelation (PLD) method described in Deming et al. (2015). The relationship between eclipse depths and a best-fit blackbody function versus stellar activity, a method described in Knutson et al. (2010), will ultimately enable us to appraise the current hypotheses of temperature inversions.

  9. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  10. Influences on the Emissions of Bacterial Plasmas Generated through Nanosecond Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenfant, Dylan J.

    In the past decade, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been shown to provide compositional data that can be used for discrimination between bacterial specimens at the strain level. This work demonstrates the viability of this technique in a clinical setting. Studies were conducted to investigate the impact of emissions generated by a nitrocellulose filter paper background on the classification of four species: E. coli, S. epidermidis, M. smegmatis, and P. aeruginosa. Limits of detection were determined as 48+/-12 kCFU per ablation event for new mounting procedures using standard diagnostic laboratory techniques, and a device for centrifuge filtration was designed for sampling from low-titer bacterial suspensions. Plasma emissions from samples grown at biological levels of magnesium, zinc, and glucose were shown not to deviate from controls. A limit of detection for environmental zinc was found to be 11 ppm. Discrimination with heat-killed samples was demonstrated, providing a sterile diagnostic environment.

  11. Overview of the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N.; Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Winz, G.; Feder, H.; Feder, R.; Labik, G.; Stratton, B. C.

    2010-10-15

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study ion gyroscale fluctuations. The BES system measures D{sub {alpha}} emission from a deuterium neutral heating beam. The system includes two optical views centered at r/a{approx_equal}0.45 and 0.85 and aligned to magnetic field pitch angles at the neutral beam. f/1.5 collection optics produce 2-3 cm spot sizes at the neutral beam. The initial channel layout includes radial arrays, poloidal arrays, and two-dimensional grids. Radial arrays provide coverage from r/a{approx_equal}0.1 to beyond the last-closed flux surface. Photodetectors and digital filters provide high-sensitivity, low-noise measurements at frequencies of up to 1 MHz. The BES system will be a valuable tool for investigating ion gyroscale turbulence and Alfven/energetic particle modes on NSTX.

  12. Thermal Emission Spectroscopy of 1 Ceres: Evidence for Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, Fred. C.; Roush, Ted L.; Cohen, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of the largest asteroid, 1 Ceres, obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory display features that may provide information about its surface mineralogy. The emissivity, obtained by dividing the spectra by a standard thermal model, is compared with emissivity spectra of olivines and phyllosilicates deduced via Kirchoff's law from reflectivity measurements. The spectra provide a fairly good match to fine grained olivines (0 to 5 micrometer size range). The smoothness of the spectrum beyond 18 micrometers is an indication of particles smaller than 50 micrometers. While the abrupt rise in emissivity near 8 micrometers matches many silicates, the distinct emissivity minimum centered near 12.8 micrometers is consistant with iron-poor olivines, but not with phyllosilicates. It suggests the presence of opaques and does not exclude a mixture with organics and fine-grained phyllosilicates.

  13. Digestion efficiency study of an intraplasmic reactor for in-situ, halogen assisted direct solid sample digestion by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamier, Jan; Salin, Eric D.

    1998-04-01

    A new type of intraplasmic reactor designed for in-situ, batch digestion of refractory solid samples, the Modified Direct Sample Introduction (MDSI) reactor, is presented and qualitatively evaluated with CH 3Cl, Cl 2 and Freon-12 as gaseous halogenating reagents. A comparison of the digestion capabilities of MDSI and CH 3Cl or Freon-12 assisted electrothermal vaporization is also presented. The refractory model compounds used were Al 2O 3 and SiO 2, which were deposited inside the reactor as 10 μl of a 1% m/m slurry. A soil sample SO-3 CRM was also used to evaluate the detection limits, which were found to be in the ppb range for sensitive lines (Cu and Pb) and in the ppm range for less sensitive lines (Al, Fe, Si and Zn). The results obtained indicate that the MDSI reactor design rapidly achieved a sufficiently high temperature for quantitative vaporization of the samples. The study of the various halogenating reagents show that (1) the presence of carbon in the halogenating reagent acts as a reducing agent for the oxides and also forms a protective pyrolitic graphite coating on the reactor's inner walls, thereby reducing analyte permeation into those walls and (2) the ideal gaseous halogenating reagent must exhibit a good thermal stability to intermediate temperatures (˜200°C) to avoid premature decomposition. The reactive intermediates must also be thermally stable to avoid formation of soot that may plug the reactor and reduce the vaporization. Of all reagents tested. Freon12 remains the reagent of choice for in-situ digestion of refractory solids.

  14. Emission spectroscopy for coal-fired cyclone furnace diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A; Boll, David E; Smith, Richard

    2003-08-01

    Using a spectrograph and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, ultraviolet and visible light emission spectra were obtained from a coal-burning electric utility's cyclone furnaces operating at either fuel-rich or fuel-lean conditions. The aim of this effort is to identify light emission signals that can be related to a cyclone furnace's operating condition in order to adjust its air/fuel ratio to minimize pollutant production. Emission spectra at the burner and outlet ends of cyclone furnaces were obtained. Spectra from all cyclone burners show emission lines for the trace elements Li, Na, K, and Rb, as well as the molecular species OH and CaOH. The Ca emission line is detected at the burner end of both the fuel-rich and fuel-lean cyclone furnaces but is not detected at the outlet ends of either furnace type. Along with the disappearance of Ca is a concomitant increase in the CaOH signal at the outlet end of both types of furnaces. The OH signal strength is in general stronger when viewing at the burner end rather than the exhaust end of both the fuel-rich and fuel-lean cyclone furnaces, probably due to high, non-equilibrium amounts of OH present inside the furnace. Only one molecular species was detected that could be used as a measure of air/fuel ratio: MgOH. It was detected at the burner end of fuel-rich cyclone furnaces but not detected in fuel-lean cyclone furnaces. More direct markers of air/fuel ratio, such as CO and O2 emission, were not detected, probably due to the generally weak nature of molecular emission relative to ambient blackbody emission present in the cyclone furnaces, even at ultraviolet wavelengths.

  15. Transmission And Emission Spectroscopy Of Exoplanetary Atmospheres From The Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I like to present some preliminary results on a new attempt of the ground based efforts and discuss the feasibility of ground-based spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres. This project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  16. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Mantenieks, M. A.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputtering rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  17. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  18. Identification of microcrystalline rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica deposits on Mars have been discovered from orbit (Holden Crater, Mawrth Vallis) and from landed surface missions to both Gusev Crater (Spirit) and Gale Crater (Curiosity). The character of these silica deposits can be used to understand both the depositional environment (i.e. fumarole vs. sinter) and/or diagenetic process. Initial work has shown that, in the case of opaline silica, there are differences in spectral shape that may be related to surface textural features imparted during formation or post-depositional alteration. Due to the increasing importance of understanding microcrystalline deposits on Mars, here, we study the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro- and macro-crystalline quartz. The spectra of chert and macro-crystalline quartz have significant differences in both spectral contrast, and in the rounded doublet between ~1000-1250 cm-1, which can shift and appear less rounded in microcrystalline samples. We find that microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 micron scale; and that this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands. We find that surface roughness, if rough on the scale of the wavelengths where the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient (k) is large, can cause not only decreased spectral contrast, but also substantial changes in spectral shape. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. We find that my studying the thermal infrared spectral character of the sample, it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity, and thus aid in the potential reconstruction of sedimentary rock diagenesis.

  19. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  20. Unreported Emission Lines of Rb, Ce, La, Sr, Y, Zr, Pb and Se Detected Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepore, K. H.; Mackie, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Fassett, C. I.

    2017-01-01

    Information on emission lines for major and minor elements is readily available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as part of the Atomic Spectra Database. However, tabulated emission lines are scarce for some minor elements and the wavelength ranges presented on the NIST database are limited to those included in existing studies. Previous work concerning minor element calibration curves measured using laser-induced break-down spectroscopy found evidence of Zn emission lines that were not documented on the NIST database. In this study, rock powders were doped with Rb, Ce, La, Sr, Y, Zr, Pb and Se in concentrations ranging from 10 percent to 10 parts per million. The difference between normalized spectra collected on samples containing 10 percent dopant and those containing only 10 parts per million were used to identify all emission lines that can be detected using LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) in a ChemCam-like configuration at the Mount Holyoke College LIBS facility. These emission spectra provide evidence of many previously undocumented emission lines for the elements measured here.

  1. Light on the 3 μm Emission Band from Space with Molecular Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Mackie, Cameron J.; Candian, Alessandra; Petrignani, Annemieke; Tielens, Xander; Oomens, Jos; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-06-01

    The majority of interstellar objects shows IR emission features also known as unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. These UIR bands are attributed to IR emission of highly-excited gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To understand the physical conditions and chemical evolution of the interstellar environment a precise identification of the emission carriers is desired. The 3 μm UIR feature is represented by a strong band at 3040 cm-1, a plateau from 3150 to 2700 cm-1 and a number of weak features within this plateau. The 3040 cm-1 component is assigned to fundamental CH-stretch vibrations of PAHs, but there still remain many questions on the origin of the other features. In this work we have studied experimentally the 3 μm region of regular, hydrogenated and methylated PAHs (up to 5 rings), combining molecular beam techniques with IR-UV ion dip spectroscopy, and theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) calculations within the harmonic and anharmonic approximation. We find that (a) the 3 μm region of PAHs is dominated by Fermi resonances and thereby cannot be treated within the harmonic approximation; (b) the periphery structure of the molecules strongly affects the shape of the 3 μm band. In particular, the two-component emission interpretation can be explained by the presence of molecules with and without bay-hydrogens; (c) due to strong Fermi resonances of fundamental modes with combination bands regular PAHs can significantly contribute to the 3 μm plateau in the 3150-2950 cm-1, while hydrogenated and methylated species are primarily responsible for features in the 2950-2750 cm-1 region.

  2. Photofield emission spectroscopy of the tungsten <112> band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radoń, T.; Jaskółka, S.

    1991-05-01

    Optical transitions in photofield emission (PFE) characteristics from the (112) plane of tungsten have been observed at five values of photon energy in the visible range. To measure very small PFE currents modulated laser radiation and phase-sensitive detection have been used. Shoulders in the characteristics obtained with s-polarized light correspond to transitions in the bulk band structure near the Fermi level in accordance with the theoretical results of Christensen and Feuerbacher [1]. Using p-polarized light, peaks of the surface density of states, lying below the Fermi level, were observed in a good agreement with both the field and photofield emission distributions.

  3. Remote sensing of the troposphere by infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Glavich, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a cryogenic IR imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, called the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), designed for observations of the troposphere and lower stratosphere from a near-earth orbit, using natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight. The principal molecular species to be measured by TES are O3, CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, H2O2, NO, NO2, HNO3, NH3, CH4, C2H6, C2H2, SO2, COS, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2. The TES is scheduled for a launch on the second polar platform of the Earth Observing System in 1998.

  4. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  5. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-04-01

    Accurate reporting of mercury concentration requires a detailed model that includes experimental parameters that vary, such as: pressure, temperature, concentration, absorption cross-section, and isotopic structure etc. During this quarter a theoretical model has been developed to model the 253.7 nm mercury transition. In addition, while testing the interferent species SO{sub 2}, SRD was able to determine the absorption cross-section experimentally and add this to the theoretical model. Assuming that the baseline losses are due to the mirror reflectivity and SO{sub 2}, SRD can now determine the concentrations of both mercury and SO{sub 2} from the data taken. For the CRD instrument to perform as a continuous emission monitor it will be required to monitor mercury concentrations over extended periods of time. The stability of monitoring mercury concentrations over time with the CRD apparatus was tested during the past quarter. During a test which monitored the mercury concentration every 2 seconds it was found that the standard deviation, of a signal from about 1.25 ppb Hg, was only 30 ppt. SRD continued interferent gas testing during this past quarter. This included creating a simulated flue gas composed of the gases tested individually by SRD. The detection limits for mercury, although dependent on the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the simulated gas matrix, remained well below the ppb range. It was determined that for the gases tested the only measurable changes in the baseline level occurred for SO{sub 2} and mercury. Speciation studies continued with mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}). This included checking for spectral speciation with both Hg and HgCl{sub 2} present in the CRD cavity. There was no observable spectral shift. Also a pyrolysis oven was incorporated into the gas delivery system both for tests with HgCl{sub 2} as well as atomization of the entire gas stream. The pyrolysis tests conducted have been inconclusive thus far.

  6. Modeling and simulation of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for the ITER prototype neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test facility for the development of the neutral beam injection system for ITER is under construction at Consorzio RFX. It will host two experiments: SPIDER, a 100 keV H{sup −}/D{sup −} ion RF source, and MITICA, a prototype of the full performance ITER injector (1 MV, 17 MW beam). A set of diagnostics will monitor the operation and allow to optimize the performance of the two prototypes. In particular, beam emission spectroscopy will measure the uniformity and the divergence of the fast particles beam exiting the ion source and travelling through the beam line components. This type of measurement is based on the collection of the H{sub α}/D{sub α} emission resulting from the interaction of the energetic particles with the background gas. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the spectrum of the collected emissions in order to design this diagnostic and to study its performance. The paper describes the model at the base of the simulations and presents the modeled H{sub α} spectra in the case of MITICA experiment.

  7. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina; ...

    2017-01-17

    Here we probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe-ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making it a powerful technique for molecular studies in a wide variety of environments. A picosecond-time-resolved measurement of the complete Is X-ray emission spectrum captures the transient photoinduced changes and includes the weak valence-to-core (vtc) emission lines that correspond to transitions from occupied valence orbitals to the nascent core-hole. Vtc-XES offers particular insight into the molecular orbitals directly involvedmore » in the light-driven dynamics; a change in the metal-ligand orbital overlap results in an intensity reduction and a blue energy shift in agreement with our theoretical calculations and more subtle features at the highest energies reflect changes in the frontier orbital populations.« less

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond repetitively pulsed microplasmas generated in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriere, Thomas; Moreau, Eric; Benard, Nicolas; Pai, David

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) microplasmas are generated in room temperature air at atmospheric pressure, in order to investigate the enhanced control of discharge properties via the combined effects of spatial confinement and nanosecond repetitive pulsing. Discharges were generated using high-voltage pulses of 15-ns duration applied to a tungsten pin-to-pin reactor, with inter-electrode gap distances (d) from 2 mm down to 0.2 mm. Optical emission spectroscopy and electrical characterization performed on the discharge indicate that heat transfer and plasma chemistry are influenced by the microplasma geometry. Ultrafast gas heating is observed upon deducing the rotational temperature of N2 from the measured emission spectrum of the N2 (C -->B) (0, 2) and (1, 3) transition bands, but use of the microplasma geometry (d = 0.2 mm) results in lower gas temperatures than in larger discharge gaps (d = 2 mm), including at high pulse repetition frequency (30 kHz) where substantial steady-state gas heating can occur. The measured Stark broadening of the Hα transition is significantly greater than for previously studied NRP discharges in air at atmospheric pressure, indicating that the maximum electron number density may be correspondingly much greater, up to 1018 cm-3. Furthermore, for NRP microplasmas, the intensities of emission from excited atomic ions (O+ and N+) are much higher than those of excited neutral atoms (O and N), in contrast to NRP discharges generated in larger discharge gaps.

  9. Undistorted X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Using s-Core-Orbital Emissions.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-05-12

    Detection of secondary emissions, fluorescence yield (FY), or electron yield (EY), originating from the relaxation processes upon X-ray resonant absorption has been widely adopted for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements when the primary absorption process cannot be probed directly in transmission mode. Various spectral distortion effects inherent in the relaxation processes and in the subsequent transportation of emitted particles (electron or photon) through the sample, however, undermine the proportionality of the emission signals to the X-ray absorption coefficient. In the present study, multiple radiative (FY) and nonradiative (EY) decay channels have been experimentally investigated on a model system, FeCl3 aqueous solution, at the excitation energy of the Fe L-edge. The systematic comparisons between the experimental spectra taken from various decay channels, as well as the comparison with the theoretically simulated Fe L-edge XA spectrum that involves only the absorption process, indicate that the detection of the Fe 3s → 2p partial fluorescence yield (PFY) gives rise to the true Fe L-edge XA spectrum. The two key characteristics generalized from this particular decay channel-zero orbital angular momentum (i.e., s orbital) and core-level emission-set a guideline for obtaining undistorted X-ray absorption spectra in the future.

  10. Monitoring Dielectric Thin-Film Production on Product Wafers Using Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    NIEMCZYK,THOMAS M.; ZHANG,SONGBIAO; HAALAND,DAVID M.

    2000-12-18

    Monitoring of dielectric thin-film production in the microelectronics industry is generally accomplished by depositing a representative film on a monitor wafer and determining the film properties off line. One of the most important dielectric thin films in the manufacture of integrated circuits is borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG). The critical properties of BPSG thin films are the boron content, phosphorus content and film thickness. We have completed an experimental study that demonstrates that infrared emission spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis can be used to simultaneous y determine these properties directly from the spectra of product wafers, thus eliminating the need of producing monitor wafers. In addition, infrared emission data can be used to simultaneously determine the film temperature, which is an important film production parameter. The infrared data required to make these determinations can be collected on a time scale that is much faster than the film deposition time, hence infrared emission is an ideal candidate for an in-situ process monitor for dielectric thin-film production.

  11. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  12. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe–ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making it a powerful technique for molecular studies in a wide variety of environments. A picosecond-time-resolved measurement of the complete 1s X-ray emission spectrum captures the transient photoinduced changes and includes the weak valence-to-core (vtc) emission lines that correspond to transitions from occupied valence orbitals to the nascent core-hole. Vtc-XES offers particular insight into the molecular orbitals directly involved in the light-driven dynamics; a change in the metal–ligand orbital overlap results in an intensity reduction and a blue energy shift in agreement with our theoretical calculations and more subtle features at the highest energies reflect changes in the frontier orbital populations. PMID:28580048

  13. Comprehensive Chemical Analysis of Metal Alloys by Means of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Multielement standard solutions were prepared from commercially available atomic absorbtion standard solutions or Spex Industries plasma-grade materials... SPECTROSCOPY W. E. Glad D"TIC LECTEfl Naval Ocean Systems Center scR. San Diego, California 92152-5000 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 0...MEANS OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY 12. PENSOIAF 111151 W.. la boron Stitaim tantlum nibim tn sten and EC zircNI in n n

  14. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy determination of trace element composition of argan oil.

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, A; Ghanjaoui, M E; El Rhazi, M; de la Guardia, M

    2010-02-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave assisted acid digestion has been developed to determine the trace element content of Moroccan argan oil. Limit of detection values equal or lower than few mg/kg were obtained for all elements under study. To assure the accuracy of the whole procedure, recovery studies were carried out on argan oil samples spiked at different concentration levels from 10 to 200 µg/L. Quantitative average recovery values were obtained for all elements evaluated, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology for the determination of trace elements in argan oil samples. Aluminum, calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, lithium, magnesium, sodium, vanadium and zinc were quantitatively determined in Moroccan argan oils being found that their concentration is different of that found in other edible oils thus offering a way for authentication and for the evaluation of possible adulterations.

  15. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for acquisition of fugitive emission flux data.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eben D; Shores, Richard C; Thompson, Edgar L; Harris, D Bruce; Thorneloe, Susan A; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Modrak, Mark T; Natschke, David F; Gamble, Heather A

    2005-05-01

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a ground-based optical remote-sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) has been the primary technique for acquisition of pollutant concentration data used in this emission measurement method. For a number of environmentally important compounds, such as ammonia and methane, open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is shown to be a viable alternative to Fourier transform spectroscopy for pollutant concentration measurements. Near-IR diode laser spectroscopy systems offer significant operational and cost advantages over Fourier transform instruments enabling more efficient implementation of the measurement strategy. This article reviews the EPA's fugitive emission measurement method and describes its multipath tunable diode laser instrument. Validation testing of the system is discussed. OP-TDLAS versus OP-FTIR correlation testing results for ammonia (R2 = 0.980) and methane (R2 = 0.991) are reported. Two example applications of tunable diode laser-based fugitive emission measurements are presented.

  16. Hadamard-Transform Fluorescence Excitation-Emission-Matrix Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Andrews, N L P; Ferguson, T; Rangaswamy, A M M; Bernicky, A R; Henning, N; Dudelzak, A; Reich, O; Barnes, J A; Loock, H-P

    2017-08-15

    We present a fluorescence excitation-emission-matrix spectrometer with superior data acquisition rates over previous instruments. Light from a white light emitting diode (LED) source is dispersed onto a digital micromirror array (DMA) and encoded using binary n-size Walsh functions ("barcodes"). The encoded excitation light is used to irradiate the liquid sample and its fluorescence is dispersed and detected using a conventional array spectrometer. After exposure to excitation light encoded in n different ways, the 2-dimensional excitation-emission-matrix (EEM) spectrum is obtained by inverse Hadamard transformation. Using this technique we examined the kinetics of the fluorescence of rhodamine B as a function of temperature and the acid-driven demetalation of chlorophyll-a into pheophytin-a. For these experiments, EEM spectra with 31 excitation channels and 2048 emission channels were recorded every 15 s. In total, data from over 3000 EEM spectra were included in this report. It is shown that the increase in data acquisition rate can be as high as [{n(n + 1)}/2]-fold over conventional EEM spectrometers. Spectral acquisition rates of more than two spectra per second were demonstrated.

  17. Continuous measurements of volcanic gases from Popocatepetl volcano by thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Noemie; Stremme, Wolfgang; Meza, Israel; Grutter, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Passive volcanic gas emissions have been poorly studied despite their impact on the atmospheric chemistry with important consequences on its geochemical cycles and climate change on regional and global scale. Therefore, long-term monitoring of volcanic gas plumes and their composition are of prime importance for climatic models and the estimation of the volcanic contribution to climate change. We present a new measurement and analysis strategy based on remote thermal emission spectroscopy which can provide continuous (day and night) information of the composition of the volcanic plume. In this study we show results from the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico with measurements performed during the year 2015 from the Altzomoni Atmospheric Observatory (19.12N, -98.65W, 3,985 masl). This site, which forms part of the RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx) and NDACC (https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/irwg) networks, is located north of the crater of this active volcano at 12 km distance. Emission spectra were recorded with an FTIR spectrometer (OPAG22, Bruker) at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution and processed using the SFIT4 radiative transfer and profile retrieval code, based on the Optimal Estimation method (Rodgers, 1976; 1990; 2000). This newly improved methodology is intercompared to a former retrieval strategy using measurements from 2008 and recent results of the variability of the SiF4/SO2 composition ratio during 2015 is presented. A discussion of how the new measurements improve the understating of the impact of volcanic gas emissions on the atmosphere on global and regional scale is included.

  18. Trap state spectroscopy studies and wettability modification of hydroxyapatite nanobioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronov, Daniel; Rosenman, Gil

    2007-02-01

    Sintered hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium-based implants demonstrate beneficial biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. It has been shown that charged surface states and bulk traps located in the vicinity of the surface of the hydroxyapatite coatings strongly influence wettability properties of the hydroxyapatite and may modify biocompatibility of these nanostructured bioceramics. Combination of high-resolution electron state spectroscopy methods, thermostimulated exoelectron emission, and thermoluminescence methods, applied in this work, have allowed studying electron trap energy spectrum of the hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

  19. LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting

    2016-07-01

    LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

  20. Theoretical background of optical emission spectroscopy for analysis of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Thierry; Noël, Cédric; Gries, Thomas; Martin, Julien; Henrion, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    This review contains a theoretical background of optical emission spectroscopy and some selected examples of issues in the field of atmospheric plasmas. It includes elements like line broadening, emission of continua and molecules, radiation models, etc. Modernized expressions figuring the terms hidden in global constants where cgs units prevail are given together with restrictions of use. Easy-to-use formulas are provided to give access to essential plasma parameters.

  1. Xanthines Studied via Femtosecond Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Kovács, Lajos; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Gustavsson, Thomas

    2016-12-03

    Xanthines represent a wide class of compounds closely related to the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Ubiquitous in the human body, they are capable of replacing natural bases in double helices and give rise to four-stranded structures. Although the use of their fluorescence for analytical purposes was proposed, their fluorescence properties have not been properly characterized so far. The present paper reports the first fluorescence study of xanthine solutions relying on femtosecond spectroscopy. Initially, we focus on 3-methylxanthine, showing that this compound exhibits non-exponential fluorescence decays with no significant dependence on the emission wavelength. The fluorescence quantum yield (3 × 10(-4)) and average decay time (0.9 ps) are slightly larger than those found for the DNA bases. Subsequently, we compare the dynamical fluorescence properties of seven mono-, di- and tri-methylated derivatives. Both the fluorescence decays and fluorescence anisotropies vary only weakly with the site and the degree of methylation. These findings are in line with theoretical predictions suggesting the involvement of several conical intersections in the relaxation of the lowest singlet excited state.

  2. Thermal emission spectroscopy as a tool for noninvasive blood glucose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Janusz M.

    2004-08-01

    The advanced prototype presented here is based on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (TES) and promises a new generation of non-invasive human tissue analyte instruments. The method and instrument are based on the discovery that natural mid-infrared emission from the human body, especially from the tympanic membrane, is modulated by the state of the emitting tissue. In a simple experimental arrangement, it was demonstrated that emission from glucose could be detected using room temperature detectors in a filter-based setup. Thermal infrared emission characteristics of different glucose concentrations in human plasma solutions were measured. To our knowledge, this is the first time such measurements are reported. In-vivo measurements demonstrated the reproducibility of the methodology of the non-invasive glucose monitor. The non-invasive measurement was calibrated to the serum glucose concentration using 432-paired measurements and subsequently tested (results of Power Analyses) in a blind fashion with 126-paired measurements from diabetic subjects. Non-invasive glucose results were compared with laboratory reference measurements using Error-in-Variable methods. Clark Error Grid analysis showed that 100% of the measurements fell within zones A and B (90% in zone A and 10% in zone B). The Standard Deviation for all non-invasive measured concentrations is 27 mg/dL, Mean Absolute Relative Error %MARE = 8.6, and the correlation coefficient is r = 0.94. This first independent clinical study of a non-invasive blood glucose prototype has demonstrated glucose measurements with clinically acceptable accuracy without the necessity of individual daily calibration.

  3. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  4. Quantitative analysis of solids in motion by transient infrared emission spectroscopy using hot-gas jet excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Quantitative compositional analysis of optically thick solids in motion is demonstrated by using transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES). TIRES greatly reduces the self-absorption that normally degrades conventional emission spectra so that they closely resemble blackbody spectra. Quantitative compositional analyses of poly((methyl methacrylate)-co-(butyl methacrylate)) and poly(ethylene-co-(vinyl acetate)) with standard errors of prediction under 1% were achieved with only a few seconds of data acquisition using principal component regression. Use of a hot-gas jet in place of a laser in the TIRES technique allows study of materials that do not absorb strongly at common laser wavelengths while reducing cost and complexity.

  5. Phase-resolved emission spectroscopy of a neutraliser-free gridded ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedrick, James; Gibson, Andrew; Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    Power-efficient electric propulsion systems that operate without an external neutraliser have the potential to increase the longevity of traditional concepts. The Neptune gridded-ion thruster prototype, which uses a single radio-requency (rf) power source for plasma generation, ion acceleration and beam neutralisation, is under development. Previous research has suggested that the time-resolved electron dynamics in the plume are important for maintaining charge neutrality and overall performance. In this study, the electron dynamics in the exhaust beam are investigated within the rf cycle using phase-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results are compared with time-resolved and time-integrated electrical diagnostics to investigate the mechanisms behind beam neutralisation. This work received financial support from the York-Paris CIRC and state aid managed by the laboratory of excellence Plas@Par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02).

  6. Imaging buried organic islands by spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Kuan Eng J; Bannani, A; Troadec, C

    2008-11-05

    The well-known Au/n-Si(111) Schottky interface is modified by a discontinuous pentacene film (∼1.5 nm thick) and studied using spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). The pentacene film introduced subtle changes to the interface which cannot be definitively detected by current-voltage measurements or a standard BEES analysis of the barrier height. In contrast, analyzing the BEES results in a dual-parameter (transmission attenuation and barrier height) space allows the effect of the pentacene film on the Au/n-Si(111) interface to be clearly demonstrated. We found that the pentacene film behaves like a tunneling barrier and increases the distribution of local barrier heights with a tendency toward lower values. Our results highlight the potential of the dual-parameter BEES analysis for understanding local interface modification by molecules.

  7. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Del Sole, Angelo; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases.

  8. Monitoring incinerator emissions from remote sites using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Spurgash, S.M.; Snyder, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) provides the potential to monitor incinerator emissions remotely and passively from air-mounted (helicopter) or ground-mounted (car) locations. The objective of this work was to extend the application of remote FTIR as an incinerator monitor to simple mixtures released in the laboratory and in the field. Initial data were collected for two commonly used principal organic hazardous components (POHCs), chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. To simulate mixtures that are more difficult to identify and quantify, subsequent laboratory and field studies were performed with methanol and diethyl malonate mixtures. The sensitivity of the equipment is currently in the region of low parts-per-million-per meter of air measured. Remote FTIR was able to identify and quantify components with overlapping absorbances in the presence of interference from carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Gas temperature and electron density profiles in an argon dc microdischarge measured by optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Ouk, Tola; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-03-15

    Optical emisssion spectroscopy was employed to study a high pressure (100 s of Torr), slot-type (600 {mu}m interelectrode gap), argon dc microdischarge, with added traces of nitrogen. Spatially resolved gas temperature profiles were obtained by analyzing rovibrational bands of the N{sub 2} first positive system. The gas temperature peaked near the cathode and increased with current. The contribution of Stark broadening to the hydrogen H{sub {beta}} emission lineshape was used to extract the electron density. The axial distribution of electron density as well as visual observation revealed that the microdischarge positive column was highly constricted. The electron density near the sheath edge increased with both pressure and current.

