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  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  3. Positron emission tomography (PET) for cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Breitenstein, S.; Apestegui, C.

    2008-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (PET-CT) provides simultaneous metabolic and anatomic information on tumors in the same imaging session. Sensitivity of PET/PET-CT is higher for intrahepatic (>90%) than for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) (about 60%). The detection rate of distant metastasis is 100%. PET, and particularly PET-CT, improves the results and impacts on the oncological management in CCA compared with other imaging modalities. Therefore, PET-CT is recommended in the preoperative staging of intrahepatic (strength of recommendation: moderate) and extrahepatic (strength of recommendation: low) CCA. PMID:18773069

  4. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  5. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  6. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for benign and malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Visioni, Anthony; Kim, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Functional imaging using radiolabeled probes which specifically bind and accumulate in target tissues has improved the sensitivity and specificity of conventional imaging. Positron Emission Tomography using modified glucose probes (FDG-PET) has demonstrated improved diagnostic accuracy in differentiating benign from malignant lesions in the setting of solitary pulmonary nodules. In addition, FDG-PET has become a useful modality in pre-operative staging of patients with lung cancer and is being tested with many other malignancies for its ability to change patient management. This article provides an overview of the current status of FDG-PET and presents the challenges of moving towards routine use. PMID:21184913

  8. Tau Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Manuela; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Moechars, Dieder; Rombouts, Frederik; Andrés, José Ignacio

    2015-06-11

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia among the elderly population. The good correlation of the density and neocortical spread of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) with clinical AD disease progression offers an opportunity for the early diagnosis and staging using a noninvasive imaging technique such as positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, PET imaging of NFTs not only holds promise as a diagnostic tool but also may enable the development of disease modifying therapeutics for AD. In this review, we focus on the structural diversity of tau PET tracers, the challenges related to the identification of high affinity and highly selective NFT ligands, and recent progress in the clinical development of tau PET radioligands.

  9. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gallamini, Andrea; Zwarthoed, Colette; Borra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG). FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later. PMID:25268160

  10. Geoscientific process monitoring with positron emission tomography (GeoPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Gründig, Marion; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Transport processes in geomaterials can be observed with input-output experiments, which yield no direct information on the impact of heterogeneities, or they can be assessed by model simulations based on structural imaging using µ-CT. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides an alternative experimental observation method which directly and quantitatively yields the spatio-temporal distribution of tracer concentration. Process observation with PET benefits from its extremely high sensitivity together with a resolution that is acceptable in relation to standard drill core sizes. We strongly recommend applying high-resolution PET scanners in order to achieve a resolution on the order of 1 mm. We discuss the particularities of PET applications in geoscientific experiments (GeoPET), which essentially are due to high material density. Although PET is rather insensitive to matrix effects, mass attenuation and Compton scattering have to be corrected thoroughly in order to derive quantitative values. Examples of process monitoring of advection and diffusion processes with GeoPET illustrate the procedure and the experimental conditions, as well as the benefits and limits of the method.

  11. [Principles and applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in cardiology. PET in Mexico: a reality].

    PubMed

    Alexanderson Rosas, Erick; Kerik, Nora E; Unzek Freiman, Samuel; Fermon Schwaycer, Salomón

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers the unique capability of measuring non-invasive by the regional myocardial substrate flow and the biochemical reaction index in millimol per minute per gram of myocardial tissue. PET also allows for the assessment or quantification of regional myocardial blood flow, cardiac metabolism, ventricular function, myocardial viability, as well as autonomous nervous system, research and evaluating of dilated myocardiopathy and of ventricular hypertrophy. PET's success is based on the radioisotopes properties, their very short half-life allows for the administration of large doses.

  12. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Probe Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kan; Masterman-Smith, Michael; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Due to increased needs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidic-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and potential limitations of each design are discussed here. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”), an easy-to-use, standalone, flexible, fully-automated radiochemical microfluidic platform can open up to simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET. PMID:20643021

  13. High-resolution PET (positron emission tomography) for medical science studies

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, T.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Jagust, W.J.; Valk, P.E. )

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging. 6 refs., 21 figs.

  14. High-resolution PET [Positron Emission Tomography] for Medical Science Studies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Budinger, T. F.; Derenzo, S. E.; Huesman, R. H.; Jagust, W. J.; Valk, P. E.

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging.

  15. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  16. The diagnostic possibilities of positron emission tomography (PET): applications in oral and maxillofacial buccal oncology.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Pelegrina, Daniela; Lomeña-Caballero, Francisco; Soler-Peter, Marina; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2005-01-01

    The principles of positron emission tomography (PET), recently introduced as a diagnostic procedure into the health sciences, are described. The principle clinical applications apply to a particular group of specialties: cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, and above all oncology. Positron emission tomography is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique with clinical applications. It is an excellent tool for the study of the stage and possible malignancy of tumors of head and neck, the detection of otherwise clinically indeterminate metastases and lymphadenopathies, and likewise for the diagnosis of relapses. The only tracer with any practical clinical application is fluor-desoxyglucosa-F18 (FDG). PET detects the intense accumulation of FDG produced in malignant tumors due to the increased glycolytic rate of the neoplastic cells. With the introduction of hybrid systems that combine computerized tomography or magnetic resonance with positron emission tomography, important advances are being made in the diagnosis and follow-up of oncologic pathology of head and neck.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  18. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley Pl; Sagebiel, Richard W; Iii, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan.

  19. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley PL; Sagebiel, Richard W; III, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan. PMID:27766186

  20. F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography imaging in primary staging of patients with malignant melanoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to systematically assess the potential patient-relevant benefit (primary aim) and diagnostic and prognostic accuracy (secondary aim) of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (CT) in primary staging of malignant melanoma. This systematic review updates the previous evidence for PET(/CT) in malignant melanoma. Materials and methods For the first aim, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating patient-relevant outcomes and comparing PET and PET(/CT) with each other or with conventional imaging were considered. For the secondary aim, a review of reviews was conducted, which was amended by an update search for primary studies. MEDLINE, EMBASE and four databases of the Cochrane Library were searched. The risk of bias was assessed using a modified QUADAS tool. Results No RCTs investigating the patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) and no prognostic accuracy studies were found. Seventeen diagnostic accuracy studies of varying quality were identified. For patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I and II, sensitivity mostly ranged from 0 to 67%. Specificity ranged from 77 to 100%. For AJCC stages III and IV, sensitivity ranged from 68 to 87% and specificity from 92 to 98%. Conclusion There is currently no evidence of a patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) in the primary staging of malignant melanoma. RCTs investigating patient-relevant outcomes are therefore required. The diagnostic accuracy of PET(/CT) appears to increase with higher AJCC stages. PMID:23237499

  1. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for monitoring lymphadenopathy in the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Dale, Janet K; Bacharach, Stephen L; Whatley, Millie; Dugan, Faith; Tretler, Jean; Fleisher, Thomas; Puck, Jennifer M; Wilson, Wyndham; Jaffe, Elaine S; Avila, Nilo; Chen, Clara C; Straus, Stephen E

    2006-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is associated with mutations that impair the activity of lymphocyte apoptosis proteins, leading to chronic lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity, and an increased risk of lymphoma. We investigated the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in discriminating benign from malignant lymphadenopathy in ALPS. We report that FDG avidity of benign lymph nodes in ALPS can be high and, hence, by itself does not imply presence of lymphoma; but FDG-PET can help guide the decision for selecting which of many enlarged nodes in ALPS patients to biopsy when lymphoma is suspected.

  2. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeLisi, L.E.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Holcomb, H.H.; Dowling-Zimmerman, S.; Pickar, D.; Boronow, J.; Morihisa, J.M.; van Kammen, D.P.; Carpenter, W.; Kessler, R.

    1985-01-01

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern.

  3. Distributed Microprocessor Automation Network for Synthesizing Radiotracers Used in Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Russell, J. A. G.; Alexoff, D. L.; Wolf, A. P.

    1984-09-01

    This presentation describes an evolving distributed microprocessor network for automating the routine production synthesis of radiotracers used in Positron Emission Tomography. We first present a brief overview of the PET method for measuring biological function, and then outline the general procedure for producing a radiotracer. The paper identifies several reasons for our automating the syntheses of these compounds. There is a description of the distributed microprocessor network architecture chosen and the rationale for that choice. Finally, we speculate about how this network may be exploited to extend the power of the PET method from the large university or National Laboratory to the biomedical research and clinical community at large. (DT)

  4. [Positron-emission tomography (PET)--basic considerations].

    PubMed

    von Schulthess, G K; Westera, G; Schubiger, P A

    1993-08-24

    A PET installation is a technically complex system composed essentially of two parts. The first consists in isotope production and synthesis of labeled biochemical compounds, the second in measuring the distribution of radioactivity in the body with the PET camera and the generation of image data. The specific advantage of PET lies on one hand in the use of positron emitters that are isotopes of ubiquitous elements in biologic matter, i.e. exact analogs of biomolecules can be produced and utilized and on the other hand quantification is possible. (= enable quantitative...?) Theoretically there are no limits for the synthesis of radioactive compounds and the method therefore provides unlimited test designs. The short half-life of the employed isotopes is advantageous for radioprotection reasons but the production of labeled compounds necessitates a cyclotron accelerator and a special laboratory for the handling of radioactive compounds rendering the production of the test substances relatively expensive. Measurements take place in a PET camera with a large number of coincidence detectors. The best available cameras have a spatial resolution of 5 mm in all three axes with an axial window of about 15 cm diameter. Evaluation of PET images is done in a qualitative way by superposition on anatomic images (CT, MRI) by image fusion. Quantitative determinations require elaborate computer modeling.

  5. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  6. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) Correlation of Histopathology and MRI in Prion Disease.

    PubMed

    Mente, Karin P; O'Donnell, James K; Jones, Stephen E; Cohen, Mark L; Thompson, Nicolas R; Bizzi, Alberto; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Safar, Jiri G; Appleby, Brian S

    2017-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and other prion diseases are rapidly progressive spongiform encephalopathies that are invariably fatal. Clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalogram, and cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities may suggest prion disease, but a definitive diagnosis can only be made by means of neuropathologic examination. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is not routinely used to evaluate patients with suspected prion disease. This study includes 11 cases of definite prion disease in which FDG-PET scans were obtained. There were 8 sporadic CJD cases, 2 genetic CJD cases, and 1 fatal familial insomnia case. Automated FDG-PET analysis revealed parietal region hypometabolism in all cases. Surprisingly, limbic and mesolimbic hypermetabolism were also present in the majority of cases. When FDG-PET hypometabolism was compared with neuropathologic changes (neuronal loss, astrocytosis, spongiosis), hypometabolism was predictive of neuropathology in 80.6% of cortical regions versus 17.6% of subcortical regions. The odds of neuropathologic changes were 2.1 times higher in cortical regions than subcortical regions (P=0.0265). A similar discordance between cortical and subcortical regions was observed between FDG-PET hypometabolism and magnetic resonance imaging diffusion weighted imaging hyperintensity. This study shows that there may be a relationship between FDG-PET hypometabolism and neuropathology in cortical regions in prion disease but it is unlikely to be helpful for diagnosis.

  7. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-based radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Alauddin, Mian M

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that is widely used in early detection and treatment follow up of many diseases, including cancer. This modality requires positron-emitting isotope labeled biomolecules, which are synthesized prior to perform imaging studies. Fluorine-18 is one of the several isotopes of fluorine that is routinely used in radiolabeling of biomolecules for PET; because of its positron emitting property and favorable half-life of 109.8 min. The biologically active molecule most commonly used for PET is 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-β-D-glucose (18F-FDG), an analogue of glucose, for early detection of tumors. The concentrations of tracer accumulation (PET image) demonstrate the metabolic activity of tissues in terms of regional glucose metabolism and accumulation. Other tracers are also used in PET to image the tissue concentration. In this review, information on fluorination and radiofluorination reactions, radiofluorinating agents, and radiolabeling of various compounds and their application in PET imaging is presented. PMID:23133802

  8. Positron emission tomography (PET): expanding the horizons of oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Lisa A; Denis, Louis; Salman, Umber; Jerabek, Paul; Thomas, Charles R; Kuhn, John G

    2003-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows three-dimensional quantitative determination of the distribution of radioactivity permitting measurement of physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at the molecular level. Until recently, no method existed to directly and noninvasively assess transport and metabolism of neoplastic agents as a function of time in various organs as well as in the tumor. Standard preclinical evaluation of potential anticancer agents entails radiolabeling the agent, usually with tritium or 14C, sacrifice experiments, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis to determine the biodistribution and metabolism in animals. Radiolabeling agents with positron-emitting radionuclides allows the same information to be obtained as well as in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) data by animal tissue and plasma sampling in combination with PET scanning. In phase I/II human studies, classic PK measurements can be coupled with imaging measurements to define an optimal dosing schedule and help formulate the design of phase III studies that are essential for drug licensure [1]. Many of the novel agents currently in development are cytostatic rather than cytotoxic and therefore, the traditional standard endpoints in phase I and II studies may no longer be relevant. The use of a specialized imaging modality that allows PK and pharmacodynamic (PD) evaluation of a drug of interest has been proposed to permit rapid and sensitive assessment of the biological effects of novel anticancer agents. The progress to date and the challenges of incorporating PET technology into oncology drug development from the preclinical to clinical setting are reviewed in this article.

  9. [Understanding positon emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG in clinical oncology. Informations dedicated to patients and relatives].

    PubMed

    Bourguet, Patrick; Brusco, Sylvie; Corone, Corinne; Devillers, Anne; Foehrenbach, Hervé; Lumbroso, Jean-Daniel; Maszelin, Philippe; Montravers, Françoise; Moretti, Jean-Luc; Rain, Jean-Didier; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Carretier, Julien; Leichtnam-Dugarin, Line; Delavigne, Valérie; Philip, Thierry; Fervers, Béatrice

    2005-07-01

    In response to the evolution of the information-seeking behaviour of patients and concerns from health professionals regarding cancer patient information, the French National Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (FNCLCC) introduced, in 1998, an information and education program dedicated to patients and relatives, the SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program (SSP). The methodology of this program adheres to established quality criteria regarding the elaboration of patient information. Cancer patient information, developed in this program, is based on clinical practice guidelines produced by the FNCLCC and the twenty French regional cancer centres, the National League against Cancer, the French Hospital Federation, the National Oncology Federation of Regional and University Hospitals, the French Oncology Federation of General Hospitals, many learned societies, as well as an active participation of patients, former patients and caregivers. The guidelines, "Standards, Options: Recommendations" (SOR) are used as primary information sources. The handbook SOR SAVOIR PATIENT Understanding positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG in clinical oncology, integrally published in this issue of the Bulletin du Cancer, is an adapted version of the clinical practice guidelines (CPG) Standards, Options and Recommendations for positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG in clinical oncology. The main objectives of this article are to allow persons affected by cancer and their close relatives to better understand this medical imaging technique and its implementation. This document also offers health professionals a synthetic evidence-based patient information source that should help them communicate that information during the physician-patient encounter. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a scintigraphy technique using a radiotracer, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (abbreviated [18F]-FDG), administered intravenously into the patient's arm. This tracer, similar to glucose (sugar

  10. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies of dopaminergic/cholinergic interactions in the baboon brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, S.L.; Brodie, J.D.; Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Schlyer, D.J.; King, P.T.; Alexoff, D.L.; Volkow, N.D.; Shiue, C.Y.; Wolf, A.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Interactions between the dopaminergic D2 receptor system and the muscarinic cholinergic system in the corpus striatum of adult female baboons (Papio anubis) were examined using positron emission tomography (PET) combined with (18F)N-methylspiroperidol (( 18F)NMSP) (to probe D2 receptor availability) and (N-11C-methyl)benztropine (to probe muscarinic cholinergic receptor availability). Pretreatment with benztropine, a long-lasting anticholinergic drug, bilaterally reduced the incorporation of radioactivity in the corpus striatum but did not alter that observed in the cerebellum or the rate of metabolism of (18F)NMSP in plasma. Pretreatment with unlabelled NMSP, a potent dopaminergic antagonist, reduced the incorporation of (N-11C-methyl)benztropine in all brain regions, with the greatest effect being in the corpus striatum greater than cortex greater than thalamus greater than cerebellum, but did not alter the rate of metabolism of the labelled benztropine in the plasma. These reductions in the incorporation of either (18F)NMSP or (N-11C-methyl)benztropine exceeded the normal variation in tracer incorporation in repeated studies in the same animal. This study demonstrates that PET can be used as a tool for investigating interactions between neurochemically different yet functionally linked neurotransmitters systems in vivo and provides insight into the consequences of multiple pharmacologic administration.

  11. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  12. A New Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Imaging Sigma-1 Receptors in Living Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Vuppala, Pradeep K.; Chan, Carmel; Avery, Bonnie A.; Fishback, James A.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Chin, Frederick T.

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) radioligands have the potential to detect and monitor various neurological diseases. Herein we report the synthesis, radiofluorination and evaluation of a new S1R ligand 6-(3-fluoropropyl)-3-(2-(azepan-1-yl)ethyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-one ([18F]FTC-146, [18F]13). [18F]13 was synthesized by nucleophilic fluorination, affording a product with >99% radiochemical purity (RCP) and specific activity (SA) of 2.6 ± 1.2 Ci/Amol (n = 13) at end of synthesis (EOS). Positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [18F]13 in mice showed high uptake of the radioligand in S1R rich regions of the brain. Pre treatment with 1 mg/kg haloperidol (2), non radioactive 13, or BD1047 (18) reduced the binding of [18F]13 in the brain at 60 min by 80%, 82% and 81% respectively, suggesting that [18F]13 accumulation in mouse brain represents specific binding to S1Rs. These results indicate that [18F]13 is a promising candidate radiotracer for further evaluation as a tool for studying S1Rs in living subjects. PMID:22853801

  13. Isolated thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis discovered on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Turpin, Sophie; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Dubois, Josée; Buteau, Chantal; Patey, Natalie

    2015-11-01

    The thymic infiltration in young patients with multisystemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis and its radiologic features are well known. However, isolated thymic disease has seldom been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 10-month-old child admitted for fever of unknown origin. Whole-body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) was performed to identify a focus of infection. It demonstrated an unusual aspect of the thymus, which led to further investigation and revealed isolated infiltration of the thymus by Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The patient was treated accordingly and is now disease free. As evaluation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis patients with F-18 FDG PET/CT is becoming more frequent, it is important to be aware of the scintigraphical characteristics of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  14. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Physiologic Imaging of Choroidal Melanoma: Before and After Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) standardized uptake values (SUV) in uveal melanoma before and after plaque brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 217 patients diagnosed with uveal melanoma and eligible for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy underwent preoperative PET/CT to evaluate their intraocular tumor and screen for metastasis. Subsequent to undergoing plaque brachytherapy, patients' PET/CT SUV were periodically reevaluated over 42 months. Results: In this series, 37 (17%) choroidal melanoma patients were found to have an SUV of >2.0. Of these, 18 patients were able to undergo interval follow-up PET/CT scanning. There were 3 patients with T2, 11 patients with T3, and 4 patients with T4 melanomas according to 7th edition AJCC-UICC criteria. Mean apical thickness was 8.8 mm (range, 3-12.3 mm), and the largest mean tumor diameter was 15.1 mm (range, 12-19.9 mm). The mean initial SUV was 3.7 (range, 2.1-7.3). Patients were followed for a median 16 months (range, 6-42 months). The median time to a tumor SUV of 0 was 8.0 months (range, 6-18 months). There was one case of one interval increase in SUV that diminished after circumferential laser treatment. Conclusions: Intraocular PET/CT imaging provides a physiological assessment of tumor metabolism that can be used to evaluate changes after treatment. In this study, ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy was associated with extinguished tumor PET/CT SUV over time. PET/CT imaging can be used to assess choroidal melanomas for their response to treatment.