  10. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  11. Imaging buried organic islands by spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Kuan Eng J.; Bannani, A.; Troadec, C.

    2008-11-01

    The well-known Au/n-Si(111) Schottky interface is modified by a discontinuous pentacene film (~1.5 nm thick) and studied using spatially resolved ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). The pentacene film introduced subtle changes to the interface which cannot be definitively detected by current-voltage measurements or a standard BEES analysis of the barrier height. In contrast, analyzing the BEES results in a dual-parameter (transmission attenuation and barrier height) space allows the effect of the pentacene film on the Au/n-Si(111) interface to be clearly demonstrated. We found that the pentacene film behaves like a tunneling barrier and increases the distribution of local barrier heights with a tendency toward lower values. Our results highlight the potential of the dual-parameter BEES analysis for understanding local interface modification by molecules.

  12. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  13. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  14. Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Burrows, Adam; Grillmair, Carl J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze all existing secondary eclipse time series spectroscopy of hot Jupiter HD 189733b acquired with the now defunct Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument. We describe the novel approaches we develop to remove the systematic effects and extract accurate secondary eclipse depths as a function of wavelength in order to construct the emission spectrum of the exoplanet. We compare our results with a previous study by Grillmair et al. that did not examine all data sets available to us. We are able to confirm the detection of a water feature near 6 μm claimed by Grillmair et al. We compare the planetary emission spectrum to three model families—based on isothermal atmosphere, gray atmosphere, and two realizations of the complex radiative transfer model by Burrows et al., adopted in Grillmair et al.'s study. While we are able to reject the simple isothermal and gray models based on the data at the 97% level just from the IRS data, these rejections hinge on eclipses measured within a relatively narrow wavelength range, between 5.5 and 7 μm. This underscores the need for observational studies with broad wavelength coverage and high spectral resolution, in order to obtain robust information on exoplanet atmospheres.

  15. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Boni, E. de; Willimann, M.; Safonova, O.; Sa, J.; Smolentsev, G.; Szlachetko, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Schmitt, B.; David, C.; Luecke, A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Jagodzinski, P.

    2012-10-15

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  16. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  17. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF [Ne II] EMISSION FROM AA Tau AND GM Aur

    SciTech Connect

    Najita, Joan R.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Bitner, Martin A.; Richter, Matthew J.; Lacy, John H.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Carr, John S.; Meijerink, Rowin; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    2009-05-20

    We present high-resolution (R = 80,000) spectroscopy of [Ne II] emission from two young stars, GM Aur and AA Tau, which have moderate to high inclinations. The emission from both sources appears centered near the stellar velocity and is broader than the [Ne II] emission measured previously for the face-on disk system TW Hya. These properties are consistent with a disk origin for the [Ne II] emission we detect, with disk rotation (rather than photoevaporation or turbulence in a hot disk atmosphere) playing the dominant role in the origin of the line width. In the non-face-on systems, the [Ne II] emission is narrower than the CO fundamental emission from the same sources. If the widths of both diagnostics are dominated by Keplerian rotation, this suggests that the [Ne II] emission arises from larger disk radii on average than does the CO emission. The equivalent width of the [Ne II] emission we detect is less than that of the spectrally unresolved [Ne II] feature in the Spitzer spectra of the same sources. Variability in the [Ne II] emission or the mid-infrared continuum, a spatially extended [Ne II] component, or a very (spectrally) broad [Ne II] component might account for the difference in the equivalent widths.

  18. Emission Spectroscopy measurement of hybrid ECR-Helicon plasma source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hala, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy measurement of plasma temperature and density were conducted on KACST hybrid plasma source. The hybrid source involves ECR and helicon source operated simultanously. The results indicate that the ECR alone density is higher than the density of the combined sources while the combined temperature is lower.

  19. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  20. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  1. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    DOE PAGES

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Bressler, Christian; ...

    2015-02-09

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. Here In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES formore » time-resolved experiments. Lastly, we discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique.« less

  3. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  4. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Synthetic Allophane and its Potential Formation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is a poorly-crystalline, hydrous aluminosilicate with variable Si/Al ratios approx.0.5-1 and a metastable precursor of clay minerals. On Earth, it forms rapidly by aqueous alteration of volcanic glass under neutral to slightly acidic conditions [1]. Based on in situ chemical measurements and the identification of alteration phases [2-4], the Martian surface is interpreted to have been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical models of altered surfaces detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater suggest the presence of an allophane-like alteration product [3]. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution models are primary tools for determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface [5]. Spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate a global compositional dichotomy, where high latitudes tend to be enriched in a high-silica material [6,7], interpreted as high-silica, K-rich volcanic glass [6,8]. However, later interpretations proposed that the high-silica material may be an alteration product (such as amorphous silica, clay minerals, or allophane) and that high latitude surfaces are chemically weathered [9-11]. A TIR spectral library of pure minerals is available for the public [12], but it does not contain allophane spectra. The identification of allophane on the Martian surface would indicate high water activity at the time of its formation and would help constrain the aqueous alteration environment [13,14]. The addition of allophane to the spectral library is necessary to address the global compositional dichotomy. In this study, we characterize a synthetic allophane by IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to create an IR emission spectrum of pure allophane for the Mars science community to use in Martian spectral models.

  5. Analysis of fertilizers for major, micro, and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. B., Jr.

    The concentrations of nine elements (B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, and Zn) in 34 Magruder Fertilizer Standards were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy, and the results compared favorably with the known concentrations for all the elements. In addition to these nine fertilizer elements, six others (AI, Cd, Cr, Na, Ni, and Pb) were determined in the same analysis, although results could only be compared to similar analyses made by two other laboratories employing ICP. All 15 elements were also determined in 12 spent acids used to manufacture liquid fertilizer and analysis results compared among the three laboratories. Analysis by ICP spectroscopy of fertilizer materials with wide ranges of elemental contents was found to be a rapid analysis technique which can give comparable results with those obtained by the more laborious AOAC procedures as well as the opportunity to determine other than only the important fertilizer elements. Collaborative study is recommended for ICP determination of the elements of importance in fertilizers for adaptation of the ICP technique by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  6. Meteor emission spectroscopy: clues on the delivery of primitive materials from cometary meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2014-07-01

    Meteor emission spectroscopy is an useful technique to infer bulk chemistry properties of meteoroids. Even for a spectrum calibrated on a relative scale, valuable chemical information about the meteoroid can be inferred. Obviously, the determination of the chemical abundances requires having into account the right physical parameters. A model assuming thermal equilibrium in the meteor head, and computing the radiating volume as a prism is created using four free parameters: temperature, column atom density, surface area, and damping constant. By directly comparing the intensity of Fe lines in the recorded spectrum with a synthetic one, the density of Fe atoms in the meteor column will be determined. Once the fit is established for Fe lines, the abundances of the other elements are changed until reaching a general match between both spectra: the recorded and the synthetic one. That procedure developed by J. Borovička allows to get reliable chemical abundances from meteoroids ablating in the Earth's atmosphere. Currently, several programs around the world study the chemical properties of meteoroids ablating in Earth's atmosphere. By using diffraction gratings in front of the optics of video cameras is then possible to infer chemical abundances for the main rock-forming elements. Current state-of-the-art meteor recording instruments can obtain meteor spectra with the needed spatial resolution to gain insight into the chemistry and physical processes at work in meteor columns. Then, a general review of current meteor spectroscopy achievements and future challenges is presented.

  7. Kβ Mainline X-ray Emission Spectroscopy as an Experimental Probe of Metal–Ligand Covalency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mainline feature in metal Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has long been recognized as an experimental marker for the spin state of the metal center. However, even within a series of metal compounds with the same nominal oxidation and spin state, significant changes are observed that cannot be explained on the basis of overall spin. In this work, the origin of these effects is explored, both experimentally and theoretically, in order to develop the chemical information content of Kβ mainline XES. Ligand field expressions are derived that describe the behavior of Kβ mainlines for first row transition metals with any dn count, allowing for a detailed analysis of the factors governing mainline shape. Further, due to limitations associated with existing computational approaches, we have developed a new methodology for calculating Kβ mainlines using restricted active space configuration interaction (RAS–CI) calculations. This approach eliminates the need for empirical parameters and provides a powerful tool for investigating the effects that chemical environment exerts on the mainline spectra. On the basis of a detailed analysis of the intermediate and final states involved in these transitions, we confirm the known sensitivity of Kβ mainlines to metal spin state via the 3p–3d exchange coupling. Further, a quantitative relationship between the splitting of the Kβ mainline features and the metal–ligand covalency is established. Thus, this study furthers the quantitative electronic structural information that can be extracted from Kβ mainline spectroscopy. PMID:24914450

  8. New method for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from livestock buildings using open-path FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briz, Susana; Barrancos, José; Nolasco, Dácil; Melián, Gladys; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio

    2009-09-01

    It is widely known that methane, together with carbon dioxide, is one of the most effective greenhouse gases contributing to climate global change. According to EMEP/CORINAIR Emission Inventory Guidebook1, around 25% of global CH4 emissions originate from animal husbandry, especially from enteric fermentation. However, uncertainties in the CH4 emission factors provided by EMEP/CORINAIR are around 30%. For this reason, works addressed to calculate emissions experimentally are so important to improve the estimations of emissions due to livestock and to calculate emission factors not included in this inventory. FTIR spectroscopy has been frequently used in different methodologies to measure emission rates in many environmental problems. Some of these methods are based on dispersion modelling techniques, wind data, micrometeorological measurements or the release of a tracer gas. In this work, a new method for calculating emission rates from livestock buildings applying Open-Path FTIR spectroscopy is proposed. This method is inspired by the accumulation chamber method used for CO2 flux measurements in volcanic areas or CH4 flux in wetlands and aquatic ecosystems. The process is the following: livestock is outside the building, which is ventilated in order to reduce concentrations to ambient level. Once the livestock has been put inside, the building is completely closed and the concentrations of gases emitted by livestock begin to increase. The Open-Path system measures the concentration evolution of gases such as CO2, CH4, NH3 and H2O. The slope of the concentration evolution function, dC/dt, at initial time is directly proportional to the flux of the corresponding gas. This method has been applied in a cow shed in the surroundings of La Laguna, Tenerife Island, Spain). As expected, evolutions of gas concentrations reveal that the livestock building behaves like an accumulation chamber. Preliminary results show that the CH4 emission factor is lower than the proposed by

  9. Simultaneous multielement detection in particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. Derrick, Jr.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Presented here is the development of a particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy source that has been interfaced with a high resolution polychromator for use as a species-specific detector for chromatographic separations. Use of the high resolution JY RF-5000 polychromator allows simultaneous, multielement analysis; a necessary requirement for comprehensive speciation analysis. Parametric optimization was performed for the nebulization conditions, desolvation temperature, glow discharge current and pressure, and the source block temperature (vaporization) using nitrate salts containing lead, nickel, and silver. Peak area, height, and width were recorded for optical emission of Pb (I) 220.35 nm, Ni (I) 341.41 nm, and Ag (I) 338.28 nm in order to determine optimal peak characteristics under chromatographic separation conditions. Response curves for a multielement salt solution containing Pb, Ni, and Ag were obtained using the optimized conditions, with detection limits for triplicate injections of 2.2, 0.17, and 0.19 ng, respectively. The ability to monitor multiple elements simultaneously reveals the existence of interelement matrix effects that have not been noted previously in hollow cathode devices. The ability to monitor metals and non-metals is demonstrated towards the future application of this system as a tool for metallomic studies.

  10. Infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy of the zinc carbonate mineral smithsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Martens, Wayde N.; Wain, Daria L.; Hales, Matt C.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared emission and infrared spectroscopy has been used to study a series of selected natural smithsonites from different origins. An intense broad infrared band at 1440 cm -1 is assigned to the ν CO 32- antisymmetric stretching vibration. An additional band is resolved at 1335 cm -1. An intense sharp Raman band at 1092 cm -1 is assigned to the CO 32- symmetric stretching vibration. Infrared emission spectra show a broad antisymmetric band at 1442 cm -1 shifting to lower wavenumbers with thermal treatment. A band observed at 870 cm -1 with a band of lesser intensity at 842 cm -1 shifts to higher wavenumbers upon thermal treatment and is observed at 865 cm -1 at 400 °C and is assigned to the CO 32-ν mode. No ν bending modes are observed in the Raman spectra for smithsonite. The band at 746 cm -1 shifts to 743 cm -1 at 400 °C and is attributed to the CO 32-ν in phase bending modes. Two infrared bands at 744 and around 729 cm -1 are assigned to the ν in phase bending mode. Multiple bands may be attributed to the structural distortion ZnO 6 octahedron. This structural distortion is brought about by the substitution of Zn by some other cation. A number of bands at 2499, 2597, 2858, 2954 and 2991 cm -1 in both the IE and infrared spectra are attributed to combination bands.

  11. Determination of minor elements in water by emission spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Paul R.; Mallory, E.C.

    1971-01-01

    With the emission spectrograph, the analyst is able to determine many minor elements simultaneously in water samples. Spectrographic methods differ chiefly in techniques of preconcentrating the elements. For waters with dissolved solids of less than 1,000 milligrams per liter, the method of evaporating to dryness and determining the elements in the dried residue is sensitive, precise, and reasonably accurate. The lower limits of detection vary with the quantity of dissolved solids. Twenty-four elements are determined by this method. For waters with more than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, it is necessary to separate the minor elements from the major constituents before spectrographically determining the former, in order to achieve adequate lower limits of detection. Such procedures generally require more time than the residue method. In the first of two such procedures given, 21 of the metallic elements are precipitated with thioacetamide prior to spectrographic determination. In an alternate procedure, 18 elements are precipitated quantitatively with complexing reagents 8-hydroxyquinoline, tannic acid, and thioanlide. This method is faster than the thioacetamide method, but at the sacrifice of some elements. A Fortran IV computer program for processing densitometric data is given in the section 'Computer Program.'

  12. Emission Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Calculations for TaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, R. S.; Liévin, J.; Bernath, P. F.

    2002-10-01

    The emission spectra of TaN have been investigated in the region 3000-35 000 cm -1 using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra were observed in a tantalum hollow-cathode lamp by discharging a mixture of 1.5 Torr of Ne and about 6 mTorr of N 2. In addition to previously known bands, numerous additional bands were observed and assigned to a number of new transitions. The spectroscopic properties of the low-lying electronic states of TaN were also predicted by ab initio calculations. A 1Σ + state, with equilibrium constants of Be=0.457 852 1(48) cm -1, α e=0.002 235 9(67) cm -1, and Re=1.683 099 9(88) Å, has been identified as the ground state of TaN based on our experimental observations supported by the ab initio results. The first excited state has been identified as the a3Δ 1 spin component at 2827 cm -1 above the ground state. To higher energies, the states become difficult to assign because of their Hund's case (c) behavior and extensive interactions between the spin components of the electronic terms.

  13. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  14. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-06-30

    Previous work on the detection of mercury using the cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has concentrated on the detection and characterization of the desired mercury transition. Interferent species present in flue gas emissions have been tested as well as a simulated flue gas stream. Additionally, work has been done on different mercury species such as the elemental and oxidized forms. The next phase of the effort deals with the actual sampling system. This sampling system will be responsible for acquiring a sample stream from the flue gas stack, taking it to the CRD cavity where it will be analyzed and returning the gas stream to the stack. In the process of transporting the sample gas stream every effort must be taken to minimize any losses of mercury to the walls of the sampling system as well as maintaining the mercury in its specific state (i.e. elemental, oxidized, or other mercury compounds). SRD first evaluated a number of commercially available sampling systems. These systems ranged from a complete sampling system to a number of individual components for specific tasks. SRD engineers used some commercially available components and designed a sampling system suited to the needs of the CRD instrument. This included components such as a pyrolysis oven to convert all forms of mercury to elemental mercury, a calibration air source to ensure mirror alignment and quality of the mirror surfaces, and a pumping system to maintain the CRD cavity pressure from atmospheric pressure (760 torr) down to about 50 torr. SRD also began evaluating methods for the CRD instrument to automatically find the center of a mercury transition. This procedure is necessary as the instrument must periodically measure the baseline losses of the cavity off of the mercury resonance and then return to the center of the transition to accurately measure the mercury concentration. This procedure is somewhat complicated due to the isotopic structure of the 254 nm mercury transition. As a result of

  15. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  16. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  17. Minority-carrier emission effect in deep level transient spectroscopy measurements on Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.I.; Borrego, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    One basic assumption underlying all the deep level transient spectroscopy derivations is the existence of a single dominant emission process during the transient. It is demonstrated in this paper that the use of conventional procedure could result in significant errors in all the calculated defect parameters when the concerned level has comparable emission rates for both carriers in the detected range. A simple verification method and an improved scheme are proposed to determine the accurate defect parameters. By using this scheme, it is confirmed that EL2 in GaAs is an electron trap with a dominant electron emission rate. A level, designated as E3, in Si shows similar electron and hole emission rates in detected range. It is proven for this level that the conventional Arrhenius plot will lead to large errors in all the calculated defect properties, while the improved scheme provides the accurate information.

  18. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, M-C; Nikolich, G; Etyemezian, V; Dubois, D W; King, J; Shafer, D; Gamboa da Costa, G; Hinton, J F; Kavouras, I G

    2013-10-01

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy study of Mn and Co valence and spin states in TbM n1 -xC oxO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuartero, V.; Lafuerza, S.; Rovezzi, M.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, E.

    2016-10-01

    The valence and spin state evolution of Mn and Co on TbM n1 -xC oxO3 series is precisely determined by means of soft and hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and K β x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Our results show the change from M n3 + to M n4 + both high-spin (HS) together with the evolution from C o2 + HS to C o3 + low-spin (LS) with increasing x . In addition, high energy resolution XAS spectra on the K pre-edge region are interpreted in terms of the strong charge transfer and hybridization effects along the series. These results correlate well with the spin values of Mn and Co atoms obtained from the K β XES data. In this paper, we determine that Co enters into the transition metal sublattice of TbMn O3 as a divalent ion in HS state, destabilizing the Mn long-range magnetic order since very low doping compositions (x ≤0.1 ). Samples in the intermediate composition range (0.4 ≤x ≤0.6 ) adopt the crystal structure of a double perovskite with long-range ferromagnetic ordering which is due to M n4 + -O-C o2 + superexchange interactions with both cations in HS configuration. Ferromagnetism vanishes for x ≥0.7 due to the structural disorder that collapses the double perovskite structure. The spectroscopic techniques reveal the occurrence of M n4 + HS and a fluctuating valence state C o2 + HS/C o3 + LS in this composition range. Disorder and competitive interactions lead to a magnetic glassy behavior in these samples.

  20. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires, light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  1. Broadband UV spectroscopy system used for monitoring of SO 2 and NO emissions from thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. G.; Wang, H. S.; Somesfalean, G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Lou, X. T.; Wu, S. H.; Zhang, Z. G.; Qin, Y. K.

    2010-11-01

    A gas monitoring system based on broadband absorption spectroscopic techniques in the ultraviolet region is described and tested. The system was employed in real-time continuous concentration measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and nitric oxide (NO) from a 220-ton h -1 circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler in Shandong province, China. The emission coefficients (per kg of coal and per kWh of electricity) and the total emission of the two pollutant gases were evaluated. The measurement results showed that the emission concentrations of SO 2 and NO from the CFB boiler fluctuated in the range of 750-1300 mg m -3 and 100-220 mg m -3, respectively. Compared with the specified emission standards of air pollutants from thermal power plants in China, the values were generally higher for SO 2 and lower for NO. The relatively high emission concentrations of SO 2 were found to mainly depend on the sulfur content of the fuel and the poor desulfurization efficiency. This study indicates that the broadband UV spectroscopy system is suitable for industrial emission monitoring and pollution control.

  2. Intracavity absorption and emission spectroscopy of atoms in pulsed gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Serdyukov, V. I.; Poplavskii, Yu. A.; Sinitsa, L. N.

    2009-07-15

    Absorption and emission spectra of U and Na atoms in the 590-nm spectral range were studied experimentally using pulsed hollow-cathode gas discharges. The spectra were recorded with a high-sensitivity intracavity laser spectrometer. The possibility of generating coherent emission on atomic emission lines in gas-discharge plasmas was demonstrated experimentally.

  3. Investigation of surface structure with X-ray absorption and electron emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Mark Daniel

    The use of electron spectromicroscopy for the study of the chemical composition and electronic properties of surfaces, overlayers, and interfaces has become widely accepted. Improvements to the optics of instruments such as the X-ray photo electron emission microscope have pushed spectroscopic microscopies into the realm of very high spatial resolution, at and below 1 micrometer [1]. Coupled with the high spectral resolution available from third generation synchrotron sources, this spatial resolution allows the measurement of micro-X-ray absorption near-edge spectra in addition to the more typical electron emission spectra and diffraction patterns. Complementary to the experimental developments is the development of improved theoretical methods for computational modeling of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies. In the field of tribochemistry, zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) has long been a topic of much study. ZDDP is widely used as an anti-wear additive in engine oils and there is interest in determining the decomposition products of ZDDP that provide this protection against friction. An analysis of X-ray absorption near-edge spectra of thermal films from ZDDP samples is presented, including a comparison of the Zinc L-edge spectra with model calculations [2]. It was found essential to carry out self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure for the modeling. For the techniques of electron diffraction, a new method for a full multiple-scattering calculation of diffraction patterns from crystals with two-dimensional periodicity parallel to the surface is presented [3]. The calculation makes use of Helmholtz's reciprocity principle to compute the path-reversed process of the back propagation of a photoelectron from the position of a distant detector to that of the emitting atom. Early application is demonstrated with simulations of 64 eV M2,3VV and 914 eV L 2,3VV Auger electron diffraction from a Cu(001) surface. The functionality of the path

  4. Statistical analysis of excitation-emission matrices for laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, N. A.; Papaeva, E. O.

    2016-07-01

    An algorithm for statistical processing of the set of multicomponent excitation-emission matrices for laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is proposed that is based on principal component analysis. It is shown for the first time that the fluorescence emission and excitation spectra of unknown fluorophores in optically thin samples can be calculated. Using the proposed algorithm, it is possible to pass from principal components with alternating signs to positive quantities corresponding to the spectra of real substances. The method is applied to a mixture of three fluorescent dyes, and it is demonstrated that the obtained spectra of principal components well reproduce the spectra of initial dyes.

  5. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  6. Note: Liquid chemical sensing by emission spectroscopy with a nanosecond pin-hole discharge in water.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a simple yet effective method for chemical detection by emission spectroscopy using a nanosecond pin-hole discharge in water. The discharge was produced in a 200-μm-diameter microchannel in water without electrode contact. The simultaneous detection of multiple mineral ions was demonstrated by measuring the intensity of Na and Ca emission lines at different concentrations. The device can be further scaled down to be integrated with microfluidic systems for monitoring water contamination or hazardous materials in other aqueous solutions.

  7. GROUND-BASED NEAR-INFRARED EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF HD 189733B

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Drossart, P.; Swain, M. R.; Deroo, P.; Griffith, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the K- and L-band dayside emission of the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b with three nights of secondary eclipse data obtained with the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. The observations for each of these three nights use equivalent instrument settings and the data from one of the nights have previously been reported by Swain et al. We describe an improved data analysis method that, in conjunction with the multi-night data set, allows increased spectral resolution (R {approx} 175) leading to high-confidence identification of spectral features. We confirm the previously reported strong emission at {approx}3.3 {mu}m and, by assuming a 5% vibrational temperature excess for methane, we show that non-LTE emission from the methane {nu}{sub 3} branch is a physically plausible source of this emission. We consider two possible energy sources that could power non-LTE emission and additional modeling is needed to obtain a detailed understanding of the physics of the emission mechanism. The validity of the data analysis method and the presence of strong 3.3 {mu}m emission are independently confirmed by simultaneous, long-slit, L-band spectroscopy of HD 189733b and a comparison star.

  8. The optical emission spectroscopy of pulsed and pulse- periodic discharges initiated with runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M.; Sorokin, D.; Tarasenko, V.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the results of measurements of an electron Te and a gas Tg temperatures as well as a reduced electric field strength E/N in the plasma of a high-voltage nanosecond discharge initiated with runaway electrons in a gap with a strongly nonuniform electric field distribution. The foregoing plasma parameters were determined with optical emission spectroscopy techniques. The possibility of using the method for determining Te and E/N in thermodynamically nonequilibrium plasma, which is based on a determination of a ratio of a peak intensities of the ionic (λ = 391.4 nm) and molecular N2 (λ = 394 nm) nitrogen bands, is proved. To measure a gas temperature the optical emission spectroscopy technique based on the measurement of a relative radiation intensity of rotation structure of electronic-vibrational molecular transitions was used, as well.

  9. Investigation of microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-07-01

    Microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy was investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode system. The electrodes of a Pd needle and a Pt plate were placed with a gap of 25 µm in typical artificial sea water or locally sampled natural deep sea water. A pulse current source, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the sea water between the electrodes, was used. The circuit parameters were optimized to decrease the breakdown voltage and the spark duration to suppress erosion of the electrodes. Using a microgap configuration, spark discharges were reproducibly ignited in the highly conductive sea water at low breakdown voltages. The ignition of spark discharges required not only a critical voltage sufficient for breakdown, but also a critical energy for preheating of the sea water, sufficient for bubble formation. The possibility of using optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in water is shown for identifying elemental composition of sea water.

  10. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    PubMed

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control.

  11. Nitrogen termination of single crystal (100) diamond surface by radio frequency N{sub 2} plasma process: An in-situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and secondary electron emission studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, Maneesh E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il

    2015-09-14

    In this letter, we report the electronic and chemical properties of nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) single crystal (100) diamond surface, which is a promising candidate for shallow NV{sup −} centers. N-termination is realized by an indirect RF nitrogen plasma process without inducing a large density of surface defects. Thermal stability and electronic property of N-terminated diamond surface are systematically investigated under well-controlled conditions by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron emission. An increase in the low energy cut-off of the secondary electron energy distribution curve (EDC), with respect to a bare diamond surface, indicates a positive electron affinity of the N-terminated diamond. Exposure to atomic hydrogen results in reorganization of N-terminated diamond to H-terminated diamond, which exhibited a negative electron affinity surface. The change in intensity and spectral features of the secondary electron EDC of the N-terminated diamond is discussed.

  12. Metallic transfer between metals in sliding contact examined by auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1972-01-01

    Metallic transfer between polycrystalline metals in sliding contact was examined. Hemispherical riders of iron, nickel, and cobalt were slid on tungsten, tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum disks in ultrahigh vacuum. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the elemental composition of the disk surfaces. Iron, nickel, and cobalt transferred to tungsten, whereas only cobalt transferred to tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum. The results of this investigation are discussed in terms of the cohesive energy and strain hardening characteristics of the specimen materials.

  13. Impurity study of TMX using ultraviolet spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Strand, O.T.; Moos, H.W.; Fortner, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1981-01-31

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) study of the emissions from intrinsic and injected impurities in TMX is presented. Two survey spectrographs were used to determine that the major impurities present were oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and titanium. Three absolutely-calibrated monochromators were used to measure the time histories and radial profiles of these impurity emissions in the central cell and each plug. Two of these instruments were capable of obtaining radial profiles as a function of time in a single shot.

  14. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2003-09-30

    The work performed during this quarter by SRD scientists and engineers focused on a number of tasks. The initial acquisition of some hardware needed and the actual construction of the sampling system have begun. This sampling system will contain the pyrolysis oven to atomize the sample gas stream needed for total gaseous mercury measurements, the CRD cavity to acquire the ring-down signal needed to obtain the mercury concentration, various tubing, and temperature and pressure measurement equipment. The amount of tubing and valves have been cut to a minimum to try and reduce the resident time the sample flue gas stream is in the sampling system and minimize the possibility that the gases in the sample gas stream will react with the elements of the sampling system and change the component mixture contained in the flue gas. In an effort to minimize the equipment that needs to be close to the actual sampling port, SRD scientists decided to fiber optically couple the laser to the CRD cavity. However, the ultra-violet (UV) light needed for the mercury transition presents a problem as fiber optics can be solarized by the UV radiation thereby changing the transmission characteristics. SRD has obtained a solarization-resistant fiber. SRD scientists were then able to couple the UV laser light into the fiber and inject the output of the fiber into the CRD cavity and obtain a ring-down signal. Long-term effects of the UV radiation on the fiber optic are being monitored to detect any change in the transmission of the laser light to the cavity. Additional requirements of the mercury CRD monitor will be to not only monitor the mercury concentration continuously but also perform the measurements over extended periods of time. SRD has extended some previously performed shorter-term studies to longer time intervals. The results of these initial long-term studies are very promising.

  15. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David G.

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  16. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, S.

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions were obtained that are not only interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up opportunities for further discoveries.

  17. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  18. Study of virus by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, K.; Kitamura, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Sawa, M.; Andriana, B. B.; Ohtani, K.; Yagura, T.; Sato, H.

    2013-02-01

    Problem of viruses is very actual for nowadays. Some viruses, which are responsible for human of all tumors, are about 15 %. Main purposes this study, early detection virus in live cell without labeling and in the real time by Raman spectroscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy (mRs) is a technique that uses a Raman spectrometer to measure the spectra of microscopic samples. According to the Raman spectroscopy, it becomes possible to study the metabolites of a live cultured cell without labeling. We used mRs to detect the virus via HEK 293 cell line-infected adenovirus. We obtained raman specters of lives cells with viruses in 24 hours and 7 days after the infection. As the result, there is some biochemical changing after the treatment of cell with virus. One of biochemical alteration is at 1081 cm-1. For the clarification result, we use confocal fluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  19. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  20. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  1. Fluorescence decay characteristics of indole compounds revealed by time-resolved area-normalized emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Nishimoto, Etsuko; Yamashita, Shoji

    2009-03-26

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of tryptophan residue has been extensively applied to the studies on structure-function relationships of protein. Regardless of this, the fluorescence decay mechanism and kinetics of tryptophan residue in many proteins still remains unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated that conformational heterogeneity and relaxation dynamics are both involved in the peculiar multiexponential decay kinetics in subnanosecond resolution. In the present study, we characterized the fluorescence decay property of six indole compounds in glycerol by resolving the contribution of conformational heterogeneity and relaxation dynamics. We applied the time-resolved area-normalized fluorescence emission spectrum (TRANES) method for the fluorescence decay analysis. The results of TRANES, time-dependent shift of fluorescence spectral center of gravity, and fluorescence decay simulation demonstrated that the dielectric relaxation process independent of intrinsic rotamer/conformer and the individual fluorescence lifetime gives the peculiarity to the fluorescence decay of indole compounds. These results confirmed that TRANES and time-dependent spectral shift analysis are potent methods to resolve the origin of multiexponential decay kinetics of tryptophyl fluorescence in protein.