  15. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of 123I/131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with 68Gallium- DOTA-DPhe1, Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA. PMID:24163518

  16. Neurobehavioural dysfunction following mild traumatic brain injury in childhood: a case report with positive findings on positron emission tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Roberts, M A; Manshadi, F F; Bushnell, D L; Hines, M E

    1995-07-01

    The present case study describes the neurobehavioural, neurodiagnostic, and positron emission tomography (PET) scan findings in a child who sustained a whiplash-type injury in a motor vehicle accident. Although neck and back pain were reported immediately, neurobehavioural symptoms, such as staring spells, gradually increased in frequency over a 2-year period following the accident. At 4 years after the accident the patient's symptoms persisted, as reported by teachers and parents, and more extensive diagnostic work-up was initiated. Standard EEG was normal while two ambulatory EEGs were abnormal and interpreted as epileptiform. A PET scan showed evidence of marked hypometabolism in both temporal lobes. Neuropsychological findings were consistent with PET findings and reflected verbal and visual memory deficits in the context of high average intelligence. Treatment with carbamazepine, verapamil, and fluoxetine greatly improved the patient's symptoms. The present case illustrates an example of a poor outcome in a paediatric case of mild traumatic brain injury, the importance of PET in demonstrating definitive evidence of brain dysfunction, and the child's positive response to anticonvulsant medication.

  17. A Novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Approach to Monitor Cardiac Metabolic Pathway Remodeling in Response to Sunitinib Malate

    PubMed Central

    Silvola, Johanna M. U.; Miller, Ian S.; Conroy, Emer; Hector, Suzanne; Cary, Maurice; Murray, David W.; Jarzabek, Monika A.; Maratha, Ashwini; Alamanou, Marina; Udupi, Girish Mallya; Shiels, Liam; Pallaud, Celine; Saraste, Antti; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Oikonen, Vesa; Ducret, Axel; Cutler, Paul; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.; Rousseau, Jacques A.; Lecomte, Roger; Gascon, Suzanne; Arany, Zoltan; Ky, Bonnie; Force, Thomas; Knuuti, Juhani; Gallagher, William M.; Roivainen, Anne; Byrne, Annette T.

    2017-01-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple solid tumors. However, cardiotoxicity is of increasing concern, with a need to develop rational mechanism driven approaches for the early detection of cardiac dysfunction. We sought to interrogate changes in cardiac energy substrate usage during sunitinib treatment, hypothesising that these changes could represent a strategy for the early detection of cardiotoxicity. Balb/CJ mice or Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally for 4 weeks with 40 or 20 mg/kg/day sunitinib. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) was implemented to investigate alterations in myocardial glucose and oxidative metabolism. Following treatment, blood pressure increased, and left ventricular ejection fraction decreased. Cardiac [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET revealed increased glucose uptake after 48 hours. [11C]Acetate-PET showed decreased myocardial perfusion following treatment. Electron microscopy revealed significant lipid accumulation in the myocardium. Proteomic analyses indicated that oxidative metabolism, fatty acid β-oxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction were among the top myocardial signalling pathways perturbed. Sunitinib treatment results in an increased reliance on glycolysis, increased myocardial lipid deposition and perturbed mitochondrial function, indicative of a fundamental energy crisis resulting in compromised myocardial energy metabolism and function. Our findings suggest that a cardiac PET strategy may represent a rational approach to non-invasively monitor metabolic pathway remodeling following sunitinib treatment. PMID:28129334

  18. FDG-PET response-adapted therapy: is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography a safe predictor for a change of therapy?

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate tool for staging, treatment monitoring, and response evaluation in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Early determination of treatment sensitivity by FDG-PET is the best tool to guide individualized, response-adapted treatment. Several ongoing or recently completed trials have investigated the use of FDG-PET/CT for early response-adapted HL therapy. The results are encouraging, but the data are immature, and PET response-adapted HL therapy is discouraged outside the setting of clinical trials. PET/CT looks promising for selection of therapy in relapsed and refractory disease, but the role in this setting is still unclear.

  19. Positron emission tomography in ovarian cancer: 18F-deoxy-glucose and 16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol PET

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoshio; Kurokawa, Tetsuji; Tsujikawa, Tetuya; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Kotsuji, Fumikazu

    2009-01-01

    The most frequently used molecular imaging technique is currently 18F-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). FDG-PET holds promise in the evaluation of recurrent or residual ovarian cancer when CA125 levels are rising and conventional imaging, such as ultrasound, CT, or MRI, is inconclusive or negative. Recently, integrated PET/CT, in which a full-ring-detector clinical PET scanner and a multidetector helical CT scanner are combined, has enabled the acquisition of both metabolic and anatomic imaging data using one device in a single diagnostic session. This can also provide precise anatomic localization of suspicious areas of increased FDG uptake and rule out false-positive PET findings. FDG-PET/CT is an accurate modality for assessing primary and recurrent ovarian cancer and may affect management. FDG-PET/CT may provide benefits for detection of recurrent of ovarian cancer and improve surgical planning. And FDG-PET has been shown to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival in advanced ovarian cancer. This review focuses on the role of FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT in the management of patients with ovarian cancer. Recently, we have evaluated 16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES)-PET, which detects estrogen receptors. In a preliminary study we reported that FES-PET provides information useful for assessing ER status in advanced ovarian cancer. This new information may expand treatment choice for such patients. PMID:19527525

  20. Increased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in benign, nonphysiologic lesions found on whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT): accumulated data from four years of experience with PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Metser, Ur; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2007-05-01

    The use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) in the field of oncology is rapidly evolving; however, (18)F-FDG is not tumor specific. Aside from physiological uptake (18)F-FDG also may accumulate in benign processes. Knowledge of these (18)F-FDG-avid nonmalignant lesions is essential for accurate PET interpretation in oncologic patients to avoid a false-positive interpretation. Through the systematic review of the reports of PET/computed tomography (CT) studies performed in oncologic patients during a 6-month period, we found benign nonphysiological uptake of (18)F-FDG in more than 25% of studies. In half of these, (18)F-FDG uptake was moderate or marked in intensity, similar to that of malignant sites. A total of 73% of benign lesions were inflammatory in nature, with post-traumatic bone and soft-tissue abnormalities (including iatrogenic injury) and benign tumors accounting for the remainder. The differentiation of benign from malignant uptake of (18)F-FDG on PET alone may be particularly challenging as a result of the low anatomical resolution of PET and paucity of anatomical landmarks. Fusion imaging, namely PET/CT, has been shown to improve not only the sensitivity of PET interpretation but also its specificity. Aside from better anatomical localization of lesions on PET/CT, morphological characterization of lesions on CT often may improve the diagnostic accuracy of nonspecific (18)F-FDG uptake. Correlation with CT on fused PET/CT data may obviate the need for further evaluation or biopsy in more than one-third of scintigraphic equivocal lesions. Familiarity with (18)F-FDG-avid nonmalignant lesions also may extend the use of (18)F-FDG-PET imaging beyond the field of oncology. We have tabulated our experience with benign entities associated with increased (18)F-FDG uptake on whole-body PET/CT from 12,000 whole-body (18)F-FDG-PET/CT studies performed during a 4-year period.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Goffin, Karolien; Koole, Michel; Porke, Kathleen; Van De Velde, Marc; Rooms, Liesbeth; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Esch, Hilde; Van Laere, Koen; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET) and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome.

  2. SU-D-201-06: Random Walk Algorithm Seed Localization Parameters in Lung Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images

    SciTech Connect

    Soufi, M; Asl, A Kamali; Geramifar, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to find the best seed localization parameters in random walk algorithm application to lung tumor delineation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images. Methods: PET images suffer from statistical noise and therefore tumor delineation in these images is a challenging task. Random walk algorithm, a graph based image segmentation technique, has reliable image noise robustness. Also its fast computation and fast editing characteristics make it powerful for clinical purposes. We implemented the random walk algorithm using MATLAB codes. The validation and verification of the algorithm have been done by 4D-NCAT phantom with spherical lung lesions in different diameters from 20 to 90 mm (with incremental steps of 10 mm) and different tumor to background ratios of 4:1 and 8:1. STIR (Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction) has been applied to reconstruct the phantom PET images with different pixel sizes of 2×2×2 and 4×4×4 mm{sup 3}. For seed localization, we selected pixels with different maximum Standardized Uptake Value (SUVmax) percentages, at least (70%, 80%, 90% and 100%) SUVmax for foreground seeds and up to (20% to 55%, 5% increment) SUVmax for background seeds. Also, for investigation of algorithm performance on clinical data, 19 patients with lung tumor were studied. The resulted contours from algorithm have been compared with nuclear medicine expert manual contouring as ground truth. Results: Phantom and clinical lesion segmentation have shown that the best segmentation results obtained by selecting the pixels with at least 70% SUVmax as foreground seeds and pixels up to 30% SUVmax as background seeds respectively. The mean Dice Similarity Coefficient of 94% ± 5% (83% ± 6%) and mean Hausdorff Distance of 1 (2) pixels have been obtained for phantom (clinical) study. Conclusion: The accurate results of random walk algorithm in PET image segmentation assure its application for radiation treatment planning and

  3. The application of positron emission tomography (PET/CT) in diagnosis of breast cancer. Part II. Diagnosis after treatment initiation, future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jodłowska, Elżbieta; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Rewers, Amanda; Jarząbek, Grażyna; Kędzia, Witold; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Similarly to the applications described in the first part of this publication, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) is also gaining importance in monitoring a tumour's response to therapy and diagnosing breast cancer recurrences. This is additionally caused by the fact that many new techniques (dual-time point imaging, positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance PET/MR, PET/CT mammography) and radiotracers (16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol, 18F-fluorothymidine) are under investigation. The highest sensitivity and specificity when monitoring response to treatment is achieved when the PET/CT scan is made after one or two chemotherapy courses. Response to anti-hormonal treatment can also be monitored, also when new radiotracers, such as FES, are used. When monitoring breast cancer recurrences during follow-up, PET/CT has higher sensitivity than conventional imaging modalities, making it possible to monitor the whole body simultaneously. New techniques and radiotracers enhance the sensitivity and specificity of PET and this is why, despite relatively high costs, it might become more widespread in monitoring response to treatment and breast cancer recurrences. PMID:27647983

  4. Fluorine-18 labeled rare-earth nanoparticles for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of sentinel lymph node.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun; Yu, Mengxiao; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Yingjian; Li, Chenguang; Mou, Tiantian; Yang, Wenjiang; Zhang, Xianzhong; Li, Biao; Huang, Chunhui; Li, Fuyou

    2011-04-01

    Rare-earth-based nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for their unique optical and magnetic properties. However, their application in bioimaging has been limited to photoluminescence bioimaging and magnetic resonance imaging. To facilitate their use in other bioimaging techniques, we developed a simple, rapid, efficient and general synthesis strategy for (18)F-labeled rare-earth nanoparticles through a facile inorganic reaction between rare-earth cations and fluoride ions. The (18)F-labeling process based on rare-earth elements was achieved efficiently in water at room temperature with an (18)F-labeling yield of >90% and completed within 5 min, with only simple purification by aqueous washing and centrifugation, and without the use of organic agents. The effectiveness of (18)F-labeled rare-earth nanoparticles was further evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of their in vivo distribution and application in lymph monitoring. In addition, this strategy is proposed for the creation of a dual-model bioimaging technique, combining upconversion luminescence bioimaging and PET imaging.

  5. Evaluation of cancer detection with whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) and 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoh, Carl K.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Glaspy, John A.; Dahlbom, Magnus; Tse, Nielson Y.; Hoffman, Edward T.; Schiepers, Christiaan; Choi, Yong; Rege, Sheila; Nitzsche, Egbert U.; Maddahi, Jamshid; Phelps, Michael E.

    1993-08-01

    Until recently, positron emission tomography (PET) has been acquired and displayed in a standard transaxial image format. The development of whole body PET has allowed biochemical and physiologic imaging of the entire body, expanding the limited axial field of view of the conventional PET scanner. In this study, the application of whole body PET studies with 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for tumor imaging was evaluated. Whole body PET studies were positive (presence of focal FDG uptake relative to surrounding tissue activity) in 61 of 70 patients (87%) with biopsy confirmed malignant tumors. PET images failed to reveal focal hypermetabolism in 9 of the 70 patients. Of the 17 patients with benign biopsies lesions, 13 patients had whole body PET studies without focal areas of FDG uptake. Because of the high glycolytic rate of malignant tissue, the whole body PET FDG technique has promise in the detection of a wide variety of both primary and metastatic malignancies. The presence of FDG uptake in benign inflammatory conditions may limit the specificity of the technique. The true positive rates for the characterization of known lesions was 87% in this series, and the PET FDG method is promising both in determining both the nature of a localized lesion, and in defining the systemic extent of malignant disease.

  6. Effect of increased axial field of view of on the performance of a volume PET scanner. [Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, J.S.; Kinahan, P.E. . Dept. of Radiology); Muehllehner, G.; Countryman, P. )

    1991-01-01

    The performance of the PENN-PET 240H scanner from UGM Medical Systems is tested and compared to the prototype PENN-PET scanner built at the University of Pennsylvania. The UGM PENN-PET scanner consists of six continuous position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, which results in a 50-cm transverse field-of-view and a 12.8-cm axial field-of-view. The fine spatial sampling in the axial direction allows the data to be sorted into as many as 64 transverse planes, each 2-mm thick. A large axial acceptance angle, without interplane septa, results in a high sensitivity, with a low scatter and randoms fraction, due to the use of a narrow photopeak energy window. This paper emphasizes those performance measurements that illustrate the special characteristics of a volume imaging scanner and how they change as the axial length is increased.

  7. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of PET drugs in submitting investigational new drug applications (INDs). DATES... guidance entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET)...

  8. The Role of Chemistry in Positron Emission Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feliu, Anthony L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study in-vivo metabolic processes. Discusses methodology of PET and medical uses. Outlines the production of different radioisotopes used in PET radiotracers. Includes selected bibliography. (ML)

  9. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    DOE PAGES

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; ...

    2015-03-15

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [¹⁸F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modelingmore » of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [¹⁸F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.« less

  10. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; Hetue, Jackson D.; Lake, Katherine A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Williams, Paul H.; DeJesus, Onofre T.

    2015-03-15

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [¹⁸F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modeling of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [¹⁸F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.

  11. Final Report Summary: Radiation dosimetry of Cu-64-labeled radiotherapy agents using PET [Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Carolyn J.; Cutler, P.D.

    2002-09-01

    This project began in 1996, and was completed in July 2001. The overall goals were to compare various methods of dosimetry of PET imaging agents, as well as develop more optimal methods. One of the major accomplishments of this grant was the human PET imaging studies of a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical for somatostatin-receptor imaging, and subsequent dosimetry calculations resulting from this study. In addition, we collaborated with Darrell Fisher and Edmund Hui to develop a MIRD-hamster program for calculating hamster organ and tumor dosimetry in hamster models. Progress was made towards a point kernel approach to more accurately determining absorbed doses to normal organs, as well as towards co-registration of PET and MRI images. This report focuses on the progress made in the last 15 months of the grant, which in general is a summary of the progress over the 5 years the project was ongoing.

  12. Evaluation of 18-F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a staging and monitoring tool for dogs with stage-2 splenic hemangiosarcoma – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Amber L.; Stuebner, Kathleen; Scott, Ruth; Ober, Christopher P.; Anderson, Kari L.; Feeney, Daniel A.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Froelich, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and monitoring of human cancer patients and is becoming increasingly available in veterinary medicine. In this study, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET-CT was used in dogs with naturally occurring splenic hemangiosarcoma (HSA) to assess its utility as a staging and monitoring modality as compared to standard radiography and ultrasonography. Nine dogs with stage-2 HSA underwent 18FDG-PET-CT following splenectomy and prior to commencement of chemotherapy. Routine staging (thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography) was performed prior to 18FDG-PET-CT in all dogs. When abnormalities not identified on routine tests were noted on 18FDG-PET-CT, owners were given the option to repeat a PET-CT following treatment with eBAT. A PET-CT scan was repeated on Day 21 in three dogs. Abnormalities not observed on conventional staging tools, and most consistent with malignant disease based on location, appearance, and outcome, were detected in two dogs and included a right atrial mass and a hepatic nodule, respectively. These lesions were larger and had higher metabolic activity on the second scans. 18FDG-PET-CT has potential to provide important prognostic information and influence treatment recommendations for dogs with stage-2 HSA. Additional studies will be needed to precisely define the value of this imaging tool for staging and therapy monitoring in dogs with this and other cancers. PMID:28222142

  13. 3D image reconstruction for PET by multi-slice rebinning and axial filtering. [Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewitt, R.M. Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA . Dept. of Radiology); Muehllehner, G. ); Karp, J.S. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Two different approaches are used at present to reconstruct from 3D coincidence data in PET. We refer to these approaches as the single-slice rebinning approach and the fully-3D approach. The single-slice rebinning approach involves geometrical approximations, but it requires the least possible amount of computation. Fully-3D reconstruction algorithms, both iterative and non-iterative, do not make such approximations, but require much more computation. Multi-slice rebinning with axial filtering is a new approach which attempts to achieve the geometrical accuracy of the fully-3D approach with the simplicity and modest amount of computation of the single-slice rebinning approach. The first step (multi-slice rebinning) involves rebinning of coincidence lines into a stack of 2D sinograms, where multiple sinograms are incremented for each oblique coincidence line. This operation is followed by an axial filtering operation, either before or after slice-by-slice reconstruction, to reduce the blurring in the axial direction. Tests with simulated and experimental data indicate that the new method has better geometrical accuracy than single-slice rebinning, at the cost of only a modest increase in computation. 11 refs.

  14. [The impact of detecting endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis: Role of positron emission tomography (PET)].

    PubMed

    Alexánderson-Rosas, Erick; Calleja-Torres, Rodrigo; Martínez-García, Alfonso; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro Alberto; Ochoa-López, Juan Manuel; Meléndez, Gabriela; Kimura-Hayama, Eric; Meave-González, Aloha

    2010-01-01

    The endothelium plays an important role in the regulation of the intracellular fluid, vascular permeability, and modulation of vascular focal tone and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunction is manifested by the loss of the endothelium ability to modulate physiology changes in its vascular bed, and actually it is considered a prognostic marker of coronary artery disease. The relevance of assessing endothelial dysfunction relies in that it has been observed in different pathologies like DM, dyslipidemia, hypertension, tabaquism and in immunologic diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus. PET is a non invasive method that allows the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow during rest, stress and adrenergic stimulation, which allows to asses endothelial function. Therefore PET is a useful diagnostic technique to identify patients with endothelial dysfunction, and in the assessment of its response to administered therapy, allowing an optimal control and prevention of secondary adverse events of these diseases.

  15. Increased activation of the human cerebellum during pitch discrimination: a positron emission tomography (PET) study.

    PubMed

    Petacchi, Augusto; Kaernbach, Christian; Ratnam, Rama; Bower, James M

    2011-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing debate concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here we used a pitch discrimination task and PET to test for cerebellar involvement in the active control of sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we predicted greater cerebellar activity during active pitch discrimination compared to passive listening, with the greatest activity when pitch discrimination was most difficult. Ten healthy subjects were trained to discriminate deviant tones presented with a slightly higher pitch than a standard tone, using a Go/No Go paradigm. To ensure that discrimination performance was matched across subjects, individual psychometric curves were assessed beforehand using a two-step psychoacoustic procedure. Subjects were scanned while resting in the absence of any sounds, while passively listening to standard tones, and while detecting deviant tones slightly higher in pitch among these standard tones at four different performance levels. Consistent with our predictions, 1) passive listening alone elicited cerebellar activity (lobule IX), 2) cerebellar activity increased during pitch discrimination as compared to passive listening (crus I and II, lobules VI, VIIB, and VIIIB), and 3) this increase was correlated with the difficulty of the discrimination task (lobules V, VI, and IX). These results complement recent findings showing pitch discrimination deficits in cerebellar patients (Parsons et al., 2009) and further support a role for the cerebellum in sensory data acquisition. The data are discussed in the light of anatomical and physiological evidence functionally connecting auditory system and cerebellum.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  17. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography [PET] in Man Using Small Bismuth Germanate Crystals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.; Huesman, R. H.; Cahoon, J. L.