  2. Low-energy electro- and photo-emission spectroscopy of GaN materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Piccardo, Marco; Weisbuch, Claude; Iveland, Justin; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; Martinelli, Lucio Peretti, Jacques; Choi, Joo Won

    2015-03-21

    In hot-electron semiconductor devices, carrier transport extends over a wide range of conduction states, which often includes multiple satellite valleys. Electrical measurements can hardly give access to the transport processes over such a wide range without resorting to models and simulations. An alternative experimental approach however exists which is based on low-energy electron spectroscopy and provides, in a number of cases, very direct and selective information on hot-electron transport mechanisms. Recent results obtained in GaN crystals and devices by electron emission spectroscopy are discussed. Using near-band-gap photoemission, the energy position of the first satellite valley in wurtzite GaN is directly determined. By electro-emission spectroscopy, we show that the measurement of the electron spectrum emitted from a GaN p-n junction and InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under electrical injection of carriers provides a direct observation of transport processes in these devices. In particular, at high injected current density, high-energy features appear in the electro-emission spectrum of the LEDs showing that Auger electrons are being generated in the active region. These measurements allow us identifying the microscopic mechanism responsible for droop which represents a major hurdle for widespread adoption of solid-state lighting.

  3. Depth-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy by Means of Grazing Emission X-ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Yves; Sá, Jacinto; Szlachetko, Jakub

    2015-11-03

    Grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) is well suited for nondestructive elemental-sensitive depth-profiling measurements on samples with nanometer-sized features. By varying the grazing emission angle under which the X-ray fluorescence signal is detected, the probed depth range can be tuned from a few to several hundred nanometers. The dependence of the XRF intensity on the grazing emission angle can be assessed in a sequence of measurements or in a scanning-free approach using a position-sensitive area detector. Hereafter, we will show that the combination of scanning-free GEXRF and fluorescence detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows for depth-resolved chemical speciation measurements with nanometer-scale accuracy. While the conventional grazing emission geometry is advantageous to minimize self-absorption effects, the use of a scanning-free setup makes the sequential scanning of the grazing emission angles obsolete and paves the way toward time-resolved depth-sensitive XAS measurements. The presented experimental approach was applied to study the surface oxidation of an Fe layer on the top of bulk Si and of a Ge bulk sample. Thanks to the penetrating properties and the insensitivity toward the electric conduction properties of the incident and emitted X-rays, the presented experimental approach is well suited for in situ sample surface studies in the nanometer regime.

  4. Enhanced 1G 4 emission in NaLaF 4: Pr 3+, Yb 3+ and charge transfer in NaLaF 4: Ce 3+, Yb 3+ studied by fourier transform luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kolk, E.; Ten Kate, O. M.; Wiegman, J. W.; Biner, D.; Krämer, K. W.

    2011-05-01

    A high resolution luminescence study of NaLaF 4: 1%Pr 3+, 5%Yb 3+ and NaLaF 4: 1%Ce 3+, 5%Yb 3+ in the UV to NIR spectral range using a InGaAs detector and a fourier transform interferometer is reported. Although the Pr 3+( 3P 0 → 1G 4), Yb 3+( 2F 7/2 → 2F 5/2) energy transfer step takes place, significant Pr 3+1G 4 emission around 993, 1330 and 1850 nm is observed. No experimental proof for the second energy transfer step in the down-conversion process between Pr 3+ and Yb 3+ can be given. In the case of NaLaF 4: Ce 3+, Yb 3+ it is concluded that the observed Yb 3+ emission upon Ce 3+ 5d excitation is the result of a charge transfer process instead of down-conversion.

  5. Application of emission ( 57Co) Mössbauer spectroscopy in bioscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2005-06-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element with a broad range of physiological and biochemical functions. However, biochemical speciation of cobalt and structural investigations of cobalt-containing complexes with biomacromolecules are challenging, as the participation of cobalt in physiological processes is limited by its very low concentrations. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy (EMS), with the radioactive 57Co isotope as the most widely used nuclide, is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than its 57Fe absorption variant which has had a rich history of applications in bioscience. Nevertheless, owing to specific difficulties related to the necessity of using radioactive 57Co in samples under study, applications of EMS in biological fields have so far been sparse. In this communication, the EMS applicability to studying biological objects as well as some specific aspects of the EMS methodology are considered in order to draw attention to the unique structural information which can be obtained non-destructively in situ. Chemical consequences (after-effects) of the nuclear transition ( 57Co→ 57Fe), which provide additional information on the electron acceptor properties of the proximate chemical microenvironment of the metal ions, are also considered. The data presented demonstrate that EMS is a sensitive tool for monitoring the chemical state and coordination of cobalt species in biological matter and in biomacromolecular complexes (metalloenzymes), providing valuable structural information at the atomic level.

  6. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  7. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  8. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  9. Two-dimensional space-resolved emission spectroscopy of laser ablation plasma in water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Ayumu; Tamura, Ayaka; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H.; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2013-02-07

    We developed a method for two-dimensional space-resolved emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasma in water to investigate the spatial distribution of atomic species involved in the plasma. Using this method, the laser ablation plasma produced on a Cu target in 5 mM NaCl aqueous solution was examined. The emission spectrum varied considerably depending on the detecting position. The temperature and the atomic density ratio N{sub Na}/N{sub Cu} at various detecting positions were evaluated by fitting emission spectra to a theoretical model based on the Boltzmann distribution. We are successful in observing even a small difference between the distributions of the plasma parameters along the directions vertical and horizontal to the surface. The present approach gives direct information for sound understanding of the behavior of laser ablation plasma produced on a solid surface in water.

  10. Tomographic optical emission spectroscopy of a high enthalpy air plasma flow.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Tobias; Löhle, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Andrianatos, Andreas

    2016-12-20

    A method is presented allowing for locally resolved emission spectroscopy using a tomographic setup. The approach presented in this work is applied to a high enthalpy air plasma flow. The resulting data sets allow for a three-dimensional (3D) representation of the non-symmetric flow field using photographs of the test section and 2D representation of the spectrally resolved radiance of the flow field. An analysis of different exposure times shows that transient fluctuations of the plasma can result in substantial asymmetry that approaches symmetry only for longer exposure times when the temporal averaging of the emission is significant. The spectral data allows the analysis of species selective excitation and emission. A non-equilibrium between atomic and molecular excitation temperatures is concluded for the investigated air plasma flow field. The spatial distribution of atomic electronic excitation temperatures are close to rotational symmetry while molecular rotational and vibrational temperatures exhibit asymmetric behavior.

  11. Spectroscopy of optically selected BL Lac objects and their γ-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrinelli, A.; Treves, A.; Farina, E. P.; Landoni, M.; Falomo, R.; Foschini, L.; Sbarufatti, B.

    2013-12-01

    We present Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of nine BL Lac objects of unknown redshift belonging to the list of optically selected radio-loud BL Lac candidates. We explore their spectroscopic properties and possible link with gamma-ray emission. From the new observations we determine the redshifts of four objects from faint emission lines or from absorption features of their host galaxies. In three cases we find narrow intervening absorptions from which a lower limit to the redshift is inferred. For the remaining two featureless sources, lower limits to the redshift are deduced from the absence of spectral lines. A search for γ counterpart emission shows that six out of the nine candidates are Fermi γ-ray emitters and we find two new detections. Our analysis suggests that most of the BL Lac objects still lacking redshift information are most likely located at high redshifts.

  12. Intrawire absorption and emission spectroscopies of individual CdSe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Rusha; McDonald, Matthew P.; Kuno, Masaru

    2015-08-01

    Concerted absorption and emission spectroscopies have been used to measure intrawire band edge absorption/emission energy variations along the length of individual CdSe nanowires (NWs). An effective mass model, previously used to explain the size-dependent linear absorption as well as Stokes shift of single CdSe NWs, has been used to rationalize the origin of observed absorption/emission heterogeneities. Associated intrawire Stokes shifts have likewise been used to estimate local exciton trap state densities as well as most probably trap depths. Mean densities of the order of 1020 and 1017 cm-3 have been obtained for small and large radii NWs, respectively, and represent the first exciton trap state density estimates for CdSe NWs. These concerted intrawire measurements broaden the scope of existing single wire microscopies and provide greater insight into the effects of size- and dielectric environment-induced inhomogeneities on the optical/electrical response of individual NWs.

  13. Perturbation Facilitated Dispersed Fluorescence and Stimulated Emission Pumping Spectroscopies of HCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Haruki; Muramoto, Yasuhiko; Namai, Masahito; Mikami, Naohiko

    2011-06-01

    Perturbations among molecular rovibronic levels provide us with mainly two benefits. Perturbations themselves are characteristic features of structure and dynamics of molecules. We have been investigating dynamics of highly excited vibrational levels of HCP in the tilde{X} ^1Σ^+ state by dispersed fluorescence (DF) and stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectroscopies of the tilde{C} ^1A^' - tilde{X} ^1Σ^+ transition. In the case of tilde{X} ^1Σ^+ HCP, its vibrational dynamics is well described by the Fermi resonance between the bend and the CP stretch modes. Based on the analysis of the Fermi resonance, we have succeeded in revealing the change in character of the bending motion in highly excited vibrational levels. In addition, perturbations enable us to explore rovibrational levels into much wider region that cannot be accessed under limits of selection rules. Jacobson and Child showed that the Coriolis interaction becomes very strong in the highly excited levels near and the above the CPH barrier. For the experimental confirmation of their prediction, the observation of the VCH≠0 and the ℓ'' ≠ 0 levels are necessary. However, due to the selection rules and the Franck-Condon selectivity, only the VCH=0 and the ℓ''=0 levels had been observed. In the course of our study, we have found a perturbed level in the tilde{C} state. In general, a very clear even-v_2 progression appears in the DF spectra of HCP. However, in the DF spectra measured by using the perturbed level as the intermediate both the odd- and even-v_2 levels are observed. Moreover, several VCH=1 levels are observed in the spectra. The perturbation-facilitated DF and SEP spectroscopies are very powerful tools to exploring the highly excited vibrational levels of HCP. Details of the perturbation-facilitated DF and SEP spectroscopies are presented in the paper. H. Ishikawa, et al. J. Chem. Phys. 109, 492 (1998); H. Ishikawa, et al. Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 50, 443 (1999). M. P. Jacobson and M. S

  14. [Study on the method for the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current arc full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES)].

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhi-hong; Yao, Jian-zhen; Tang, Rui-ling; Zhang, Xue-mei; Li, Wen-ge; Zhang, Qin

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determmation of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES) was established. Direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectrometer with a large area of solid-state detectors has functions of full spectrum direct reading and real-time background correction. The new electrodes and new buffer recipe were proposed in this paper, and have applied for national patent. Suitable analytical line pairs, back ground correcting points of elements and the internal standard method were selected, and Ge was used as internal standard. Multistage currents were selected in the research on current program, and each current set different holding time to ensure that each element has a good signal to noise ratio. Continuous rising current mode selected can effectively eliminate the splash of the sample. Argon as shielding gas can eliminate CN band generating and reduce spectral background, also plays a role in stabilizing the are, and argon flow 3.5 L x min(-1) was selected. Evaporation curve of each element was made, and it was concluded that the evaporation behavior of each element is consistent, and combined with the effects of different spectrographic times on the intensity and background, the spectrographic time of 35s was selected. In this paper, national standards substances were selected as a standard series, and the standard series includes different nature and different content of standard substances which meet the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 1.1, 0.09, 0.01, 0.41, and 0.56 microg x g(-1) respectively, and the precisions (RSD, n=12) for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 4.57%-7.63%, 5.14%-7.75%, 5.48%-12.30%, 3.97%-10.46%, and 4.26%-9.21% respectively. The analytical accuracy was

  15. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm. PMID:28772781

  16. Mid-infrared, long wave infrared (4-12 μm) molecular emission signatures from pharmaceuticals using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to augment the atomic emission spectra of conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and to provide an increase in selectivity, mid-wave to long-wave infrared (IR), LIBS studies were performed on several organic pharmaceuticals. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signature molecular emissions of target organic compounds are observed for the first time in the IR fingerprint spectral region between 4-12 μm. The IR emission spectra of select organic pharmaceuticals closely correlate with their respective standard Fourier transform infrared spectra. Intact and/or fragment sample molecular species evidently survive the LIBS event. The combination of atomic emission signatures derived from conventional ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared LIBS with fingerprints of intact molecular entities determined from IR LIBS promises to be a powerful tool for chemical detection.

  17. Study on plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of Zr(C,N) and Ti(C,N) thin films and in situ plasma diagnostics with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S. J.; Nam, S.-H.; Jung, C.-K.; Jee, H.-G.; Boo, J.-H.; Kim, S.; Han, J. G.

    2008-07-15

    Zr(C,N) and Ti(C,N) films were synthesized by pulsed dc plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method using metal-organic compounds of tetrakis diethylamido titanium and tetrakis diethylamido zirconium at 200-300 deg. C. To change the plasma characteristics, different carrier gases such as H{sub 2} and He/H{sub 2} were used and, as the reactive gas, N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} were added to the gas mixture. The effect of N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases was also evaluated in the reduction of C content of the films. Radical formation and ionization behaviors in plasma were analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry at various pulsed biases and gas conditions. The gas mixture of He and H{sub 2} as the carrier gas was very effective in enhancing the dissociation of molecular gases. In the case of N{sub 2} addition, N{sub 2} as reactive gas resulted in higher hardness. However, NH{sub 3} as reactive gas highly reduced the formation of CN radical, thereby greatly decreasing the C content of Zr(C,N) and Ti(C,N) films. The hardness of the film is 1400-1700 HK depending on gas species and bias voltage. Higher hardness can be obtained for a H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} gas atmosphere and bias voltage of -600 V. Plasma surface cleaning using N{sub 2} gas prior to deposition appeared to increase the adhesion of films on steel. The changes of plasmas including radicals and film properties are illustrated in terms of carrier and reactive gases, as well as pulsed power variation.

  18. Finding the Elusive Iodocarbene: Fluorescence Excitation and Single Vibronic Level Emission Spectroscopy of Chi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Ebben, C.; Ko, H. T.; Reid, S. A.; Wang, Z.; Sears, T. J.

    2009-06-01

    Among the triatomic halocarbenes, only the iodocarbenes remain to be characterized. The search for these elusive species is motivated by a controversy regarding the multiplicity of the ground state. Photoelectron spectra of Lineberger and co-workers suggest a triplet ground state for CHI, at variance with recent ab initio studies, which suggest a singlet ground state with a singlet-triplet gap of around 4 kcal mol^{-1}. In this work, we have succeeded in finding the spectra of CHI and its deuterated isotopomer using pulsed discharge jet spectroscopy. Rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectra are consistent with a singlet-singlet transition, and the derived rotational constants are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Single vibronic level emission spectra confirm a singlet multiplicity for the ground state, and reveal extensive mixing of the singlet and triplet levels at higher energy. We are able to set a lower limit on the singlet-triplet gap of 4.1 kcal mol^{-1}, in excellent agreement with theory. Extrapolation of the observed bending levels for CHI and CDI to a common origin suggests that the origin of the A^{1}A^'' state lies near 10 500 cm^{-1}, and we will report on high resolution measurements near the electronic origin made at Brookhaven National Laboratory. M. K. Gilles, K. M. Ervin, J. Ho, and W. C. Lineberger, J. Phys. Chem. 96, 1130 (1992).

  19. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy analysis of landfill leachate DOM in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guocheng; Wang, Chuang; Dong, Xingwei

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate contains a variety of organic matters, some of which can be excited and emit fluorescence signal. In order to degrade these organic matters, the pretreatment of the leachate is needed, which can improve the degradation performance of post-treatment process. Coagulation-flocculation is one of the important pretreatment processes to treat landfill leachate. Assessing the chemical compositions of landfill leachate is helpful in the understanding of their sources and fates as well as the mechanistic behaviors in the water environment. The present work aimed to use fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to characterize the chemical fractions of landfill leachate dissolved organic matter (DOM) in conjunction with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Results showed that the DOM of landfill leachate tested in this study was identified resulting from microbial input, which included five typical characteristic peaks and four kinds of PARAFAC fractions. These fractions were mainly composed of hydrophobic macromolecule humic acid-like (HM-HA), hydrophilic intermediate molecular fulvic acid-like (HIM-FA), and hydrophilic small molecule protein-like substances (HSM-PS). HM-HA and HIM-FA were found to be easier to remove than HSM-PS. Further research on HSM-PS removal by coagulation-flocculation still needs to be improved.

  20. X-ray emission spectroscopy of bulk liquid water in "no-man's land".

    PubMed

    Sellberg, Jonas A; McQueen, Trevor A; Laksmono, Hartawan; Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; DePonte, Daniel P; Kennedy, Brian; Nordlund, Dennis; Sierra, Raymond G; Schlesinger, Daniel; Tokushima, Takashi; Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Eckert, Sebastian; Segtnan, Vegard H; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Kubicek, Katharina; Techert, Simone; Bergmann, Uwe; Dakovski, Georgi L; Schlotter, William F; Harada, Yoshihisa; Bogan, Michael J; Wernet, Philippe; Föhlisch, Alexander; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-28

    The structure of bulk liquid water was recently probed by x-ray scattering below the temperature limit of homogeneous nucleation (TH) of ∼232 K [J. A. Sellberg et al., Nature 510, 381-384 (2014)]. Here, we utilize a similar approach to study the structure of bulk liquid water below TH using oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Based on previous XES experiments [T. Tokushima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 460, 387-400 (2008)] at higher temperatures, we expected the ratio of the 1b1' and 1b1″ peaks associated with the lone-pair orbital in water to change strongly upon deep supercooling as the coordination of the hydrogen (H-) bonds becomes tetrahedral. In contrast, we observed only minor changes in the lone-pair spectral region, challenging an interpretation in terms of two interconverting species. A number of alternative hypotheses to explain the results are put forward and discussed. Although the spectra can be explained by various contributions from these hypotheses, we here emphasize the interpretation that the line shape of each component changes dramatically when approaching lower temperatures, where, in particular, the peak assigned to the proposed disordered component would become more symmetrical as vibrational interference becomes more important.

  1. X-ray emission spectroscopy of bulk liquid water in "no-man's land"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellberg, Jonas A.; McQueen, Trevor A.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kennedy, Brian; Nordlund, Dennis; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schlesinger, Daniel; Tokushima, Takashi; Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Eckert, Sebastian; Segtnan, Vegard H.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Kubicek, Katharina; Techert, Simone; Bergmann, Uwe; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Schlotter, William F.; Harada, Yoshihisa; Bogan, Michael J.; Wernet, Philippe; Föhlisch, Alexander; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bulk liquid water was recently probed by x-ray scattering below the temperature limit of homogeneous nucleation (TH) of ˜232 K [J. A. Sellberg et al., Nature 510, 381-384 (2014)]. Here, we utilize a similar approach to study the structure of bulk liquid water below TH using oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Based on previous XES experiments [T. Tokushima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 460, 387-400 (2008)] at higher temperatures, we expected the ratio of the 1b1' and 1b1″ peaks associated with the lone-pair orbital in water to change strongly upon deep supercooling as the coordination of the hydrogen (H-) bonds becomes tetrahedral. In contrast, we observed only minor changes in the lone-pair spectral region, challenging an interpretation in terms of two interconverting species. A number of alternative hypotheses to explain the results are put forward and discussed. Although the spectra can be explained by various contributions from these hypotheses, we here emphasize the interpretation that the line shape of each component changes dramatically when approaching lower temperatures, where, in particular, the peak assigned to the proposed disordered component would become more symmetrical as vibrational interference becomes more important.

  2. Characterization of an atmospheric helium plasma jet by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; González, Manuel Á.; Leys, Christophe; Pei Lu, Xin

    2013-02-01

    The characteristics of plasma temperatures (gas temperature and electron excitation temperature) and electron density in a pulsed-dc excited atmospheric helium plasma jet are studied by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy (OES). High-resolution OES is performed for the helium and hydrogen lines for the determination of electron density through the Stark broadening mechanism. A superposition fitting method composed of two component profiles corresponding to two different electron densities is developed to fit the investigated lines. Electron densities of the orders of magnitude of 1021 and 1020 m-3 are characterized for the center and edge regions in the jet discharge when the applied voltage is higher than 13.0 kV. The atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of helium demonstrates that the discharge deviates from the Boltzmann-Saha equilibrium state, especially for the helium lower levels, which are significantly overpopulated. Local electron excitation temperatures T13 and Tspec corresponding to the lower and upper parts of the helium ASDF are defined and found to range from 1.2 eV to 1.4 eV and 0.2 eV to 0.3 eV, respectively. A comparative analysis shows that the Saha balance is valid in the discharge for helium atoms at high excited states.

  3. Electron energy-loss and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of electronic structure of MgB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Saito, Taiki; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Terauchi, Masami; Saito, Hiroki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of MgB4, with the characteristic crystal structure comprising one-dimensional pentagonal B6 cluster chain, was investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy. The dielectric function and density of state of unoccupied and occupied states were clarified experimentally for the first time. Although theoretical calculations has predicted MgB4 to be a semiconductor, the electron energy-loss spectrum in this study show a plasmon peak at 0.4 eV, which might be due to carrier electrons. Theoretical calculations suggested that the electronic states near the Fermi energy are localized along the one dimensional B6 cluster chain. Therefore, one-dimensional electric conductivity is expected.

  4. Layer-Resolved Evolution of Organic Thin Films Monitored by Photoelectron Emission Microscopy and Optical Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and differential (optical) reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) have proven independently to be versatile analytical tools for monitoring the evolution of organic thin films during growth. In this paper, we present the first experiment in which both techniques have been applied simultaneously and synchronously. We illustrate how the combined PEEM and DRS results can be correlated to obtain an extended perspective on the electronic and optical properties of a molecular film dependent on the film thickness and morphology. As an example, we studied the deposition of the organic molecule α-sexithiophene on Ag(111) in the thickness range from submonolayers up to several monolayers. PMID:26523159

  5. Emission Spectroscopy of the 4X Source Discharge With and Without N2 Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Horace Vernon

    2016-01-14

    This tech note summarizes the December, 1988 emission spectroscopy measurements made on the 4X source discharge with and without N₂ gas added to the H + Cs discharge. This study is motivated by the desire to understand why small amounts of N₂ gas added to the source discharge results in a reduction in the H⁻ beam noise. The beneficial effect of N₂ gas on H⁻ beam noise was first discovered by Bill Ingalls and Stu Orbesen on the ATS SAS source. For the 4X source the observed effect is that when N2 gas is added to the discharge the H⁻ beam noise is reduced about a factor of 2.

  6. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium batterymaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Augustsson, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  7. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  8. Role of the emission depth distribution function in quantification of electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.

    2005-07-01

    Quantitative analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy or photoelectron spectroscopy should be founded on a reliable relation between the measured signal intensity and composition of the surface region. In this relation, the signal electron elastic scattering effects are conveniently described by the emission depth distribution function (DDF). This function is the distribution of depths of origin for signal electrons emitted from a solid in a given direction without energy loss. Numerous parameters needed for quantification of electron spectroscopies can be derived from the DDF, e.g. the mean escape depth, the information depth, the effective attenuation length, etc. Generally, knowledge of the accurate DDF facilitates the procedure of including the elastic scattering effects into the formalism of quantitative analysis. The function called the partial escape distribution (PED) defining the probability of emission in a given direction after a certain number of inelastic interactions can be considered as a generalization of the DDF. The PED becomes equivalent to the DDF in the case of no inelastic interactions. A series of the PED functions is needed for quantification of the recorded spectra, especially when the elastic collisions need to be taken into account. It has been shown that the PED for any number of inelastic collisions can be derived from the DDF. Reliability of the obtained PED functions was checked for different analytical expressions for the DDF. It has been shown that the expression published by Tilinin et al. is the most accurate, and can be recommended for calculations of the PED.

  9. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  10. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1991-10-01

    Carbon dioxide presents a great challenge to spectroscopy because of its propensity toward dissociation in all of its excited states. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy is usually not applicable to the study of dissociating molecules because the dissociation competes effectively with ionization, resulting in no signal. We reasoned, however, that with high enough laser fluence, ionization could compete with dissociation in the longer lived states, exposing them for study from the continuous spectral background resulting from rapidly dissociating states. We describe the various spectroscopic and photophysical effects found through the multiphoton ionization and multiphoton photoelectron spectra. A recently developed variant of threshold ionization spectroscopy, usually called ZEKE, has shown a great deal of usefulness in providing the same information as traditional photoelectron spectroscopy but with higher resolution and much better signal-to-noise when using standard laboratory lasers. Threshold ionization techniques locate the states of an ion by scanning a light source across the ionization continuum of a neutral and somehow detecting when electrons are produced with no kinetic energy. We chose to develop our capabilities in threshold ionization spectroscopy using aromatic molecules because of their importance and because their electronic structure allows a pump-probe type of excitation scheme which avoids the use of vacuum ultraviolet laser beams. Among aromatics, the azines are noted for their small S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} energy gap which give them unique and interesting photophysical properties. We have continued our work on the multiphoton spectrum of metastable nitrogen produced by an electric discharge in supersonic beam. We have been able to assign more of the lines and simulated their rotational structure but many peaks remain unassigned.

  11. Study shows gasohol ups car emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-04

    Evaporative emissions by cars using gasohol were examined by General Motors Corp. The study showed an increase in emissions by as much as 51% over cars using unleaded gasoline. It is stated that cold-start driveability was worse with gasohol and there was a 0.9 to 3.7% decrease in fuel economy. The use of gasohol, however, did produce lower HC, CO and NO exhaust emissions than gasoline.

  12. Synthesis, structure, and emission spectroscopy of luminescent Pt(COD)(dithiolate) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, J.M.; Zuleta, J.A.; Eisenberg, R.

    1993-08-18

    The synthesis, characterization, X-ray structure determination and emission spectroscopy of two Pt(COD)(S-S) complexes are reported where COD = 1,5-cycloctadiene (COD) and S-S is maleonitriledithiolate (mnt) for complex 1 and 1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-1-cyanoethylene-2,2-dithiolate (ecda) for complex 2. Both complexes are isolated in high yield from the reaction of Pt(COD)Cl{sub 2} and the corresponding dianionic dithiolate salt. Orange crystals of 1 (C{sub 12}H{sub 12}N{sub 2}PtS{sub 2}) are monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n (No. 14). Each complex possess a square planar structure with chelating diolefin and dithiolate ligands. Proton NMR spectroscopy shows that the solid-state structures are maintained in solution. The complexes are luminescent at low temperature in the solid state and in frozen glasses. In the solid state at 77 K, Pt(COD)(mnt) exhibits a highly structured emission ({lambda}{sub max} = 560 nm, 17.9 kcm{sup {minus}1}) with a vibronic progression of {approximately}1400 cm{sup {minus}1}, whereas for Pt(COD)(ecda), the emission is broad and featureless ({lambda}{sub max} = 525 nm, 19.0 kcm{sup {minus}1}). The emissive state for both complexes is assigned as a metal-to-dithiolate charge transfer with differences in the structure and energy of the emissions resulting from differences in the {pi}*{sub dithiolate} orbital of the mnt and ecda ligands.

  13. Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from outdoor-stored broiler litter using tunable-diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, William Harrison

    Handling and storage of a variety of types of agricultural wastes results in the formation and release of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) gases to the atmosphere. These gases contribute to climate change through the greenhouse effect. Few studies have examined evolution of these gases from stored poultry litter in North America. Although N 2O is a by-product of nitrification, it is largely produced as an intermediate product of denitrification and is produced most intensely when both aerobic and anaerobic conditions are present. CH4 emissions, however, are typically associated with anaerobic reactions. Outdoor storage of broiler litter provides an excellent media for which both aerobic and anaerobic zones can coexist, particularly when the litter is of varying ages from multiple broiler flocks (cycles). It provides a large amount of nitrogen for bacterial nitrification/denitrification processes as well as Carbon to support anaerobic bacterial fermentation. The objective of the study was to quantify N 2O and CH4 emissions for broiler litter stored in an uncovered, outdoor bunker by conducting small-scale dynamic flux chamber studies and full-scale field experiments. The field experiments used a modified micrometeorological mass balance approach to monitor emissions from stored broiler litter in a three-walled concrete bunker. Atmospheric concentrations of N2O and CH4 were measured using tunable-diode laser spectroscopy. Field experiments over the course of approximately four months yielded average emission rates of 14+/-17mug m-2 s -1 and 84+/-61 mug m-2 s-1 for N2O and CH4 respectively that agreed well with the trends of emission rates observed in the dynamic flux chamber experiments. The primary drivers of emissions of both CH4 and N2O appeared to be temperature and moisture content while organic carbon and organic nitrogen (loss on ignition, nitrate concentrations) contents were also important factors.

  14. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  15. Excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann-Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 - 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  16. Results from the Project 8 phase-1 cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtari Esfahani, A.; Böser, S.; Claessens, C.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Doeleman, S.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Guigue, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Jones, A. M.; Kazkaz, K.; LaRoque, B. H.; Machado, E.; Monreal, B.; Nikkel, J. A.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Saldaña, L.; Slocum, P. L.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thümmler, T.; Vandevender, B. A.; Wachtendonk, M.; Weintroub, J.; Young, A.; Zayas, E.

    2017-09-01

    The Project 8 collaboration seeks to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale by means of precision spectroscopy of the beta decay of tritium. Our technique, cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy, measures the frequency of the radiation emitted by electrons produced by decays in an ambient magnetic field. Because the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the electron’s Lorentz factor, this is also a measurement of the electron’s energy. In order to demonstrate the viability of this technique, we have assembled and successfully operated a prototype system, which uses a rectangular waveguide to collect the cyclotron radiation from internal conversion electrons emitted from a gaseous 83m Kr source. Here we present the main design aspects of the first phase prototype, which was operated during parts of 2014 and 2015. We will also discuss the procedures used to analyze these data, along with the features which have been observed and the performance achieved to date.

  17. Determination of Yttrium in High Density Silicon Nitride by Emission and X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    AD-AI07 596 ARMY MATERIALS AND MECHANICS RESEARCH CENTER WATERTOWN MA F/S 7/4 DETERMINATION OF YTTRIUM IN HIGH DENSITY SILICON NITRIDE BY EMI-ETCIU...AUG Al B H STRAUSS. UNCLASSIFIED AMMRC-TR-Al-39 N AMMRC TR 81-39 A ~LEVEL ’ t’- .- DETERMINATION OF YTTRIUM IN 1 HIGH DENSITY SILICON NITRIDE BY...DETERMINATION OF YTTRIUM IN HIGH DENSITY SILICON NITRIDE BY EMISSION AND X-RAY Final Report FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment.

  19. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  20. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) investigations of gastrointestinal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts.; Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Penkov, N.; Keremedchiev, M.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this report we will present our recent investigations of the fluorescence properties of lower part gastrointestinal tissues using excitation-emission matrix and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy measurement modalities. The spectral peculiarities observed will be discussed and the endogenous sources of the fluorescence signal will be addressed. For these fluorescence spectroscopy measurements the FluoroLog 3 system (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) was used. It consists of a Xe lamp (300 W, 200-650 nm), a double mono-chromators, and a PMT detector with a work region at 220- 850 nm. Autofluorescence signals were detected in the form of excitation-emission matrices for the samples of normal mucosa, dysphasia and colon carcinoma and specific spectral features for each tissue were found. Autofluorescence signals from the same samples are observed through synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, which is a novel promising modality for fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of bio-samples. It is one of the most powerful techniques for multicomponent analysis, because of its sensitivity. In the SFS regime, the fluorescence signal is recorded while both excitation λexc and emission wavelengths λem are simultaneously scanned. A constant wavelength interval is maintained between the λexc and λem wavelengths throughout the spectrum. The resulted fluorescence spectrum shows narrower peak widths, in comparison with EEMs, which are easier for identification and minimizes the chance for false determinations or pretermission of specific spectral feature. This modality is also faster, than EEMs, a much smaller number of data points are required.1 In our measurements we use constant wavelength interval Δλ in the region of 10-200 nm. Measurements are carried out in the terms of finding Δλ, which results in a spectrum with most specific spectral features for comparison with spectral characteristics observed in EEMs. Implementing synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy in optical

  1. Physical Properties of Emission-Line Galaxies at 2 from Near-Infrared Spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel C.; McCarthy, P. J.; Malkan, M. A.; Siana, B. D.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Atek, H.; Henry, A. L.; WISP Team

    2014-01-01

    We present results from near-infrared spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE of 26 strong emission-line galaxies at 2.2 and 1.5. The sample was selected from the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) survey, which uses the near-infrared grism capability of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect emission-line galaxies over 0.5 < z < 2.3. High-resolution ( 5000) follow-up spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE over 1.0--2.5 microns resolves important rest-frame optical emission lines, allowing us to measure physical properties such as dust obscuration, metal abundance, star formation rate, ionization parameter, and emission line kinematics. We also analyze the properties of composite spectra derived from the FIRE-observed sample. With this relatively large sample of rest-frame optical spectra we can make statistical inferences about the population of emission-line galaxies at 2. We find that the galaxies are low metallicity ( 1/5-1/2 Z_solar) as determined from the R23 calibration. The galaxies are low dust extinction on average (E(B-V 0.2) but with significant scatter. The dust-corrected H-alpha star formation rates range from ~10--150 M_sun yr^-1 with a mean of 50 M_su yr^-1. The average ionization parameter for the sample, log U ~ -2.5, is higher than typically found for star-forming galaxies in the local universe but consistent with those found in more intense starbursting regions in galaxies such as M82. Emission line velocity dispersions are measured to be 71 +- 38 km s^-1, in good agreement with other studies that have probed the H-alpha kinematics of star-forming galaxies at similar redshift. The galaxies are compact, with half-light radii of < 2 kpc, and ~50% show evidence for multiple structures or asymmetries in the WFC3 imaging. Based on the line velocity dispersions and the location of the galaxies on BPT diagnostic plots, there is little evidence for significant AGN contribution to most emission-line galaxies at 2.

  2. Spatially resolved measurement of Ar excited species in magnetized inductively coupled plasma using multi-port optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Gi; Ha, Chang-Seung; Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun; Koo, Il Gyo; Lee, Soojin; Seong, Hyo-Seong

    2013-09-01

    Optical emission spectrometry (OES), which is the spectral analysis of the light emanating from plasma, is probably the most widely used method for monitoring and diagnosis of plasma processes. This technique has the advantage of being external to the reactor and vacuum system. However, the OES method is limited to measure spatial distribution of species accurately. In this work, multi-port optical emission spectroscopy system was developed to improve the space-resolved ability. This multi-port OES system consists of Si wafers, optical fibers, prisms and windows. The Si wafers are used for making the same condition while this device is put in the etching or deposition reactor. The emission light from plasma is collected and transferred through the optical fibers. The spatial distribution of Ar excited species is measured using this device in inductively coupled plasma with and without external axial magnetic field. The off-axis density profile of electron, Ar ion and excited species are appeared in weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma. Also the emission intensity was changed in this experimental condition. Two-dimensional simulation was studied to verify this experimental result. This was supported by SEMES cooperative research project.

  3. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  5. Experimental detection of iron overload in liver through neutron stimulated emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, A J; Tourassi, G D; Sharma, A C; Crowell, A S; Kiser, M R; Howell, C R

    2008-05-21

    Iron overload disorders have been the focus of several quantification studies involving non-invasive imaging modalities. Neutron spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated great potential in detecting iron concentrations within biological tissue. We are developing a neutron spectroscopic technique called neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT), which has the potential to diagnose iron overload in the liver at clinically acceptable patient dose levels through a non-invasive scan. The technique uses inelastic scatter interactions between atomic nuclei in the sample and incoming fast neutrons to non-invasively determine the concentration of elements in the sample. This paper discusses a non-tomographic application of NSECT investigating the feasibility of detecting elevated iron concentrations in the liver. A model of iron overload in the human body was created using bovine liver tissue housed inside a human torso phantom and was scanned with a 5 MeV pulsed beam using single-position spectroscopy. Spectra were reconstructed and analyzed with algorithms designed specifically for NSECT. Results from spectroscopic quantification indicate that NSECT can currently detect liver iron concentrations of 6 mg g(-1) or higher and has the potential to detect lower concentrations by optimizing the acquisition geometry to scan a larger volume of tissue. The experiment described in this paper has two important outcomes: (i) it demonstrates that NSECT has the potential to detect clinically relevant concentrations of iron in the human body through a non-invasive scan and (ii) it provides a comparative standard to guide the design of iron overload phantoms for future NSECT liver iron quantification studies.

  6. Laser-induced optical breakdown spectroscopy of polymer materials based on evaluation of molecular emission bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Stefan; Jasik, Juraj; Parigger, Christian G.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Spendelhofer, Wolfgang; Lackner, Johannes; Veis, Pavel; Heitz, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for composition analysis of polymer materials results in optical spectra containing atomic and ionic emission lines as well as molecular emission bands. In the present work, the molecular bands are analyzed to obtain spectroscopic information about the plasma state in an effort to quantify the content of different elements in the polymers. Polyethylene (PE) and a rubber material from tire production are investigated employing 157 nm F2 laser and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation in nitrogen and argon gas background or in air. The optical detection reaches from ultraviolet (UV) over the visible (VIS) to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. In the UV/VIS range, intense molecular emissions, C2 Swan and CN violet bands, are measured with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The measured molecular emission spectra can be fitted by vibrational-rotational transitions by open access programs and data sets with good agreement between measured and fitted spectra. The fits allow determining vibrational-rotational temperatures. A comparison to electronic temperatures Te derived earlier from atomic carbon vacuum-UV (VUV) emission lines show differences, which can be related to different locations of the atomic and molecular species in the expanding plasma plume. In the NIR spectral region, we also observe the CN red bands with a conventional CDD Czerny Turner spectrometer. The emission of the three strong atomic sulfur lines between 920 and 925 nm is overlapped by these bands. Fitting of the CN red bands allows a separation of both spectral contributions. This makes a quantitative evaluation of sulfur contents in the start material in the order of 1 wt% feasible.

  7. Laser-induced optical breakdown spectroscopy of polymer materials based on evaluation of molecular emission bands.

    PubMed

    Trautner, Stefan; Jasik, Juraj; Parigger, Christian G; Pedarnig, Johannes D; Spendelhofer, Wolfgang; Lackner, Johannes; Veis, Pavel; Heitz, Johannes

    2017-03-05

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for composition analysis of polymer materials results in optical spectra containing atomic and ionic emission lines as well as molecular emission bands. In the present work, the molecular bands are analyzed to obtain spectroscopic information about the plasma state in an effort to quantify the content of different elements in the polymers. Polyethylene (PE) and a rubber material from tire production are investigated employing 157nmF2 laser and 532nm Nd:YAG laser ablation in nitrogen and argon gas background or in air. The optical detection reaches from ultraviolet (UV) over the visible (VIS) to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. In the UV/VIS range, intense molecular emissions, C2 Swan and CN violet bands, are measured with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The measured molecular emission spectra can be fitted by vibrational-rotational transitions by open access programs and data sets with good agreement between measured and fitted spectra. The fits allow determining vibrational-rotational temperatures. A comparison to electronic temperatures Te derived earlier from atomic carbon vacuum-UV (VUV) emission lines show differences, which can be related to different locations of the atomic and molecular species in the expanding plasma plume. In the NIR spectral region, we also observe the CN red bands with a conventional CDD Czerny Turner spectrometer. The emission of the three strong atomic sulfur lines between 920 and 925nm is overlapped by these bands. Fitting of the CN red bands allows a separation of both spectral contributions. This makes a quantitative evaluation of sulfur contents in the start material in the order of 1wt% feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Measuring NMHC and NMOG emissions from motor vehicles via FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierczak, Christine A.; Kralik, Lora L.; Mauti, Adolfo; Harwell, Amy L.; Maricq, M. Matti

    2017-02-01

    The determination of non-methane organic gases (NMOG) emissions according to United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations is currently a multi-step process requiring separate measurement of various emissions components by a number of independent on-line and off-line techniques. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method described in this paper records all required components using a single instrument. It gives data consistent with the regulatory method, greatly simplifies the process, and provides second by second time resolution. Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are measured by identifying a group of hydrocarbons, including oxygenated species, that serve as a surrogate for this class, the members of which are dynamically included if they are present in the exhaust above predetermined threshold levels. This yields an FTIR equivalent measure of NMHC that correlates within 5% to the regulatory flame ionization detection (FID) method. NMOG is then determined per regulatory calculation solely from FTIR recorded emissions of NMHC, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde, yielding emission rates that also correlate within 5% with the reference method. Examples are presented to show how the resulting time resolved data benefit aftertreatment development for light duty vehicles.

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  10. Spectroscopy and single-molecule emission of a fluorene-terthiophene oligomer.

    PubMed

    Khalil, G E; Adawi, A M; Robinson, B; Cadby, A J; Tsoi, W C; Kim, J-S; Charas, A; Morgado, J; Lidzey, D G

    2011-10-27

    We study the thiophene-based oligomer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2'-ethylhexyl)fluorene)-alt-2,5-terthiophene] (PF3T) in solution and when dispersed at low concentration into a polynorbornene matrix. We find that at high concentration in solution the 0-0 electronic transition observed in fluorescence is suppressed, a result indicative of the formation of weakly coupled H-aggregates. At low concentration in a polymer matrix, emission from both single molecules and molecular aggregates is observed. We find that the fluorescence spectra of most PF3T emitters are composed of a number of relatively narrow emission features, indicating that the emission usually occurs from multiple chromophores. A small number of PF3T molecules are however characterized by single chromophore emission, spectral blinking, and narrowed emission peaks.

  11. Laser Induced Emission Spectroscopy of Cold and Isolated Neutral PAHs and PANH: Implications for the red rectangle emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Blue luminescence (BL) in the emission spectra of the red rectangle centered on the bright star HD44179 is recently reported by Vijh et al [1]. This results is consistent with the broad band polarization measurements obtained in 1980 by Schmidt et al. Both experimental and theoretical studies support that BL emission could be attributed the luminescence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) excited with ultraviolet light from the center of the star [4 and reference therein]. The abundance on N to C in the interstellar medium suggest also that nitrogen substituted PAH (PANH) are likely abundant in the interstellar medium [3]. They exhibit similar features as PAHs and could contribute to the unidentified spectral bands. Comparing the BL to laboratory spectra obtained on similar environment is crucial for the identification of interstellar molecules. We present in this works the absorption and the laser induced emission spectra of several isolated and cold PAHs and PANHs. Laser induced emission was performed first to PAHs and PANHs isolated in Argon matrix at 10 K. Then, measurements are performed with the supersonic jet technique of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames. We focus, here, on the emission spectra (fluorescence and (or) phosphorescence) of these molecules and we discuss their contributions to the blue luminescence emission in the Red Rectangle nebula.[1] Vijh,U.P., Witt. A.N. & Gordon,K.D, APJ, 606, L69 (2004)[2] Schmidt, G. D., Cohen, M. & Margon, B., ApJ, 239L.133S (1980)[3] Spitzer, L., Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium (New York Wiley-Interscience) (1978)[4] Salama, F., Galazutdinov, G. A., Kre lowski, J., Allamandola, L. J., & Musaev, F. A. ApJ, 526,(1999)

  12. A system for endoscopic mechanically scanned localized proton MR and light-induced fluorescence emission spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Ahmet E; Webb, Andrew G; Spees, William M; Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos V

    2012-09-01

    Molecular and near-cellular modalities offer new opportunities in assessing living tissue in situ, and multimodality approaches, which offer complementary information, may lead to improved characterization of tissue pathophysiology benefiting diagnosis and focal therapy. However, many such modalities are limited by their low penetration through tissue, which has led to minimally invasive trans-cannula approaches to place the corresponding sensors locally at the area of interest. This work presents a system for performing localized fluorescence emission and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopies via endoscopic access. The in-house developed side-firing 1.9-mm wide dual-sensor integrates a three-fiber optical sensor for fluorescence emission optical spectroscopy and a 1-mm circular radiofrequency (RF) coil for localized MR proton spectroscopy. An MR-compatible manipulator was developed for carrying and mechanically translating the dual-sensor along a linear access channel. The hardware and software control of the system allows reconfigurable synchronization of the manipulator-assisted translation of the sensor, and MR and optical data collection. The manipulator serves as the mechanical link for the three modalities and MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra are inherently co-registered to the MR scanner coordinate system. These spectra were then used to generate spatio-spectral maps of the fluorophores and proton MR-signal sources in three-compartment phantoms with optically- and MR-visible, and distinguishable, materials. These data demonstrate a good spatial match between MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra along the scanned path. In addition to basic research, such a system may have clinical applications for assessing and characterizing cancer in situ, as well as guiding focal therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A system for endoscopic mechanically scanned localized proton MR and light-induced fluorescence emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Ahmet E.; Webb, Andrew G.; Spees, William M.; Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular and near-cellular modalities offer new opportunities in assessing living tissue in situ, and multimodality approaches, which offer complementary information, may lead to improved characterization of tissue pathophysiology benefiting diagnosis and focal therapy. However, many such modalities are limited by their low penetration through tissue, which has led to minimally invasive trans-cannula approaches to place the corresponding sensors locally at the area of interest. This work presents a system for performing localized fluorescence emission and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopies via endoscopic access. The in-house developed side-firing 1.9-mm wide dual-sensor integrates a three-fiber optical sensor for fluorescence emission optical spectroscopy and a 1-mm circular radiofrequency (RF) coil for localized MR proton spectroscopy. An MR-compatible manipulator was developed for carrying and mechanically translating the dual-sensor along a linear access channel. The hardware and software control of the system allows reconfigurable synchronization of the manipulator-assisted translation of the sensor, and MR and optical data collection. The manipulator serves as the mechanical link for the three modalities and MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra are inherently co-registered to the MR scanner coordinate system. These spectra were then used to generate spatio-spectral maps of the fluorophores and proton MR-signal sources in three-compartment phantoms with optically- and MR-visible, and distinguishable, materials. These data demonstrate a good spatial match between MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra along the scanned path. In addition to basic research, such a system may have clinical applications for assessing and characterizing cancer in situ, as well as guiding focal therapies.

  14. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  15. Thermal degradation of polyketones. Vibrational spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, G.; Sommazzi, A.

    1993-03-01

    Thermal degradation studies of regular alternating polymers of carbon monoxide and olefin have been followed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The I.R spectra of solid samples, performed in inert atmosphere and in high vacuum, were recorded as a function of time at different temperatures. From the I.R. data it is possible to conclude that the reaction process, near the melting point of the polymers, could consist of intra or intermolecular hydrogen transfer yielding an enol and a small quantity of insaturations. The thermal degradation process, at temperatures higher than melting point, involves the scission of the polymer chain and produces fragments with a large number of insaturations.

  16. CO 2 sensor studied by impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, M.; Pasierb, P.; Rekas, M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied to study the effect of heat treatment conditions (temperature and time of heating) on electrical properties of electrochemical gas sensors. The use of EIS method allowed observing the effect of undesirable chemical reaction in electrochemical cells (sensors) by the detection of change of electrical properties at the very early stage of such reaction. Addition of barium carbonate to lithium carbonate resulted in long-term stabilization of electrical properties of the system carbonate phase solid electrolyte. It was found that impedance spectra of the cell: carbonate|Au|YSZ|Pt with inner Au electrode provided the most useful information about reactivity progress between both phases.

  17. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM.

  18. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  19. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  20. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  1. Capillary Electrophoresis and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy for Characterization of Humic Substances

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in natural organic matter (NOM) studies. In this study, we characterized five fulvic acids, six humic acids and two unprocessed NOM samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) using these two ana...

  2. Surface studies of praseodymium by electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław; Pisarek, Marcin; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2016-12-01

    Electron transport properties in praseodymium (Pr) foil samples were studied by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES). Prior to EPES measurements, the Pr sample surface was pre-sputtered by Ar ions with ion energy of 2-3 keV. After such treatment, the Pr sample still contained about 10 at.% of residual oxygen in the surface region, as detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport within this region (4 nm-thick), was evaluated from EPES using both Ni and Au standards as a function of energy in the range of 0.5-2 keV. Experimental IMFPs, λ, were approximated by the simple function λ = kEp, where E is energy (in eV), and k = 0.1549 and p = 0.7047 were the fitted parameters. These values were compared with IMFPs for the praseodymium surface in which the presence of oxygen was tentatively neglected, and also with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2M predictive equation for bulk praseodymium. We found that the measured IMFP values to be only slightly affected by neglect of oxygen in calculations. The fitted function applied here was consistent with the energy dependence of the EPES-measured IMFPs. Additionally, the measured IMFPs were found to be from 2% to 4.2% larger than the predicted IMFPs for praseodymium in the energy range of 500-1000 eV. For electron energies of 1500 eV and 2000 eV, there was an inverse correlation between these values, and then the resulting deviations of -0.4% and -2.7%, respectively, were calculated.

  3. Using an artificial neural network to classify multicomponent emission lines with integral field spectroscopy from SAMI and S7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, E. J.; Medling, A. M.; Groves, B.; Kewley, L.; Dopita, M.; Davies, R.; Ho, I.-T.; Kaasinen, M.; Leslie, S.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Thomas, A. D.; Allen, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J. J.; Croom, S.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A.; Konstantantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; McElroy, R.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Shastri, P.

    2017-09-01

    Integral field spectroscopy (IFS) surveys are changing how we study galaxies and are creating vastly more spectroscopic data available than before. The large number of resulting spectra makes visual inspection of emission line fits an infeasible option. Here, we present a demonstration of an artificial neural network (ANN) that determines the number of Gaussian components needed to describe the complex emission line velocity structures observed in galaxies after being fit with lzifu. We apply our ANN to IFS data for the S7 survey, conducted using the Wide Field Spectrograph on the ANU 2.3 m Telescope, and the SAMI Galaxy Survey, conducted using the SAMI instrument on the 4 m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We use the spectral fitting code lzifu (Ho et al. 2016a) to fit the emission line spectra of individual spaxels from S7 and SAMI data cubes with 1-, 2- and 3-Gaussian components. We demonstrate that using an ANN is comparable to astronomers performing the same visual inspection task of determining the best number of Gaussian components to describe the physical processes in galaxies. The advantage of our ANN is that it is capable of processing the spectra for thousands of galaxies in minutes, as compared to the years this task would take individual astronomers to complete by visual inspection.

  4. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Removal of High Density Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Anthony; Shannon, Steven; Hudak, Stephen; Cuomo, Jerry

    2011-10-01

    Detailed spectroscopic measurements have been made on a hybrid vortex stabilized plasma torch probing the removal of high density polyethylene (HDPE). It has been determined that the dominant removal mechanism is related to the emission intensity of the reactive species present in the plasma through correlating the intensity of the atomic oxygen 777 nm peak with the removal rate as a function of axial distance from the torch. The studies also determined a weak correlation between removal rate and temperature. Further investigation of the removal mechanism has been based on in situ OES measurements of the plasma etching HDPE. This enables the comparison of the emission from available plasma reactants to the emission from the products resulting from either direct emission during the reaction phase or indirect reincorporation into the plasma region. Knowledge of the initial reactants and final products permits the formation of a hypothesis on the actual dominant removal mechanism or reaction pathway. Funded by SERDP WP-1762.

  5. Emission enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by localized surface plasmon resonance for analyzing plant nutrients.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Kotani, Takashi; Hattori, Takeaki

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the monitoring of plant nutrients in leaves of Citrus unshiu and Rhododendron obtusum using low-energy (<1 mJ) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The raw plant leaf was successfully ablated without desiccation before laser irradiation, by applying metallic colloidal particles to the leaf surface. The emission intensity with the metallic particles was larger than that without the particles. This result indicates an improvement of the sensitivity and the detection limit of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The emission enhancement was caused by localized surface plasmon resonance and was dependent on the size and material of metallic particles.

  6. Conceptual design and structural analysis of the spectroscopy of the atmosphere using far infrared emission (SAFIRE) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Averill, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    The conceptual design and structural analysis for the Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Instrument are provided. SAFIRE, which is an international effort, is proposed for the Earth Observing Systems (EOS) program for atmospheric ozone studies. A concept was developed which meets mission requirements and is the product of numerous parametric studies and design/analysis iterations. Stiffness, thermal stability, and weight constraints led to a graphite/epoxy composite design for the optical bench and supporting struts. The structural configuration was determined by considering various mounting arrangements of the optical, cryo, and electronic components. Quasi-static, thermal, modal, and dynamic response analyses were performed, and the results are presented for the selected configuration.

  7. Study of infrared emission spectroscopy for the B1Δg-A1Πu and B'1Σg+-A1Πu systems of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Bernath, Peter F.; Tang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen bands for the B1Δg-A1Πu system and eleven bands for the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system of C2 were identified in the Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of hydrocarbon discharges. The B'1Σg+ v = 4 and the B1Δg v = 6, 7, and 8 vibrational levels involved in nine bands were studied for the first time. A direct global analysis with Dunham parameters was carried out satisfactorily for the B1Δg-A1Πu system except for a small perturbation in the B1Δg v = 6 level. The calculated rovibrational term energies up to B1Δg v = 12 showed that the level crossing between the B1Δg and d3Πg states is responsible for many of the prominent perturbations in the Swan system observed previously. Nineteen forbidden transitions of the B1Δg-a3Πu transition were identified and the off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction constant AdB between d3Πg and B1Δg was derived as 8.3(1) cm-1. For the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system, only individual band analyses for each vibrational level in the B'1Σg+ state could be done satisfactorily and Dunham parameters obtained from these effective parameters showed that the anharmonic vibrational constant ωexe is anomalously small (nearly zero). Inspection of the RKR (Rydberg-Klein-Rees) potential curves for the B'1Σg+ and X1Σg+ states revealed that an avoided crossing or nearly avoided crossing may occur around 30 000 cm-1, which is responsible for the anomalous molecular constants in these two states.

  8. Study of infrared emission spectroscopy for the B(1)Δg-A(1)Πu and B'(1)Σg(+)-A(1)Πu systems of C2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Bernath, Peter F; Tang, Jian

    2016-02-14

    Thirteen bands for the B(1)Δg-A(1)Πu system and eleven bands for the B'(1)Σg(+)-A(1)Πu system of C2 were identified in the Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of hydrocarbon discharges. The B'(1)Σg(+)v = 4 and the B(1)Δg v = 6, 7, and 8 vibrational levels involved in nine bands were studied for the first time. A direct global analysis with Dunham parameters was carried out satisfactorily for the B(1)Δg-A(1)Πu system except for a small perturbation in the B(1)Δg v = 6 level. The calculated rovibrational term energies up to B(1)Δg v = 12 showed that the level crossing between the B(1)Δg and d(3)Πg states is responsible for many of the prominent perturbations in the Swan system observed previously. Nineteen forbidden transitions of the B(1)Δg-a(3)Πu transition were identified and the off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction constant AdB between d(3)Πg and B(1)Δg was derived as 8.3(1) cm(-1). For the B'(1)Σg(+)-A(1)Πu system, only individual band analyses for each vibrational level in the B'(1)Σg(+) state could be done satisfactorily and Dunham parameters obtained from these effective parameters showed that the anharmonic vibrational constant ωexe is anomalously small (nearly zero). Inspection of the RKR (Rydberg-Klein-Rees) potential curves for the B'(1)Σg(+) and X(1)Σg(+) states revealed that an avoided crossing or nearly avoided crossing may occur around 30,000 cm(-1), which is responsible for the anomalous molecular constants in these two states.

  9. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  10. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  11. Measurement of the stratospheric hydrogen peroxide concentration profile using far infrared thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Jucks, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The first unequivocal measurement of hydrogen peroxide in the stratosphere have been made, a concentration profile obtained from a balloon platform using Fourier transform thermal emission spectroscopy in the far infrared. Measurements were made using the 112/cm R-Q5 branch of the rotational-torsional spectrum, with some confirmation from the 94/cm R-Q4 branch. The volume mixing ratio of H2O2 is 1.6 x 10 to the -10th at 38.4 km, decreasing to 0.6 x 10 to the -10th at 23.8 km, with uncertainties of about 16 percent. These measurements are compared to a recent stratospheric model calculation.

  12. Multielement analysis of geologic materials by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, O.D.; Kroneman, R.L.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    Atomic emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source permits the rapid acquisition of multielement geochemical data from a wide variety of geologic materials. Rocks or other solid samples are taken into solution with a four acid digestion procedure and introduced directly into the plasma; fluid samples are acidified or analyzed directly. The entire process is computer-controlled, fully-automated, and requires less than five minutes per sample for quantitative determination of 37 elements. The procedures and instrumentation employed at the ESL for multielement ICP analysis of geologic materials are described and these are intended as a guide for evaluating analytic results reported from this laboratory. The quality of geochemical data can be characterized by precision, limits of quantitative determination, and accuracy. Precision values are a measure of the repeatability of analyses. In general, major element and analyses have precision of better than 5% and trace elements of better than 10% of the amount present. (MHR)

  13. Analysis of edge density fluctuation measured by trial KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovacsik, A.

    2012-10-15

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system based on direct imaging avalanche photodiode (APD) camera has been designed for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) and a trial system has been constructed and installed for evaluating feasibility of the design. The system contains two cameras, one is an APD camera for BES measurement and another is a fast visible camera for position calibration. Two pneumatically actuated mirrors were positioned at front and rear of lens optics. The front mirror can switch the measurement between edge and core region of plasma and the rear mirror can switch between the APD and the visible camera. All systems worked properly and the measured photon flux was reasonable as expected from the simulation. While the measurement data from the trial system were limited, it revealed some interesting characteristics of KSTAR plasma suggesting future research works with fully installed BES system. The analysis result and the development plan will be presented in this paper.

  14. Gas recognition using a neural network approach to plasma optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Mark; Mariotti, Davide; Dubitzky, Werner; McLaughlin, James A.; Maguire, Paul

    2000-10-01

    A system has been developed which enables the detection and recognition of various gases. Plasma emission spectroscopy has been used to record spectra from volatile species of acetone, vinegar, and coffee beans, along with air and nitrogen spectra. The spectra have been uniquely processed and fed into an artificial neural network program for training and recognition of unknown gases. The system as a whole can be grouped into the emerging and diverse area of artificial nose technology. The sy stem has shown to provide a solution to the recognition of simple gases and odours (air, nitrogen, acetone) and could also satisfactorily recognise more complex samples (vinegar and coffee beans). Recognition is performed in seconds; this being a positive aspect for many artificial nose applications.

  15. Temperature Effect on the Optical Emission Intensity in Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Super Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbani, S. M. R.; Ghezelbash, M.; Majd, A. E.; Soltanolkotabi, M.; Saghafifar, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of heating and cooling samples on the optical emission spectra and plasma parameters of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for Titanium 64, Inconel 718 super alloys, and Aluminum 6061 alloy is investigated. Samples are uniformly heated up to approximately 200°C and cooled down to -78°C by an external heater and liquid nitrogen, respectively. Variations of plasma parameters like electron temperature and electron density with sample temperature are determined by using Boltzmann plot and Stark broadening methods, respectively. Heating the samples improves LIBS signal strength and broadens the width of the spectrum. On the other hand, cooling alloys causes fluctuations in the LIBS signal and decrease it to some extent, and some of the spectral peaks diminish. In addition, our results show that electron temperature and electron density depend on the sample temperature variations.