    1982-04-01

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

  18. External ultrasonography of the neck does not add diagnostic value to integrated positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanning in the diagnosis of cervical lymph node metastases in patients with esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blom, R L G M; Vliegen, R F A; Schreurs, W M J; Belgers, H J; Stohr, I; Oostenbrug, L E; Sosef, M N

    2012-08-01

    One of the objectives of preoperative imaging in esophageal cancer patients is the detection of cervical lymph node metastases. Traditionally, external ultrasonography of the neck has been combined with computed tomography (CT) in order to improve the detection of cervical metastases. In general, integrated positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has been shown to be superior to CT or PET regarding staging and therefore may limit the role of external ultrasonography of the neck. The objective of this study was to determine the additional value of external ultrasonography of the neck to PET-CT. This study included all patients referred our center for treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Diagnostic staging was performed to determine treatment plan. Cervical lymph nodes were evaluated by external ultrasonography of the neck and PET-CT. In case of suspect lymph nodes on external ultrasonography or PET-CT, fine needle aspiration (FNA) was performed. Between 2008 and 2010, 170 out of 195 referred patients underwent both external ultrasonography of the neck and PET-CT. Of all patients, 84% were diagnosed with a tumor at or below the distal esophagus. In 140 of 170 patients, the cervical region was not suspect; no FNA was performed. Seven out of 170 patients had suspect nodes on both PET-CT and external ultrasonography. Five out of seven patients had cytologically confirmed malignant lymph nodes, one of seven had benign nodes, in one patient FNA was not performed; exclusion from esophagectomy was based on intra-abdominal metastases. In one out of 170 patients, PET-CT showed suspect nodes combined with a negative external ultrasonography; cytology of these nodes was benign. Twenty-two out of 170 patients had a negative PET-CT with suspect nodes on external ultrasonography. In 18 of 22 patients, cervical lymph nodes were cytologically confirmed benign; in four patients, FNA was not possible or inconclusive. At a median postoperative follow-up of 15 months

  19. A Novel Method to Evaluate Local Control of Lung Cancer in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment Using 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathriarachchi, Vindu Wathsala

    An improved method is introduced for prediction of local tumor control following lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET). A normalized background-corrected tumor maximum Standard Uptake Value (SUVcmax) is introduced using the mean uptake of adjacent aorta (SUVref), instead of the maximum uptake of lung tumor (SUVmax). This method minimizes the variations associated with SUVmax and objectively demonstrates a strong correlation between the low SUVcmax (< 2.5-3.0) and local control of post lung SBRT. The false positive rates of both SUVmax and SUVcmax increase with inclusion of early (<6 months) PET scans, therefore such inclusion is not recommended for assessing local tumor control of post lung SBRT.

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. Material/Methods A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. Conclusions All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the

  1. [PET/CT tomography. Usefulness in oncology].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villaseñor, David; Gerson-Cwilich, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    In order to have optimum results in oncological patients, precise evaluation, diagnosis and staging of the patient is necessary. Positron emission tomography (PET) yields a high negative predictive value through exploration of the entire body. It diagnoses the benign or malignant state of a neoplasm that has been detected by other imaging methods and establishes an extensive diagnosis previous to therapeutic treatment of a known cancer. It identifies residual tumor and changes produced after surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy and locates suspicious residual tumor clinically or by elevation of the tumor markers. It allows for a new extension study or re-staging after diagnosis of recurrence and permits early evaluation of response to a therapeutic regime and permits the search for a primary tumor in patients with metastasis of unknown origin. PET leads to a molecular functional imaging of cancer in the entire body.

  2. Quantification of pulmonary blood flow (PBF): validation of perfusion MRI and nonlinear contrast agent (CA) dose correction with H(2)15O positron emission tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Neeb, Daniel; Kunz, Rainer Peter; Ley, Sebastian; Szábo, Gábor; Strauss, Ludwig G; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Schreiber, Laura Maria

    2009-08-01

    Validation of quantification of pulmonary blood flow (PBF) with dynamic, contrast-enhanced MRI is still missing. A possible reason certainly lies in difficulties based on the nonlinear dependence of signal intensity (SI) from contrast agent (CA) concentration. Both aspects were addressed in this study. Nine healthy pigs were examined by first-pass perfusion MRI using gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Calculations of hemodynamic parameters were based on a one-compartment model (MR) and a two-compartment model (PET). Simulations showed a significant error when assuming a linear relation between MR SI and CA dose in the arterial input function (AIF), even at low doses of 0.025 mmol/kg body weight (BW). To correct for nonlinearity, a calibration curve was calculated on the basis of the signal equation. The required accuracy of equation parameters (like longitudinal relaxation time) was evaluated. Error analysis estimates <5% over-/underestimation of the corrected SI. Comparison of PET and MR flow values yielded a significant correlation (P < 0.001) in dorsal regions where signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was sufficient. Changes in PBF due to the correction method were significant (P < 0.001) and resulted in a better agreement: mean values (standard deviation) in units of ml/min/100 ml lung tissue were 59 (15) for PET, 112 (28) for uncorrected MRI, and 80 (21) for corrected MRI.

  3. Test-retest variability of high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cortical serotonin (5HT2A) receptors in older, healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Position emission tomography (PET) imaging using [18F]-setoperone to quantify cortical 5-HT2A receptors has the potential to inform pharmacological treatments for geriatric depression and dementia. Prior reports indicate a significant normal aging effect on serotonin 5HT2A receptor (5HT2AR) binding potential. The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest variability of [18F]-setoperone PET with a high resolution scanner (HRRT) for measuring 5HT2AR availability in subjects greater than 60 years old. Methods: Six healthy subjects (age range = 65–78 years) completed two [18F]-setoperone PET scans on two separate occasions 5–16 weeks apart. Results The average difference in the binding potential (BPND) as measured on the two occasions in the frontal and temporal cortical regions ranged between 2 and 12%, with the lowest intraclass correlation coefficient in anterior cingulate regions. Conclusion We conclude that the test-retest variability of [18F]-setoperone PET in elderly subjects is comparable to that of [18F]-setoperone and other 5HT2AR radiotracers in younger subject samples. PMID:19580676

  4. Organizing Hematoma of the Maxillary Sinus Mimicking Malignancy Diagnosed by Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography (FDG PET/CT): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Kyun; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Organizing hematoma of the paranasal sinuses is a diagnostic dilemma clinically and radiographically, mimicking benign or malignant neoplastic processes. Although the diagnostic rate of this disease has increased as characteristic imaging findings are somewhat elucidated, endoscopic examination, preoperative biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) imaging do not give helpful information in differentiating these lesions from malignant neoplastic processes. A 55-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of recurrent nasal bleeding. He also complained of a left-sided nasal obstruction. CT findings were highly suggestive of a malignant tumor of the maxillary sinus. However, based on fluorodeoxyglucose F18 positron-emission tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the provisional diagnosis of benign tumor rather than malignancy was made. Complete resection of the mass was achieved by simple transnasal endoscopic surgery using the Caldwell-Luc approach. Organizing hematoma of the maxillary sinus was diagnosed by histopathologic evaluation. The clinical, radiological, and histopathologic findings of the patient are presented. In this report, we have presented 18FDG-PET findings of organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus (OHMS) that showed an increased FDG uptake in the peripheral rim of the mass with central photopenia. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature reporting FDG-PET/CT findings of OHMS. Careful interpretation of metabolic (FDG-PET/CT) and anatomic (CT and MRI) images should be performed to accurately characterize the expansile lesion of the maxillary sinus in order to increase specificity and reduce equivocal findings significantly. PMID:26587203

  5. Intractable gelastic seizures during infancy: ictal positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrating epileptiform activity within the hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Goldsher, Dorit; Genizi, Jacob; Ravid, Sarit; Keidar, Zohar

    2008-02-01

    Gelastic seizures comprise a very rare form of epilepsy. They present with recurrent bursts of laughter voices without mirth and are most commonly associated with the evolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma. The purpose of this article is to describe the second reported ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography study in a unique case of an infant with intractable gelastic seizures since the neonatal period associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. The patient presented at 4 months old with recurrent, almost persistent, gelastic seizures consisting of laughter bouts without mirth. The seizures were noticeable at the first week of life and increased in frequency to last up to 12 hours, namely status gelasticus. These gelastic fits were accompanied with focal motor seizures, including unilateral right-eye blinking and mouth twitching. Developmental mile-stones were intact for age. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cortex demonstrated a large hypothalamic hamartoma within the third ventricle, hampering cerebrovascular fluid drainage of the lateral ventricles. An electroencephalography was nondiagnostic. Ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography demonstrated a large circumscribed hypermetabolic region within the location of the hypothalamic hamartoma, representing localized intense epileptiform activity. The infant became instantly free of all seizure types given minute doses of oral benzodiazepine (clonazepam) and remains completely controlled after 12 months. Her overall development remains intact. This ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is the second reported study verifying that the main source of the epileptic activity inducing gelastic seizures originates from the hypothalamic hamartoma itself; therefore, a complementary fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography study should be considered in any patient presenting with intractable gelastic seizures, especially in those associated with hypothalamic hamartoma, in order

  6. 18F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a Pharmacodynamic Marker for EWS-FLI1 Activity and Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, Christy L.; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Maloney, Nichole; Madaj, Zachary B.; Peck, Anderson; Boguslawski, Elissa; Jess, Jennifer; Buck, Jason; Winn, Mary E.; Manning, H. Charles; Grohar, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a bone and soft-tissue tumor that depends on the activity of the EWS-FLI1 transcription factor for cell survival. Although a number of compounds have been shown to inhibit EWS-FLI1 in vitro, a clinical EWS-FLI1-directed therapy has not been achieved. One problem plaguing drug development efforts is the lack of a suitable, non-invasive, pharmacodynamic marker of EWS-FLI1 activity. Here we show that 18F-FLT PET (18F- 3′-deoxy-3′-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography) reflects EWS-FLI1 activity in Ewing sarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. 18F-FLT is transported into the cell by ENT1 and ENT2, where it is phosphorylated by TK1 and trapped intracellularly. In this report, we show that silencing of EWS-FLI1 with either siRNA or small-molecule EWS-FLI1 inhibitors suppressed the expression of ENT1, ENT2, and TK1 and thus decreased 18F-FLT PET activity. This effect was not through a generalized loss in viability or metabolic suppression, as there was no suppression of 18F-FDG PET activity and no suppression with chemotherapy. These results provide the basis for the clinical translation of 18F-FLT as a companion biomarker of EWS-FLI1 activity and a novel diagnostic imaging approach for Ewing sarcoma. PMID:27671553

  7. Current and future technological trends in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Karp, J S; Freifelder, R

    1992-04-01

    Current trends in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation are examined, with an emphasis on providing information suitable to the prospective PET user. Basic principles underlying PET are explained and information on performance measurements, techniques, and quantitation are given in order to allow the user to compare and contrast different types of PET scanners. These scanner designs are described. Specific examples are given and the combination of PET with other modalities is discussed.

  8. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-12-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was /sup 68/Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes.

  9. Positron emission tomography (PET) analysis of the effects of auditory stimulation on the distribution of /sup 11/C-N-methylchlorphentermine in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Paschal, C.B.

    1986-06-01

    This experimental work was launched to study how auditory stimulation effects blood flow in the brain. The technique used was Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with /sup 11/C-N-methylchlorphentermine (/sup 11/C-NMCP) as the tracer. /sup 11/C-NMCP acts as a molecular microsphere and thus measures blood flow. The objectives of this work were: to develop, test, and refine an experimental procedure, to design and construct a universally applicable positioning device, and to develop and test a synthesis for a radiopure solution of /sup 11/C-NMCP; all were accomplished. PET was used to observe the brain distribution of /sup 11/C-NMCP during binaural and monaural stimulation states. The data was analyzed by finding the signal intensity in regions of the image that represented the left and right interior colliculi (IC's), brain structures dedicated to the processing of auditory signals. The binaural tests indicated a statistically significant tendency for slightly higher concentration of the tracer in the left IC than in the right IC. The monaural tests combined with those of the binaural state were not solidly conclusive, however, three of the four cases showed a decrease in tracer uptake in the IC opposite the zero-stimulus ear, as expected. There is some indication that the anesthesia used in the majority of this work may have interferred with blood flow response to auditory stimulation. 39 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. In vivo quantitative imaging of photoassimilate transport dynamics and allocation in large plants using a commercial positron emission tomography (PET) scanner

    DOE PAGES

    Karve, Abhijit A.; Alexoff, David; Kim, Dohyun; ...

    2015-11-09

    Although important aspects of whole-plant carbon allocation in crop plants (e.g., to grain) occur late in development when the plants are large, techniques to study carbon transport and allocation processes have not been adapted for large plants. Positron emission tomography (PET), developed for dynamic imaging in medicine, has been applied in plant studies to measure the transport and allocation patterns of carbohydrates, nutrients, and phytohormones labeled with positron-emitting radioisotopes. However, the cost of PET and its limitation to smaller plants has restricted its use in plant biology. Here we describe the adaptation and optimization of a commercial clinical PET scannermore » to measure transport dynamics and allocation patterns of 11C-photoassimilates in large crops. Based on measurements of a phantom, we optimized instrument settings, including use of 3-D mode and attenuation correction to maximize the accuracy of measurements. To demonstrate the utility of PET, we measured 11C-photoassimilate transport and allocation in Sorghum bicolor, an important staple crop, at vegetative and reproductive stages (40 and 70 days after planting; DAP). The 11C-photoassimilate transport speed did not change over the two developmental stages. However, within a stem, transport speeds were reduced across nodes, likely due to higher 11C-photoassimilate unloading in the nodes. Photosynthesis in leaves and the amount of 11C that was exported to the rest of the plant decreased as plants matured. In young plants, exported 11C was allocated mostly (88 %) to the roots and stem, but in flowering plants (70 DAP) the majority of the exported 11C (64 %) was allocated to the apex. Our results show that commercial PET scanners can be used reliably to measure whole-plant C-allocation in large plants nondestructively including, importantly, allocation to roots in soil. This capability revealed extreme changes in carbon allocation in sorghum plants, as they advanced to maturity

  11. In vivo quantitative imaging of photoassimilate transport dynamics and allocation in large plants using a commercial positron emission tomography (PET) scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Karve, Abhijit A.; Alexoff, David; Kim, Dohyun; Schueller, Michael J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Babst, Benjamin A.

    2015-11-09

    Although important aspects of whole-plant carbon allocation in crop plants (e.g., to grain) occur late in development when the plants are large, techniques to study carbon transport and allocation processes have not been adapted for large plants. Positron emission tomography (PET), developed for dynamic imaging in medicine, has been applied in plant studies to measure the transport and allocation patterns of carbohydrates, nutrients, and phytohormones labeled with positron-emitting radioisotopes. However, the cost of PET and its limitation to smaller plants has restricted its use in plant biology. Here we describe the adaptation and optimization of a commercial clinical PET scanner to measure transport dynamics and allocation patterns of 11C-photoassimilates in large crops. Based on measurements of a phantom, we optimized instrument settings, including use of 3-D mode and attenuation correction to maximize the accuracy of measurements. To demonstrate the utility of PET, we measured 11C-photoassimilate transport and allocation in Sorghum bicolor, an important staple crop, at vegetative and reproductive stages (40 and 70 days after planting; DAP). The 11C-photoassimilate transport speed did not change over the two developmental stages. However, within a stem, transport speeds were reduced across nodes, likely due to higher 11C-photoassimilate unloading in the nodes. Photosynthesis in leaves and the amount of 11C that was exported to the rest of the plant decreased as plants matured. In young plants, exported 11C was allocated mostly (88 %) to the roots and stem, but in flowering plants (70 DAP) the majority of the exported 11C (64 %) was allocated to the apex. Our results show that commercial PET scanners can be used reliably to measure whole-plant C-allocation in large plants nondestructively including, importantly, allocation to roots in soil. This capability revealed extreme changes in

  12. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Two Agents for Imaging Estrogen Receptor β by Positron Emission Tomography: Challenges in PET Imaging of a Low Abundance Target

    PubMed Central

    HakLee, Jae; Peters, Olaf; Lehmann, Lutz; Dence, Carmen S.; Sharp, Terry L.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Zhou, Dong; Jeyakumar, M.; Welch, Michael J.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Independent measurement of the levels of both the estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, in breast cancer could improve prediction of benefit from endocrine therapies. While ERα levels can be measured by positron emission tomography (PET) using 16α-[18F]fluoroestradiol (FES), no effective agent for imaging ERβ by PET has yet been reported. Methods We have prepared the fluorine-18 labeled form of 8β-(2-fluoroethyl)estradiol(8BFEE2), an analog of an ERβ-selective steroidal estrogen, 8β-vinylestradiol; efficient incorporation of fluorine-18 was achieved, but required very vigorous conditions. We have examined the biodistribution of this compound, as well as ofBr-041, an analog of a known non-steroidal ERβ-selective ligand (ERB-041), labeled with bromine-76. Studies were done in immature female rodents, with various pharmacological and endocrine perturbations to assess ERβ selectivity of uptake. Results Little evidence of ERβ-mediated uptake was observedwith either [18F]8BFEE2 or [76Br]Br-041. Attempts to increase the ERβ content of target tissues were not effective and failed to improve biodistribution selectivity. Conclusions Because on an absolute level, ERβ levels are low in all target tissues, these studies have highlighted the need to develop improved in vivo models for evaluating ERβ-selective radiopharmaceuticals for use in PET imaging. Genetically engineered breast cancer cells that are being developed to express either ERα or ERβ in a regulated manner, grown as xenografts in immune-compromised mice, could prove useful for future studies to develop ER subtype-selective radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:22749433

  13. Early and late stage positron emission tomography (PET) studies on the haemocirculation and metabolism of seemingly normal brain tissue in patients with gliomas following radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mineura, K; Suda, Y; Yasuda, T; Kowada, M; Ogawa, T; Shishido, F; Uemura, K

    1988-01-01

    Haemocirculatory and metabolic changes in seemingly normal brain tissue following radiochemotherapy including nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) and tegafur (FT) were analyzed using oxygen-15 and fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (PET) in seven patients with gliomas. At an early stage (within one month) after radiochemotherapy, marginal increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were found contralateral to the tumour in gray matter which was apparently normal brain structure, as seen on computerized tomography (CT). The oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) decreased significantly (p less than 0.05 by a paired-t test) from that of the pretreatment study, due to surgical decompression and radiochemotherapy. At the late stage (three to thirty-one months with a mean of thirteen months), rCBF decreased significantly from the early stage study (p less than 0.05); oxygen consumption (rCMRO2) fell in all cases significantly from the pretreatment study (p less than 0.01) and from the early stage study (p less than 0.05); consequently, rOEF remained unchanged at a level similar to the early stage study. Glucose consumption (rCMRG1) increased slightly as compared with the early stage study but failed to be restored to the level of the pretreatment study. Noteworthy was a coupling reduction of rCBF and rCMRO2--presumably, a late delayed effect of radiochemotherapy. These preliminary results indicate that with PET studies it may be possible to predict damage to normal brain tissue after radiochemotherapy.