  16. Angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy signature of the resonant excitonic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, X.; Kloss, T.; Pépin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) signature of the resonant excitonic state (RES) that was proposed as the pseudo-gap state of cuprate superconductors (Kloss T. et al., arXiv:1510.03038 (2015)). This new state can be described as a set of excitonic (particle-hole) patches with an internal checkerboard modulation. Here, we modelize the RES as a charge order with 2\\textbf{p}F wave vectors, where 2\\textbf{p}F is the ordering vector connecting two opposite sides of the Fermi surface. We calculate the spectral weight and the density of states in the RES and we find that our model correctly reproduces the opening of the PG in Bi-2201.

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  18. Ballistic-electron-emission-spectroscopy detection of monolayer thickness fluctuations in a semiconductor heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, D. K.; First, P. N.; Gaylord, T. K.; Glytsis, E. N.; Leibenguth, R. E.

    1999-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) is used to measure fluctuations in the thickness of buried Ga0.8Al0.2As layers. The device under measurement is a half-electron-wavelength Fabry-Perot filter that has been designed to have two quasibound states. By performing BEES at several different spatial locations and by utilizing the relationship between the thicknesses of the device layers and the location (in energy) of the quasibound states, single-monolayer variations are detected in the thicknesses of both the GaAs quantum well and the surrounding Ga0.8Al0.2As barriers. The lateral resolution is shown to be better than 20 nm.

  19. Diagnostic performance of the beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Thompson, D. S.

    2012-10-15

    The beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment measures localized density fluctuations on the ion gyroscale. Optical sightlines provide core to edge radial coverage, and the sightlines are aligned to typical pitch angles to maximize cross-field spatial resolution. Sightline images are 2-3 cm, and point spread function calculations indicate image distortion from pitch angle misalignment and atomic state finite lifetimes is minor with a 15% increase in the image size. New generation photodetectors achieve photon noise limited measurements at frequencies up to 400 kHz with refrigerant cooling at -20 Degree-Sign C. Measurements near the pedestal show broadband turbulence up to 100 kHz, and poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 cm. Plasma turbulence signals can be 2-3 orders of magnitude above photon noise and amplifier thermal noise.

  20. Measurement of lanthanum and technetium in uranium fuels by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, K.; Crane, P.; Cummings, D.; Krsul, J.; McKnight, R.

    1999-06-10

    An important parameter in characterizing an irradiated nuclear fuel is determining the amount of uranium fissioned. By determining the amount of uranium fissioned in the fuel a burnup performance parameter can be calculated, and the amount of fission products left in the fuel can be predicted. The quantity of uranium fissioned can be calculated from the amount of lanthanum and technetium present in the fuel. Lanthanum and technetium were measured in irradiated fuel samples using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) instrument and separation equipment located in a shielded glove-box. A discussion of the method, interferences, detection limits, quality control and a comparison to other work will be presented.

  1. Differential isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy for the studies of deep levels in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suno, K.; Yoshino, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Morimoto, J.; Miyakawa, T.

    1997-05-01

    Differential isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (DICTS) and normalized isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (NICTS) were proposed to improve the resolution of the conventional isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS) which could characterize the deep levels in semiconductors isothermally. The resolution of the methods was studied for the closely spaced energy levels by the numerical simulation. Though the resolvable emission rate ratio R (R=λ2/λ1, where λ1 and λ2 are each thermal emission rate for two levels) of ICTS was around 5, R of DICTS was around 4. Moreover, R of NICTS reached 3.5 which is less than that of any other conventional methods. The error ratio of the estimation is almost the same as ICTS. The new method was applied to study the deep levels in a Si:Au system as an example and found two closely spaced energy levels explicitly.

  2. Spatially Resolved HST Grism Spectroscopy of a Lensed Emission Line Galaxy at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Brenda L.; Hurley, Mairead; Bowen, David V.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Sharon, Keren; Straughn, Amber; Coe, Dan; Broadhurst, Tom; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-01

    We take advantage of gravitational lensing amplification by A1689 (z = 0.187) to undertake the first space-based census of emission line galaxies (ELGs) in the field of a massive lensing cluster. Forty-three ELGs are identified to a flux of i 775 = 27.3 via slitless grism spectroscopy. One ELG (at z = 0.7895) is very bright owing to lensing magnification by a factor of ≈4.5. Several Balmer emission lines (ELs) detected from ground-based follow-up spectroscopy signal the onset of a major starburst for this low-mass galaxy (M * ≈ 2 × 109 M ⊙) with a high specific star formation rate (≈20 Gyr-1). From the blue ELs we measure a gas-phase oxygen abundance consistent with solar (12+log(O/H) = 8.8 ± 0.2). We break the continuous line-emitting region of this giant arc into seven ~1 kpc bins (intrinsic size) and measure a variety of metallicity-dependent line ratios. A weak trend of increasing metal fraction is seen toward the dynamical center of the galaxy. Interestingly, the metal line ratios in a region offset from the center by ~1 kpc have a placement on the blue H II region excitation diagram with f ([O III])/f (Hβ) and f ([Ne III])/f (Hβ) that can be fitted by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). This asymmetrical AGN-like behavior is interpreted as a product of shocks in the direction of the galaxy's extended tail, possibly instigated by a recent galaxy interaction. Based, in part, on data obtained with the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the"map" approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Bär, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Grunze, M.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.

    2008-06-17

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and constructed a novel experimental setup for the study of liquids, with the long-term goal of investigating the electronic structure of biological systems in aqueous environments. We have developed a flow-through liquid cell in which the liquid is separated from vacuum by a thin Si3N4 or SiC window and which allows a precise control of temperature. This approach has significant advantages compared to static liquids cells used in the past. Furthermore, we have designed a dedicated high-transmission, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer. The high transmission makes it possible to measure complete resonant XES"maps" in less than an hour, giving unprecedented detailed insight into the electronic structure of the investigated sample. Using this new equipment we have investigated the electronic structure of liquid water. Furthermore, our XES spectra and maps give information about ultra-fast dissociation on the timescale of the O 1s core hole lifetime, which is strongly affected by the initial state hydrogen bonding configuration.

  4. [Study on terahertz spectroscopy of Hotan jade].

    PubMed

    Maimaitiming; Ainiwaer; Xiong, Wei; Guo, Xue-jiao; Shen, Jing-ling

    2010-10-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) technique has a wide range of applications including illicit drugs and explosive detection, and organic molecules recognition. In the present paper, the spectral features of three kinds of Hotan jade were studied experimentally by THz-TDS technique and the characteristic absorption spectra and refractive index were obtained in the range of 0.2 to 2.6 THz. The experimental results show that different samples have different absorption characters, and the refractive index is 2.4-2.7 in the range of 0.2-2.6 THz. The results indicate that it is feasible to apply THz-TDS technique to identification of Hotan jade, which provides a new approach to the nondestructive examination of Hotan jade.

  5. Corrosion Study Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion is a common phenomenon. It is the destructive result of chemical reaction between a metal or metal alloy and its environment. Stainless steel tubing is used at Kennedy Space Center for various supply lines which service the orbiter. The launch pads are also made of stainless steel. The environment at the launch site has very high chloride content due to the proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Also, during a launch, the exhaust products in the solid rocket boosters include concentrated hydrogen chloride. The purpose of this project was to study various alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in corrosive environments similar to the launch sites. This report includes data and analysis of the measurements for 304L, 254SMO and AL-6XN in primarily neutral 3.55% NaCl. One set of data for 304L in neutral 3.55%NaCl + 0.1N HCl is also included.

  6. Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Tohru; Higuchi, T.; Liu, Y.-S.; Yao, P.; Glans, P.-A.; Guo, Jinghua; Chang, C.; Wu, Z.; Sakamoto, W.; Itoh, N.; Shimura, T.; Yogo, T.; Hattori, T.

    2008-07-11

    The electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} has been studied using soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra exhibit that the valence band is mainly composed of O 2p state hybridized with Fe 3d state. The band gap corresponding to the energy separation between the top of the O 2p valence band and the bottom of the Fe 3d conduction band is 1.3 eV. The soft-X-ray Raman scattering reflects the features due to charge transfer transition from O 2p valence band to Fe 3d conduction band. These findings are similar to the result of electronic structure calculation by density functional theory within the local spin-density approximation that included the effect of Coulomb repulsion between localized d states.

  7. Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Tohru; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Yao, Peng; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Chang, Chinglin; Wu, Ziyu; Sakamoto, Wataru; Itoh, Naoyuki; Shimura, Tetsuo; Yogo, Toshinobu; Hattori, Takeshi

    2008-08-01

    The electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 has been studied using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra exhibit that the valence band is mainly composed of O2p state hybridized with Fe3d state. The band gap corresponding to the energy separation between the top of the O2p valence band and the bottom of the Fe3d conduction band is 1.3 eV. The soft x-ray Raman scattering reflects the features due to the charge-transfer transition from O2p valence band to Fe3d conduction band. These findings are similar to the result of electronic structure calculation by density-functional theory within the local spin-density approximation that included the effect of Coulomb repulsion between localized d states.

  8. Measuring the electron temperature by optical emission spectroscopy in two temperature plasmas at atmospheric pressure: A critical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.

    2006-02-01

    The measurement of the electron mean kinetic energy by identifying the electron temperature and the excitation temperature obtained by optical emission spectroscopy is theoretically studied for two temperature argon plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Using a 32-level collisional radiative model in which both electron impact and argon-impact inelastic collisions are taken into account, it has been found that under certain conditions the argon inelastic collisions may cause a decrease of the argon excitation temperature so that the relation T{sub e}>T{sub exc}>T{sub 0} is satisfied. This inequality also appears when electron losses due to diffusion are important and the electron density is lower than its equilibrium value.

  9. Interaction between carbamazepine and humic substances: a fluorescence spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Liu, Congqiang; Guo, Jianyang; Fu, Pingqing; Li, Wen; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-01-01

    Carbamazepine is a popular drug that has been detected in natural environments, but little is known about its biogeochemical cycling, influencing factors, and eco-environmental effects in aquatic ecosystems. Interaction between carbamazepine and humic substances, including fulvic and humic acids, was studied using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous-scan fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of humic substances was quenched on the addition of carbamazepine, and static quenching was the primary mechanism. The binding parameters on their interaction, including the conditional binding constants (log K) and binding capacities (C(L)), were estimated by the Ryan-Weber nonlinear theory equation. Log K ranged from 3.41 to 5.04 L/mol at 25 degrees C and pH 7.0. The influence of pH on the complexation and the competition between carbamazepine and Cu(II) for fluorescence-binding sites also were discussed. The present results would be helpful in understanding the fate and biogeochemical cycling of other pharmaceuticals and personal care products in aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Anisotropic emission in quantum-beat spectroscopy of helium excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchini, M.; Ludwig, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Kasmi, L.; Herrmann, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Landsman, A. S.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.

    2015-06-01

    We present quantum-beat spectroscopy of excited states of helium atoms populated selectively with high-order-harmonic emission below the atomic ionization potential by means of low-pass filtering of the pump radiation. The created electron wave packet is ionized by few-cycle infrared (IR) pulses leading to characteristic peaks in the photoelectron yield, which beat with a frequency proportional to the energy gap between the states involved in the two-color photoionization process. Minimizing the direct ionization by the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation, we can follow the evolution of the electron wave packet also in the region of temporal pump-probe overlap. A detailed time-frequency analysis of the quantum beats and direct comparison with the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation reveal the existence of quantum beats characterized by a final state of mixed parity. Finally, we show that by varying the carrier-envelope offset phase of the probe pulse, one can optically control the preferred direction of photoelectron emission and the contrast of such beats.

  11. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Nam, Y. U.

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  12. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Rupke, David S. N.; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M.; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.

    2016-09-01

    We present lzifu (LaZy-IFU), an idl toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. lzifu is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. lzifu has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of lzifu, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying lzifu to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line profiles presented in IFS data. The code is made available to the astronomy community through github. lzifu will be further developed over time to other IFS instruments, and to provide even more accurate line and uncertainty estimates.

  13. Complex Molecules in the Laboratory - a Comparison of Chriped Pulse and Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Marius; Wehres, Nadine; Maßen, Jakob; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Detecting molecules of astrophysical interest in the interstellar medium strongly relies on precise spectroscopic data from the laboratory. In recent years, the advancement of the chirped-pulse technique has added many more options available to choose from. The Cologne emission spectrometer is an additional path to molecular spectroscopy. It allows to record instantaneously broad band spectra with calibrated intensities. Here we present a comparison of both methods: The Cologne chirped-pulse spectrometer as well as the Cologne emission spectrometer both cover the frequency range of 75-110 GHz, consistent with the ALMA Band 3 receivers. High sensitive heterodyne receivers with very low noise temperature amplifiers are used with a typical bandwidth of 2.5 GHz in a single sideband. Additionally the chirped-pulse spectrometer contains a high power amplifier of 200 mW for the excitation of molecules. Room temperature spectra of methyl cyanide and comparison of key features, such as measurement time, sensitivity, limitations and commonalities are shown in respect to identification of complex molecules of astrophysical importance. In addition, future developments for both setups will be discussed.

  14. Initial density fluctuation measurements from the NSTX Beam Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic system*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Thompson, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Stratton, B. C.

    2010-11-01

    Density fluctuation measurements on the ion gyroscale have been obtained on NSTX with a newly commissioned beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system. The BES system measures red-shifted Dα emission near 660 nm from deuterium neutral beams with high throughput optics and high efficiency detectors. The system presently employs 16 detection channels arranged in radial and poloidal arrays, and an expansion to 32 channels is planned. Radial arrays can measure fluctuations from r/a 0.1 to beyond the last closed flux surface and resolve fluctuations with kρi<=1.5. Initial BES measurements reveal broadband turbulence and coherent modes below 300 kHz for r/a>=0.4. The broadband turbulence appears in high gradient regions and increases at H-L transitions. The frequency characteristics of the coherent modes correlate with Alfvén/energetic particle modes in Mirnov probe measurements, but some coherent modes appear in BES measurements only. *Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Nos. DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-SC0001288.

  15. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  16. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Réfy, D.; Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  17. AC impedance-emission spectroscopy for determining the electrochemical behaviour of anodised aluminium in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.

    2010-09-01

    In the present investigation, holographic interferometry was utilised for the first time to determine the rate change of the alternating current (AC) impedance of aluminium samples during the initial stage of anodisation processes in aqueous solution without any physical contact. In fact, because the AC impedance values in this investigation were obtained by holographic interferometry, electromagnetic method rather than electronic method, the abrupt rate change of the AC impedance was called AC impedance-emission spectroscopy. The anodisation process (oxidation) of the aluminium samples was carried out chemically in different sulphuric acid concentrations (0.5-3.125% H2SO4) at room temperature. In the mean time, the real time holographic interferometry was used to determine the difference in the AC impedance of two subsequent values, dZ, as a function of the elapsed time of the experiment for the aluminium samples in 0. 5, 1.0, 1.5 and 3.125% H2SO4 solutions. The AC impedance-emission spectra of the present investigation represent a detailed picture of not only the rate change of the AC impedance throughout the anodisation processes but also the spectra represent the rate change of the growth of the oxide films on the aluminium samples in different solutions. Consequently, holographic interferometry is found to be very useful for surface finish industries, especially for monitoring the early stage of anodisation processes of metals, in which the rate change of AC impedance of the aluminium samples can be determined in situ.

  18. Far-red to near infrared emission and scattering spectroscopy for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang

    2001-06-01

    The thesis investigates the far-red and near infrared (NIR) spectral region from biomedical tissue samples for monitoring the state of tissues. The NIR emission wing intensity is weak in comparison to the emission in the visible spectral region. The wing emission from biomedical samples has revealed meaningful information about the state of the tissues. A model is presented to explain the shape of the spectral wing based on a continuum of energy levels. The wing can be used to classify different kinds of tissues; especially it can be used to differentiate cancer part from normal human breast tissues. The research work of the far-red emission from thermal damaged tissue samples shows that the emission intensity in this spectral region is proportional to the extent of the thermal damage of the tissue. Near infrared spectral absorption method is used to investigate blood hemodynamics (perfusion and oxygenation) in brain during sleep-wake transition. The result of the research demonstrates that the continuous wave (CW) type near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device can be used to investigate brain blood perfusion and oxygenation with a similar precision with frequency domain (FD) type device. The human subject sleep and wake transition, has been monitored by CW type NIRS instrument with traditional electroencephalograph (EEG) method. Parallel change in oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb is a discrete event that occurs in the transition from both sleep to wakefulness and wakefulness to sleep. These hemodynamic switches are generally about few seconds delayed from the human decided transition point between sleep and wake on the polygraph EEG recording paper. The combination of NIRS and EEG methods monitor the brain activity, gives more information about the brain activity. The sleep apnea investigation was associated with recurrent apneas, insufficient nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the different response of the peripheral and central compartments to breathing

  19. Optical spectroscopy of IRAS sources with infrared emission bands. 1: IRAS 21282+5050 and the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Jones, B. F.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of the starlike optical counterpart to IRAS 21282+5050, a source with the hydrocarbon infrared emission band spectrum, shows an 07(f)-(WC11) planetary nebula nucleus suffering an extinction of 5.7 mag. Emission line widths in the WC spectrum are only approx. 100 km/s, indicating a very slow stellar wind. Optical diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are prominent. Five DIBs are strongly enhanced, namely lamda lamda 5797, 6196, 6203, 6283, and 6613. The presence of circumstellar hydrocarbon molecules may explain both the infrared emission bands and the enhanced DIBs.

  20. Combining emission and absorption spectroscopy at rare earth spectral lines: plasma temperature measurements in ceramic metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Westermeier, M.; Höbing, T.; Bergner, A.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2013-07-01

    Presently, most high intensity discharge (HID) lamps contain mercury to generate a high pressure buffer gas and thereby an appropriate power input into the arc. Due to its toxicity, the replacement of Hg is of particular interest in recent research on HID lamps. Up to now, the emission coefficient of an atomic Hg double line is widely used to determine the plasma temperature Tpl in HID lamps. Tpl is needed to calculate the total density of atoms and ions of elements inside these lamps. A combination of optical emission and broadband absorption spectroscopy allows us to evaluate Tpl independently of Hg emission lines. The method is required for a determination of Tpl if the Hg line intensity within the investigated lamp is too low, is superimposed by other lines or if environmental-friendly Hg-free lamps are developed. Within this work, phase-resolved plasma temperatures are determined in front of the electrode of Hg-containing MH lamps by emission spectroscopy at atomic Hg lines. Above all, temperatures are measured by a combination of emission and absorption spectroscopy at atomic rare earth lines, namely Dy and Tm. A comparison of Tpl determined by both methods agree within an error margin of <10%. Total phase-resolved rare earth atom densities are obtained by means of the measured ground state densities and Tpl. The combination of emission and absorption spectroscopy is also applied to the bulk plasma of lamps where the intensity of the Hg emission lines is too low for plasma temperature measurements or Hg is absent. It provides the partial rare earth pressure and by comparison with thermodynamic data cold spot temperatures within the lamps.

  1. Electronic Structure of the ID Conductor K0.3MoO3 studied using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Learmonth, T.; Glans, P.-A.; McGuinness, C.; Plucinski, L.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, J.-H.; Greenblatt, M.; Smith, K.E.

    2008-09-24

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one dimensional conductor K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured using high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data is compared to that from the related two dimensional insulator {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. Scattering features are observed from both oxides that are explained in terms of the band momentum selectivity of the scattering process, allowing a comparison of the scattering data to recent band structure calculations.

  2. Extended wavelength anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) measurements: better filters, validation standards, and Rayleigh scatter removal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamayou-Boucau, Yannick; Ryder, Alan G.

    2017-09-01

    Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) provides valuable insights into multi-fluorophore proteins (Groza et al 2015 Anal. Chim. Acta 886 133-42). Fluorescence anisotropy adds to the multidimensional fluorescence dataset information about the physical size of the fluorophores and/or the rigidity of the surrounding micro-environment. The first ARMES studies used standard thin film polarizers (TFP) that had negligible transmission between 250 and 290 nm, preventing accurate measurement of intrinsic protein fluorescence from tyrosine and tryptophan. Replacing TFP with pairs of broadband wire grid polarizers enabled standard fluorescence spectrometers to accurately measure anisotropies between 250 and 300 nm, which was validated with solutions of perylene in the UV and Erythrosin B and Phloxine B in the visible. In all cases, anisotropies were accurate to better than ±1% when compared to literature measurements made with Glan Thompson or TFP polarizers. Better dual wire grid polarizer UV transmittance and the use of excitation-emission matrix measurements for ARMES required complete Rayleigh scatter elimination. This was achieved by chemometric modelling rather than classical interpolation, which enabled the acquisition of pure anisotropy patterns over wider spectral ranges. In combination, these three improvements permit the accurate implementation of ARMES for studying intrinsic protein fluorescence.

  3. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  4. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  5. Comparison of Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy for Biodistribution Analysis of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; Cole, Adam J.; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) have been widely studied for use in targeted drug delivery. Analysis of MNP biodistribution is essential to evaluating the success of targeting strategies and the potential for off-target toxicity. This work compared the applicability of inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in assessing MNP biodistribution. Biodistribution was evaluated in 9L-glioma bearing rats administered with MNP (12-25 mg Fe/kg) under magnetic targeting. Ex vivo analysis of MNP in animal tissues was performed with both ICP-OES and ESR. A cryogenic method was developed to overcome the technical hurdle of loading tissue samples into ESR tubes. Comparison of results from the ICP-OES and ESR measurements revealed two distinct relationships for organs accumulating high or low levels of MNP. In organs with high MNP accumulation such as liver and spleen, data were strongly correlated (r = 0.97, 0.94 for liver and spleen, respectively), thus validating equivalency of the two methods in this high concentration range (> 1000 nmol Fe/g tissue). The two sets of measurements, however, differed significantly in organs with lower levels of MNP accumulation such as brain, kidney, and the tumor. Whereas ESR resolved MNP to 10-55 nmol Fe/g tissue, ICP-OES failed to detect MNP due to masking by endogenous iron. These findings suggest that ESR coupled to cryogenic sample handling is more robust than ICP-OES, attaining better sensitivity in analyses. Such advantages render ESR the method of choice for accurate profiling of MNP biodistribution across tissues with high variability in nanoparticle accumulation. PMID:20039679

  6. Development of an Open-Path, Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (LDS) Analyser for the Measurement of Large Area Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belal, M.; Daghestani, N.; Weidmann, D.; Kannath, A.

    2016-12-01

    Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (LDS), is a new gas sensing technique that applies a novel approach to tuneable diode laser spectroscopy. Common techniques depend on measuring detected intensity to derive concentration. This significantly impacts measurements in "dirty" environments where detected intensity of the transmitted light is bound to fluctuate. MIRICO's LDS-based instrument derives concentration using the phase of light. This makes it highly immune to intensity fluctuations received at the photodetector. The instrument enables precise, real time measurements of trace gas molecules in demanding environments. Furthermore, compared to absorption techniques, the analyser can measure gas concentrations within a very wide dynamic range (typically about five to six orders of magnitude), meaning for example from parts per billion all the way to sub percent concentrations without the requirement for dilution. In a long open-path, multi-direction configuration, coupled with a retroreflector arrays, and anemometer, the LDS analyser is capable of measuring methane concentrations associated with large area sources, and locating and quantifying of point source emissions within said area. Here we describe the principle of LDS, and the development of the prototype instrument. In addition, we report the results of a pilot study where the capabilities of the LDS instrument set-up described above was tested using a controlled release of methane from a point source within a large target area.

  7. MEASURING ORGANIC MOLECULAR EMISSION IN DISKS WITH LOW-RESOLUTION SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Henning, Thomas E-mail: najita@noao.edu E-mail: pascucci@stsci.edu E-mail: henning@mpia.de

    2011-06-10

    We explore the extent to which Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra taken at low spectral resolution can be used in quantitative studies of organic molecular emission from disks surrounding low-mass young stars. We use Spitzer IRS spectra taken in both the high- and low-resolution modules for the same sources to investigate whether it is possible to define line indices that can measure trends in the strength of the molecular features in low-resolution data. We find that trends in the HCN emission strength seen in the high-resolution data can be recovered in low-resolution data. In examining the factors that influence the HCN emission strength, we find that the low-resolution HCN flux is modestly correlated with stellar accretion rate and X-ray luminosity. Correlations of this kind are perhaps expected based on recent observational and theoretical studies of inner disk atmospheres. Our results demonstrate the potential of using the large number of low-resolution disk spectra that reside in the Spitzer archive to study the factors that influence the strength of molecular emission from disks. Such studies would complement results for the much smaller number of circumstellar disks that have been observed at high resolution with IRS.

  8. Study of Infrared Emission Spectroscopy for the B1Δg-A1Πu and B'1Σg+-A1Πu Systems of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Wang; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we carried out the perturbation analysis of C_2 spectra and identified forbidden singlet-triplet intersystem transitions, which aroused further interest in other C_2 spectra for the many low-lying electronic states of this fundamental molecule. In 1988, the B1Δg-A1Πu and B'1Σg+-A1Πu band systems were discovered by Douay et al., who observed eight bands of the B1Δg-A1Πu system with v up to 5 for the B1Δg state and six bands of the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system with v up to 3 for the B'1Σg+ state in the Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of hydrocarbon discharges. In the work presented here, we identified twenty-four bands of the two systems, among which the B'1Σg+ v = 4 and the B1Δg v = 6, 7 and 8 vibrational levels involved in nine bands were studied for the first time. A direct global analysis with Dunham parameters was carried out satisfactorily for the B1Δg-A1Πu system except for a small perturbation in the B1Δg v = 6 level. The calculated rovibrational term energies up to B1Δg v = 12 showed that the level crossing between the B1Δg and d3Πg states is responsible for many of the prominent perturbations in the Swan system observed previously. Nineteen lines of the B1Δg-a3Πu forbidden transitions were identified and the off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction constant AdB between d3Πg and B1Δg was derived as 8.3(1) wn. For the B'1Σg+-A1Πu system, only individual band analyses for each vibrational level in the B'1Σg+ state could be done satisfactorily and Dunham parameters obtained from these effective parameters showed that the anharmonic vibrational constant ω_e x_e is anomalously small (nearly zero). Inspection of the RKR potential curves for the B'1Σg+ and X1Σg+ states revealed that an avoided crossing may occur around 30000 wn, which is responsible for the anomalous molecular constants in these two states. W. Chen, K. Kawaguchi, P. F. Bernath, and J. Tang, J. Chem. Phys., 141, 064317 (2015) M. Douay, R. Nietmann and P. F. Bernath

  9. Results of the air emission research study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Air quality was monitored in beef mono-slope barns. The objectives of the study were 1) to gather baseline data for the levels of gas emissions and particulate matter from beef mono-slope facilities, 2) evaluate the effect of two different manure handling systems on air quality, and 3) provide infor...

  10. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  11. First hydrogen operation of NIO1: Characterization of the source plasma by means of an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Baltador, C.; Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.; Fantz, U.; Wünderlich, D.; Vialetto, L.

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a compact and flexible radio frequency H{sup −} ion source, developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL. The aim of the experimentation on NIO1 is the optimization of both the production of negative ions and their extraction and beam optics. In the initial phase of its commissioning, NIO1 was operated with nitrogen, but now the source is regularly operated also with hydrogen. To evaluate the source performances, an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic was installed. The system includes a low resolution spectrometer in the spectral range of 300-850 nm and a high resolution (50 pm) one, to study, respectively, the atomic and the molecular emissions in the visible range. The spectroscopic data have been interpreted also by means of a collisional-radiative model developed at IPP Garching. Besides the diagnostic hardware and the data analysis methods, the paper presents the first plasma measurements across a transition to the full H mode, in a hydrogen discharge. The characteristic signatures of this transition in the plasma parameters are described, in particular, the sudden increase of the light emitted from the plasma above a certain power threshold.

  12. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H.; Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G.; Villalobos, S.

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  13. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado, Utah, and Texas using mobile isotopic methane analysis based on Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Chris; Winkler, Renato; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Crosson, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation, provided that the fugitive emissions of methane are kept under control. A key step in assessing these emissions in a given region is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis, using the isotopic carbon signature to distinguish between natural gas and landfills or ruminants. We present measurements of methane using a mobile spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in three intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah, and the Barnett Shale in Texas. Performance of the CRDS isotope analyzer is presented, including precision, calibration, stability, and the potential for measurement bias due to other atmospheric constituents. Mobile isotope measurements of individual sources and in the nocturnal boundary layer have been combined to establish the fraction of the observed methane emissions that can be attributed to natural gas activities. The fraction of total methane emissions in the Denver-Julesburg basin attributed to natural gas emissions is 78 +/- 13%. In the Uinta basin, which has no other significant sources of methane, the fraction is 96% +/- 15%. In addition, results from the Barnett shale are presented, which includes a major urban center (Dallas / Ft. Worth). Methane emissions in this region are spatially highly heterogeneous. Spatially-resolved isotope and concentration measurements are interpreted using a simple emissions model to

  14. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  15. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    PubMed

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Biophotonics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag.