  14. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ˜14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  15. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  16. Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert; Zheng, Huaiyu; Kraenzle, Jennifer; Biller, Ashley; Vanover, Carol D; Proctor, Mary; Sherwood, Leslie; Steffen, Marlene; Ng, Chin; Mollura, Daniel J; Jonsson, Colleen B

    2012-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been a long-standing animal model used in the evaluation and treatment of human diseases. Molecular imaging techniques such as 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) would be an invaluable method of tracking disease in vivo, but this technique has not been reported in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish baseline imaging characteristics of PET/computed tomography (CT) with (18)F-FDG in the ferret model. Twelve healthy female ferrets were anesthetized and underwent combined PET/CT scanning. After the images were fused, volumes of interest (VOIs) were generated in the liver, heart, thymus, and bilateral lung fields. For each VOI, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Additional comparisons were made between radiotracer uptake periods (60, 90, and >90 minutes), intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of (18)F-FDG, and respiratory gated and ungated acquisitions. Pulmonary structures and the surrounding thoracic and upper abdominal anatomy were readily identified on the CT scans of all ferrets and were successfully fused with PET. VOIs were created in various tissues with the following SUV calculations: heart (maximum standardized uptake value [SUV(Max)] 8.60, mean standardized uptake value [SUV(Mean)] 5.42), thymus (SUV(Max) 3.86, SUV(Mean) 2.59), liver (SUV(Max) 1.37, SUV(Mean) 0.99), right lung (SUV(Max) 0.92, SUV(Mean) 0.56), and left lung (SUV(Max) 0.88, SUV(Mean) 0.51). Sixty- to 90-minute uptake periods were sufficient to separate tissues based on background SUV activity. No gross differences in image quality were seen between intraperitoneal and intravenous injections of (18)F-FDG. Respiratory gating also did not have a significant impact on image quality of lung parenchyma. The authors concluded that (18)F-FDG PET and CT imaging can be performed successfully in normal healthy ferrets with the parameters identified in this study. They

  17. Ferret Thoracic Anatomy by 2-Deoxy-2-(18F)Fluoro-D-Glucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Albert; Zheng, Huaiyu; Kraenzle, Jennifer; Biller, Ashley; Vanover, Carol D.; Proctor, Mary; Sherwood, Leslie; Steffen, Marlene; Ng, Chin; Mollura, Daniel J.; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2013-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been a long-standing animal model used in the evaluation and treatment of human diseases. Molecular imaging techniques such as 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) would be an invaluable method of tracking disease in vivo, but this technique has not been reported in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish baseline imaging characteristics of PET/computed tomography (CT) with 18F-FDG in the ferret model. Twelve healthy female ferrets were anesthetized and underwent combined PET/CT scanning. After the images were fused, volumes of interest (VOIs) were generated in the liver, heart, thymus, and bilateral lung fields. For each VOI, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Additional comparisons were made between radiotracer uptake periods (60, 90, and >90 minutes), intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of 18F-FDG, and respiratory gated and ungated acquisitions. Pulmonary structures and the surrounding thoracic and upper abdominal anatomy were readily identified on the CT scans of all ferrets and were successfully fused with PET. VOIs were created in various tissues with the following SUV calculations: heart (maximum standardized uptake value [SUVMax] 8.60, mean standardized uptake value [SUVMean] 5.42), thymus (SUVMax 3.86, SUVMean 2.59), liver (SUVMax 1.37, SUVMean 0.99), right lung (SUVMax 0.92, SUVMean 0.56), and left lung (SUVMax 0.88, SUVMean 0.51). Sixty- to 90-minute uptake periods were sufficient to separate tissues based on background SUV activity. No gross differences in image quality were seen between intraperitoneal and intravenous injections of 18F-FDG. Respiratory gating also did not have a significant impact on image quality of lung parenchyma. The authors concluded that 18F-FDG PET and CT imaging can be performed successfully in normal healthy ferrets with the parameters identified in this study. They obtained similar imaging

  18. Technology related parameters affecting quantification in positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Visvikis, D; Turzo, A; Bizais, Y; Cheze-Le Rest, C

    2004-07-01

    Some of the issues associated with positron emission tomography (PET) technology which still pose challenges for the recovery of quantitative images are discussed. Through these issues reference to what is today considered as the 'gold standard' in quantitative PET imaging is also presented. A brief comparison of 2-D and 3-D PET is given, together with a short discussion of combined PET/CT imaging devices.

  19. Estimation of usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorders--preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wojtłowska-Wiechetek, D; Tworus, R; Dziuk, M; Petrovic, A; Szymańska, S; Zbyszewski, M; Ilnicki, S; Krzesiński, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using PET both in assessing the susceptibility to stress and in the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorders. Mentally and somatically healthy soldiers were subjected to PET-CT head scan examinations before and after virtual reality stimulation with warfare scenarios. Despite stimulation of peripheral nervous system after 10 minutes, VR exposure in any of the examined soldiers simulation did not cause changes in any brain structure that was visualized in PET. PET-CT head scan was also performed in patients with typical symptoms of acute PTSD according to the criteria of DSM IV TR. In those patients no changes in any brain structure was found. Initially it was found that VR exposure techniques like clinically typical acute symptoms of PTSD do not leave changes in CNS, which could be visualized in PET. The preliminary hypothesis was put forward that exposure to stimuli like symptoms of PTSD must remain long enough to induce permanent damage of brain structure.

  20. Role of positron emission tomography in urological oncology.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Jorge; Rodríguez-Fraile, Macarena; Lima-Favaretto, Ricardo; Rincón-Mayans, Anibal; Peñuelas-Sánchez, Iván; Zudaire-Bergera, Juan Javier; Parra, Raul O

    2010-12-01

    • Positron emission tomography (PET) is a diagnostic tool using radiotracers to show changes in metabolic activities in tissues. We analysed the role of PET and PET/computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis, staging, and follow-up of urological tumours. • A critical, non-structured review of the literature of the role of PET and PET/CT in urological oncology was conducted. • PET and PET/CT can play a role in the management of urological malignancies. For prostate cancer, the advances in radiotracers seems promising, with novel radiotracers yielding better diagnostic and staging results than 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). In kidney cancer, PET and PET/CT allow a proper diagnosis before the pathological examination of the surgical specimen. For testis cancer, PET and PET/CT have been shown to be useful in the management of seminoma tumours. In bladder cancer, these scans allow a better initial diagnosis for invasive cancer, while detecting occult metastases. • PET and its combined modality PET/CT have shown their potential in the diagnosis of urological malignancies. However, further studies are needed to establish the role of PET in the management of these diseases. Future applications of PET may involve fusion techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging with PET.

  1. The serotonin-dopamine interaction measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and C-11 raclopride in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.S.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.

    1994-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the interaction between serotonin and dopamine can be measured with C-11 raclopride and PET in the baboon brain. A series of studies was undertaken to extend dim findings to the normal human brain. PET studies were conducted in male control subjects (n=8) using the CTI 931 tomograph. Two C-11 raclopride scans were performed, prior to and 180 minutes following administration of the selective serotonin releasing agent, fenfluramine (60mg/PO). The neuroendocrine response to fenfluramine challenge is commonly used in psychiatric research as an index of serotonin activity. The C-11 raclopride data were analyzed with the distribution volume method. For the group of subjects, an increase was observed in the striatum to cerebellum ratio (specific to non-specific binding ratio), in excess of the test-retest variability of the ligand. Variability in response was observed across subjects. These results are consistent with our previous findings in the baboon that citalopram administration increased C-11 raclopride binding, consistent with a decrease in endogenous dopamine. In vivo microdialysis studies in freely moving rats confirmed that citalopram produces a time-dependent decrease in extracellular dopamine levels, consistent with the PET results. In vivo PET studies of the serotonin-dopamine interaction are relevant to the evaluation of etiologic and therapeutic mechanisms in schizophrenia and affective disorder.

  2. Imaging Keratitis-Icthyosis-Deafness (KID) syndrome with FDG-PET (F18-fluorodeoxiglucose-Positron Emission Tomography).

    PubMed

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Arcienega, Daniela; Cho, Eric; Hawkins, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Keratitis-Icthyosis-Deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare dysplasia characterized by vascularizing keratitis, congenital sensorineural hearing-loss, and progressive erythrokeratoderma. To our knowledge, this is the first KID syndrome imaged with FDG-PET in the literature. This paper is intended to help familiarize with the FDG abnormalities related to this rare entity.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and monkey positron emission tomography (PET) studies of [18F]Y1-973, a PET tracer for the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Eric D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gantert, Liza; Williams, Mangay; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Kameda, Minoru; Ando, Makoto; Sato, Nagaaki; Ozaki, Satoshi; Tokita, Shigeru; Ohta, Hisashi; Williams, David; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Burns, H Donald; Hargreaves, Richard

    2011-02-14

    Neuropeptide Y receptor subtype 1 (NPY Y1) has been implicated in appetite regulation, and antagonists of NPY Y1 are being explored as potential therapeutics for obesity. An NPY Y1 PET tracer is useful for determining the level of target engagement by NPY Y1 antagonists in preclinical and clinical studies. Here we report the synthesis and evaluation of [(18)F]Y1-973, a novel PET tracer for NPY Y1. [(18)F]Y1-973 was radiolabeled by reaction of a primary chloride with [(18)F]KF/K2.2.2 followed by deprotection with HCl. [(18)F]Y1-973 was produced with high radiochemical purity (>98%) and high specific activity (>1000 Ci/mmol). PET studies in rhesus monkey brain showed that the distribution of [(18)F]Y1-973 was consistent with the known NPY Y1 distribution; uptake was highest in the striatum and cortical regions and lowest in the pons, cerebellum nuclei, and brain stem. Blockade of [(18)F]Y1-973 uptake with NPY Y1 antagonist Y1-718 revealed a specific signal that was dose-dependently reduced in all regions of grey matter to a similarly low level of tracer uptake, indicative of an NPY Y1 specific signal. In vitro autoradiographic studies with [(18)F]Y1-973 in rhesus monkey and human brain tissue slices revealed an uptake distribution consistent with the in vivo PET studies. Highest binding density was observed in the dentate gyrus, caudate-putamen, and cortical regions; moderate binding density in the hypothalamus and thalamus; and lowest binding density in the globus pallidus and cerebellum. In vitro saturation binding studies in rhesus monkey and human caudate-putamen homogenates confirmed a similarly high B(max)/K(d) ratio for [(18)F]Y1-973, suggesting the tracer may provide a specific signal in human brain of similar magnitude to that observed in rhesus monkey. [(18)F]Y1-973 is a suitable PET tracer for imaging NPY Y1 in rhesus monkey with potential for translation to human PET studies.

  4. Role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in dementia.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Sidney R; Stocker, Derek J; Bradley, Yong C

    2013-09-01

    This article provides a clinically based review of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for dementia. Significant advances in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques have improved the understanding of the genetic and molecular processes that define neurodegenerative dementia diseases. Metabolic imaging remains constant in its ability to document neuronal loss and lost function. Amyloid-β radiotracers are useful in documenting amyloid deposition, differentiating origins of dementia and possibly predicting disease progression. These radiotracers may be useful in diagnosis-specific treatment. PET radiotracers have increased sensitivity and specificity to complement clinical presentation and other adjunct testing in the evaluation of dementia.

  5. An Assessment of Early Response to Targeted Therapy via Molecular Imaging: A Pilot Study of 3'-deoxy-3'[(18)F]-Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography (18)F-FLT PET/CT in Prostate Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, Kalevi; Ravizzini, Gregory C; Macapinlac, Homer A; Subbiah, Vivek

    2017-04-04

    Fluorothymidine is a thymidine analog labeled with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine for positron emission tomography ((18)F-FLT-PET) imaging. Thymidine is a nucleic acid that is used to build DNA. Fluorine-18 fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) utilizes the same metabolic pathway as does thymidine but has a very low incidence of being incorporated into the DNA (<1%). (18)F-FLT-PET could have a role in the evaluation of response to targeted therapy. We present here a pilot study where we investigated cellular metabolism and proliferation in patients with prostate cancer before and after targeted therapy. Seven patients with Stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, candidates for targeted therapy inhibiting the hepatocyte growth factor/tyrosine-protein kinase Met (HGF/C-MET) pathway, were included in this study. The HGF/C-MET pathway is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and an evaluation of the inhibition of this pathway could be valuable. (18)F-FLT was performed at baseline and within four weeks post-therapy. Tumor response was assessed semi-quantitatively and using visual response criteria. The range of SUVmax for (18)F-FLT at baseline in the prostate varied from 2.5 to 4.2. This study demonstrated that (18)F-FLT with positron emission tomography/computerized tomography ((18)F-FLT PET/CT) had only limited applications in the early response evaluation of prostate cancer. (18)F-FLT PET/CT may have some utility in the assessment of response in lymph node disease. However, (18)F-FLT PET/CT was not found to be useful in the evaluation of the prostate bed, metastatic skeletal disease, and liver disease.

  6. Evaluation of novel genetic algorithm generated schemes for positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image fusion.

    PubMed

    Baum, K G; Schmidt, E; Rafferty, K; Krol, A; Helguera, María

    2011-12-01

    The use and benefits of a multimodality approach in the context of breast cancer imaging are discussed. Fusion techniques that allow multiple images to be viewed simultaneously are discussed. Many of these fusion techniques rely on the use of color tables. A genetic algorithm that generates color tables that have desired properties such as satisfying the order principle, the rows, and columns principle, have perceivable uniformity and have maximum contrast is introduced. The generated 2D color tables can be used for displaying fused datasets. The advantage the proposed method has over other techniques is the ability to consider a much larger set of possible color tables, ensuring that the best one is found. We asked radiologists to perform a set of tasks reading fused PET/MRI breast images obtained using eight different fusion techniques. This preliminary study clearly demonstrates the need and benefit of a joint display by estimating the inaccuracies incurred when using a side-by-side display. The study suggests that the color tables generated by the genetic algorithm are good choices for fusing MR and PET images. It is interesting to note that popular techniques such as the Fire/Gray and techniques based on the HSV color space, which are prevalent in the literature and clinical practice, appear to give poorer performance.

  7. Positron emission tomography: physics, instrumentation, and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Porenta, G

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources, PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and user-friendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center.

  8. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) Findings in an Unusual Case of Multiple Myeloma Presenting with a Large Extra-Axial Intracranial Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Sevin; Ayaz, Ümit Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We aimed to present unusual cranial FDG PET/CT findings of a 56-year-old female with multiple myeloma (MM). Case Report Plain CT images revealed a lytic lesion in the right parietal bone, filled with an oval-shaped, large, extra-axial, extradural, intracranial mass which measured 75×75×40 mm and had smooth borders. The right parietal lobe was compressed by the mass. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the mass lesion was 8.94 on FDG PET/CT images. Multiple lytic lesions with an increased uptake were also detected in other calvarial bones, in several vertebras and in the proximal left femur. After seven months, a control FDG PET/CT following radiotherapy and chemotherapy revealed almost complete regression of the right parietal extra-axial mass lesion. The number, size and metabolism of lytic lesions in other bones also decreased. Conclusions FDG PET/CT was useful for an initial evaluation of MM lesions and was effective in monitoring the response of these lesions to therapy. PMID:28058074

  9. Initial Fludeoxyglucose (18F) Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) Imaging of Breast Cancer – Correlations with the Primary Tumour and Locoregional Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Sevin; Gültekin, Salih Sinan; Ayaz, Ümit Yaşar; Dilli, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Summary Backround We aimed to evaluate initial PET/CT features of primary tumour and locoregional metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in breast cancer and to look for potential relationships between several parameters from PET/CT. Material/Methods Twenty-three women (mean age; 48.66±12.23 years) with a diagnosis of primary invasive ductal carcinoma were included. They underwent PET/CT imaging for the initial tumour staging and had no evidence of distant metastates. Patients were divided into two groups. The LABC (locally advanced breast cancer) group included 17 patients with ipsilateral axillary lymph node (LN) metastases. The Non-LABC group consisted of six patients without LN metastases. PET/CT parameters including tumour size, axillary LN size, SUVmax of ipsilateral axillary LNs (SUVmax-LN), SUVmax of primary tumour (SUVmax-T) and NT ratios (SUVmax-LN/SUVmax-T) were compared between the groups. Correlations between the above-mentioned PET/CT parameters in the LABC group as well as the correlation between tumour size and SUVmax-T within each group were evaluated statistically. Results The mean values of the initial PET/CT parameters in the LABC group were significantly higher than those of the non-LABC group (p<0.05). The correlation between tumour size and SUVmax-T value within both LABC and non-LABC groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). In the LABC group, the correlations between the size and SUVmax-LN values of metastatic axillary LNs, between tumour size and metastatic axillary LN size, between SUVmax-T values and metastatic axillary LN size, between SUVmax-T and SUVmax-LN values, and between tumour size and SUVmax-LN values were all significant (p<0.05). Conclusions We found significant correlations between PET/CT parameters of the primary tumour and those of metastatic axillary LNs. Patients with LN metastases had relatively larger primary tumours and higher SUVmax values. PMID:28105247

  10. Design and Construction of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Unit and Medical Applications with GEANT Detector Simulation Package

    SciTech Connect

    Karagoz, Muge

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of the construction of a sample PET coincidence unit in our HEP laboratory, a setup with two face to face PMTs and two 2x8 Csi(Tl) scintillator matrices has been constructed. In this setup, 1-D projections of a pointlike 22 Na positron source at different angles have been measured. Using these projections a 2-D image has been formed. Monte Carlo studies of this setup have been implemented using the detector simulation tool in CERN program library, GEANT. Again with GEANT a sample human body is created to study the effects of proton therapy. Utilization of the simulation as a pretherapy tool is also investigated.

  11. Comparison of 2D and 3D qualitative whole body positron emission tomography (PET) without attenuation or scatter correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlmyer, S.G.; Mankoff, D.A.; Lewellen, T.K.; Kaplan, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The increased sensitivity of 3D PET reduces image noise but can also result in a loss of contrast due to higher scatter fractions. Phantom studies were performed to compare tumor detectability in 2D and 3D qualitative whole body PET without scatter or attenuation correction. Lesion detectability was defined as: detectability = contrast/noise = (-) / {sigma}liver, where and are the average of lesion and liver regions of interest (ROIs), respectively. Liver, heart, and soft tissue sections of a Data Spectrum torso phantom containing a Teflon spine insert were filled with F-18 to match relative concentrations found in clinical FDG studies. Spherical lesions of 1.2 and 2.2 cm diameter were placed in the liver with a lesion to liver activity concentration ratio of 2 : 1. Resulting 2D and 3D images were compared for equivalent whole body acquisition times. Circular ROIs, half the diameter of the lesions, were placed on the tumors and the surrounding background. Background ROIs were normalized to account for the spatially variant bias caused by the absence of the scatter and attenuation corrections. Detectability was greater in the 3D images over the range of count densities and lesion sizes studied, although the difference in detectability between 2D and 3D decreases with decreasing lesion size. These results suggest that 3D imaging is preferable to 2D imaging for clinical qualitative whole body scanning without scatter or attenuation correction. Further studies representing a larger range of clinical applications are required.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled estrogens and progestins as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Seven new estrogen receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals, 16[alpha]-[[sup 18]F]-fluoro-17[alpha]-ethynyl-estradiol, (FEES), 15, 11[beta]-methoxy-FEES, 16, 11[beta]-ethyl-FEES, 17, 16[beta]-[[sup 18]F]-fluoroestradiol, (16[beta]-FES), 19, 11[beta]-methoxy-16[beta]-FES, 20, 16[beta]-[[sup 18]F]-fluoro-17[alpha]-ethynyl-estradiol, (16[beta]FEES), 21, and 11[beta]-methoxy-16[beta]-FEES, 22, have been prepared and evaluated as potential PET imaging agents for estrogen receptor-rich breast tumors. Radiolabeling was achieved by nucleophilic displacement of the appropriate 16[beta]- or 16[alpha]-trifluoromethanesulfonate(triflate)-estrone-3-triflate derivative with nBu[sub 4]N[sup 18]F. Subsequent hydride reduction or nucleophilic attack by lithium-trimethylsilylacetylide followed by HPLC purification yielded the FES or FEES analogs, respectively. These compounds can be prepared in 90-120 minutes from [sup 18]F-fluoride with radiochemical yields of 1-40% (decay corrected) and effective specific activities ranging from 50-4,000 Ci/mmol. The relative binding affinities (RBA) ranged from 0.5 to 309. Biological distribution was performed in 25 day old Sprague-Dawley female rats. Uterine uptake ranged from 5-16 percent of the injected dose. These fluorestrogens were highly selective in vivo as evidenced by the high uterus-to-blood (range 10-170) and uterus-to-muscle (range 25-80) ratios. The FEES analogs, 15,16, and 17, had the highest uterus to blood ratios ever seen amongst estrogen radiopharmaceuticals; 154, 145 and 169, respectively. The dose to critical clearance organs (liver and kidneys) was less than 3% of the injected dose per gram of tissue. Metabolic defluorination did not occur with these compounds. These new analogs exhibited an array of desirable characteristics for the optimal PET imaging of estrogen receptor-positive human mammary tumors.

  13. Ictal onset zone and seizure propagation delineated on ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Garg, Ajay; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the utility of ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in delineating the seizure onset zone in a child with complex partial seizures. Although F-18 FDG PET has been successfully used to delineate interictal hypometabolism, planned ictal FDG PET, in cases with prolonged seizure activity, can provide better spatial resolution than single-photon emission CT by delineating the seizure onset zone and propagation pathway.

  14. The influence of tumor oxygenation on 18F-FDG (Fluorine-18 Deoxyglucose) uptake: A mouse study using positron emission tomography (PET)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Linda W; Hapdey, Sebastien; English, Sean; Seidel, Jurgen; Carson, Joann; Sowers, Anastasia L; Krishna, Murali C; Green, Michael V; Mitchell, James B; Bacharach, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    Background This study investigated whether changing a tumor's oxygenation would alter tumor metabolism, and thus uptake of 18F-FDG (fluorine-18 deoxyglucose), a marker for glucose metabolism using positron emission tomography (PET). Results Tumor-bearing mice (squamous cell carcinoma) maintained at 37°C were studied while breathing either normal air or carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2), known to significantly oxygenate tumors. Tumor activity was measured within an automatically determined volume of interest (VOI). Activity was corrected for the arterial input function as estimated from image and blood-derived data. Tumor FDG uptake was initially evaluated for tumor-bearing animals breathing only air (2 animals) or only carbogen (2 animals). Subsequently, 5 animals were studied using two sequential 18F-FDG injections administered to the same tumor-bearing mouse, 60 min apart; the first injection on one gas (air or carbogen) and the second on the other gas. When examining the entire tumor VOI, there was no significant difference of 18F-FDG uptake between mice breathing either air or carbogen (i.e. air/carbogen ratio near unity). However, when only the highest 18F-FDG uptake regions of the tumor were considered (small VOIs), there was a modest (21%), but significant increase in the air/carbogen ratio suggesting that in these potentially most hypoxic regions of the tumor, 18F-FDG uptake and hence glucose metabolism, may be reduced by increasing tumor oxygenation. Conclusion Tumor 18F-FDG uptake may be reduced by increases in tumor oxygenation and thus may provide a means to further enhance 18F-FDG functional imaging. PMID:16722588

  15. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristics) study of maximum likelihood estimator human brain image reconstructions in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Llacer, J.; Veklerov, E.; Nolan, D. ); Grafton, S.T.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Hoh, C.K.; Hoffman, E.J. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper will report on the progress to date in carrying out Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) studies comparing Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) and Filtered Backprojection (FBP) reconstructions of normal and abnormal human brain PET data in a clinical setting. A previous statistical study of reconstructions of the Hoffman brain phantom with real data indicated that the pixel-to-pixel standard deviation in feasible MLE images is approximately proportional to the square root of the number of counts in a region, as opposed to a standard deviation which is high and largely independent of the number of counts in FBP. A preliminary ROC study carried out with 10 non-medical observers performing a relatively simple detectability task indicates that, for the majority of observers, lower standard deviation translates itself into a statistically significant detectability advantage in MLE reconstructions. The initial results of ongoing tests with four experienced neurologists/nuclear medicine physicians are presented. Normal cases of {sup 18}F -- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) cerebral metabolism studies and abnormal cases in which a variety of lesions have been introduced into normal data sets have been evaluated. We report on the results of reading the reconstructions of 90 data sets, each corresponding to a single brain slice. It has become apparent that the design of the study based on reading single brain slices is too insensitive and we propose a variation based on reading three consecutive slices at a time, rating only the center slice. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Suzanne E.; Voller, Thomas F.; Welch, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia imaging has applications in functional recovery in ischemic events such as stroke and myocardial ischemia, but especially in tumors in which hypoxia can be predictive of treatment response and overall prognosis. Recently there has been development of imaging agents utilizing positron emission tomography for non-invasive imaging of hypoxia. Many of these PET agents have come to the forefront of hypoxia imaging. Halogenated PET nitroimidazole imaging agents labeled with 18F (t1/2 = 110 m) and 124I (t1/2 = 110 m) have been under investigation for the last 25 years, with radiometal agents (64Cu-ATSM) being developed more recently. This review focuses on these positron emission tomography imaging agents for hypoxia. PMID:20046923

  17. Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0125 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 Sept 2013-31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer ...proposal is to develop peptide based radiopharmaceuticals and evaluate them as PET imaging agents in preclinical animal models of prostate cancer

  18. Imaging dopamine release with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and (11)C-raclopride in freely moving animals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vinal D; Lee, Dianne E; Alexoff, David L; Dewey, Stephen L; Schiffer, Wynne K

    2008-07-01

    We investigated an imaging strategy that provides simultaneous measurements of radiotracer binding and behavior in awake, freely moving animals. In this strategy, animals are injected intravenously (i.v.) through a catheterized line and permitted to move freely for 30 min during uptake of the imaging agent, in this case 11C-raclopride. After this Awake Uptake period, animals are anesthetized and scanned for 25 min. We tested the utility of this strategy for measuring changes in striatal 11C-raclopride binding under control conditions (awake and freely moving in the home cage) and with several drug challenges: a loading dose of unlabeled raclopride, pretreatment with methamphetamine (METH) or pretreatment with gamma-vinyl-GABA [S+-GVG] followed by METH. An additional group of animals underwent a stress paradigm that we have previously shown increases brain dopamine. For drug challenge experiments, the change in 11C-raclopride binding was compared to data from animals that were anesthetized for the uptake period ("Anesthetized Uptake") and full time activity curves were used to calculate 11C-raclopride binding. Regardless of the drug treatment protocol, there was no difference in 11C-raclopride striatum to cerebellum ratio between the Awake versus the Anesthetized Uptake conditions. Awake and Anesthetized groups demonstrated over 90% occupancy of dopamine receptors with a loading dose of cold raclopride, both groups demonstrated approximately 30% reduction in 11C-raclopride binding from METH pretreatment and this effect was modulated to the same degree by GVG under both uptake conditions. Restraint during Awake Uptake decreased 11C-raclopride binding by 29%. These studies support a unique molecular imaging strategy in which radiotracer uptake occurs in freely moving animals, after which they are anesthetized and scanned. This imaging strategy extends the applicability of small animal PET to include functional neurotransmitter imaging and the neurochemical correlates

  19. Oncocytic carcinoid tumor of the lung with intense F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Rieko; Hosokawa, Kohei; Kajihara, Makoto; Shimizu, Teruhiko; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Sakai, Shinya; Sawada, Shigeki; Yamashita, Motohiro; Ohtani, Haruhiko

    2013-10-01

    The present report describes a case of typical carcinoid tumor with intense fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The most of tumor cells were characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm resulting from accumulation of mitochondria, which was called an oncocytic carcinoid tumor. Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) was expressed in a membranous pattern in the oncocytic component. Oncocytic carcinoid tumors could show intense FDG uptake due to the numerous intracellular mitochondria and the membranous overexpression of GLUT-1. Thus, it could be a potential pitfall of interpreting FDG-PET/CT image.

  20. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  1. Asymptomatic Emphysematous Pyelonephritis - Positron Emission Tomography Computerized Tomography Aided Diagnostic and Therapeutic Elucidation

    PubMed Central

    Pathapati, Deepti; Shinkar, Pawan Gulabrao; kumar, Satya Awadhesh; Jha; Dattatreya, Palanki Satya; Chigurupati, Namrata; Chigurupati, Mohana Vamsy; Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    The authors report an interesting coincidental unearthing by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) of a potentially serious medical condition of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The management by conservative ureteric stenting and antibiotics was done with gratifying clinical outcome. PMID:28242985

  2. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  3. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  4. Hypermetabolism in the left thalamus and right inferior temporal area on positron emission tomography-statistical parametric mapping (PET-SPM) in a patient with Charles Bonnet syndrome resolving after treatment with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Won; Youn, Young Chul; Seok, Ju-Won; Ha, Sam-Yeol; Shin, Hae-Won; Ahan, Suk-Won; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kwon, Oh-Sang

    2011-08-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is characterized by the occurrence of complex visual hallucinations in visually impaired patients who understand that what they see is unreal. The pathophysiologic mechanism of CBS is poorly understood. However, hypermetabolism of the thalamocortical pathway as a result of deafferentation was recently proposed as a possible mechanism. A 69-year-old patient with CBS presented with a 5-year history of visual hallucinations after bilateral visual impairment, which had progressed to troublesome images of many unreal people and animals. Positron emission tomography-statistical parametric mapping (PET-SPM) imaging studies initially revealed hypermetabolism in the right inferior temporal area and left thalamus, which disappeared after treatment with valproic acid. This case, using PET-SPM analysis, supports the thalamic hypermetabolism theory of CBS.

  5. Tumor Quantification in Clinical Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Bading, James; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used extensively in clinical oncology for tumor detection, staging and therapy response assessment. Quantitative measurements of tumor uptake, usually in the form of standardized uptake values (SUVs), have enhanced or replaced qualitative interpretation. In this paper we review the current status of tumor quantification methods and their applications to clinical oncology. Factors that impede quantitative assessment and limit its accuracy and reproducibility are summarized, with special emphasis on SUV analysis. We describe current efforts to improve the accuracy of tumor uptake measurements, characterize overall metabolic tumor burden and heterogeneity of tumor uptake, and account for the effects of image noise. We also summarize recent developments in PET instrumentation and image reconstruction and their impact on tumor quantification. Finally, we offer our assessment of the current development needs in PET tumor quantification, including practical techniques for fully quantitative, pharmacokinetic measurements. PMID:24312151

  6. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Takeo; Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Senda, Michio; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  7. [Positron emission tomography: diagnostic imaging on a molecular level].

    PubMed

    Allemann, K; Wyss, M; Wergin, M; Bley, C Rohrer; Ametamay, S; Bruehlmeier, M; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2004-08-01

    In human medicine positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern diagnostic imaging method. In the present paper we outline the physical principles of PET and give an overview over the main clinic fields where PET is being used, such as neurology, cardiology and oncology. Moreover, we present a current project in veterinary medicine (in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute and the University Hospital Zurich), where a hypoxia tracer is applied to dogs and cats suffering from spontaneous tumors. Finally new developments in the field of PET were discussed.

  8. Positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography in substance abuse research.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2003-04-01

    Many advances in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain have come from the application of imaging technologies directly in the human drug abuser. New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology, and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, oncology, and cardiology because of the high medical, social, and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. This article highlights recent advances in the use of PET and SPECT imaging to measure the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs of abuse on the human brain.

  9. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome.

  10. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  11. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B.

    1995-07-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

  12. Positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.M.; Semple, W.E.; Gross, M.

    1986-03-01

    PET is a unique tool for the direct in vivo evaluation of physiologic processes within discrete areas of the brain. Thus far, its application to the study of schizophrenia has served to confirm the subtleties of this illness. However, PET does promise to increase our knowledge of the neurochemical anatomy of the normal and abnormal mind with respect to goal-directed behavior.22 references.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography of band heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Miura, K; Watanabe, K; Maeda, N; Matsumoto, A; Kumagai, T; Ito, K; Kato, T

    1993-01-01

    A case of band heterotopia was reported with findings of positron emission tomography (PET). The patient was an 8-year-old girl who had mild mental retardation and intractable partial epilepsy. Her MRI showed another diffuse layer of gray matter underlying the normal-looking cortex and separated from it by an apparently normal layer of white matter. PET scan with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose revealed that band heterotopia had the same degree of glucose metabolism as that of the overlying cortex.

  14. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography: state of the art and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays a fundamental role in medical imaging, with a wide range of applications covering, among the others, oncology, neurology and cardiology. PET has undergone a steady technological evolution since its introduction in mid 20th century, from the development of 3D PET in the late 1980s, to the invention of PET/CT in the 1990s and more recently with the introduction of PET/MR scanners. The current research topics aiming to develop the next generation of PET scanners are summarized in this paper, focusing on the efforts to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, as long as improving their timing, spatial and energy resolutions, with the final goal of reducing the amount of radioactive dose received by the patients and the duration of the exams while improving at the same time the detectability of lesions.

  16. A Review on Segmentation of Positron Emission Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brent; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Xu, Ziyue; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a non-invasive functional imaging method at the molecular level, images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity. PET imaging provides detailed quantitative information about many diseases and is often used to evaluate inflammation, infection, and cancer by detecting emitted photons from a radiotracer localized to abnormal cells. In order to differentiate abnormal tissue from surrounding areas in PET images, image segmentation methods play a vital role; therefore, accurate image segmentation is often necessary for proper disease detection, diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-ups. In this review paper, we present state-of-the-art PET image segmentation methods, as well as the recent advances in image segmentation techniques. In order to make this manuscript self-contained, we also briefly explain the fundamentals of PET imaging, the challenges of diagnostic PET image analysis, and the effects of these challenges on the segmentation results. PMID:24845019

  17. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography with improved spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drukier, A.K.

    1990-04-01

    Applied Research Corporation (ARC) proposed the development of a new class of solid state detectors called Superconducting Granular Detectors (SGD). These new detectors permit considerable improvements in medical imaging, e.g. Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The biggest impact of this technique will be in imaging of the brain. It should permit better clinical diagnosis of such important diseases as Altzheimer's or schizophrenia. More specifically, we will develop an improved PET-imager; a spatial resolution 2 mm may be achievable with SGD. A time-of-flight capability(t {approx} 100 psec) will permit better contrast and facilitate 3D imaging. In the following, we describe the results of the first 9 months of the development.

  19. Outcome of Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients With a Posttreatment 18F-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET)-Negative Residual Mass: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hugo J A; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review and meta-analyze the outcome of Hodgkin lymphoma patients with a posttreatment (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-negative residual mass. A systematic PubMed/MEDLINE database search was performed. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed. The number of patients with a posttreatment non-FDG-avid residual mass and the number of these patients who developed disease relapse during follow-up were extracted from each included study. Heterogeneity in disease relapse proportions across individual studies was assessed using the I2 test, with heterogeneity defined as I(2) > 50%. Using a Freeman-Tukey transformation, the disease relapse proportions from each individual study were then meta-analyzed with either a fixed-effects model (if I2 ≤ 50 %) or a random-effects model (if I2 > 50 %). A total of 5 studies comprising a total of 727 Hodgkin lymphoma patients with an FDG-PET-negative residual mass after first-line therapy were included. The overall quality of included studies was moderate. The proportion of patients with a posttreatment non-FDG-avid residual mass who experienced disease relapse during follow-up ranged between 0% and 13.8%. There was heterogeneity in disease relapse proportions across individual studies (I2 = 61.4%). Pooled disease relapse proportion (random effects) was 6.8% (95% confidence interval: 2.6%-12.5%). The disease relapse rate in Hodgkin lymphoma patients with a FDG-PET-negative residual mass after first-line therapy is approximately 6.8%. Considering the existing literature, the presence of a non-FDG-avid residual mass has not been proven yet to be associated with a worse outcome than a posttreatment FDG-PET-based complete remission status without a residual mass.

  20. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Saffer, Janet R.; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions. PMID:18383664

  1. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Konecky, Soren D; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M; Saffer, Janet R; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G

    2008-02-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography: Human Brain Function and Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Michael E.; Mazziotta, John C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the method, present status, and application of positron emission tomography (PET), an analytical imaging technique for "in vivo" measurements of the anatomical distribution and rates of specific biochemical reactions. Measurements and image dynamic biochemistry link basic and clinical neurosciences with clinical findings…

  3. Accuracy of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging of pediatric sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Hosono, Ako; Makimoto, Atsushi; Sakurada, Aine; Terauchi, Takashi; Arai, Yasuaki; Imai, Yutaka; Kim, Euishin Edmund

    2007-09-01

    The present study was conducted to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the staging in pediatric sarcomas. Fifty pediatric patients with histologically proven sarcomas who underwent 18FDG PET/CT before treatment were evaluated retrospectively for the detection of nodal and distant metastases. Diagnostic accuracy of 18FDG PET/CT in detecting nodal and distant metastases was compared with that of 18FDG PET and conventional imaging (CI). The images were reviewed and a diagnostic consensus was reached by 3 observers. REFERENCE standard was histologic examination in 15 patients and confirmation of an obvious progression in size of the lesions on follow-up examinations. Nodal metastasis was correctly assessed in 48 patients (96%) with PET/CT, in contrast to 43 patients (86%) with PET, and 46 patients (92%) with CI. Diagnostic accuracies of nodal metastasis in 3 modalities were similar. Using PET/CT, distant metastasis was correctly assigned in 43 patients (86%), whereas interpretation based on PET alone or CI revealed distant metastasis in 33 patients (66%) and 35 patients (70%), respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of distant metastasis with PET/CT was significantly higher than that of PET (P=0.002) or CI (P=0.008). False negative results regarding distant metastasis by PET/CT in 7 patients (14%) were caused by subcentimetric lesions (n=4), bone marrow lesion (n=2), and soft tissue lesions (n=1). PET/CT is more accurate and probably more cost-effective than PET alone or CI regarding distant metastasis in pediatric sarcomas.

  4. Positron emission tomography for use in microdosing studies.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Claudia Christina; Müller, Markus; Lappin, Graham; Langer, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using microdoses of radiolabeled drug tracers is gaining increasing acceptance in modern clinical drug development. This approach is unique in that it allows for direct quantitative assessment of drug concentrations in the tissues targeted for treatment, thereby bridging the gap between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Current applications of PET in anticancer, anti-infective and central nervous system drug research are reviewed herein. Situated at the interface of preclinical and clinical drug testing, PET microdosing is a powerful and highly innovative tool for pharmaceutical development.

  5. Direct conversion semiconductor detectors in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Gu, Yi; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor detectors are playing an increasing role in ongoing research to improve image resolution, contrast, and quantitative accuracy in preclinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET). These detectors serve as a medium for direct detection of annihilation photons. Early clinical translation of this technology has shown improvements in image quality and tumor delineation for head and neck cancers, relative to conventional scintillator-based systems. After a brief outline of the basics of PET imaging and the physical detection mechanisms for semiconductor detectors, an overview of ongoing detector development work is presented. The capabilities of semiconductor-based PET systems and the current state of these devices are discussed.

  6. Variation in Positron Emission Tomography Use After Colon Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y. Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D.; Chang, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. Patients and Methods: We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. Conclusion: PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. PMID:25852143

  7. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  8. Attenuation correction in emission tomography using the emission data—A review

    SciTech Connect

    Berker, Yannick Li, Yusheng

    2016-02-15

    The problem of attenuation correction (AC) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) had been considered solved to a large extent after the commercial availability of devices combining PET with computed tomography (CT) in 2001; single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has seen a similar development. However, stimulated in particular by technical advances toward clinical systems combining PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), research interest in alternative approaches for PET AC has grown substantially in the last years. In this comprehensive literature review, the authors first present theoretical results with relevance to simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity. The authors then look back at the early history of this research area especially in PET; since this history is closely interwoven with that of similar approaches in SPECT, these will also be covered. We then review algorithmic advances in PET, including analytic and iterative algorithms. The analytic approaches are either based on the Helgason–Ludwig data consistency conditions of the Radon transform, or generalizations of John’s partial differential equation; with respect to iterative methods, we discuss maximum likelihood reconstruction of attenuation and activity (MLAA), the maximum likelihood attenuation correction factors (MLACF) algorithm, and their offspring. The description of methods is followed by a structured account of applications for simultaneous reconstruction techniques: this discussion covers organ-specific applications, applications specific to PET/MRI, applications using supplemental transmission information, and motion-aware applications. After briefly summarizing SPECT applications, we consider recent developments using emission data other than unscattered photons. In summary, developments using time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data for AC have shown promising advances and open a wide range of applications. These techniques may both remedy

  9. Attenuation correction in emission tomography using the emission data—A review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    The problem of attenuation correction (AC) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) had been considered solved to a large extent after the commercial availability of devices combining PET with computed tomography (CT) in 2001; single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has seen a similar development. However, stimulated in particular by technical advances toward clinical systems combining PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), research interest in alternative approaches for PET AC has grown substantially in the last years. In this comprehensive literature review, the authors first present theoretical results with relevance to simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity. The authors then look back at the early history of this research area especially in PET; since this history is closely interwoven with that of similar approaches in SPECT, these will also be covered. We then review algorithmic advances in PET, including analytic and iterative algorithms. The analytic approaches are either based on the Helgason–Ludwig data consistency conditions of the Radon transform, or generalizations of John’s partial differential equation; with respect to iterative methods, we discuss maximum likelihood reconstruction of attenuation and activity (MLAA), the maximum likelihood attenuation correction factors (MLACF) algorithm, and their offspring. The description of methods is followed by a structured account of applications for simultaneous reconstruction techniques: this discussion covers organ-specific applications, applications specific to PET/MRI, applications using supplemental transmission information, and motion-aware applications. After briefly summarizing SPECT applications, we consider recent developments using emission data other than unscattered photons. In summary, developments using time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data for AC have shown promising advances and open a wide range of applications. These techniques may both remedy

  10. Positron emission tomography in CNS drug discovery and drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Piel, Markus; Vernaleken, Ingo; Rösch, Frank

    2014-11-26

    Molecular imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly involved in the development of new drugs. Using radioactive tracers as imaging probes, PET allows the determination of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug candidate, via recording target engagement, the pattern of distribution, and metabolism. Because of the noninvasive nature and quantitative end point obtainable by molecular imaging, it seems inherently suited for the examination of a pharmaceutical's behavior in the brain. Molecular imaging, most especially PET, can therefore be a valuable tool in CNS drug research. In this Perspective, we present the basic principles of PET, the importance of appropriate tracer selection, the impact of improved radiopharmaceutical chemistry in radiotracer development, and the different roles that PET can fulfill in CNS drug research.