  16. Characterisation of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for THz emission using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kristof J. P.; Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Ohnishi, Dai; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) provide high speed current oscillation which is applicable to THz generation when coupled to a suitably designed antenna. For this purpose, the InGaAs/AlAs/InP materials have been used, as this system offers high electron mobility, suitable band-offsets, and low resistance contacts. However for high current density operation (~MA/cm2) the epitaxial structure is challenging to characterize using conventional techniques as it consists of a single, very thin AlAs/InGaAs quantum well (QW). Here, we present a detailed low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopic study of high current density RTDs that allow the non-destructive mapping of a range of critical parameters for the device. We show how the doping level of the emitter/collector and contact layers in the RTD structure can be measured using the Moss-Burstein effect. For the full device structure, we show how emission from the QW may be identified, and detail how the emission changes with differing indium composition and well widths. We show that by studying nominally identical, un-doped structures, a type-II QW emission is observed, and explain the origin of the type-I emission in doped devices. This observation opens the way for a new characterization scheme where a "dummy" RTD active element is incorporated below the real RTD structure. This structure allows significantly greater control in the epitaxial process.

  17. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  18. Feasibility study for detecting copper contaminants in transformer insulation using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparna, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.; Rajan, J. Sundara

    2014-10-01

    In recent times, copper sulphide (Cu2S) diffusion in the transformer insulation is a major problem reducing the life of transformers. It is therefore essential to identify a simple methodology to understand the diffusion of Cu2S into the solid insulation [oil impregnated pressboard (OIP)]. In the present work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was adopted to study the diffusion of Cu2S into the pressboard insulation and to determine the depth of diffusion. The diffusion of Cu2S in pressboard was confirmed by electrical discharge studies. In general, flashover voltage and increase in ageing duration of pressboard insulation/Cu concentration had inverse relationship. The characteristic emission lines were also studied through optical emission spectroscopy. Based on LIBS studies with Cu powder dispersed pressboard samples, Cu I emission lines were found to be resolvable up to a lowest concentration of 5 μg/cm2. The LIBS intensity ratio of Cu I-Ca II emission lines were found to increase with increase in the ageing duration of the OIP sample. LIBS studies with OIP samples showed an increase in the optical emission lifetime. LIBS results were in agreement with the electrical discharge studies.

  19. Terahertz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz DES) - ‘ALMA in the Lab’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile Auriacombe, Olivier Bruno Jacques; Fraser, Helen; Ellison, Brian; Ioppolo, Sergio; Rea, Simon

    2016-06-01

    ALMA is revolutionising our scope to identify and locate molecules that have been desorbed from ices, particularly complex organic molecules (COMS), which provide a vital link between interstellar and prebiotic chemistry. Explaining the existence of these molecules in star-forming regions relies on an empirical understanding of the chemistry that underpins their formation:- do COMS form predominantly in the solid-phase and then desorb to the gas phase, or do only “smaller” species, radials or ions desorb and then undergo gas-phase chemical reactions to generate larger COMS?-are the rotational state populations in COMS only attributable to equilibrium chemistry, or could their formation mechanisms and desorption processes affect the rotational state occupancy of these molecules, thereby directly tying certain species to solid-state origins?We have developed a novel laboratory method - THz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz-DES) that combines “traditional” laboratory astrophysics high-vacuum ice experiments with a sensitive high-spectral-resolution terahertz total-power heterodyne radiometer 1,2, partially mirroring the spectral range of ALMA band 7 (275- 373 GHz). Ices are grown in situ on a cold-plate, situated in a vacuum cell, then (thermally) desorbed. The sub-mm emission spectra of the resultant gas-phase molecules are detected as a function of time, temperature, or distance from the surface. Our first THz DES results will be shown for pure and binary ice systems including H2O, N2O and CH3OH. They show good correlation with established methods e.g. TPD, with the advantage of exploiting the molecular spectroscopy to unravel surface dynamics, state-occupancy, and unequivocal molecular identification, as well as concurrently measuring desorption barriers and molecular yields. We will extend our technique to a broader frequency range, enabling us to detect radical and ion desorption, to differentiate between A and E populations of CH3OH or ortho

  20. DETECTION OF REST-FRAME OPTICAL LINES FROM X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF WEAK EMISSION-LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Gallo, Elena; Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, Bin; Schneider, Donald P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Lira, Paulina; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 15 yr, examples of exotic radio-quiet quasars with intrinsically weak or absent broad emission line regions (BELRs) have emerged from large-scale spectroscopic sky surveys. Here, we present spectroscopy of seven such weak emission line quasars (WLQs) at moderate redshifts (z = 1.4–1.7) using the X-shooter spectrograph, which provides simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy covering the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) through optical. These new observations effectively double the number of WLQs with spectroscopy in the optical rest-frame, and they allow us to compare the strengths of (weak) high-ionization emission lines (e.g., C iv) to low-ionization lines (e.g., Mg ii, Hβ, Hα) in individual objects. We detect broad Hβ and Hα emission in all objects, and these lines are generally toward the weaker end of the distribution expected for typical quasars (e.g., Hβ has rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 15–40 Å). However, these low-ionization lines are not exceptionally weak, as is the case for high-ionization lines in WLQs. The X-shooter spectra also display relatively strong optical Fe ii emission, Hβ FWHM ≲ 4000 km s{sup −1}, and significant C iv blueshifts (≈1000–5500 km s{sup −1}) relative to the systemic redshift; two spectra also show elevated UV Fe ii emission, and an outflowing component to their (weak) Mg ii emission lines. These properties suggest that WLQs are exotic versions of “wind-dominated” quasars. Their BELRs either have unusual high-ionization components, or their BELRs are in an atypical photoionization state because of an unusually soft continuum.

  1. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perring, Loïc; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99+/-5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given.

  2. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy of the X(1)A' --> A(1)A'' system of CHI and CDI.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chong; Ebben, Carlena; Reid, Scott A

    2009-11-26

    We report on the first detailed studies of the spectroscopy of an iodocarbene, measuring fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the X1A' --> A1A'' system of :CHI and the deuterated isotopomer :CDI. Due to similar bending and C-I stretching frequencies in the upper state, fluorescence excitation spectra of :CHI show polyads composed of members of the 2(0)(n-x)3(0)x progressions with x = 0-3. For :CDI, only progressions with x = 0, 1 are observed. Extrapolation of the 20n term energies for both isotopomers to a common origin places the electronic origin of the X1A' --> A1A'' system near 10500 cm-1, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Rotational analysis of the 16 observed bands for CHI and 13 observed bands for :CDI yields rotational constants for the upper and lower states that are also in good agreement with theory. To investigate the controversial issue of the ground state multiplicity of :CHI, we measured single vibronic level emission spectra from many A1A'' levels. These spectra show conclusively that the ground state is a singlet, as for both isotopomers the ã3A'' origin is observed, lying well above the origin of the X1A' state. At energies above the ã3A'' origin, the spin-orbit mixing is so severe that few vibrational assignments can be made. Analysis of the emission spectra provides a lower limit on the singlet-triplet gap of 4.1 kcal mol-1, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions.

  3. Scientific prospects for spectroscopy of the gamma-ray burst prompt emission with SVOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M. G.; Xie, F.; Sizun, P.; Piron, F.; Dong, Y.; Atteia, J.-L.; Antier, S.; Daigne, F.; Godet, O.; Cordier, B.; Wei, J.

    2017-07-01

    SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Sino-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade, capable to detect and localise the GRB emission, and to follow its evolution in the high-energy and X-ray domains, and in the visible and NIR bands. The satellite carries two wide-field high-energy instruments: a coded-mask gamma-ray imager (ECLAIRs; 4-150 keV), and a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRM; 15-5500 keV) that, together, will characterise the GRB prompt emission spectrum over a wide energy range. In this paper we describe the performances of the ECLAIRs and GRM system with different populations of GRBs from existing catalogues, from the classical ones to those with a possible thermal component superimposed to their non-thermal emission. The combination of ECLAIRs and the GRM will provide new insights also on other GRB properties, as for example the spectral characterisation of the subclass of short GRBs showing an extended emission after the initial spike.

  4. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy of CdSe quantum dots in polar and nonpolar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloepfer, Jeremiah; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2004-03-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) offer the opportunity to study semiconductors in liquid environments. QD biological labels in water are often protected from emission quenching and surface oxidation. We wish to exploit these processes to construct novel "on/off" sensors based on energy and electron transfer. These systems offer the chance to probe the semiconductor surface-solvent interface. Time-correlated-single-photon-counting was used to measure the emission lifetimes of several QD-solvent systems. Typical lifetimes could be divided into fast single exponential ( 100 ps) and slow stretched exponential ( 10 ns) decays. CdSe and ZnS(CdSe) were prepared in non-polar solvents with high quantum yields. QD were solubilized in water with thiol-compounds, polymer/protein coats, and micelles/vesicles. Large changes in the emission profiles of the different systems were observed. Systems in water experienced a reduction in quantum yield and loss of the longtime emission decay. Surface oxidation lead to a recovery of the longtime decay which matched that of the ZnS-capped counterpart in non-polar solvents. Lifetimes of QD in the presence of energy/electron transfer donors/acceptors was measured to test the viability of constructing nanocrystal sensors that exploit these processes.

  5. Scientific prospects for spectroscopy of the gamma-ray burst prompt emission with SVOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M. G.; Xie, F.; Sizun, P.; Piron, F.; Dong, Y.; Atteia, J.-L.; Antier, S.; Daigne, F.; Godet, O.; Cordier, B.; Wei, J.

    2017-10-01

    SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Sino-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade, capable to detect and localise the GRB emission, and to follow its evolution in the high-energy and X-ray domains, and in the visible and NIR bands. The satellite carries two wide-field high-energy instruments: a coded-mask gamma-ray imager (ECLAIRs; 4-150 keV), and a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRM; 15-5500 keV) that, together, will characterise the GRB prompt emission spectrum over a wide energy range. In this paper we describe the performances of the ECLAIRs and GRM system with different populations of GRBs from existing catalogues, from the classical ones to those with a possible thermal component superimposed to their non-thermal emission. The combination of ECLAIRs and the GRM will provide new insights also on other GRB properties, as for example the spectral characterisation of the subclass of short GRBs showing an extended emission after the initial spike.

  6. A new electron spectroscopy system for measuring electron emission from fast ion interactions with atomic, molecular, and condensed phase targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Wilson L.

    A new electron spectroscopy system has been developed for measuring electron emission from gas and solid targets induced by fast ion impact. This system uses an ultrahigh-vacuum compatible cylindrical deflector analyzer, designed and fabricated in the Department of Physics at East Carolina University, to measure electron yields as a function of electron energy and emission angle for fast ions interacting with materials. The new spectroscopy system was tested in a previously existing high-vacuum target chamber that has been installed on a new beam line in the ECU Accelerator Laboratory. In addition to the new analyzer, a new data acquisition and experimental control system, based on LabVIEW computer control software, was developed and tested using an existing cylindrical mirror analyzer. Data from this system was compared to previous results to confirm the functionality of the design. Subsequently, the new analyzer was installed in the high-vacuum target chamber and tested by measuring Auger electron emission from 2 MeV protons incident on an argon gas target and comparing to well-known emission spectra. Ultimately, the new electron spectroscopy system will be used for measuring electron yields from condensed phase targets in ultrahigh-vacuum conditions in future experiments.

  7. Emission Spectroscopy of Atmospheric-Pressure Ball Plasmoids: Higher Energy Reveals a Rich Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Rose, Amber Nicole; Glumac, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2017-06-01

    Ball plasmoids (self-sustaining spherical plasmas) are a particularly unique example of a non-equilibrium air plasma. These plasmoids have lifetimes on the order of hundreds of milliseconds without an external power source, however, current models dictate that a ball plasmoid should recombine in a millisecond or less. Ball plasmoids are considered to be a laboratory analogue of natural ball lightning, a phenomenon that has eluded scientific explanation for centuries. We are searching for the underlying physicochemical mechanism(s) by which ball plasmoids and (by extension) ball lightning are stabilized using a variety of diagnostic techniques. This presentation will focus on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) of ball plasmoid discharges between 190-850 nm. The previous generation of OES measurements of this system showed emission from only a few atomic and molecular species, however, the energy available for the discharges in these experiments was limited by the size of the capacitor banks and voltages to which the capacitor banks were charged. We are capable of generating plasmoids at much higher energies, and as a result we are the first to report a very rich chemistry previously not observed in ball plasmoids. We have identified signals from species including NO A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, OH A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, NH A^{3}Π→X^{3}Σ^{-}, AlO A^{2}Π→X^{2}Σ^{+}, NH^{+} B^{2}Δ→X^{2}Π, W I, Al I, Cu I, and H_{α}, all of which have not yet been reported for this system. Analysis of the emission spectra and fitting procedures will be discussed, rotational temperatures of constituent species will be reported, and theories of ball plasmoid stabilization based upon these new results will be presented. Versteegh, A.; Behringer, K.; Fantz, U.; Fussman, G.; Jüttner, B.; Noack, S. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2008, 17(2), 024014 Stephan, K. D.; Dumas, S.; Komala-Noor, L.; McMinn, J. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2013, 22(2), 025018

  8. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  9. Study of melanoma invasion by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sulé-Suso, J.; Sockalingum, G. D.

    2008-02-01

    Compared to other forms of skin cancer, a malignant melanoma has a high risk of spreading to other parts of the body. Melanoma invasion is a complex process involving changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and cell-cell interactions. To fully understand the factors which control the invasion process, a human skin model system was reconstructed. HBL (a commercially available cell line) melanoma cells were seeded on a skin model with and without the presence of keratinocytes and/or fibroblasts. After 14 days culture, the skin specimens were fixed, parafin embedded and cut into 7 µm sections. The de-parafinised sections were investigated by synchrotron Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to study skin cell invasion behaviour. The advantage of using FTIR is its ability to obtain the fingerprint information of the invading cells in terms of protein secondary structure in comparison to non-invading cells and the concentration of the enzyme (matrix-metalloproteinase) which digests protein matrix, near the invading cells. With aid of the spectral mapping images, it is possible to pinpoint the cells in non-invasion and invasion area and analyse the respective spectra. It has been observed that the protein bands in cells and matrix shifted between non-invasive and invasive cells in the reconstructed skin model. We hypothesise that by careful analysis of the FTIR data and validation by other models, FTIR studies can reveal information on which type of cells and proteins are involved in melanoma invasion. Thus, it is possible to trace the cell invasion path by mapping the spectra along the interface of cell layer and matrix body by FTIR spectroscopy.

  10. Alpha Coincidence Spectroscopy studied with GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-11-02

    Abstract The high-energy side of peaks in alpha spectra, e.g. 241Am, as measured with a silicon detector has structure caused mainly by alpha-conversion electron and to some extent alphagamma coincidences. We compare GEANT4 simulation results to 241Am alpha spectroscopy measurements with a passivated implanted planar silicon detector. A large discrepancy between the measurements and simulations suggest that the GEANT4 photon evaporation database for 237Np (daughter of 241Am decay) does not accurately describe the conversion electron spectrum and therefore was found to have large discrepancies with experimental measurements. We describe how to improve the agreement between GEANT4 and alpha spectroscopy for actinides of interest by including experimental measurements of conversion electron spectroscopy into the photon evaporation database.

  11. Photofield Emission Study of Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yongli

    In this thesis the efforts made to better understand the mech- anisms and to refine the apparatus of photofield emission are described. Photofield electron yield and photofield emission from surface electronic have been measured. Both demonstrate the surface sensitivity of this new technique. Analyses of laser-induced thermal effects are also reported which allows the simultaneous determination of both the temperature and workfunction of a laser illuminated surface as small as 50(ANGSTROM) in spatial extent. Theoretical calculations of photofield emission based on the relativistic elec- tronic band structure of tungsten are also carried out and the results are compared to experiment. Data from W(110) and W(111) for a number of different photon energies between 2.41eV and 3.54eV are reported. The measured yield is compared to the theoretical models of the photoexcitation process. Based on this comparison, it is concluded that the spatial variation of the vector potential (')A near the metal-vacuum interface is the dominant excitation mechanism in producing the photocurrent from a laser illuminated field emission tip. Photofield emission from surface electronic states is a unique probe to examine the radiation field near the vicinity of a metal sur- face since the surface states are localized within the first atomic layer of the surface. Studies of photofield emission from surface states on W(100), Mo(100) and Ir(111) are presented in the text. Data analysis shows that photofield emission from localized sur- face states depends predominantly on the normal component of the vector potential (')A. Laser-induced thermal effects on various surfaces of tungsten and molybdenum have been studied using field emitted electrons. Energy distributions measured by a dispersive electron energy ana- lyzer allow the temperature increase of a laser-illuminated surface to be determined to within (+OR-)10 K. In addition to estimating the tem - perature rise, small temperature

  12. The binuclear nickel center in the A-cluster of acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and two biomimetic dinickel complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapers, P.; Mebs, S.; Ilina, Y.; Warner, D. S.; Wörmann, C.; Schuth, N.; Kositzki, R.; Dau, H.; Limberg, C.; Dobbek, H.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is involved in the bacterial carbon oxide conversion pathway. The binuclear nickel sites in ACS enzyme and two biomimetic synthetic compounds containing a Ni(II)Ni(II) unit (1 and 2) were compared using XAS/XES. EXAFS analysis of ACS proteins revealed similar Ni-N/O/S bond lengths and Ni-Ni/Fe distances as in the crystal structure in oxidized ACS, but elongated Ni-ligand bonds in reduced ACS, suggesting more reduced nickel species. The XANES spectra of ACS and the dinickel complexes showed overall similar shapes, but less resolved pre-edge and edge features in ACS, attributed to more distorted square-planar nickel sites in particular in reduced ACS. DFT calculation of pre-edge absorption and Kβ2,5 emission features reproduced the experimental spectra of the synthetic complexes, was sensitive even to the small geometry differences in 1 and 2, and indicated low-spin Ni(II) sites. Comparison of nickel sites in proteins and biomimetic compounds is valuable for deducing structural and electronic differences in response to ligation and redox changes.

  13. Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy and its Unique Application to Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1970's the infrared heterodyne technique has evolved into a powerful tool for the study of molecular constituents, temperatures, and dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Its extremely high spectral resolution (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda/>10(exp 6)) and highly accurate frequency measurement (to 1 part in 10(exp 8)) enabled the detection of nonthermal/natural lasing phenomena on Mars and Venus; direct measurements of winds on Venus, Mars, and Titan; study of mid-infrared aurorae on Jupiter; direct measurement of species abundances on Mars (ozone, isotopic CO2), hydrocarbons on Jupiter, Saturn., Neptune, and Titan, and stratospheric composition in the Earth's stratosphere (O3, CIO, N2O, CO2 ....). Fully resolved emission and absorption line shapes measured by this method enabled the unambiguous retrieval of molecular abundances and local temperatures and thermal structure in regions not probed by other techniques. The mesosphere of Mars and thermosphere of Venus are uniquely probed by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy. Results of these studies tested and constrained photochemical and dynamical theoretical models describing the phenomena measured. The infrared heterodyne technique will be described. Highlights in its evolution to today's instrumentation and resultant discoveries will be presented, including work at Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Koln. Resultant work will include studies supporting NASA and ESA space missions and collaborations between instrumental and theoretical groups.

  14. Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy and its Unique Application to Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1970's the infrared heterodyne technique has evolved into a powerful tool for the study of molecular constituents, temperatures, and dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Its extremely high spectral resolution (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda/>10(exp 6)) and highly accurate frequency measurement (to 1 part in 10(exp 8)) enabled the detection of nonthermal/natural lasing phenomena on Mars and Venus; direct measurements of winds on Venus, Mars, and Titan; study of mid-infrared aurorae on Jupiter; direct measurement of species abundances on Mars (ozone, isotopic CO2), hydrocarbons on Jupiter, Saturn., Neptune, and Titan, and stratospheric composition in the Earth's stratosphere (O3, CIO, N2O, CO2 ....). Fully resolved emission and absorption line shapes measured by this method enabled the unambiguous retrieval of molecular abundances and local temperatures and thermal structure in regions not probed by other techniques. The mesosphere of Mars and thermosphere of Venus are uniquely probed by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy. Results of these studies tested and constrained photochemical and dynamical theoretical models describing the phenomena measured. The infrared heterodyne technique will be described. Highlights in its evolution to today's instrumentation and resultant discoveries will be presented, including work at Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Koln. Resultant work will include studies supporting NASA and ESA space missions and collaborations between instrumental and theoretical groups.

  15. Ultra-nonlocality in density functional theory for photo-emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uimonen, A.-M.; Stefanucci, G.; Leeuwen, R. van

    2014-05-14

    We derive an exact expression for the photocurrent of photo-emission spectroscopy using time-dependent current density functional theory (TDCDFT). This expression is given as an integral over the Kohn-Sham spectral function renormalized by effective potentials that depend on the exchange-correlation kernel of current density functional theory. We analyze in detail the physical content of this expression by making a connection between the density-functional expression and the diagrammatic expansion of the photocurrent within many-body perturbation theory. We further demonstrate that the density functional expression does not provide us with information on the kinetic energy distribution of the photo-electrons. Such information can, in principle, be obtained from TDCDFT by exactly modeling the experiment in which the photocurrent is split into energy contributions by means of an external electromagnetic field outside the sample, as is done in standard detectors. We find, however, that this procedure produces very nonlocal correlations between the exchange-correlation fields in the sample and the detector.

  16. Updates on the Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Thomson Scattering Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Azzari, Phillip; Royce, James; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Stutzman, Brooke; Zuniga, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) have set up spectral probes to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Raw data collected will be used to measure the plasma's relative density, temperature, structure, and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of the plasma's properties can be determined through modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic field structure to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time and space. In addition, the Thomson Scattering (TS) device will measure internal temperature and density data as the HPX plasma transitions through capacitive and inductive modes while developing into helicon plasma. Currently CGAPL is focused on building its laser beam transport and scattered light collection optical systems. Recently, HPX has acquired an Andor ICCD spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Data collected by the TS system will be logged in real time by CGAPL's Data Acquisition (DAQ) system with LabView remote access. Further progress on HPX will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  17. Updates on Optical Emission Spectroscopy & Langmuir Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; Frank, John; Azzari, Phillip; Hopson, Jordan; James, Royce; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Eva; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    HPX is developing a to shorter lifetime (20 - 30 ns) more reproducible plasma at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). Once achieved, spectral and particle probes will help to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Once corrections for the RF field are in place for the Langmuir probe, raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of plasma properties can be determined with modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, both using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the implementation of the OES and Langmuir probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  18. Improvement of photomask CD uniformity using spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Junhwa; Kim, Youngkeun; Jang, Il-Yong; Kim, Byung-Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Kang, Minwook; Lee, Changmin; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-10-01

    According to the design rule shrinkage, more precise control of mask CD, including mean to target and uniformity, is required in lithography process. Since dry etching is one of the most critical processes to determine CD qualities in photomask, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to monitor plasma status during dry etching process could be useful. However, it is not possible to obtain distributional information of plasma with a conventional OES tool because the OES acquires totally integrated signals of light from the chamber. To overcome the limit of OES, we set up a spatially resolved (SR)-OES tool and measure the distribution of radicals in plasma during dry etch process. The SR-OES consists of a series of lenses, apertures, and a pinhole as a spatial filter which enable us to focus on certain area in the chamber, to extract the emitted light from plasma, and to perform the spectroscopic analysis. The Argon based actinometry combined with SR-OES shows spatially distinguished peaks related to the etch rate of Chromium on photomask. In this paper, we present experimental results of SR-OES installed on a commercial photomask dry etcher and discuss its practical effectiveness by correlation of the results with chamber etch rate.

  19. [Research on the atomic emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma process].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiang; Li, Na; Xu, Lu; Wang, Bo; Jin, Hui-Liang

    2013-02-01

    In the reaction of the atmospheric pressure plasma process, the heat stable process of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet has a direct impact on the removal rate, CF4 is the provider of active F* atom, O2 is important auxiliary gas, and they play an important role in the process. In order to research the rule of the concentration of the 3 parameters upon the atmospheric pressure plasma processing, the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used for processing and the spectrometer was used to monitor the changes in the process. The experiment indicates that: when the heat is stable, the concentration of the active F* atom essentially remains unchanged; with increasing the concentration of gas CF4, the spectrum of the active F* atom has self-absorption phenomena, so using the atomic emission spectroscopy method to monitor the changes in the concentration of active F* atom generated by CF4 is not completely exact; because O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF4, which inhibits the compound of the active F* atom, so in a certain range with increasing the concentration of gas O2, the concentration of the active F* atom becomes strong.

  20. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  1. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in PECVD Helps Modulate Key Features in Biofunctional Coatings for Medical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Miguel; Michael, Praveesuda; Filipe, Elysse; Wise, Steven; Bilek, Marcela; University of Sydney Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We explore the use of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnostic tools as a process feedback control strategy in plasma-assisted deposition of biofunctional coatings. Hydrogenated carbon nitride coatings are deposited on medical-grade metallic substrates using radio-frequency (rf) discharges sustained in C2H2/N2/Ar gaseous mixtures. The discharge is generated by capacitively coupling the rf power (supplied at f = 13.56 MHz) to the plasma and the substrates are electrically biased using a pulse generator to provide microsecond square profiled pulses at voltages in the range |Vbias| = 250 V - 1000 V. Nitrogen content and CN bonding configurations in the coatings follow similar trends to those of CN radicals and nitrogen molecular ions in the discharge. OES is used as a non-intrusive diagnostic technique to identify a suitable window of process parameters and ultimately achieve biofunctional interfaces compatible with current clinical demands. Importantly, we demonstrate that key features of the coatings can be modulated and made suitable for blood and/or tissue contacting medical implants, such as coronary stents and orthopaedic implants. The coatings are mechanically robust, inherently non-thrombogenic and can be readily modified, enabling an easy functionalization through the immobilization of biological molecules in a bioactive conformation.

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopy of planetary nebulae: How strong is the H2 emission?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Carr, J.; Harvey, P. M.; Lester, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    In an effort to understand the systematics of the H2 emission from planetary nebulae, a program of near-infared spectroscopy using the University of Texas infrared reticon spectrometer was started. This instrument has a 1x32 element InSb photodiode array as a detector. All of the observations reported were made on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m telescope, with spectra resolving power lambda/delta lambda = 600. The spectral coverage allows the measurement strengths of Brackett gamma He I 2.113 microns, HE II 2.189 microns and the v = 1=0 S(1) line of H2 at 2.122 microns. One of the most important advantages of this instrument is that we are able to resolve H2 from the adjacent He I line. Most previous observations of planetaries have been made at spectral resolving powers of about 100, which blend these lines. The contribution of the He I line has generally been dismissed as being unimportant, but we show that this may not be valid. Our higher resolving power also improves the line-to-continuum contrast; in some cases, the continuum is the limiting factor in detecting faint lines.

  3. Titanium density analysed by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy in a dc magnetron discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, M.; Britun, N.; Kim, Yong M.; Han, Jeon G.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents an optical diagnostic examination of dc planar magnetron discharge used for titanium deposition at 30 mTorr in argon bulk gas. The results were obtained by optical absorption (OAS) and emission (OES) spectroscopy for two distances from the target without substrate. The absolute density of titanium in the ground and metastable states at 4 cm from the target ranged, respectively, between 8 × 1010 cm-3 and 1012 cm-3 and between 6 × 1010 cm-3 and 3 × 1011 cm-3, in the range 0.2-1.0 A. OES results were used to prepare an assumed interpretation in terms of differences in loss mechanisms, mainly by either diffusion towards the walls for all particles at 8 cm from the target or collision losses for non-radiative species at 4 cm from the target, except for the titanium ground state. This was confirmed by our results of the argon metastable density measurement at 4 cm which was constant at around 7 × 1010 cm-3 with discharge current.

  4. Synthetic diagnostic for the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic using a full optical integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausammann, L.; Churchill, R. M.; Shi, L.

    2017-02-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is used to measure fluctuations of electron density in the edge and core of fusion plasmas, and is a key in understanding turbulence in a plasma reactor. A synthetic BES diagnostic for the turbulence simulation code XGC1 has been developed using a realistic neutral beam model and an optical system easily adaptable to different kinds of tokamaks. The beam is modeled using multiple beam energy components, each one with a fraction of the total energy and their own mass and energy (mono-energetic components). The optical system consists of a lens focusing a bundle of optical fibers and resulting in a 2D measurement. The synthetic diagnostic gives similar correlation functions and behaviour of the turbulences than the usual methods that do not take into account the full 3D optical effects. The results, based on a simulation of XGC1, contain an analysis of the correlation (in space and time), a comparison of different approximations possible and their importance in accurately modeling the BES diagnostic.

  5. Imaging molecular adsorption and desorption dynamics on graphene using terahertz emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Y.; Kawayama, I.; Tabata, M.; Salek, K. A.; Murakami, H.; Wang, M.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.; Kono, J.; Tonouchi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Being an atomically thin material, graphene is known to be extremely susceptible to its environment, including defects and phonons in the substrate on which it is placed as well as gas molecules that surround it. Thus, any device design using graphene has to take into consideration all surrounding components, and device performance needs to be evaluated in terms of environmental influence. However, no methods have been established to date to readily measure the density and distribution of external perturbations in a quantitative and non-destructive manner. Here, we present a rapid and non-contact method for visualizing the distribution of molecular adsorbates on graphene semi-quantitatively using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging. We found that the waveform of terahertz bursts emitted from graphene-coated InP sensitively changes with the type of atmospheric gas, laser irradiation time, and ultraviolet light illumination. The terahertz waveform change is explained through band structure modifications in the InP surface depletion layer due to the presence of localized electric dipoles induced by adsorbed oxygen. These results demonstrate that terahertz emission serves as a local probe for monitoring adsorption and desorption processes on graphene films and devices, suggesting a novel two-dimensional sensor for detecting local chemical reactions.

  6. Assessment of diabetic neuropathy with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Harshvardhan; Gaur, Neeraj; Tipre, Dnyanesh

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are nerve-damaging disorders associated with diabetes. They are commonly attributed to peripheral nerves and primarily affect the limbs of the patient. They cause altered sensitivity to external stimuli along with loss in balance and reflexes of the affected patient. DNs are associated with a variety of clinical manifestations including autonomic failure and are caused by poor management of blood sugar levels. Imaging modalities provide vital information about early physiological changes in DNs. This review summarizes contributions by various teams of scientists in developing imaging methods to assess physiological changes in DNs and ongoing clinical trials where imaging modalities are applied to evaluate therapeutic intervention in DNs. Development of PET, single photon emission computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods over the past 20 years are reviewed in the diagnostic assessment of DNs. Abnormal radiotracer pharmacokinetics and neurometabolite spectra in affected organs confirm physiological abnormalities in DN. With the use of the Siemens Biograph mMR and GE Signa - 60 cm (PET/MRI scanner), simultaneous acquisition of physiological and anatomical information could enhance understanding of DNs and accelerate drug development.