  11. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography/computed tomography treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Macapinlac, Homer A

    2008-03-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has provided an incremental dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of important molecular images in radiotherapy treatment planning, ie, direct evaluation of tumor metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia, and angiogenesis. The CT component allows 4D imaging techniques, allowing improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery by compensating for tumor/normal organ motion, improving PET quantification, and correcting PET and CT image misregistration. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system to obtain a fused anatomical and functional image data is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for improved delineation of tumor volumes and optimization of treatment plans. PET has the potential to improve radiotherapy planning by minimizing unnecessary irradiation of normal tissues and by reducing the risk of geographic miss. PET influences treatment planning in a high proportion of cases and therefore radiotherapy dose escalation without PET may be futile. This article examines the increasing role of hybrid PET/CT imaging techniques in process of improving treatment planning in oncology with emphasis on non small cell lung cancer.

  12. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 5 (mGluR5) Cortical Abnormalities in Focal Cortical Dysplasia Identified In Vivo With [11C]ABP688 Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Jonathan M.; Rousset, Olivier G.; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Hall, Jeffery A.; Reader, Andrew J.; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) abnormalities have been described in tissue resected from epilepsy patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). To determine if these abnormalities could be identified in vivo, we investigated mGluR5 availability in 10 patients with focal epilepsy and an MRI diagnosis of FCD using positron-emission tomography (PET) and the radioligand [11C]ABP688. Partial volume corrected [11C]ABP688 binding potentials (BPND) were computed using the cerebellum as a reference region. Each patient was compared to homotopic cortical regions in 33 healthy controls using region-of-interest (ROI) and vertex-wise analyses. Reduced [11C]ABP688 BPND in the FCD was seen in 7/10 patients with combined ROI and vertex-wise analyses. Reduced FCD BPND was found in 4/5 operated patients (mean follow-up: 63 months; Engel I), of whom surgical specimens revealed FCD type IIb or IIa, with most balloon cells showing negative or weak mGluR5 immunoreactivity as compared to their respective neuropil and normal neurons at the border of resections. [11C]ABP688 PET shows for the first time in vivo evidence of reduced mGluR5 availability in FCD, indicating focal glutamatergic alterations in malformations of cortical development, which cannot be otherwise clearly demonstrated through resected tissue analyses. PMID:27578494

  13. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  14. Routine positron emission tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography in melanoma staging with positive sentinel node biopsy is of limited benefit.

    PubMed

    Constantinidou, Anastasia; Hofman, Michael; O'Doherty, Michael; Acland, Katharine M; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark

    2008-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for the staging and management of melanoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of PET or PET/ computed tomography (CT) as a routine procedure in patients with positive sentinel node biopsy (SNB). Thirty patients with melanoma of Breslow thickness greater than 1 mm who had PET or PET/CT scans performed within 100 days after a positive SNB were reviewed retrospectively. Two patients (6%) had a positive PET scan, none of which were melanoma related. The first patient had a synchronous neuroendocrine thyroid tumour and the second patient had increased uptake in the chest wall, which proved to be old trauma. Lymph node dissection was positive in five cases (16%). With a median follow-up of 24 months, 21 patients remained disease free. In none of the 30 cases did the early PET scan after a positive SNB alter subsequent melanoma management. The role of PET scanning soon after a positive sentinel node biopsy seems to be of limited benefit. It is questionable whether any imaging is beneficial at this stage. The results of this review suggest that PET scanning might not be indicated for this group of patients.

  15. PET-Computed Tomography in Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Randall, Elissa K

    2016-05-01

    PET/CT is an advanced imaging modality that is becoming more commonly used in veterinary medicine. It is most commonly used to image patients with cancer, and the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is F-18 FDG. F-18 FDG is a glucose analog that highlights areas of increased glucose metabolism on the PET images. CT images provide excellent anatomic depiction and aid in interpretation of the PET data. Many types of cancer are hypermetabolic on PET/CT scans, but normal structures and areas of inflammation are also hypermetabolic, so knowledge of normal imaging and cytologic or histopathologic evaluation of lesions is essential.

  16. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  17. Positron emission tomography: a financial and operational analysis.

    PubMed

    Conti, P S; Keppler, J S; Halls, J M

    1994-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an emerging clinical imaging technique that is facing the challenges of expansion in a period of imminent health care contraction and reform. Although PET began showing utility in clinical medicine in the mid-1980s [1], its proliferation into mainstream medical practice has not matched that of other new imaging technologies such as MR imaging. Many factors have contributed to this, including the changing health care economy, the high cost of PET, the length of time it takes to develop a PET facility, and its inherent complexity. In part because of the proliferation of the use of other technologies and the general explosion of costs, insurance carriers are now holding diagnostic techniques, including PET, to stricter standards of efficacy. New techniques must show improvement in long-term outcome of patients, a difficult task for diagnostic tools. In addition to these issues, PET is an expensive technology that requires highly trained multidisciplinary personnel. Questions have also been raised about the most appropriate mechanism for regulation of PET isotope preparation, leading to speculation about future regulatory requirements. The current pioneers of PET must meet these challenges in order for it to become a routine imaging technique. Because of its clinical value, PET will probably survive despite the challenges. For many reasons, though, not every hospital should necessarily develop PET services. Conversely, many hospitals without this technology should consider acquiring PET. The purpose of this article is to identify the financial, operational, and clinical challenges facing PET centers today, describe potential organizational configurations that may enable PET to survive in an antitechnology environment, and delineate which institutions should consider this new technology.

  18. Fluorine-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Patients With Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx: Diagnostic Accuracy and Impact on Clinical Management

    SciTech Connect

    Gordin, Arie . E-mail: ariegor@hotmail.com; Golz, Avishay; Daitzchman, Marcello; Keidar, Zohar; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Kuten, Abraham; Israel, Ora

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma as compared with PET and conventional imaging (CI) alone, and to assess the impact of PET/CT on further clinical management. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma had 45 PET/CT examinations. The study was a retrospective analysis. Changes in patient care resulting from the PET/CT studies were recorded. Results: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 92%, 90%, 90%, 90%, and 91%, respectively, as compared with 92%, 65%, 76%, 86%, and 80% for PET and 92%, 15%, 60%, 60%, and 60% for CI. Imaging with PET/CT altered further management of 19 patients (57%). Imaging with PET/CT eliminated the need for previously planned diagnostic procedures in 11 patients, induced a change in the planned therapeutic approach in 5 patients, and guided biopsy to a specific metabolically active area inside an edematous region in 3 patients, thus decreasing the chances for tissue sampling errors and avoiding damage to nonmalignant tissue. Conclusions: In cancer of the nasopharynx, the diagnostic performance of PET/CT is better than that of stand-alone PET or CI. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography had a major impact on further clinical management in 57% of patients.

  19. PET/Computed Tomography in Renal, Bladder, and Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/computed tomography (CT) is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in urooncology. In both bladder and renal cancers, there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder, and testicular cancers.

  20. PET/Computed Tomography Using New Radiopharmaceuticals in Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Alavi, Abass

    2015-10-01

    Targeted therapy is gaining prominence in the management of different cancers. Given different mechanism of action compared with traditional chemoradiotherapy, selection of patients for targeted therapy and monitoring response to these agents is difficult with conventional imaging. Various new PET radiopharmaceuticals have been evaluated for molecular imaging of these targets to achieve specific patient selection and response monitoring. These PET/computed tomography (CT) agents target the cell surface receptors, hormone receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, or angiogenesis components. This article reviews the established and potential role of PET/CT with new radiopharmaceuticals for guiding targeted therapy.

  1. Improving 18F-Fluoro-D-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Alzheimer's Disease Studies

    PubMed Central

    Knešaurek, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The goal was to improve Alzheimer's 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging through application of a novel, hybrid Fourier-wavelet windowed Fourier transform (WFT) restoration technique, in order to provide earlier and more accurate clinical results. General Electric Medical Systems downward-looking sonar PET/CT 16 slice system was used to acquire studies. Patient data were acquired according the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) protocol. Here, we implemented Fourier-wavelet regularized restoration, with a Butterworth low-pass filter, order n = 6 and a cut-off frequency f = 0.35 cycles/pixel and wavelet (Daubechies, order 2) noise suppression. The original (PET-O) and restored (PET-R) ADNI subject PET images were compared using the Alzheimer's discrimination analysis by dedicated software. Forty-two PET/CT scans were used in the study. They were performed on eleven ADNI subjects at intervals of approximately 6 months. The final clinical diagnosis was used as a gold standard. For three subjects, the final clinical diagnosis was mild cognitive impairment and those 13 PET/CT studies were not included in the final comparison, as the result was considered as inconclusive. Using the reminding 29 PET/CT studies (23 AD and 6 normal), the sensitivity and specificity of the PET-O and PET-R were calculated. The sensitivity was 0.65 and 0.96 for PET-O and PET-R, respectively, and the specificity was 0.67 and 0.50 for PET-O and PET-R. The accuracy was 0.66 and 0.86 for PET-O and PET-R, respectively. The results of the study demonstrated that the accuracy of three-dimensional brain F-18 FDG PET images was significantly improved by Fourier-wavelet restoration filtering. PMID:26420987

  2. History and future technical innovation in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Jones, Terry; Townsend, David

    2017-01-01

    Instrumentation for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has experienced tremendous improvements in performance over the past 60 years since it was first conceived as a medical imaging modality. Spatial resolution has improved by a factor of 10 and sensitivity by a factor of 40 from the early designs in the 1970s to the high-performance scanners of today. Multimodality configurations have emerged that combine PET with computed tomography (CT) and, more recently, with MR. Whole-body scans for clinical purposes can now be acquired in under 10 min on a state-of-the-art PET/CT. This paper will review the history of these technical developments over 40 years and summarize the important clinical research and healthcare applications that have been made possible by these technical advances. Some perspectives for the future of this technology will also be presented that promise to bring about new applications of this imaging modality in clinical research and healthcare.

  3. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. (68)Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of (177)Lu-PSMA therapy.

  4. Trends in radiation protection of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, A; Soliman, K

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, the number of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging procedures has increased substantially. This imaging technique provides accurate functional and anatomical information, particularly for oncological applications. Separately, both PET and CT are considered as high-dose imaging modalities. With the increased use of PET/CT, one could expect an increase in radiation doses to staff and patients. As such, major efforts have been made to reduce radiation dose in PET/CT facilities. Variations in working techniques have made it difficult to compare published results. This study aimed to review the literature on proposed methods to reduce patient and staff dose in clinical PET/CT imaging. A brief overview of some published information on staff and patient doses will be analysed and presented. Recent trends regarding radiation protection in PET/CT imaging will be discussed, and practical recommendations for reducing radiation doses to staff and patients will be discussed and summarised. Generally, the CT dose component is often higher in magnitude than the dose from PET alone; as such, focusing on CT dose reduction will decrease the overall patient dose in PET/CT imaging studies. The following factors should be considered in order to reduce the patient's dose from CT alone: proper justification for ordering contrast-enhanced CT; use of automatic exposure control features; use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms; and optimisation of scan parameters, especially scan length. The PET dose component can be reduced by administration of lower activity to the patient, optimisation of the workflow, and appropriate use of protective devices and engineered systems. At the international level, there is wide variation in work practices among institutions. The current observed trends are such that the annual dose limits for radiation workers in PET/CT imaging are unlikely to be exceeded.

  5. Positron emission tomography: a first-hand experience.

    PubMed

    Traylor, J

    2000-01-01

    In July 1999, the University of Kansas Hospital installed a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and added PET to the imaging technologies it offers patients and physicians. The new service is managed by the nuclear medicine section in the department of radiology. Plans are being implemented now to install a cyclotron in March 2000. Prior to installation of the scanner, a radiation area survey was performed in the space being considered for the PET unit. We also needed to address other critical considerations, including the manufacturer's requirements for construction of the scanner room, special electrical needs, and how the system would connect to our existing information network. It is important to work closely with your chief financial officer and chief operations officer from the beginning of the purchasing process so that these administrators have up-to-date, supportive information about PET and the progress of the installation. We made use of a variety of promotional techniques to market the new service, including broadcast e-mail, an open house for potential referring physicians, postings on the nuclear medicine Web site and communication through the local media. We also worked with the major insurance providers that utilize our hospital to educate them about PET and its benefits. In addition, we trained our own billing staff about procedures that optimize reimbursement for PET. In March 2000, University of Kansas Hospital will install the first cyclotron in the state, enabling us to generate the drugs used for PET scanning and potentially to add targets for research PET radiopharmaceuticals.

  6. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Gallbladder Detected on Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Asif Ali; Rodrigue, Paul David; Fakhri, Amena Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is rare in patients with diagnosed multiple myeloma. Soft tissue plasmacytoma of the gallbladder is particularly uncommon and has been described in only a handful of cases. Diagnosis of gallbladder plasmacytoma with fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has not previously been reported. We present a 65-year-old female with a history of multiple myeloma who underwent a restaging F18-FDG-PET/CT which showed a focal area of hypermetabolic activity, corresponding to a nodular lesion within the posterior gallbladder wall. The patient underwent successful cholecystectomy, with surgical pathology revealing gallbladder plasmacytoma. A follow-up scan was negative for active malignancy. This is a novel case of gallbladder plasmacytoma diagnosed on whole-body F18-FDG PET/CT – thus demonstrating the clinical value of this imaging modality in staging, restaging, and surveillance for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:27761300

  7. Principles and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Gardner, S F; Green, J A; Bednarczyk, E M; Farnett, L; Miraldi, F

    1992-06-01

    The basics of positron emission tomography (PET) are presented, including the physics, instrumentation, and radiopharmaceuticals involved; the clinical and research applications; and the cost. In PET, organic molecules labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides are injected or inhaled, and the high-energy photons produced by annihilation events are detected by paired, integrated crystal detectors. A computer uses the lines of origin of these photons to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of a functioning organ system. The positron-emitting radionuclides most often used are carbon 11, oxygen 15, nitrogen 13, fluorine 18, and rubidium 82. PET imaging centers usually consist of a cyclotron facility, a radiochemistry facility, a PET scanner, and computers for image reconstruction. Radiopharmaceuticals used in PET may be divided into blood flow-imaging agents, metabolic imaging agents, and drug receptor-imaging agents. Although PET is still primarily a research tool, it has shown diagnostic potential in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. It has also shown promise as a tool for pharmacologic assessment, as in studies of the effects of the fluorinated quinolones on cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism. PET may become important in drug development because it yields specific information relatively noninvasively. A single study carries an average break-even price tag of $1500-$2000; rigorous cost-benefit analyses should be conducted before society is asked to subsidize such costs. Positron emission tomography is a frontier technology for which valuable clinical applications are being discovered. Pharmacists can contribute enormously to PET applications and at the same time establish a unique subspecialty for the profession.

  8. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome. PMID:26917907

  9. Value of sequential 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in prediction of the overall survival of esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimin; Lin, Qin; Luo, Zuoming; Zhao, Long; Zhu, Luchao; Sun, Long; Wu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the value of the metabolic parameters measured by sequential FDG PET/CT in predicting the overall survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A total of 160 patients who were newly diagnosed as ESCC patients and treated with chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The FDG PET/CT was carried out prior to radiotherapy (PET1), when the cumulative dose of radiotherapy reached 50 Gy (PET2), at the end of radiotherapy (PET3) and 1 month after radiotherapy (PET4). The max of the standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor, the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total lesion glycolisis (TLG) prior to treatment were measured. The correlation of the measured parameters and the derived parameters of SUVmax with the overall survival was analyzed. The relatively reduced percentage of the SUVmax of PET3 and PET4 to the SUVmax of PET1 and PET2, had predictive value for the overall survival. The area under researcher operation curve (ROC) was between 0.62 and 0.73 (P < 0.01). The MTV and TLG prior to treatment might be used to predict the overall survival, and the area under ROC were both 0.69 (P < 0.001). Sequential FDG PET/CT scanning is useful to predict the overall survival of chemoradiotherapy for ESCC. The metabolic parameters and the derived parameters of FDG PET/CT have predictive values for overall survival.

  10. Value of sequential 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in prediction of the overall survival of esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimin; Lin, Qin; Luo, Zuoming; Zhao, Long; Zhu, Luchao; Sun, Long; Wu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the value of the metabolic parameters measured by sequential FDG PET/CT in predicting the overall survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A total of 160 patients who were newly diagnosed as ESCC patients and treated with chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The FDG PET/CT was carried out prior to radiotherapy (PET1), when the cumulative dose of radiotherapy reached 50 Gy (PET2), at the end of radiotherapy (PET3) and 1 month after radiotherapy (PET4). The max of the standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor, the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total lesion glycolisis (TLG) prior to treatment were measured. The correlation of the measured parameters and the derived parameters of SUVmax with the overall survival was analyzed. The relatively reduced percentage of the SUVmax of PET3 and PET4 to the SUVmax of PET1 and PET2, had predictive value for the overall survival. The area under researcher operation curve (ROC) was between 0.62 and 0.73 (P < 0.01). The MTV and TLG prior to treatment might be used to predict the overall survival, and the area under ROC were both 0.69 (P < 0.001). Sequential FDG PET/CT scanning is useful to predict the overall survival of chemoradiotherapy for ESCC. The metabolic parameters and the derived parameters of FDG PET/CT have predictive values for overall survival. PMID:26379889

  11. Flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Louise M; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-03-28

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-flourodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  12. Contrast Media in PET/Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Varun Singh; Rana, Neelima; Nazar, Aftab Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Is there a need for the contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) scan or is the low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced PET/CT scan sufficient? The topic has been debated time and again. Although low-dose noncontrast CT serves the purpose of simple anatomic correlation and attenuation correction of PET images, many times patients have to undergo additional contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging modalities, which may lead to a delay in decision-making. In this review, the authors have addressed various such issues related to the use of contrast agents and special techniques of clinical interest based on their utility in dual-modality PET/CT.

  13. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  14. [Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG in bronchopulmonary cancer and its impact on medical decision at the time of diagnosis, staging, or recurrence evaluation].

    PubMed

    Grahek, D; Montravers, F; Mayaud, C; Regnard, J F; Kerrou, K; Younsi, N; Talbot, J N

    2001-12-01

    Clinical usefulness of [18F]-FDG imaging, performed by means of a dedicated or a "hybrid" PET machine, has been recognised in France since November 1998. Among the clinical indications, three major clinical settings of lung cancer have been included: characterisation, staging and detection of recurrences. After a brief presentation of the PET scintigraphic imaging modality, authors report on the experience of the nuclear medicine team of Hôspital Tenon and summarise the results in literature. For tumour characterisation, a recent meta-analysis obtained a 96% sensitivity, a 73% specificity, a 91% positive predictive value and a 90% negative predictive value, the performances being better for lesions greater than 1 cm. For staging, an increase greater than 15% both in sensitivity and specificity has been observed with dedicated or "hybrid" PET versus CT for N staging. Detection of distant metastases was also more accurate using [18F]-FDG. A similar increase was observed in the detection of recurrence, in accordance with our study; some authors described even better results. A better anatomical delineation of the lesions detected with FDG can be achieved by means of image fusion with CT; this technique is likely to develop as a routine tool in the near future. Finally, FDG imaging led to modification of patient's management in 37% of the cases according to a recent meta-analysis versus 53% of the cases in our retrospective survey concerning the first year of installation of a dedicated PET machine. This rate was equal with dedicated PET and with CDET. In 46% of the cases an inter-modality change occurred, and in 7% an intra-modality change consisting mainly in adaptation of the surgical procedure. As soon as the FDG examination became available, its clinical impact, in the French medical context, appeared to reach the highest values that were published internationally.

  15. Overview of positron emission tomography chemistry: clinical and technical considerations and combination with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, G; Maravelis, G; Koukouraki, S; Padelakos, P; Kouloulias, V

    2009-01-01

    The concept of emission and transmission tomography was introduced by David Kuhl and Roy Edwards in the late 1950s. Their work later led to the design and construction of several tomographic instruments at the University of Pennsylvania. Tomographic imaging techniques were further developed by Michel Ter-Pogossian, Michael E. Phelps and others at the Washington University School of Medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a 3-dimensional image or map of functional processes in the body. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule. Images of tracer concentration in 3-dimensional space within the body are then reconstructed by computer analysis. In modern scanners, this reconstruction is often accomplished with the aid of a CT X-ray scan performed on the patient during the same session, in the same machine. If the biologically active molecule chosen for PET is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), an analogue of glucose, the concentrations of tracer imaged give tissue metabolic activity in terms of regional glucose uptake. Although use of this tracer results in the most common type of PET scan, other tracer molecules are used in PET to image the tissue concentration of many other types of molecules of interest. The main role of this article was to analyse the available types of radiopharmaceuticals used in PET-CT along with the principles of its clinical and technical considerations.