  7. The emission spectroscopy of the B2Σ- -X2 Π system of CD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, W.; Zachwieja, M.; Hakalla, R.

    2016-06-01

    The visible spectrum of CD has been investigated at high resolution between 24,500 and 27,500 cm-1 using a high accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy technique. The CD molecules were produced and excited in a stainless steel hollow-cathode lamp with two anodes and filled with a mixture of He buffer gas and CD4. The emission from the discharge was observed with a plane grating spectrograph and recorded by a photomultiplier tube. The 0-0, 1-0 and 1-1 bands of the B2Σ- -X2 Π transition have been registered and measured, while 2-0 and 2-1 absorption bands (Herzberg and Johns, 1969) have been reanalyzed. The current data were elaborated with help of recent X2 Π ground state parameters reported by Zachwieja et al. (2012) from investigation of the A2 Δ -X2 Π transition. This way, the improved spectroscopic constants for the B2Σ- state of CD have been provided as follows: νe = 26,050.787 (11) cm-1, ωe = 1653.019 (25) cm-1, ωexe = 123.899 (12) cm-1, Be = 7.08296 (32) cm-1, αe = 0.30741 (84) cm-1, and γe = - 0.10727 (42) cm-1.

  8. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Barbisan, M.

    2012-04-15

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H{sup -} or D{sup -} particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H{sup -} (D{sup -}) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H{sub {alpha}} (D{sub {alpha}}) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  9. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  10. VUV emission spectroscopy combined with H- density measurements in the ion source Prometheus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleiferis, S.; Laulainen, J.; Svarnas, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2017-08-01

    "Prometheus I" is a volume H- negative ion source, driven by a network of dipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR; 2.45 GHz) modules. The vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectrum of low-temperature hydrogen plasmas may be related to molecular and atomic processes involved directly or indirectly in the production of negative ions. In this work, VUV spectroscopy has been performed in the above source, Prometheus I, both in the ECR zones and the bulk (far from ECR zones and surfaces) plasma. The acquired VUV spectra are correlated with the negative ion densities, as measured by means of laser photodetachment, and the possible mechanisms of negative ion production are considered. The well-established H- formation process of dissociative attachment to vibrationally excited molecules is evaluated, while an additional production path (i.e. neutral resonant ionization) is tested due to the recently attracted interest. The obtained results indicate that for the source Prometheus I, the dominant formation process is dissociative attachment.

  11. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  12. Heuristic modeling of spectral plasma emission for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, Rolf; Noll, Reinhard

    2009-12-15

    A heuristic model was developed to describe the spectral emission of laser-induced plasmas generated for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under the assumption that the composition of the plasma and the plasma state is known. The plasma is described by a stationary spherical shell model surrounded by an ambient gas, which partially absorbs the emitted radiation. The radiation transport equation is used to calculate the spectrum emitted by the plasma. Simulations of a multiline iron spectrum and a self-reversed Al line are compared with experimental spectra. For the iron spectrum, the degree of congruence is moderate to good, which may be attributed to a lack of precise atomic and Stark broadening data as well as a simplified plasma model. The line profile of the Al resonance line with self reversal can be simulated with a high degree of agreement. Simulated spectra of a steel sample in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range demonstrate the strong influence of the ambient atmosphere in the spectral range between 178 and 194 nm. The number of free parameters of the plasma model of 8 can be further reduced down to 3, taking into account the integral parameters of the plasma that are accessible experimentally.

  13. Advanced Low Emissions Subsonic Combustor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Reid

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in commercial and military aircraft gas turbines have yielded significant improvements in fuel efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, due in large part to increased combustor operating pressures and temperatures. However, the higher operating conditions have increased the emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), which is a pollutant with adverse impact on the atmosphere and environment. Since commercial and military aircraft are the only important direct source of NOx emissions at high altitudes, there is a growing consensus that considerably more stringent limits on NOx emissions will be required in the future for all aircraft. In fact, the regulatory communities have recently agreed to reduce NOx limits by 20 percent from current requirements effective in 1996. Further reductions at low altitude, together with introduction of limits on NOx at altitude, are virtual certainties. In addition, the U.S. Government recently conducted hearings on the introduction of federal fees on the local emission of pollutants from all sources, including aircraft. While no action was taken regarding aircraft in this instance, the threat of future action clearly remains. In these times of intense and growing international competition, the U.S. le-ad in aerospace can only be maintained through a clear technological dominance that leads to a product line of maximum value to the global airline customer. Development of a very low NOx combustor will be essential to meet the future needs of both the commercial and military transport markets, if additional economic burdens and/or operational restrictions are to be avoided. In this report, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) presents the study results with the following specific objectives: Development of low-emissions combustor technologies for advances engines that will enter into service circa 2005, while producing a goal of 70 percent lower NOx emissions, compared to 1996 regulatory levels. Identification of solution approaches to

  14. Investigation of Ti2AlC and TiC by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Martin

    2007-04-01

    The electronic structure of the MAX-phase Ti2AlC was investigated by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. This nanolaminated carbide compound represents a class of layered materials with a combination of properties from both metals and ceramics. The bulk-sensitive soft x-ray emission technique is shown to be particularly useful for detecting detailed electronic structure information about internal monolayers and interfaces. The Ti-Al bonding is manifested by a pronounced peak in the Ti L-emission of Ti2AlC, which is not present in the binary TiC system. The spectral shape of Al L-emission in the MAX-phase is strongly modified in comparison to metallic Al. By replacing the constituting elements, a change of the electron population can be achieved causing a change of covalent bonding between the laminated layers, which enables control of the macroscopic properties of the material.

  15. Boronyl Mimics Gold: a Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have found that gold atom and boronyl bear similarities in bonding in many gas phase clusters. B10(BO), B12(BO), B3(BO)n (n=1, 2) were found to possess similar bonding and structures to B10Au, B12Au, B3Aun (n=1, 2), respectively. During the recent photoelectron spectroscopy experiments, the spectra of BiBO- and BiAu- clusters are found to exhibit similar patterns, hinting that they possess similar geometric structures. While BiAu- is a linear molecule, BiBO- is also linear. The similarity in bonding between BiBO- and BiAu- is owing to the fact that Au and BO are monovalent σ ligands. The electron affinities are measured to be 1.79±0.04eV for BiBO- and 1.36±0.02eV for BiAu-. The current results provide new examples for the BO/Au isolobal analogy and enrich the chemistry of boronyl and gold. H.-J. Zhai, C.-Q. Miao, S.-D. Li, L.-S. Wang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 12155-1216 Q. Chen, H. Bai, H.-J. Zhai, S.-D. Li, L.-S. Wang, J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 139, 044308 H. Bai, H.-J. Zhai, S.-D. Li, L.-S. Wang, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 9646-9653 H.-J. Zhai, Q. Chen, H. Bai, S.-D. Li, L.-S. Wang, Acc. Chem. Res. 2014, 47, 2435-2445

  16. VIMOS integral field spectroscopy of blue compact galaxies. I. Morphological properties, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairós, L. M.; Caon, N.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Blue compact galaxies (BCG) are gas-rich, low-luminosity, low-metallicity systems that undergo a violent burst of star formation. These galaxies offer us a unique opportunity to investigate collective star formation and its effects on galaxy evolution in a relatively simple environment. Spatially resolved spectrophotometric studies of BCGs are essential for a better understanding of the role of starburst-driven feedback processes on the kinematical and chemical evolution of low-mass galaxies near and far. Aims: We carry out an integral field spectroscopic study of a sample of BCGs, with the aim of probing the morphology, kinematics, dust extinction, and excitation mechanisms of their warm interstellar medium. Methods: Eight BCGs were observed with the VIMOS integral field unit at the Very Large Telescope using blue and orange grisms in high-resolution mode. At a spatial sampling of 0''&dotbelow;67 per spaxel, we covered about 30″ × 30″ on the sky, with a wavelength range of 4150...7400 Å. Emission lines were fitted with a single Gaussian profile to measure their wavelength, flux, and width. From these data we built two-dimensional maps of the continuum and the most prominent emission-lines, as well as diagnostic line ratios, extinction, and kinematic maps. Results: An atlas has been produced with the following: emission-line fluxes and continuum emission; ionization, interstellar extinction, and electron density maps from line ratios; velocity and velocity dispersion fields. From integrated spectroscopy, it includes tables of the extinction corrected line fluxes and equivalent widths, diagnostic-line ratios, physical parameters, and the abundances for the brightest star-forming knots and for the whole galaxy. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 079.B-0445.The reduced datacubes and their error maps (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp

  17. Tissue differentiation by means of high resolution optical emission spectroscopy during electrosurgical intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Ines; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Nüßle, Daniela; Spether, Dominik; Neugebauer, Alexander; Bibinov, Nikita; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Enderle, Markus; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Electrosurgery is the use of radio-frequency electric current for the cutting of biological tissue e.g. for resection of tumour tissue. In this work, the optical emission of plasma being generated during the electrosurgical procedure is investigated with a high resolution echelle spectrometer to find differences between tumour tissue and normal renal tissue in a pre-clinical ex vivo study. Trace elements like zinc, iron, copper and cadmium are present in the tissue spectra as well as the electrolytes magnesium, calcium, sodium and potassium and some diatomic molecules such as hydroxyl radical, cyano radical, dicarbon, nitrogen monohydride and molecular nitrogen which are mainly dissociated from polyatomic molecules. With the atomic emission line of cadmium at 228.8 nm the treated tissue can be differentiated in tumorous and healthy tissue with correct assignment of 95% for tumour tissue and 92% for normal renal tissue.

  18. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  19. EUVE Spectroscopy of Comet Hyakutake: First Detection of Solar Wind Charge Transfer Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Mumma, M. J.

    2000-10-01

    The ROSAT and EUVE observations of comet Hyakutake in 1996 revealed a puzzling X-ray emission. That comet appeared to be a more efficient emitter of X-rays than the Moon by a factor of 80,000. Currently our EUVE database includes eight observations of comets, and soft X-ray emissions have been detected in five of those observations. The measured soft X-ray luminosities are proportional to r3/2Qgas with the efficiency of (6.4+/- 0.9)10-5 AU3/2 and therefore favor a gas-related mechanism. The observed behavior of the brightness maxima and spatial distributions of soft X-ray emissions indicate charge transfer of solar wind heavy ions as the only viable excitation process. However, a final and crucial test for the X-ray excitation process should be made by spectroscopy. We extracted three spectra from our EUVE observations of comet Hyakutake. These spectra cover the ranges of 80-180, 170-360, and 300-700 Å. Due to the close flyby of the comet at 0.1 AU, (1-3)104 photons were collected in each spectrum, that is, more by two orders of magnitude than in the previously published spectra. Despite very good dispersion of the EUVE spectrometers, the great angular extent of the comet reduced the resolving power to 10 in our spectra. The spectra revealed for the first time emission lines of multiple charged ions which present a direct evidence for solar wind charge transfer excitation. The most prominent lines are O4+ 215 Å, C4+ 249 Å, He+ 304 Å, and Ne7+ 448 Å. Some other lines, which are of comparable strength, are blended. The photon luminosity of charge exchange at energy below 100 eV (124 Å) exceeds that above 100 eV by a factor of 2, and the mean total quantum yield is 4 photons per heavy ion. The detected O+ lines at 538/539, 617, and 430/442 Å are excited by photoionization of atomic oxygen similar to that in Earth's dayglow. The observed depletion of neon by more than a factor 2600 relative to the solar abundance confirm the current view that Oort cloud comets

  20. A Chemical Detector for Gas Chromatography Using Pulsed Discharge Emission Spectroscopy on a Microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Zhu, W.; Mitra, B.; Liu, J.; Liu, T.; Fan, X.; Gianchandani, Y.

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in miniaturized systems for chemical analysis in harsh environments. Chemical detection by emission spectroscopy of on-chip microdischarges [1-3] can be performed at >200°C [4], suggesting utility inspace exploration, volcanic monitoring, and oil well monitoring. This abstract describes the first use of pulsed microdischarge spectroscopy for gas chromatography (GC).This effort supports NASA interests in monitoring closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The microdischarge occurs on a 1cm2 glass chip (Fig. 1a), with thin-film Ni electrodes separated by 160μm. A glass lid with a grooved gas-flow channel, and inlet/outlet capillary tubes are epoxy-sealed to the chip. Located downstream of the 1.7m-long, RTX-1-coated, GC separation column, the microdischarge chip is read by a spectrometer. In a typical experiment (Fig. 1b), a mixture of acetone 3.6μg, 1-hexanol 2.8μg and nitrobenzene 3.0μg, is injected, with He carrier gas at 1.56sccm, through the GC. Acetone elutes quickly while nitrobenzene is slower. Microdischarges are triggered at 0.5Hz for 6 min., and 0.04Hz thereafter. Each microdischarge consumes ≈8mJ; the average power is ≈1.14mW. The spectrum (Fig. 1b, inset) shows that the 388nm peak, representing CN/CH fragments [5], is enhanced by carbon compounds. Its strength relative to the 588nm peak of He provides a chromatogram. Fig. 1b also shows a benchmark result from a commercial flame ionization detector (FID). The differences in elution time are attributed to differences in the gas flow paths for the two detectors [1]. REFERENCES [1] Eijkel et al, Anal. Chem, 2000 [2] Mitra et al, IEEE Trans Plasma Sci, 2008 [3] Mitra et al, IEEE Sensors, 2008 [4] Wright et al, APL, 2009 [5] Pearse et al, The Identification of Molecular Spectra, 1963

  1. Integral Field Spectroscopy of the Extended Emission-Line Region of 4C 37.43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Stockton, Alan

    2007-09-01

    We present Gemini integral field spectroscopy and Keck II long-slit spectroscopy of the extended emission-line region (EELR) around the quasar 4C 37.43. The velocity structure of the ionized gas is complex and cannot be explained globally by a simple dynamical model. The spectra from the clouds are inconsistent with shock or ``shock + precursor'' ionization models, but they are consistent with photoionization by the quasar nucleus. The best-fit photoionization model requires a low-metallicity [12+log(O/H)<~8.7] two-phase medium, consisting of a matter-bounded diffuse component with a unity filling factor (N~1 cm-3, T~15,000 K), in which are embedded small, dense clouds (N~400 cm-3, T~104 K). The high-density clouds are transient and can be regenerated through compressing the diffuse medium by low-speed shocks (VS<~100 km s-1). Our photoionization model gives a total mass for the ionized gas of about 3×1010 Msolar, and the total kinetic energy implied by this mass and the observed velocity field is ~2×1058 erg. The fact that luminous EELRs are confined to steep-spectrum radio-loud QSOs, yet show no morphological correspondence to the radio jets, suggests that the driving force producing the 4C 37.43 EELR was a roughly spherical blast wave initiated by the production of the jet. That such a mechanism seems capable of ejecting a mass comparable to that of the total interstellar medium of the Milky Way suggests that ``quasar-mode'' feedback may indeed be an efficient means of regulating star formation in the early universe. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), CNPq

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.; Stafford, L.

    2014-03-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C2 molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH3)x and O-Si-(CH3)x bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O2 in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiOx. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O2 in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the average size of the titanate nanoparticles was smaller

  3. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Stafford, L.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.

    2014-03-21

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C{sub 2} molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} and O-Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O{sub 2} in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiO{sub x}. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O{sub 2} in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the

  4. Development of a polarization-modulation spectroscopy system for the temporally resolved measurement of linear polarization in plasma emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kenji; Shikama, Taiichi; Higashi, Takanori; Hasuo, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    A system to measure linear polarization in the HeI 21P-31D emission line (667.8 nm) was developed for application to plasma polarization spectroscopy. To verify the system performance, the normalized Stokes parameters were evaluated. A measurement error of less than 1% with a time resolution of 1 ms was achieved for monochromatic light in the state of complete linear polarization.

  5. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-07-21

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3–8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  6. FTIR Spectroscopy for Carbon Family Study.

    PubMed

    Ţucureanu, Vasilica; Matei, Alina; Avram, Andrei Marius

    2016-11-01

    Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a versatile technique for the characterization of materials belonging to the carbon family. Based on the interaction of the IR radiation with matter this technique may be used for the identification and characterization of chemical structures. Most important features of this method are: non-destructive, real-time measurement and relatively easy to use. Carbon basis for all living systems has found numerous industrial applications from carbon coatings (i.e. amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films: diamond-like carbon (DLC) films) to nanostructured materials (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene) and carbon materials at nanoscale or carbon dots (CDots). In this paper, we present the FTIR vibrational spectroscopy for the characterization of diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fullerene and carbon quantum dots (CQDs), without claiming to cover entire field.

  7. Bevalac studies of magnet Cerenkov spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The attempt was made to identify the various contributions to the velocity resolution of Cerenkov detectors such as might be used in Astromag, to measure the magnitude of these contributions and assess their effect on the mass resolution of an isotope spectrometer for Astromag, and to perform Bevalac tests of magnet/Cerenkov spectroscopy. A first version of a new 5 in. photomultiplier tube was also tested that is designed for use in large magnetic fields.

  8. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, J; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Swetz, D S; Jaye, C; Fischer, D A; Reintsema, C D; Bennett, D A; Vale, L R; Mandal, U; O'Neil, G C; Miaja-Avila, L; Joe, Y I; El Nahhas, A; Fullagar, W; Gustafsson, F Parnefjord; Sundström, V; Kurunthu, D; Hilton, G C; Schmidt, D R; Ullom, J N

    2015-05-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies.

  9. Deep level study of Mg-doped GaN using deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Amano, Hiroshi; Monemar, Bo; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl

    2016-07-01

    Deep levels in Mg-doped GaN grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), undoped GaN grown by MOCVD, and halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE)-grown GaN have been studied using deep level transient spectroscopy and minority charge carrier transient spectroscopy on Schottky diodes. One hole trap, labeled HT1, was detected in the Mg-doped sample. It is observed that the hole emission rate of the trap is enhanced by increasing electric field. By fitting four different theoretical models for field-assisted carrier emission processes, the three-dimensional Coulombic Poole-Frenkel (PF) effect, three-dimensional square well PF effect, phonon-assisted tunneling, and one-dimensional Coulombic PF effect including phonon-assisted tunneling, it is found that the one-dimensional Coulombic PF model, including phonon-assisted tunneling, is consistent with the experimental data. Since the trap exhibits the PF effect, we suggest it is acceptorlike. From the theoretical model, the zero field ionization energy of the trap and an estimate of the hole capture cross section have been determined. Depending on whether the charge state is -1 or -2 after hole emission, the zero field activation energy Ei 0 is 0.57 eV or 0.60 eV, respectively, and the hole capture cross section σp is 1.3 ×10-15c m2 or 1.6 ×10-16c m2 , respectively. Since the level was not observed in undoped GaN, it is suggested that the trap is associated with an Mg related defect.

  10. Characterization of a high current pulsed arc using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Zaepffel, C.; Chemartin, L.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation realized on an experimental setup that simulates an arc column subjected to the transient phase of a lightning current waveform in laboratory conditions. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to assess space- and time-resolved properties of this high current pulsed arc. Different current peak levels are utilised in this work, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with a peak time around 15 µs. Ionic lines of nitrogen and oxygen are used to determine the radial profiles of temperature and electron density of the arc channel over time from 2 µs to 36 µs. A combination of 192 N II and O II lines is considered in the calculation of the bound-bound contribution of the absorption coefficient of the plasma channel. Calculations of the optical thickness showed that self-absorption of these ionic lines in the arc column is important. To obtain temperature and electron density profiles in the arc, we solved the radiative transfer equation across the channel under an axisymmetric assumption and considering the channel formed by uniform concentric layers. For the 100 kA current peak level, the temperature reaches more than 38 000 K and the electron density reaches 5  ×  1018 cm-3. The pressure inside the channel is calculated using the air plasma composition at local thermodynamic equilibrium, and reaches 45 bar. The results are discussed and utilised to estimate the electrical conductivity of the arc channel.

  11. Curve of growth methodology applied to laser-induced plasma emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, I. B.; Anzano, J. M.; King, L. A.; Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1999-04-01

    The curve-of-growth (COG) method was applied to a laser-induced plasma. The plasma was produced by a Nd:YAG laser on the surface of steel samples containing 0.007-1.3% of Cr. The emission was collected from the top of the plasma by means of a 45° pierced mirror and aligned onto an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) with a gate width of 1 μs and a variable delay time. The resonance 425.4 nm Cr line was used for construction of the COG. The temperature of the plasma (˜8000 K at 5-μs delay) was determined from a Boltzmann plot. The damping constant a, proportional to the ratio of the Lorentzian to the Doppler line widths, was found from the best fit of a series of calculated COG to the experimental data points and was 0.20±0.05. The number density of neutral Cr atoms which corresponded to the transition between low and high optical densities, was ≈6.5·10 12 cm -3. The cross-section for broadening collisions of Cr atoms with atmospheric species (presumably N 2) was calculated to be (66±16) Å. The shape of the 425.4-nm Cr line was additionally checked by scanning an ultra-narrow cw Ti:Sapphire laser across the atomic transition and found to be in agreement with preliminary estimates. The potential of the COG method for laser breakdown spectroscopy is discussed.

  12. Steady-state tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy study to probe tertiary structure of proteins in solid powders.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas K; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain information about protein tertiary structure in solid state by using steady state tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence emission spectroscopy on protein powders. Beta-lactoglobulin (betaLg) and interferon alpha-2a (IFN) powder samples were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using a front surface sample holder. Two different sets of dried betaLg samples were prepared by vacuum drying of solutions: one containing betaLg, and the other containing a mixture of betaLg and guanidine hydrochloride. Dried IFN samples were prepared by vacuum drying of IFN solutions and by vacuum drying of polyethylene glycol precipitated IFN. The results obtained from solid samples were compared with the emission scans of these proteins in solutions. The emission scans obtained from protein powders were slightly blue-shifted compared to the solution spectra due to the absence of water. The emission scans were red-shifted for betaLg samples dried from solutions containing GuHCl. The magnitude of the shifts in lambda(max) depended on the extent of drying of the samples, which was attributed to the crystallization of GuHCl during the drying process. The shifts in the lambda(max) of the Trp emission spectrum are associated with the changes in the tertiary structure of betaLg. In the case of IFN, the emission scans obtained from PEG-precipitated and dried sample were different compared to the emission scans obtained from IFN in solution and from vacuum dried IFN. The double peaks observed in this sample were attributed to the unfolding of the protein. In the presence of trehalose, the two peaks converged to form a single peak, which was similar to solution emission spectra, whereas no change was observed in the presence of mannitol. We conclude that Trp fluorescence spectroscopy provides a simple and reliable means to characterize Trp microenvironment in protein powders that is related to the tertiary conformation of proteins in the solid state. This study shows

  13. The use of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) in the determination of lithium in cleaning validation swabs.

    PubMed

    Lewen, Nancy; Nugent, Dennis

    2010-09-05

    The pharmaceutical industry is required to perform cleaning validation studies to verify that equipment used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals is adequately cleaned from one product or process to the next. Typically, these cleaning validation studies require an analytical method that uses some form of chromatographic technique. In the case of products that may have an inorganic constituent, however, if can often be easier to verify the cleanliness of equipment by using a non-chromatographic technique. A method is described to certify the cleanliness of processing equipment by determining lithium in cleaning validation swabs using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  14. Revealing the Dual Nature of Magnetism in Iron Pnictides and Iron Chalcogenides Using X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gretarsson H.; Xu Z.; Lupascu, A.; Kim, J.; Casa, D.; Gog, T,; Wu, W.; Julian, S.R.; Wen, J.S.; Gu, G.D.; Yuan, R.H.; Chen, Z.G.; Wang, N.-L.; Khim, S.; Kim, K.H.; Ishikado, M.; Jarrige, I.; Shamoto, S.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.and Young-June Kim

    2011-09-22

    We report a Fe K{beta} x-ray emission spectroscopy study of local magnetic moments in various iron-based superconductors in their paramagnetic phases. Local magnetic moments are found in all samples studied: PrFeAsO, Ba(Fe,Co){sub 2}As{sub 2}, LiFeAs, Fe{sub 1+x}(Te,Se), and A{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 5} (where A = K, Rb, and Cs). The moment size is independent of temperature or carrier concentration but varies significantly across different families. Specifically, all iron pnictide samples have local moments of about 1 {micro}B/Fe, while FeTe and K{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 5} families have much larger local moments of {approx}2 {micro}B/Fe and {approx}3.3 {micro}B/Fe, respectively. Our results illustrate the importance of multiorbital physics in describing magnetism of these compounds.

  15. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X. Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2014-02-15

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H{sup −} ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  16. The emission spectroscopy of the e1Π-a1Δ system of VN molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qunchao; Hu, Shi; Sun, Weiguo; Wang, Qi

    2013-10-01

    Vanadium nitride is an important metallurgical additive and a good electrode material molecule. It is necessary to understand its intrinsic microstructure for better applications. Four groups of known experimental transition data of low-lying rotational quantum states and the analytical formula developed recently by Sun group are used to study the Ree, Pee, Rff and Pff-branch emission spectra of the (0, 0) band of the e1Π-a1Δ system of VN molecule respectively. The results not only reproduce all known experimental spectral lines accurately, but also generate valid data of the unknown spectral lines up to J = 80 that may not be available experimentally.

  17. Spectroscopy and CCD-photography of extended red emission in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. N.; Schild, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent spectrographic studies of extended red emission (ERE) seen in the 0.6 to 0.9 micron spectral region in many reflection nebulae have shown fluorescence by amorphous hydrogenated carbon to be the most probable cause of the ERE. Spectrographic observations were performed on the nebulae NGC 2023 and NGC 7023, using the intensified Reticon scanner (IRS) of Kitt Peak National Observatory on the N0-2 0.9 mm telescope. Charge coupled device (CCD) images of NGC2023 and NGC 7023 were obtained with the CfA CCD detector on the 0.6 mm telescope of the Whipple Observatory. Results are discussed.

  18. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J.; DuBois, R.; Shevelko, V.; Fritzsche, S.; Zou, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  19. Evaluation of cross-sections for particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbich, A. F.

    2014-07-01

    The extension of the cross-section evaluation procedure to PIGE data was investigated and the first results are reported. Two different cases were studied: the gamma emission accompanying inelastic scattering of protons, and the (p,γ)-reaction. The corresponding theoretical calculations were performed in the framework of R-matrix and DWBA for the (p,p‧γ) reaction on 23Na, and using statistical model for the proton radiative capture by 52Cr. The possibility of achieving a close fit to the experimental data is demonstrated.

  20. 1,1-dimethylhydrazine as a high purity nitrogen source for MOVPE-water reduction and quantification using nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-atomic emission detection spectroscopy and cryogenic-mass spectroscopy analytical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Odedra, R.; Smith, L.M.; Rushworth, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrazine derivatives are attractive low temperature nitrogen sources for use in MOVPE due to their low thermal stability. However their purification and subsequent analysis has not previously been investigated in depth for this application. A detailed study on 1,1-dimethylhydrazine {l{underscore}brace}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}N-NH{sub 2}{r{underscore}brace} purified by eight different methods and the subsequent quantitative measurements of water present in the samples obtained is reported here. A correlation between {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) and cryogenic mass spectroscopy (Cryogenic-MS) has been performed. All three analysis techniques can be used to measure water in the samples and with the best purification the water content can be lowered well below 100 ppm. The high purity of this material has been demonstrated by growth results and the state-of-the-art performance of laser diodes.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  2. Estimation of the amount of tropospheric ozone in a cloudy sky by ground-based Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spänkuch, D; Döhler, W; Güldner, J; Schulz, E

    1998-05-20

    The problem of retrieving minor concentrations of constituents by ground-based Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy is addressed by means of the concept of differential optical emission spectroscopy in analogy to the concept of differential optical absorption spectroscopy. Using the prominent nu3 ozone feature at 1043 cm(-1), we show that the strength of the spectral signature depends not only on the amount of ozone but also on the atmospheric thermal structure. This dependence can be described by a rather accurate approximation, which was used to construct a simple diagram to estimate the amount of column ozone between the instrument site and a cloud deck as well as to determine the detection limit. The detection limit is shown to depend on cloud base height. For a given thermal lapse rate it was found that the lower the detection limit, the higher the cloud base altitude. However, as shown in a case study with variable cloud base height, the concept fails for semitransparent clouds. Multiple scattering of the emitted radiation within the clouds yielded a path enhancement that simulated an enhanced amount of constituent. The path enhancement was estimated to be 2.4-4 km at 1000 cm(-1) for low-level clouds, equivalent to an enhancement factor of 6-21. The multiple scattering effect has considerable consequences for ground-based as well as for nadir satellite retrieval techniques in cloudy skies.

  3. Studies of Hot Photoluminescence in Plasmonically Coupled Silicon via Variable Energy Excitation and Temperature-Dependent Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By integrating silicon nanowires (∼150 nm diameter, 20 μm length) with an Ω-shaped plasmonic nanocavity, we are able to generate broadband visible luminescence, which is induced by high order hybrid nanocavity-surface plasmon modes. The nature of this super bandgap emission is explored via photoluminescence spectroscopy studies performed with variable laser excitation energies (1.959 to 2.708 eV) and finite difference time domain simulations. Furthermore, temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy shows that the observed emission corresponds to radiative recombination of unthermalized (hot) carriers as opposed to a resonant Raman process. PMID:25120156

  4. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization and their ratio monitored using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremme, W.; Krueger, A.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2011-09-01

    The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a save distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006-2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS). The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm-1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume, animation and determination of its propagation speed. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 which was confirmed from the strong ash emission registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time) and a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered. Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential imagees is used to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  5. Characterization of low-pressure microwave and radio frequency discharges in oxygen applying optical emission spectroscopy and multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Styrnoll, Tim; Mitschker, Felix; Bienholz, Stefan; Nikita, Bibinov; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and multipole resonance probe (MRP) are adopted to characterize low-pressure microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen. In this context, both discharges are usually applied for the deposition of permeation barrier SiOx films on plastic foils or the inner surface of plastic bottles. For technological reasons the MW excitation is modulated and a continuous wave (cw) RF bias is used. The RF voltage produces a stationary low-density plasma, whereas the high-density MW discharge is pulsed. For the optimization of deposition process and the quality of the deposited barrier films, plasma conditions are characterized using OES and MRP. To simplify the comparison of applied diagnostics, both MW and RF discharges are studied separately in cw mode. The OES and MRP diagnostic methods complement each other and provide reliable information about electron density and electron temperature. In the MW case, electron density amounts to ne = (1.25 ± 0.26) × 1017 m-3, and kTe to 1.93 ± 0.20 eV, in the RF case ne = (6.8 ± 1.8)×1015 m-3 and kTe = 2.6 ± 0.35 eV. The corresponding gas temperatures are 760±40 K and 440±20 K.

  6. Optical emission spectroscopy of OH lines in N2 and Ar plasma during the treatments of cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoro, Nikola; Puac, Nevena; Spasic, Kosta; Malovic, Gordana; Gorjanc, Marija; Petrovic, Zoran Lj

    2016-09-01

    Low pressure non-equilibrium plasmas are proven to be irreplaceable tool in material processing. Among other fields their applications in treatments of textiles are still diversifying, but the main role of plasma is activation of the surface of treated sample. After, or during, the treatments these surfaces can be covered with different materials or species (such as microcapsules) that enhance properties of the fabric. In order to investigate mechanisms how active species from plasma interact with the cotton surface, we studied both plasma and surface properties. Bleached cotton samples were treated in low-pressure nitrogen and argon plasma in a chamber with parallel-plate electrodes. The effect of the plasma treatment on the cotton samples was investigated with the colorimetric measurements on dyes absorption by a spectrophotometer. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed by using spectrometer with a sensitive CCD camera. We have recorded the evolution of the maximum of the intensity of OH and N2 second positive band lines. Measurement were done with and without samples in the chamber and comparison between the lines intensity was made. The parameters for optimal plasma treatment conditions were determined. Research supported by the MESTD, projects III41011 and ON171037.

  7. A separation method to overcome the interference of aluminium on zinc determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Djane S.; das Graças Korn, Maria; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Carvalho, Marcelo S.

    2000-04-01

    The use of polyurethane foam (PUF) to separate zinc from large amounts of aluminium and its determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique (ICP-AES) in aluminium matrices is described. The proposed method is based on the solid-phase extraction of the zinc(II) cation as a thiocyanate complex. Parameters such as effect of pH on zinc sorption, zinc desorption from the foam and analytical features of the procedure were studied. Results showed that the zinc(II) cation within the range from 0.02 to 65.0 μg in 0.2 mol l -1 thiocyanate solution and pH range from 1.0 to 4.0, could be quantitatively extracted by 0.1 g of PUF. The precision of the method was calculated as the relative standard deviation from a series of seven measurements. It was 3.9% for 1.0 μg of zinc in a volume solution of 50 ml. The proposed procedure was used for zinc determination in both aluminium alloys and salts with zinc concentration in the range from 50 to 300 μg g -1. A standard addition technique was used and achieved results showing that this procedure has good accuracy and precision.

  8. High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

    2008-05-21

    A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

  9. High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M-F; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

    2008-10-01

    A large radius, R=44.3 m, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 lines/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 A wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 microm wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 A, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (full width at half maximum), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

  10. Positron emission tomography of fluorine-18-deoxyglucose and image-guided phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D.; Heindel, W.; Herholz, K.; Rudolf, J.; Bunke, J.; Jeske, J.; Friedmann, G. )

    1990-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of 2(18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and volume-selective phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) are methods used to assess the energy metabolism of the brain. Both methods were studied with respect to their contribution to differential diagnosis in 23 patients with various brain tumors. The various neuroectodermal tumors differed with respect to their metabolic rate for glucose (MRGL). Benign and malignant tumors could be better differentiated by using tumor metabolism relative to contralateral brain and by evaluating heterogeneities in tumors. Low-grade gliomas usually showed normal 31P-MR spectra; high-grade gliomas were characterized by reduced and often split phosphodiester peaks and alkaline pH. Meningiomas, which had variable MRGL, typically showed extremely low phosphocreatine levels, reduced phosphodiesters, and alkaline pH. We concluded that FDG-PET and 31P-MRS examine different aspects of tumor metabolism. Therefore, both can contribute independently and complementarily to the differential diagnosis of brain tumors.

  11. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy to Complement Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission in the Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safiq, Alexandrea; Ali, Salina; Nadarski, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy; Yoskowitz, Josh; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael; Union College Team

    2013-10-01

    There is an active research program in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory on proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of atmospheric aerosols. PIXE is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because it provides information on a broad range of elements simultaneously, has low detection limits, is nondestructive, does not require large samples, and the analysis can be performed in a short amount of time. However, PIXE provides only elemental information. We are investigating the use of Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) to complement PIXE analysis of aerosol samples by providing chemical information. In MRS, laser light is inelastically scattered from a sample and the vibrational spectrum of the scattered light is used to identify molecules and their functional groups. We are focusing on aerosol samples collected in the Adirondack Mountains that have considerable concentrations of sulfur that may contribute to acid rain. The MRS spectra collected on aerosol samples are being compared with a library of standards to try to determine the molecular structures in which the sulfur is bound. We will describe the analysis and present preliminary results. Union College Undergraduate Research Program.

  12. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature.

  13. Spin states of FeOOH at high pressure using x-ray emission spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. L.; Gleason, A. E.; Pentcheva, R.; Otte, K.; Suzuki, A.

    2011-12-01

    Electronic spin transitions in alpha-FeOOH (goethite) and high-pressure phase epsilon-FeOOH were monitored using high pressure x-ray emission spectroscopy. A high- to low-spin transition in trivalent iron was found in synthesized epsilon-FeOOH on compression at 56.8 GPa, which returned to high-spin on decompression at 20 GPa. This corroborates density-functional theory (DFT) calculations with an on-site Coulomb repulsion term (GGA+U) predict the transition to occur at 56.6 GPa. Compression of alpha-FeOOH to 60 GPa did not show any high- to low-spin transition consistent with the DFT results. Monitoring the spin states of iron-oxy-hydroxides as a function of pressure gives insight into the relationship between electronic spin transitions and structural transitions - which has previously been studied in other key mantle minerals, including iron-bearing perovskites and ferropericlase. Furthermore, this may help uncover a connection between water content (presence of hydroxyl) in a mineral and Fe3+ spin-transition pressure at mid- to lower-mantle conditions in the Earth.

  14. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 (2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ thymine and PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  16. Quantitative multi-color FRET measurements by Fourier lifetime excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Huang, Run; Peng, Leilei

    2012-11-19

    Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is extensively used to probe macromolecular interactions and conformation changes. The established FRET lifetime analysis method measures the FRET process through its effect on the donor lifetime. In this paper we present a method that directly probes the time-resolved FRET signal with frequency domain Fourier lifetime excitation-emission matrix (FLEEM) measurements. FLEEM separates fluorescent signals by their different phonon energy pathways from excitation to emission. The FRET process generates a unique signal channel that is initiated by donor excitation but ends with acceptor emission. Time-resolved analysis of the FRET EEM channel allows direct measurements on the FRET process, unaffected by free fluorophores that might be present in the sample. Together with time-resolved analysis on non-FRET channels, i.e. donor and acceptor EEM channels, time resolved EEM analysis allows precise quantification of FRET in the presence of free fluorophores. The method is extended to three-color FRET processes, where quantification with traditional methods remains challenging because of the significantly increased complexity in the three-way FRET interactions. We demonstrate the time-resolved EEM analysis method with quantification of three-color FRET in incompletely hybridized triple-labeled DNA oligonucleotides. Quantitative measurements of the three-color FRET process in triple-labeled dsDNA are obtained in the presence of free single-labeled ssDNA and double-labeled dsDNA. The results establish a quantification method for studying multi-color FRET between multiple macromolecules in biochemical equilibrium.

  17. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl {PCB} emissions ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber serving as a stable source of PCBs and building materials in the test chamber. During the tests, the PCB concentrations in the outlet air of the test chamber were monitored and the building materials were removed from the test chamber at different times to determine their PCB content. Among the materials tested, a petroleum-based paint, a latex paint, and a certain type of carpet were among the strongest sinks. Solvent-free epoxy coating, certain types of flooring materials, and brick were among the weakest sinks. For a given sink material, PCB congeners with lower vapor pressures were sorbed in larger quantities. Rough estimates of the partition and diffusion coefficients were obtained by applying a sink model to the data acquired from the chamber studies. A desorption test with the concrete panels showed that re-emission is a slow process, suggesting that PCB sinks, e.g. concrete, can release PCBs into the air for a prolonged period of time (years or decades). This study could fill some of the data gaps associated with the characterization of PCB sinks in contaminated buildings. This paper summarizes the laboratory research results for PCB transport from primary sources to PCB sinks, includ

  18. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) emissions ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber serving as a stable source of PCBs and building materials in the test chamber. During the tests, the PCB concentrations in the outlet air of the test chamber were monitored and the building materials were removed from the test chamber at different times to determine their PCB content. Among the materials tested, a petroleum-based paint, a latex paint, and a certain type of carpet were among the strongest sinks. Solvent-free epoxy coating, certain types of flooring materials, and brick were among the weakest sinks. For a given sink material, PCB congeners with lower vapor pressures were sorbed in larger quantities. Rough estimates of the partition and diffusion coefficients were obtained by applying a sink model to the data acquired from the chamber studies. A desorption test with the concrete panels showed that re-emission is a slow process, suggesting that PCB sinks, e.g. concrete, can release PCBs into the air for a prolonged period of time (years or decades). This study could fill some of the data gaps associated with the characterization of PCB sinks in contaminated buildings. This paper summarizes the laboratory research results for PCB transport from primary sources to PCB sinks, includ

  19. Doppler spectroscopy and D-alpha emission diagnostics for the C-2 FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Paganini, E.; Bonelli, L.; Deng, B. H.; Gornostaeva, O.; Hayashi, R.; Knapp, K.; McKenzie, M.; Pousa-Hijos, R.; Primavera, S.; Schroeder, J.; Tuszewski, M.; Balvis, A.; Giammanco, F.; Marsili, P.

    2010-10-15

    Two Doppler spectroscopy diagnostics with complementary capabilities are developed to measure the ion temperatures and velocities of FRC plasmas in the C-2 device. First, the multichord ion doppler diagnostic can simultaneously measure 15 chords of the plasma using an image intensified camera. Second, a single-chord fast-response ion Doppler diagnostic provides much higher faster time response by using a 16-channel photo-multiplier tube array. To study the neutral density of deuterium under different wall and plasma conditions, a highly sensitive eight-channel D-alpha diagnostic has been developed and calibrated for absolute radiance measurements. These spectroscopic diagnostics capabilities, combined with other plasma diagnostics, are helping to understand and improve the field reversed configuration plasmas in the C-2 device.

  20. Doppler spectroscopy and D-alpha emission diagnostics for the C-2 FRC plasma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak K; Paganini, E; Balvis, A; Bonelli, L; Deng, B H; Giammanco, F; Gornostaeva, O; Hayashi, R; Knapp, K; Marsili, P; McKenzie, M; Pousa-Hijos, R; Primavera, S; Schroeder, J; Tuszewski, M

    2010-10-01

    Two Doppler spectroscopy diagnostics with complementary capabilities are developed to measure the ion temperatures and velocities of FRC plasmas in the C-2 device. First, the multichord ion doppler diagnostic can simultaneously measure 15 chords of the plasma using an image intensified camera. Second, a single-chord fast-response ion Doppler diagnostic provides much higher faster time response by using a 16-channel photo-multiplier tube array. To study the neutral density of deuterium under different wall and plasma conditions, a highly sensitive eight-channel D-alpha diagnostic has been developed and calibrated for absolute radiance measurements. These spectroscopic diagnostics capabilities, combined with other plasma diagnostics, are helping to understand and improve the field reversed configuration plasmas in the C-2 device.

  1. The relationship between gasoline composition and vehicle hydrocarbon emissions: a review of current studies and future research needs.

    PubMed Central

    Schuetzle, D; Siegl, W O; Jensen, T E; Dearth, M A; Kaiser, E W; Gorse, R; Kreucher, W; Kulik, E

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current studies concerning the relationship of fuel composition to vehicle engine-out and tail-pipe emissions and to outline future research needed in this area. A number of recent combustion experiments and vehicle studies demonstrated that reformulated gasoline can reduce vehicle engine-out, tail-pipe, running-loss, and evaporative emissions. Some of these studies were extended to understand the fundamental relationships between fuel composition and emissions. To further establish these relationships, it was necessary to develop advanced analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons in fuels and vehicle emissions. The development of real-time techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser diode spectroscopy, and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry were useful in studying the transient behavior of exhaust emissions under various engine operating conditions. Laboratory studies using specific fuels and fuel blends were carried out using pulse flame combustors, single- and multicylinder engines, and vehicle fleets. Chemometric statistical methods were used to analyze the large volumes of emissions data generated from these studies. Models were developed that were able to accurately predict tail-pipe emissions from fuel chemical and physical compositional data. Some of the primary fuel precursors for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and C2-C4 alkene emissions are described. These studies demonstrated that there is a strong relationship between gasoline composition and tail-pipe emissions. PMID:7529705

  2. Assessment of the maturity and biological parameters of compost produced from dairy manure and rice chaff by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Zhenhua; Yu, Guanghui; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of maturity and biological parameters is important in the composting process. In this study, excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to evaluate the maturity and biological parameters of compost produced from the co-composting of dairy and rice chaff. The results from a Pearson correlation analysis between traditional physico-chemical maturity indices and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) parameters showed that among the FRI parameters, P(V,n)/P(III,n) and P(V,n) were suitable for the assessment of compost maturity. Moreover, the FRI parameters could be used to evaluate biological parameters including the germination index (GI) and ribotype evolution which indicate the bacterial community structure and dynamics. P(IV,n) was the most suitable indicator for revealing the community structure and dynamics during the composting process. Fluorescence spectroscopy combined with the FRI analysis could be used as a sensitive and efficient tool for assessing compost maturity and biological parameters.

  3. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy of astronomical and laboratory sources at 8.5 micron. [absorption line profiles of nitrogen oxide and black body emission from Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M.; Kostiuk, T.; Cohen, S.; Buhl, D.; Vonthuna, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The first infrared heterodyne spectrometer using tuneable semiconductor (PbSe) diode lasers has been constructed and was used near 8.5 micron to measure absorption line profiles of N2O in the laboratory and black body emission from the Moon and from Mars. Spectral information was recorded over a 200 MHz bandwidth using an 8-channel filter bank. The resolution was 25 MHz and the minimum detectable (black body) power was 1 x 10 to the minus 16th power watts for 8 minutes of integration. The results demonstrate the usefulness of heterodyne spectroscopy for the study of remote and local sources in the infrared.

  4. Emission characterization of a single CdSe-ZnS nanocrystal with high temporal and spectral resolution by photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coolen, L; Brokmann, X; Spinicelli, P; Hermier, J-P

    2008-01-18

    We report a spectroscopic study of single colloidal CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals at low temperature. We use photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy, a technique based on measuring the correlations of the intensities detected at the outputs of a Michelson interferometer. Spectral diffusion over a few microeV is evidenced, on a typical time scale of 200 micros. A time resolution as high as 20 micros is obtained, and an upper limit of 6.5 microeV emission linewidth is measured, corresponding to a coherence time of at least 200 ps, similar to the values for epitaxial quantum dots.

  5. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of M87 with the Einstein observatory - The detection of an O VIII emission line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Clark, G. W.; Markert, T. H.; Berg, C.; Smedira, M.; Bardas, D.; Schnopper, H.; Kalata, K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy performed to study the extended source surrounding the giant elliptical galaxy, M87, in the Virgo cluster. From observations carried out with a focal plane crystal spectrometer, L-alpha emission was detected from hydrogenic oxygen (O VIII). Upper limits could be set on lines from intermediate ionization states of iron. The presence of a quantity of cooler matter surrounding M87 was revealed, which has important implications for cluster models and favors a radiatively controlled accretion mechanism.

  6. Estimation of vehicular emissions using dynamic emission factors: A case study of Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Dhirendra; Goyal, P.

    2014-12-01

    The estimation of vehicular emissions depends mainly on the values of emission factors, which are used for the development of a comprehensive emission inventory of vehicles. In this study the variations of emission factors as well as the emission rates have been studied in Delhi. The implementation of compressed natural gas (CNG), in the diesel and petrol, public vehicles in the year 2001 has changed the complete air quality scenario of Delhi. The dynamic emission factors of criteria pollutants viz. carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10) for all types of vehicles have been developed after, which are based on the several factors such as regulated emission limits, number of vehicle deterioration, vehicle increment, vehicle age etc. These emission factors are found to be decreased continuously throughout the study years 2003-2012. The International Vehicle Emissions (IVE) model is used to estimate the emissions of criteria pollutants by utilizing a dataset available from field observations at different traffic intersections in Delhi. Thus the vehicular emissions, based on dynamic emission factors have been estimated for the years 2003-2012, which are found to be comparable with the monitored concentrations at different locations in Delhi. It is noticed that the total emissions of CO, NOx, and PM10 are increased by 45.63%, 68.88% and 17.92%, respectively up to the year 2012 and the emissions of NOx and PM10 are grown continuously with an annual average growth rate of 5.4% and 1.7% respectively.

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy study of Blepharocalyx salicifolius (Kunt) O. Berg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. F. R.; Jacobson, T. K. B.; Moraes, J. S. F.; Faria, F. S. E. D. V.; Cunha, R. M.; Santos, J. G.; Oliveira, A. C.; Azevedo, R. B.; Morales, M. A.; Morais, P. C.

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) has revolutionized the fields of biological, environmental, and agricultural sciences. It is a very simple, sensitive, and non-destructive technique that allows the determination of optical properties of bio-samples. The in vivo chlorophylls of the leaf have a recorded maximum absorption peak at 675 nm as against 665 nm of the in vitro chlorophylls. The intensity of purple pigmentation in leaves of Blepharocalyx salicifolius (Kunt) O. Berg, is inversely correlated to the soil moisture levels, leaf water content and leaf water potentials. The applicability of PAS to biological samples was discussed. It allows the validation of existing emission models which are important for atmospheric process. A portable device for photoacoustic spectroscopy of plants and other photosynthetic tissues, cells and organelles is provided. Further, there is provided a method to measure photosynthesis of such tissues, cells and organelles.

  8. IFU Spectroscopy of 10 ETG nuclei: Properties of the circumnuclear gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.

    2015-09-01

    LINERs are galactic nuclei containing spectra with prominence of low-ionization lines. Several ionization sources are able to produce a LINER-like spectra (e.g. shocks, low-luminosity AGNs, pAGB stars). In this work, we will present an analysis performed on a sample of 10 massive ETGs with distances up to 30 Mpc. This sample was observed with the GMOS-IFU installed on the Gemini-South Telescope. The data cubes of the galaxies have a FOV of 3.5 - 5 arcsec2 and a spatial resolution of about 0.6 -- 1.0 arcsec. After subtracting the stellar component of the galaxies by means of spectral synthesis, we studied the emission lines all over the FOV of the data cubes. In galaxies where an AGN was clearly detected, we found ionized gaseous discs and also a low-velocity extended emission perpendicular to the gas discs. We concluded that only ionizing photons emerging from the AGNs are not enough to photoionize the gaseous discs of the galaxies. On the other hand, it seems to be responsible for the photoionization of the low-velocity extended gas perpendicular to the discs. We propose a scheme where some collimating agent, somehow aligned to the gaseous discs, may be present in some LINER-like AGNs in the local universe.

  9. PPAK wide-field Integral Field Spectroscopy of NGC 628 - II. Emission line abundance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2011-08-01

    In this second paper of the series, we present the two-dimensional (2D) emission line abundance analysis of NGC 628, the largest object within the PPAK Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) Nearby Galaxies Survey, PINGS. We introduce the methodology applied to the 2D IFS data in order to extract and deal with large spectral samples, from which a 2D abundance analysis can be later performed. We obtain the most complete and reliable abundance gradient of the galaxy up to date, by using the largest number of spectroscopic points sampled in the galaxy, and by comparing the statistical significance of different strong-line metallicity indicators. We find features not previously reported for this galaxy that imply a multimodality of the abundance gradient consistent with a nearly flat distribution in the innermost regions of the galaxy, a steep negative gradient along the disc and a shallow gradient or nearly constant metallicity beyond the optical edge of the galaxy. The N/O ratio seems to follow the same radial behaviour. We demonstrate that the observed dispersion in metallicity shows no systematic dependence with the spatial position, signal-to-noise ratio or ionization conditions, implying that the scatter in abundance for a given radius is reflecting a true spatial physical variation of the oxygen content. Furthermore, by exploiting the 2D IFS data, we were able to construct the 2D metallicity structure of the galaxy, detecting regions of metal enhancement and showing that they vary depending on the choice of the metallicity estimator. The analysis of axisymmetric variations in the disc of NGC 628 suggest that the physical conditions and the star formation history of different symmetric regions of the galaxy have evolved in a different manner. Based on observations made at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  10. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A micro-air corona discharge, which is one of the plasmas successfully used for gene transfection in terms of high transfection and cell viability rates, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. This non-equilibrium low temperature plasma is generated from the tip of a pulsed high voltage micro-tube (0.2 mm inner diameter and 0.7 mm for outer diameter) placed 2 mm in front of a petri dish containing deionized water and set on a grounded copper plate. The electron temperature, equal to about 6.75 eV near the electrode tip and decreased down to 3.4 eV near the plate, has been estimated, with an error bar of about 30%, from an interesting approach based on the experimental ratio of the closest nitrogen emission spectra of \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm and N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm. This is based on one hand on a balance equation between creations and losses of the excited upper levels of these two UV spectra and on the other hand on the electron impact rates of the creation of these upper levels calculated from solution of the multi-term Boltzmann equation. Then using the measured Hα spectrum, electron density n e has been estimated from Stark broadening versus the inter-electrode position with an average error bar of about 50%. n e  ≈  1  ×  1015 cm-3 is near the tip coherent with the usual magnitude of electron density in the streamer head developed near the tip of the corona discharges. Rotational temperatures, estimated from comparison of synthetic and experimental spectra of OH(A  -  X), \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm, and N2(SPS) at 337 nm are respectively equal to 2350 K, 2000 K and 700 K in the gap space. This clearly underlines a thermal non-equilibrium of the corresponding excited species generated inside the thin streamer filaments. But, due to the high dilution of these species in the background gas, these high rotational temperatures do not affect the mean gas temperature that remains close to 300

  12. Water vapor concentration measurement in singlet oxygen generator by using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weili; Wang, Zengqiang; Fang, Benjie; Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2005-12-01

    By using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm, partial water pressure at the exit of a square pipe-array jet-type singlet oxygen generator (SPJSOG) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was measured. The water vapor fraction was calculated from the partial water pressure in the diagnostic cell when we assumed the water vapor fraction in the diagnostic cell is the same as that in the generator. The results from the two methods showed that the water vapor concentration is less than 0.08 in this SPJSOG during normal operation. The water vapor fraction decreases with the increasing of the pressure in the generator and rises with the increasing of buffer gas flow rate and the basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) temperature in the case of constant chlorine flow rate. Measurements showed that the change of water vapor fraction due to BHP temperature could be ignored during normal operation. It is indicated that the gas flow velocity is the main reason that affects on the water vapor fraction in COIL. It is proved that the emission spectroscopy method is one of the simple and convenient ways to measure the water vapor concentration in singlet oxygen generator (SOG), especially in real time measurements. But absorption spectroscopy method, as a direct measurement, can give the more factual results of the water concentration.

  13. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  14. Coal devolatilization and char combustion study using FTIR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Raines, T.S.; Brown, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to characterize coals during the normal operation of an industrial-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. The method determines coal properties based on the analysis of transient CO and CO{sub 2} emissions from the boiler. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the gaseous products of combustion. The method is non-intrusive and is performed under realistic combustion conditions. Preliminary data suggest that coal devolatilization is complete before char combustion commences in a circulating fluidized bed boiler.

  15. Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations of non-resonant and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; George, Michael W.; Besley, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of non-resonant and resonant (resonant inelastic X-ray scattering) X-ray emission spectra simulated based upon Kohn-Sham density functional theory is assessed. Accurate non-resonant X-ray emission spectra with the correct energy scale are obtained when short-range corrected exchange-correlation functionals designed for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used. It is shown that this approach can be extended to simulate resonant inelastic X-ray scattering by using a reference determinant that describes a core-excited state. For this spectroscopy, it is found that a standard hybrid functional, B3LYP, gives accurate spectra that reproduce the features observed in experiment. However, the ability to correctly describe subtle changes in the spectra arising from different intermediate states is more challenging and requires averaging over conformations from a molecular dynamics simulation. Overall, it is demonstrated that accurate non-resonant and resonant X-ray emission spectra can be simulated directly from Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  16. Simulating Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Complexes with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Khalil, Munira; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-11-09

    Valence-to-core (VtC) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has emerged as a power- ful technique for the structural characterization of complex organometallic compounds in realistic environments. Since the spectrum represents electronic transitions from the ligand molecular orbitals to the core holes of the metal centers, the approach is more chemically sensitive to the metal-ligand bonding character compared with con- ventional X-ray absorption techniques. In this paper we study how linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) can be harnessed to simulate K-edge VtC X-ray emission spectra reliably. LR-TDDFT allows one to go beyond the single-particle picture that has been extensively used to simulate VtC-XES. We con- sider seven low- and high-spin model complexes involving chromium, manganese and iron transition metal centers. Our results are in good agreement with experiment.

  17. Simulating Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Complexes with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Khalil, Munira; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-12-08

    Valence-to-core (VtC) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has emerged as a powerful technique for the structural characterization of complex organometallic compounds in realistic environments. Since the spectrum represents electronic transitions from the ligand molecular orbitals to the core holes of the metal centers, the approach is more chemically sensitive to the metal-ligand bonding character compared with conventional X-ray absorption techniques. In this paper we study how linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) can be harnessed to simulate K-edge VtC X-ray emission spectra reliably. LR-TDDFT allows one to go beyond the single-particle picture that has been extensively used to simulate VtC-XES. We consider seven low- and high-spin model complexes involving chromium, manganese, and iron transition metal centers. Our results are in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Far-infrared emission line spectroscopy of planetary nebulae from the KAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    1994-01-01

    The main focus of the overall project was to study the properties of planetary nebulae using far-infrared emission lines. The observations were conducted with the 'cooled grating spectrometer' or CGS, a moderate-resolution echelle spectrometer designed and built at the Ames Research Center. During the first few years of the program, the emphasis was on emission lines of doubly-ionized oxygen and nitrogen ((O III) 52 and 88 microns, (N III) 57 microns), which arise in the ionized regions of the nebulae. Starting around 1989, our emphasis shifted to observing fine-structure lines of neutral oxygen and singly-ionized carbon ((O I) 63 and 145 microns, (C II) 157 microns), which arise from predominantly neutral material outside the ionized regions. This program was typically assigned one or two observing flights per year. Because these studies required obtaining a substantial sample of objects in order to reach meaningful conclusions, publication of comprehensive papers summarizing all of the results is still pending. However, numerous interim reports based on the airborne results as well as on closely-related supporting observations have been published during the grant period. The bibliographic information for these reports is given in the publications section. An overall summary of the planetary nebula results was presented at the Airborne Astronomy Symposium (20th Anniversary of the KAO) on 8 July 1994; reprints will be provided when available. In parallel with the planetary nebula study, we also observed the (O III) and (N III) lines in several H II regions, and attempted (unsuccessfully) to detect these lines in several old nova remnants and the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

  19. Determination of the electron temperature by optical emission spectroscopy in a 13.56 MHz dusty methane plasma: Influence of the power

    SciTech Connect

    Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2009-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is applied to the study of a radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) discharge in methane used to obtain hydrogenated carbon films and particles. The methane dissociation allows the creation of species in the plasma bulk as H{sub 2}, H, and CH. The emission lines of these species are studied as a function of time and of incident rf power. The electron temperature is determined from the two line radiance ratio method and the corona balance model using the Balmer lines (H{sub alpha}, H{sub beta}, and H{sub gamma}). The incident rf power enhancement in the range 40-120 W leads to the increase in the emission line intensities as the electron temperature decreases. The temporal variations of CH and hydrogen emission lines, of the dc self-bias voltage, and of the electron temperature are correlated both with the particle behavior and growth in the plasma, and with the coating that grows onto the powered electrode.

  20. Determination of nitrous acid emission factors from a gasoline vehicle using a chassis dynamometer combined with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a well-known source of hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere. Vehicle exhaust is considered to be one of the primary emission sources of HONO. In this study, measurements of HONO in gasoline vehicle exhaust were carried out using a chassis dynamometer combined with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. When catalysts were warm, concentrations of HONO were higher than those prior to catalysts warming. Other species, such as CO, and total hydrocarbons (THCs), showed the opposite pattern. There were no correlations evident between HONO and other trace species concentrations immediately after emission. The HONO/NOx ratio, a good proxy for the formation of HONO in atmosphere, ranged from 1.1 to 6.8×10(-3), which was consistent with previous studies. HONO emission factors (EFs) were calculated to be 0.01-3.6mgkg(-1) fuel, which was different from the vehicle's specifications and those reported under different driving cycles. Annual HONO emissions in Japan were estimated using the calculated EFs and other statistical data.