  16. Simulation study of respiratory-induced errors in cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Gianna M.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2006-08-15

    Heart disease is a leading killer in Canada and positron emission tomography (PET) provides clinicians with in vivo metabolic information for diagnosing heart disease. Transmission data are usually acquired with {sup 68}Ge, although the advent of PET/CT scanners has made computed tomography (CT) an alternative option. The fast data acquisition of CT compared to PET may cause potential misregistration problems, leading to inaccurate attenuation correction (AC). Using Monte Carlo simulations and an anthropomorphic dynamic computer phantom, this study determines the magnitude and location of respiratory-induced errors in radioactivity uptake measured in cardiac PET/CT. A homogeneous tracer distribution in the heart was considered. The AC was based on (1) a time-averaged attenuation map (2) CT maps from a single phase of the respiratory cycle, and (3) CT maps phase matched to the emission data. Circumferential profiles of the heart uptake were compared and differences of up to 24% were found between the single-phase CT-AC method and the true phantom values. Simulation results were supported by a PET/CT canine study which showed differences of up to 10% in the heart uptake in the lung-heart boundary region when comparing {sup 68}Ge- to CT-based AC with the CT map acquired at end inhalation.

  17. Imaging in breast cancer: Single-photon computed tomography and positron-emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, François; Turcotte, Éric

    2005-01-01

    Although mammography remains a key imaging method for the early detection and screening of breast cancer, the overall accuracy of this test remains low. Several radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed as adjunct imaging methods to characterize breast masses by single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET). Useful in characterizing indeterminate palpable masses and in the detection of axillary metastases, these techniques are insufficiently sensitive to detect subcentimetric tumor deposits. Their role in staging nodal involvement of the axillary areas therefore currently remains limited. Several enzymes and receptors have been targeted for imaging breast cancers with PET. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose is particularly useful in the detection and staging of recurrent breast cancer and in assessing the response to chemotherapy. Several other ligands targeting proliferative activity, protein synthesis, and hormone and cell-membrane receptors may complement this approach by providing unique information about biological characteristics of breast cancer across primary and metastatic tumor sites. PMID:15987467

  18. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges.

  19. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges. PMID:26643024

  20. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Awan, Musaddiq J; Siddiqui, Farzan; Schwartz, David; Yuan, Jiankui; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min

    2015-11-28

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs.

  1. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Musaddiq J; Siddiqui, Farzan; Schwartz, David; Yuan, Jiankui; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs. PMID:26644824

  2. [11C]MADAM Used as a Model for Understanding the Radiometabolism of Diphenyl Sulfide Radioligands for Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    PubMed Central

    Gourand, Fabienne; Amini, Nahid; Jia, Zhisheng; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Guilloteau, Denis; Barré, Louisa; Halldin, Christer

    2015-01-01

    In quantitative PET measurements, the analysis of radiometabolites in plasma is essential for determining the exact arterial input function. Diphenyl sulfide compounds are promising PET and SPECT radioligands for in vivo quantification of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and it is therefore important to investigate their radiometabolism. We have chosen to explore the radiometabolic profile of [11C]MADAM, one of these radioligands widely used for in vivo PET-SERT studies. The metabolism of [11C]MADAM/MADAM was investigated using rat and human liver microsomes (RLM and HLM) in combination with radio-HPLC or UHPLC/Q-ToF-MS for their identification. The effect of carrier on the radiometabolic rate of the radioligand [11C]MADAM in vitro and in vivo was examined by radio-HPLC. RLM and HLM incubations were carried out at two different carrier concentrations of 1 and 10 μM. Urine samples after perfusion of [11C]MADAM/MADAM in rats were also analysed by radio-HPLC. Analysis by UHPLC/Q-ToF-MS identified the metabolites produced in vitro to be results of N-demethylation, S-oxidation and benzylic hydroxylation. The presence of carrier greatly affected the radiometabolism rate of [11C]MADAM in both RLM/HLM experiments and in vivo rat studies. The good concordance between the results predicted by RLM and HLM experiments and the in vivo data obtained in rat studies indicate that the kinetics of the radiometabolism of the radioligand [11C]MADAM is dose-dependent. This issue needs to be addressed when the diarylsulfide class of compounds are used in PET quantifications of SERT. PMID:26367261

  3. [11C]MADAM Used as a Model for Understanding the Radiometabolism of Diphenyl Sulfide Radioligands for Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Gourand, Fabienne; Amini, Nahid; Jia, Zhisheng; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Guilloteau, Denis; Barré, Louisa; Halldin, Christer

    2015-01-01

    In quantitative PET measurements, the analysis of radiometabolites in plasma is essential for determining the exact arterial input function. Diphenyl sulfide compounds are promising PET and SPECT radioligands for in vivo quantification of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and it is therefore important to investigate their radiometabolism. We have chosen to explore the radiometabolic profile of [11C]MADAM, one of these radioligands widely used for in vivo PET-SERT studies. The metabolism of [11C]MADAM/MADAM was investigated using rat and human liver microsomes (RLM and HLM) in combination with radio-HPLC or UHPLC/Q-ToF-MS for their identification. The effect of carrier on the radiometabolic rate of the radioligand [11C]MADAM in vitro and in vivo was examined by radio-HPLC. RLM and HLM incubations were carried out at two different carrier concentrations of 1 and 10 μM. Urine samples after perfusion of [11C]MADAM/MADAM in rats were also analysed by radio-HPLC. Analysis by UHPLC/Q-ToF-MS identified the metabolites produced in vitro to be results of N-demethylation, S-oxidation and benzylic hydroxylation. The presence of carrier greatly affected the radiometabolism rate of [11C]MADAM in both RLM/HLM experiments and in vivo rat studies. The good concordance between the results predicted by RLM and HLM experiments and the in vivo data obtained in rat studies indicate that the kinetics of the radiometabolism of the radioligand [11C]MADAM is dose-dependent. This issue needs to be addressed when the diarylsulfide class of compounds are used in PET quantifications of SERT.

  4. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  5. [18F]ASEM, a radiolabeled antagonist for imaging the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) with positron emission tomography (PET)

    PubMed Central

    Horti, Andrew G.; Gao, Yongjun; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Wang, Yuchuan; Abazyan, Sofya; Yasuda, Robert P.; Tran, Thao; Xiao, Yingxian; Sahibzada, Niaz; Holt, Daniel P.; Kellar, Kenneth J.; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.; Pomper, Martin G.; Wong, Dean F.; Dannals, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The α7-nicotinic cholinergic receptor (α7-nAChR) is a key mediator of brain communication and has been implicated in a wide variety of central nervous system disorders. None of the currently available PET radioligands for α7-nAChR are suitable for quantitative PET imaging, mostly due to insufficient specific binding. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of [18F]ASEM ([18F]JHU82132) as an α7-nAChR radioligand for PET. Methods Inhibition binding assay and receptor functional properties of ASEM were assessed in vitro. The brain regional distribution of [18F]ASEM in baseline and blockade were evaluated in DISC1 mice (dissection) and baboons (PET). Results ASEM is an antagonist for the α7-nAChR with high binding affinity (Ki = 0.3 nM). [18F]ASEM readily entered the baboon brain and specifically labeled α7-nAChR. The in vivo specific binding of [18F]ASEM in the brain regions enriched with α7-nAChRs was 80–90%. SSR180711, an α7-nAChR selective partial agonist, blocked [18F]ASEM binding in the baboon brain in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the binding of [18F]ASEM was mediated by α7-nAChRs and the radioligand was suitable for drug evaluation studies. In the baboon baseline studies, the brain regional volume of distribution (VT) values for [18F]ASEM were 23 (thalamus), 22 (insula), 18 (hippocampus) and 14 (cerebellum), whereas in the binding selectivity (blockade) scan, all regional VT values were reduced to less than 4. The range of regional binding potential (BPND) values in the baboon brain was from 3.9 to 6.6. In vivo cerebral binding of [18F]ASEM and α7-nAChR expression in mutant DISC1 mice, a rodent model of schizophrenia, was significantly lower than in control animals, which is in agreement with previous post-mortem human data. Conclusion [18F]ASEM holds promise as a radiotracer with suitable imaging properties for quantification of α7-nAChR in the human brain. PMID:24556591

  6. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography-computed tomography to diagnose recurrent cancer

    PubMed Central

    You, J J; Cline, K J; Gu, C-S; Pritchard, K I; Dayes, I S; Gulenchyn, K Y; Inculet, R I; Dhesy-Thind, S K; Freeman, M A; Chan, A M; Julian, J A; Levine, M N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sometimes the diagnosis of recurrent cancer in patients with a previous malignancy can be challenging. This prospective cohort study assessed the clinical utility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT) in the diagnosis of clinically suspected recurrence of cancer. Methods: Patients were eligible if cancer recurrence (non-small-cell lung (NSCL), breast, head and neck, ovarian, oesophageal, Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) was suspected clinically, and if conventional imaging was non-diagnostic. Clinicians were asked to indicate their management plan before and after 18F-FDG PET-CT scanning. The primary outcome was change in planned management after 18F-FDG PET-CT. Results: Between April 2009 and June 2011, 101 patients (age, median 65 years; 55% female) were enroled from four cancer centres in Ontario, Canada. Distribution by primary tumour type was: NSCL (55%), breast (19%), ovarian (10%), oesophageal (6%), lymphoma (6%), and head and neck (4%). Of the 99 subjects who underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT, planned management changed after 18F-FDG PET-CT in 52 subjects (53%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 42–63%); a major change in plan from no treatment to treatment was observed in 38 subjects (38%, 95% CI, 29–49%), and was typically associated with 18F-FDG PET-CT findings that were positive for recurrent cancer (37 subjects). After 3 months, the stated post-18F-FDG PET-CT management plan was actually completed in 88 subjects (89%, 95% CI, 81–94%). Conclusion: In patients with suspected cancer recurrence and conventional imaging that is non-diagnostic, 18F-FDG PET-CT often provides new information that leads to important changes in patient management. PMID:25942398

  7. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    ScienceCinema

    Joanna Fowler

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  8. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna Fowler

    2008-10-13

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  9. Microdosing studies in humans: the role of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Wagner, Claudia Christina; Langer, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)-microdosing comprises the administration of a carbon-11- or fluorine-18-labelled drug candidate to human subjects in order to describe the drug's concentration-time profile in body tissues targeted for treatment. As PET microdosing involves the administration of only microgram amounts of unlabelled drug, the potential toxicological risk to human subjects is very limited. Consequently, regulatory authorities require reduced preclinical safety testing as compared with conventional phase 1 studies. Microdose studies are gaining increasing importance in clinical drug research as they have the potential to shorten time-lines and cut costs along the critical path of drug development. Current applications of PET in anticancer, anti-infective and CNS system drug research are reviewed.

  10. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

  11. Quantitative Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography: The Time Is Coming!

    PubMed Central

    Sciagrà, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the use of positron emission tomography (PET) has grown dramatically because of its oncological applications, and PET facilities are now easily accessible. At the same time, various groups have explored the specific advantages of PET in heart disease and demonstrated the major diagnostic and prognostic role of quantitation in cardiac PET. Nowadays, different approaches for the measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF) have been developed and implemented in user-friendly programs. There is large evidence that MBF at rest and under stress together with the calculation of coronary flow reserve are able to improve the detection and prognostication of coronary artery disease. Moreover, quantitative PET makes possible to assess the presence of microvascular dysfunction, which is involved in various cardiac diseases, including the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis, hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, and hypertensive heart disease. Therefore, it is probably time to consider the routine use of quantitative cardiac PET and to work for defining its place in the clinical scenario of modern cardiology. PMID:24278760

  12. Florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Ann; Trzepacz, Paula T.; Wang, Shufang; Yu, Peng; Case, Michael; Hochstetler, Helen; Witte, Michael M.; Degenhardt, Elisabeth K.; Dean, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship between florbetapir-F18 positron emission tomography (FBP PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Methods Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)-GO/2 healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia subjects with clinical measures and CSF collected ±90 days of FBP PET data were analyzed using correlation and logistic regression. Results In HC and MCI subjects, FBP PET anterior and posterior cingulate and composite standard uptake value ratios correlated with CSF amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) and tau/Aβ1-42 ratios. Using logistic regression, Aβ1-42, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181P (p-tau), and FBP PET composite each differentiated HC versus AD. Aβ1-42 and t-tau distinguished MCI versus AD, without additional contribution by FBP PET. Total tau and p-tau added discriminative power to FBP PET when classifying HC versus AD. Conclusion Based on cross-sectional diagnostic groups, both amyloid and tau measures distinguish healthy from demented subjects. Longitudinal analyses are needed. PMID:25916563

  13. CO2BOLD assessment of moyamoya syndrome: Validation with single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pellaton, Alain; Bijlenga, Philippe; Bouchez, Laurie; Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure, Isabelle; Garibotto, Valentina; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) using CO2BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) vs positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as reference standard. METHODS Ten consecutive patients (8 women, mean age of 41 ± 26 years) with moyamoya syndrome underwent 14 pre-surgical evaluations for external-internal carotid artery bypass surgery. CVR was assessed using CO2BOLD and PET (4)/SPECT (11) with a maximum interval of 36 d, and evaluated by two experienced neuroradiologists. RESULTS The inter-rater agreement was 0.81 for SPECT (excellent), 0.43 for PET (fair) and 0.7 for CO2BOLD (good). In 9/14 cases, there was a correspondence between CO2BOLD and PET/SPECT. In 4/14 cases, CVR was over-estimated in CO2BOLD, while in 1/14 case, CVR was underestimated in CO2BOLD. The sensitivity of CO2BOLD was 86% and a specificity of 43%. CONCLUSION CO2BOLD can be used for pre-surgical assessment of CVR in patients with moyamoya syndrome and combines the advantages of absent irradiation, high availability of MRI and assessment of brain parenchyma, cerebral vessels and surrogate CVR in one stop. PMID:27928470

  14. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sürücü, Erdem; Demir, Yusuf; Dülger, Ahmet C.; Batur, Abdüssamed; Ölmez, Şehmus; Kitapçı, Mehmet T.

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27751978

  15. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  16. Evaluating Positron Emission Tomography Use in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Nazanene H.; Papaleontiou, Maria; Worden, Francis P.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results—Medicare database, a substantial increase was found in the use of positron emission tomography (PET) scans after 2004 in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. The reason for the increased utilization of the PET scan was not clear based on available the data. Therefore, the indications for and outcomes of PET scans performed at an academic institution were evaluated. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed of DTC patients who underwent surgery at the University of Michigan Health System from 2006 to 2011. After identifying patients who underwent a PET scan, indications, rate of positive PET scans, and impact on management were evaluated. For positive scans, the location of disease was characterized, and presence of disease on other imaging was determined. Results: Of the 585 patients in the cohort, 111 (19%) patients had 200 PET scans performed for evaluation of DTC. Indications for PET scan included: elevated thyroglobulin and negative radioiodine scan in 52 scans (26.0%), thyroglobulin antibodies in 13 scans (6.5%), rising thyroglobulin in 18 scans (9.0%), evaluation of abnormality on other imaging in 22 scans (11.0%), evaluation of extent of disease in 33 scans (16.5%), follow-up of previous scan in 57 scans (28.5%), other indications in two scans (1.0%), and unclear indications in three scans (1.5%). The PET scan was positive in 124 studies (62.0%); positivity was identified in the thyroid bed on 25 scans, cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes on 105 scans, lung on 28 scans, bone on four scans, and other areas on 14 scans. Therapy following PET scan was surgery in 66 cases (33.0%), chemotherapy or radiation in 23 cases (11.5%), observation in 110 cases (55.0%), and palliative care in one case (0.5%). Disease was identifiable on other imaging in 66% of cases. PET scan results changed management in 59 cases (29.5%). Conclusions: In this academic medical center, the PET scan was

  17. Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of an 18F-Labeled Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 4 (mGlu4)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Four 4-phthalimide derivatives of N-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-picolinamide were synthesized as potential ligands for the PET imaging of mGlu4 in the brain. Of these compounds, N-(3-chloro-4-(4-fluoro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, KALB001) exhibited improved binding affinity (IC50 = 5.1 nM) compared with ML128 (1) and was subsequently labeled with 18F. When finally formulated in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4) with 10% ethanol, the specific activity of [18F]3 at the end of synthesis (EOS) was 233.5 ± 177.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4). The radiochemical yield of [18F]3 was 16.4 ± 4.8% (n = 4), and the purity was over 98%. In vivo imaging studies in a monkey showed that the radiotracer quickly penetrated the brain with the highest accumulation in the brain areas known to express mGlu4. Despite some unfavorable radiotracer properties like fast washout in rodent studies, [18F]3 is the first 18F-labeled mGlu4 radioligand, which can be further modified to improve pharmacokinetics and brain penetrability for future human studies. PMID:25330258

  18. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Other Thyroid Cancers: Medullary, Anaplastic, Lymphoma and So Forth

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Çayır, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in staging, restaging, and evaluation of therapy response in many cancers as well as differentiated thyroid carcinomas especially in non-iodine avid variants. Its potential in less frequent thyroid tumors like medullary, anaplastic thyroid cancers, thyroid lymphoma and metastatic tumors of the thyroid however, is not well established yet. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the recent applications and indications of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these tumors and to focus on the controversies in the clinical setting. PMID:28291004

  19. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a rare case of carcinoma stomach with concomitant silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Unni, Madhavan; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2016-01-01

    The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose. (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography. (PET)/computed tomography. (CT) in the initial staging of various malignancies is now well established. However, nonspecificity of FDG occasionally results in tracer uptake in benign lung lesions. The authors describe a complicated case of carcinoma stomach with multiple nodules and a cavitary lesion in lungs where 18F-FDG PET CT done for initial staging revealed FDG avid mass in stomach, FDG avid multiple mediastinal lymph nodes and multiple intensely FDG avid bilateral lung lesions. The FDG avid lung lesions turned out to be due to silicosis as confirmed by histopathology. PMID:27833322

  20. Are We Ready for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-based Target Volume Definition in Lymphoma Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Kheng-Wei; Mikhaeel, N. George

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has become indispensable for the clinical management of lymphomas. With consistent evidence that it is more accurate than anatomic imaging in the staging and response assessment of many lymphoma subtypes, its utility continues to increase. There have therefore been efforts to incorporate PET/CT data into radiation therapy decision making and in the planning process. Further, there have also been studies investigating target volume definition for radiation therapy using PET/CT data. This article will critically review the literature and ongoing studies on the above topics, examining the value and methods of adding PET/CT data to the radiation therapy treatment algorithm. We will also discuss the various challenges and the areas where more evidence is required.

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  2. Positron emission tomography: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, A. K.; Kumar, Utham

    2006-01-01

    The rate of glucose utilization in tumor cells is significantly enhanced as compared to normal cells and this biochemical characteristic is utilized in PET imaging using FDG as a major workhorse. The PET systems as well as cyclotrons producing positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals have undergone continuous technological refinements. While PET (CT) systems enable fusion images as well as precise attenuation correction, the self-shielded cyclotrons developed provide dedicated systems for in-house production of a large number of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The application of PET images in oncology includes those of pulmonary, colorectal, breast, lymphoma, head & neck, bone, ovarian and GI cancers. The PET has been recognized as promising diagnostic tool to predict biological and physiological changes at the molecular level and hence offer a potential area for future applications including Stem Cell research. PMID:21206635

  3. Noninvasive imaging of islet grafts using positron-emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Zhang, Zesong; Washburn, Lorraine; Stout, David B.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark A.; Phelps, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2006-07-01

    Islet transplantation offers a potential therapy to restore glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetes patients. However, islet transplantation is not routinely successful because most islet recipients gradually lose graft function. Furthermore, serological markers of islet function are insensitive to islet loss until the latter stages of islet graft rejection. A noninvasive method of monitoring islet grafts would aid in the assessment of islet graft survival and the evaluation of interventions designed to prolong graft survival. Here, we show that recombinant adenovirus can engineer isolated islets to express a positron-emission tomography (PET) reporter gene and that these islets can be repeatedly imaged by using microPET after transplantation into mice. The magnitude of signal from engineered islets implanted into the axillary cavity was directly related to the implanted islet mass. PET signals attenuated over the following weeks because of the transient nature of adenovirus-mediated gene expression. Because the liver is the preferred site for islet implantation in humans, we also tested whether islets could be imaged after transfusion into the mouse liver. Control studies revealed that both intrahepatic islet transplantation and hyperglycemia altered the biodistribution kinetics of the PET probe systemically. Although transplanted islets were dispersed throughout the liver, clear signals from the liver region of mice receiving PET reporter-expressing islets were detectable for several weeks. Viral transduction, PET reporter expression, and repeated microPET imaging had no apparent deleterious effects on islet function after implantation. These studies lay a foundation for noninvasive quantitative assessments of islet graft survival using PET. diabetes | transplantation

  4. Pancreatic tuberculosis: Evaluation of therapeutic response using F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Srinivasan, Radhika; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-10-01

    F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is a functional imaging technique that monitors glucose metabolism in tissues. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has been reported to show intense uptake of FDG, with a decrease in metabolism of the tuberculous lesions after successful anti-tubercular treatment (ATT). The authors present a patient with pancreatic TB and demonstrate the usefulness of FDG PET/CT in monitoring the response to ATT.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography: A Basic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbacher, M. E.; Deaton, J. W.; Phinney, L. C.; Mitchell, L. J.; Duggan, J. L.

    2007-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is useful in detecting biological abnormalities. The technique involves attaching radiotracers to a material used inside the body, in many cases glucose. Glucose is absorbed most readily in areas of unusual cell growth or uptake of nutrients so through natural processes the treated glucose highlights regions of tumors and other degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The higher the concentration of isotopes, the more dynamic the area. Isotopes commonly used as tracers are 11C, 18F, 13N, and 15O due to their easy production and short half-lives. Once the tracers have saturated an area of tissue they are detected using coincidence detectors collinear with individual isotopes. As the isotope decays it emits a positron which, upon annihilating an electron, produces two oppositely directioned gamma rays. The PET machine consists of several pairs of detectors, each 180 degrees from their partner detector. When the oppositely positioned detectors are collinear with the area of the isotope, a computer registers the location of the isotope and can compile an image of the activity of the highlighted area based on the position and strength of the isotopes.

  6. The economics of creating a positron emission tomography center.

    PubMed

    Lissak, R J

    2000-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning has been a powerful research tool since its inception. Changes in the marketplace that have allowed PET to move into the clinical environment include the commercial availability of appropriate radiopharmaceuticals, reimbursement of procedures by insurance companies, and increasing awareness of physicians of the benefits of PET. Facilities that are interested in clinical PET need to develop a process to purchase equipment with an appropriate business plan. This is necessary to assure financial viability and to convince hospital administrators of the viability. The creation of a successful PET program requires an understanding of all aspects relating to a center. The process begins with reviewing the mission statement of the facility. The next step is to prepare the feasibility study, which includes reviewing the existing marketplace and determining the volume, level of referring physicians' interest, and availability of radiopharmaceuticals. Finally, an appropriate pro forma needs to be constructed to facilitate the final decision concerning the potential financial viability of such an endeavor.

  7. Characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction by positron-emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.; Biello, D.; Welch, M.J.; Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Roberts, R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-04-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) performed after i.v. 11C-palmitate permits detection and characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction. PET was performed after the i.v. injection of 11C-palmitate in 10 normal subjects, 24 patients with initial nontransmural myocardial infarction (defined electrocardiographically), and 22 patients with transmural infarction. Depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate was detected with sagittal, coronal and transverse reconstructions, and quantified based on 14 contiguous transaxial reconstructions. Defects with homogeneously intense depression of accumulation of tracer were detected in all 22 patients with transmural infarction (100%). Abnormalities of the distribution of 11C-palmitate in the myocardium were detected in 23 patients with nontransmural infarction (96%). Thallium scintigrams were abnormal in only 11 of 18 patients with nontransmural infarction (61%). Tomographically estimated infarct size was greater among patients with transmural infarction (50.4 +/- 7.8 PET-g-Eq/m2 (+/- SEM SEM)) compared with those with nontransmural infarction (19 +/- 4 PET-g-Eq, p less than 0.01). Residual accumulation of 11C-palmitate within regions of infarction was more intensely depressed among patients with transmural compared to nontransmural infarction (33 +/- 1 vs 39 +/- 1% maximal myocardial radioactivity, p less than 0.01). Thus, PET and metabolic imaging with 11C-palmitate is a sensitive means of detecting, quantifying and characterizing nontransmural and transmural myocardial infarction.

  8. Application of silicon photomultipliers to positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2011-04-01

    Historically, positron emission tomography (PET) systems have been based on scintillation crystals coupled to photomultipliers tubes (PMTs). However, the limited quantum efficiency, bulkiness, and relatively high cost per unit surface area of PMTs, along with the growth of new applications for PET, offers opportunities for other photodetectors. Among these, small-animal scanners, hybrid PET/MRI systems, and incorporation of time-of-flight information are of particular interest and require low-cost, compact, fast, and magnetic field compatible photodetectors. With high quantum efficiency and compact structure, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) overcome several of the drawbacks of PMTs, but this is offset by degraded signal-to-noise and timing properties. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer an alternative solution, combining many of the advantages of PMTs and APDs. They have high gain, excellent timing properties and are insensitive to magnetic fields. At the present time, SiPM technology is rapidly developing and therefore an investigation into optimal design and operating conditions is underway together with detailed characterization of SiPM-based PET detectors. Published data are extremely promising and show good energy and timing resolution, as well as the ability to decode small scintillator arrays. SiPMs clearly have the potential to be the photodetector of choice for some, or even perhaps most, PET systems.

  9. Automated identification of the lung contours in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nery, F.; Silvestre Silva, J.; Ferreira, N. C.; Caramelo, F. J.; Faustino, R.

    2013-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that permits to analyze, in three dimensions, the physiological processes in vivo. One of the areas where PET has demonstrated its advantages is in the staging of lung cancer, where it offers better sensitivity and specificity than other techniques such as CT. On the other hand, accurate segmentation, an important procedure for Computer Aided Diagnostics (CAD) and automated image analysis, is a challenging task given the low spatial resolution and the high noise that are intrinsic characteristics of PET images. This work presents an algorithm for the segmentation of lungs in PET images, to be used in CAD and group analysis in a large patient database. The lung boundaries are automatically extracted from a PET volume through the application of a marker-driven watershed segmentation procedure which is robust to the noise. In order to test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compared the segmentation results in several slices using our approach with the results obtained from manual delineation. The manual delineation was performed by nuclear medicine physicians that used a software routine that we developed specifically for this task. To quantify the similarity between the contours obtained from the two methods, we used figures of merit based on region and also on contour definitions. Results show that the performance of the algorithm was similar to the performance of human physicians. Additionally, we found that the algorithm-physician agreement is similar (statistically significant) to the inter-physician agreement.

  10. Shifted helical computed tomography to optimize cardiac positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration: quantitative improvement and limitations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nils P; Pan, Tinsu; Gould, K Lance

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) uses CT attenuation correction but suffers from misregistration artifacts. However, the quantitative accuracy of helical versus cine CT in the same patient after optimized coregistration by shifting both CT data as needed for each patient is unknown. We studied 293 patients undergoing cardiac perfusion PET-CT using helical CT attenuation correction for comparison to cine CT. Objective, quantitative criteria identified perfusion abnormalities that were associated visually with PET-CT misregistration. Custom software shifted CT data to optimize coregistration with quantitative artifact improvement. The majority (58.1%) of cases with both helical and shifted helical CT data (n  = 93) had artifacts that improved or resolved by software shifting helical CT data. Translation of shifted helical CT was greatest in the x-direction (8.8 ± 3.3 mm) and less in the y- and z-directions (approximately 3.5 mm). The magnitude of differences in quantitative end points was greatest for helical (p  =  .0001, n  =  177 studies), less for shifted helical but significant (p  =  .0001, n  =  93 studies), and least for cine (not significant, n  =  161 studies) CT compared to optimal attenuation correction for each patient. Frequent artifacts owing to attenuation-emission misregistration are substantially corrected by software shifting helical CT scans to achieve proper coregistration that, however, remains on average significantly inferior to cine CT attenuation quantitatively.

  11. Precision Medicine and PET/Computed Tomography: Challenges and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    Precision Medicine is about selecting the right therapy for the right patient, at the right time, specific to the molecular targets expressed by disease or tumors, in the context of patient's environment and lifestyle. Some of the challenges for delivery of precision medicine in oncology include biomarkers for patient selection for enrichment-precision diagnostics, mapping out tumor heterogeneity that contributes to therapy failures, and early therapy assessment to identify resistance to therapies. PET/computed tomography offers solutions in these important areas of challenges and facilitates implementation of precision medicine.

  12. Positron emission tomography scanning is coming to a hospital near you soon!

    PubMed

    Bashir, Humayun; Shabo, Gregory; Nunan, T O

    2008-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is still generally not available in the UK; however, there are plans to introduce a national service in England from April 2008. Plans are also at an advanced stage in Scotland and Wales. The main uses of PET are in preoperative staging of lung cancer, detection of recurrent colorectal cancer, and management of patients with lymphoma. Although these provide the bulk of the referral base, PET is also of use in specific situations in patients with less common cancers, such as head and neck cancer, gynaecological cancer, and melanoma. In its more common uses, PET has been shown to be cost effective. Positron emission tomography will play an increasing role in the evaluation of response to treatment to enable early separation of patients who are responding well to chemotherapy from those who are not responding and need to be transferred to another therapy.

  13. Serotonin transporter in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--preliminary results from a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Linnea; Tuominen, Lauri; Huotarinen, Antti; Leppämäki, Sami; Sihvola, Elina; Helin, Semi; Sipilä, Maria; Tani, Pekka; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hietala, Jarmo; Karlsson, Hasse

    2013-05-30

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients has not been explored by earlier positron emission tomography (PET) studies. We measured SERT availability in female ADHD patients (n=8) and healthy controls (n=14) with PET and [11C]MADAM as a tracer. No significant group differences in [11C]MADAM binding potential were noted.

  14. Cancer Localization in the Prostate with F-18 Fluorocholine Position Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    prostate cancer sextant localization on the basis of measured fluorocholine uptake. The data acquired thus far with conventional PET in 15 subjects...emission tomography (PET) detection of malignancy in anatomical sextants of the prostate gland. The rationale for evaluating fluorocholine as an...correlation with step-section prostate histopathology to assess the accuracy of sextant detection of prostate malignancy based on this technique. With

  15. F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography is not accurate in preoperative staging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae Kyung; Choi, Yun Young; Song, Soon Young

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical benefits of F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) over multi-detector row CT (MDCT) in preoperative staging of gastric cancer. Methods FDG-PET/CT and MDCT were performed on 78 patients with gastric cancer pathologically diagnosed by endoscopy. The accuracy of radiologic staging retrospectively was compared to pathologic result after curative resection. Results Primary tumors were detected in 51 (65.4%) patients with 18F-FDG-PET/CT, and 47 (60.3%) patients with MDCT. Regarding detection of lymph node metastasis, the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT was 51.5% with an accuracy of 71.8%, whereas those of MDCT were 69.7% and 69.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for a primary tumor with signet ring cell carcinoma was lower than that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for a primary tumor with non-signet ring cell carcinoma (35.3% vs. 73.8%, P < 0.01). Conclusion Due to its low sensitivity, 18F-FDG-PET/CT alone shows no definite clinical benefit for prediction of lymph node metastasis in preoperative staging of gastric cancer. PMID:22066108

  16. Positron emission tomography: the conceptual idea using a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Paans, Anne M J; van Waarde, Aren; Elsinga, Philip H; Willemsen, Antoon T M; Vaalburg, Willem

    2002-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitatively measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This technique is also used for measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labeled drugs and measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Deviations from normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained.

  17. The impact of positron emission tomography imaging on the clinical management of patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    Clinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of human epilepsy has a 30-year history, but it is still searching for its exact role among rapidly advancing neuroimaging techniques. The vast majority of epilepsy PET studies used this technique to improve detection of epileptic foci for surgical resection. Here, we review the main trends emerging from three decades of PET research in epilepsy, with a particular emphasis on how PET imaging has impacted on the clinical management of patients with intractable epilepsy. While reviewing the latest studies, we also present an argument for a changing role of PET and molecular imaging in the future, with an increasing focus on epileptogenesis and newly discovered molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. These new applications will be facilitated by technological advances, such as the use of integrated PET/MRI systems and utilization of novel radiotracers, which may also enhance phenotype-genotype correlations and assist rational, individualized treatment strategies.

  18. Wilson's disease studied with FDG and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.A.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    Four patients with Wilson's disease and eight normal controls were studied with 2-deoxy-2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET). The patients had diffusely reduced glucose metabolism in all brain regions evaluated compared with controls, with the exception of the thalamus. The ratio of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in the lenticular nuclei to hemispheres declined from 1.23 (+/- 0.14 SD) in controls to 1.03 (+/- 0.06) (p less than 0.025) in Wilson's disease patients. Compared with Huntington's disease, the PET FDG results in Wilson's disease indicate relatively less focal involvement of the caudate nucleus, more severe focal changes in the lenticular nuclei, and more significant global changes in glucose metabolism.

  19. Translational neuroimaging: positron emission tomography studies of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joanna S; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiotracers with high molecular specificity is an important scientific tool in studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO), an important enzyme in the regulation of the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin as well as the dietary amine, tyramine. MAO occurs in two different subtypes, MAO A and MAO B, which have different substrate and inhibitor specificity and which are different gene products. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies of special value. MAO A and B can be imaged in the human brain and certain peripheral organs using PET and carbon-11 (half-life 20.4 minutes) labeled mechanism-based irreversible inhibitors, clorgyline and L -deprenyl, respectively. In this article we introduce MAO and describe the development of these radiotracers and their translation from preclinical studies to the investigation of variables affecting MAO in the human brain and peripheral organs.

  20. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  1. Calcified peritoneal metastasis identified on 18F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography: Importance of extraosseous uptake of F-18 fluoride.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Chandra, Piyush; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    F-18 NaF positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for the evaluation of malignant and nonmalignant osseous disease. Extraosseous uptake of 18 fluoride-NaF has been observed in the arterial vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract. We describe a case of a woman with carcinoma of unknown primary in whom F-18 NaF PET/CT showed tracer uptake in the calcified peritoneal metastasis. Extraosseous findings on F-18 NaF PET/CT, though rare, may be visualized and may result in important management changes.

  2. Pneumococcal aortitis, report of a case with emphasis on the contribution to diagnosis of positron emission tomography using fluorinated deoxyglucose.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, E H; Oyen, W J G; van Dijk, A P J; van der Meer, J W M

    2003-01-01

    We describe an 82-year-old male with pneumococcal aortitis of the descending aorta, visualized by echocardiography and positron emission tomography using fluorinated deoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Computed tomography is considered to be the best diagnostic imaging modality in infected aortic lesions; in this case, the use of FDG-PET, which gives the opportunity to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory aortic aneurysms, made an important contribution to the diagnosis.

  3. Positron emission tomography as a diagnostic tool in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schiepers, C; Hoh, C K

    1998-01-01

    Early diagnosis in oncology is important for treatment by surgical intervention, which generally has the highest curative potential. For higher stages of disease involvement, initiation of rapid treatment is indicated to provide the patient with the optimal therapy regimen. Although this may not improve the prognosis, it will maintain the quality of life. Anatomic imaging modalities, such as CT, MR imaging, and US, are clinically important high-resolution imaging techniques that are well suited to reveal structural abnormalities. However, the differentiation of lesions as being benign or malignant is still problematic. Metabolic imaging modalities in nuclear medicine (NM), i.e., single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), can reveal biochemical parameters of the lesions such as glucose, oxygen, or amino acid metabolism, or measure the receptor density status. These parameters may allow a completely new clinical perspective in the management and understanding of diseases such as cancer. Although PET has been around since the early 1960s, it has only recently emerged as a powerful diagnostic tool in oncology. Society has great difficulty accepting this clinical imaging modality because of its high cost and complexity. Current applications of PET in oncology have been in characterizing lesions, differentiating recurrent disease from treatment effects, staging tumors, evaluating the extent of disease, and therapy monitoring. Here, the role of PET in diagnosis, staging, and restaging of cancer is reviewed and compared with the other tumor imaging modalities. We cover articles published in the past 3 years. We utilize the typical radiology format, in which the contribution in each body area is reviewed (topographic orientation), instead of the more organ-based approach used in internal medicine.

  4. Intracranial Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Three Cases from Breast Cancer Demonstrated on F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ortapamuk, Hulya; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is an uncommon late manifestation of non-central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors. With prolonged survival in solid tumors, an increased frequency of metastases is noted in these tumors too. The detection of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remains the gold standard. Noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used for the diagnosis of LC. Although its low sensitivity of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) on demonstrating CNS lesions, it could be useful in identifying the possibility of LC of breast carcinoma by giving high attention to the meninges. We discuss here three cases all of them having intracranial LC; where (18)F-FDG PET/CT study helped us in the diagnosis of LC. To our knowledge, this is the second report about intracranial LC from breast cancer demonstrating on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  5. Intracranial Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Three Cases from Breast Cancer Demonstrated on F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ortapamuk, Hulya; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is an uncommon late manifestation of non-central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors. With prolonged survival in solid tumors, an increased frequency of metastases is noted in these tumors too. The detection of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remains the gold standard. Noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used for the diagnosis of LC. Although its low sensitivity of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) on demonstrating CNS lesions, it could be useful in identifying the possibility of LC of breast carcinoma by giving high attention to the meninges. We discuss here three cases all of them having intracranial LC; where 18F-FDG PET/CT study helped us in the diagnosis of LC. To our knowledge, this is the second report about intracranial LC from breast cancer demonstrating on 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:28242978

  6. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance in Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Chiara; Raderer, Markus; Karanikas, Georgios; Weber, Michael; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Dolak, Werner; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) (with and without diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) to 18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT), with regard to the assessment of nodal and extranodal involvement, in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, without restriction to FDG-avid subytpes. Materials and Methods Patients with histologically proven lymphoma were enrolled in this prospective, institutional review board–approved study. After a single 18F-FDG injection, patients consecutively underwent 18F-FDG PET⁄CT and 18F-FDG PET/MR on the same day for staging or restaging. Three sets of images were analyzed separately: 18F-FDG PET/CT, 18F-FDG PET/MR without DWI, and 18F-FDG PET/MR with DWI. Region-based agreement and examination-based sensitivity and specificity were calculated for 18F-FDG PET/CT, 18F-FDG PET/MR without DWI, and 18F-FDG PET/MR DWI. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) on 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MR were compared and correlated with minimum and mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCmin, ADCmean). Results Thirty-four patients with a total of 40 examinations were included. Examination-based sensitivities for 18F-FDG PET/CT, 18F-FDG PET/MR, and 18F-FDG PET/MR DWI were 82.1%, 85.7%, and 100%, respectively; specificities were 100% for all 3 techniques; and accuracies were 87.5%, 90%, and 100%, respectively. 18F-FDG PET/CT was false negative in 5 of 40 examinations (all with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma), and 18F-FDG PET/MR (without DWI) was false negative in 4 of 40 examinations. Region-based percentages of agreement were 99% (κ, 0.95) between 18F-FDG PET/MR DWI and 18F-FDG PET/CT, 99.2% (κ, 0.96) between 18F-FDG PET/MR and 18F-FDG PET/CT, and 99.4% (κ, 0.97) between 18F-FDG PET/MR DWI and 18F-FDG PET/MR. There was a strong correlation between 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MR for SUVmax (r = 0

  7. Imaging pancreatic islet cells by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Karunananthan, Johann; Pelham, Bradley; Kandeel, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that every year more than 30000 persons in the United States - approximately 80 people per day - are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is caused by autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islet (β cells) cells. Islet transplantation has become a promising therapy option for T1D patients, while the lack of suitable tools is difficult to directly evaluate of the viability of the grafted islet over time. Positron emission tomography (PET) as an important non-invasive methodology providing high sensitivity and good resolution, is able to accurate detection of the disturbed biochemical processes and physiological abnormality in living organism. The successful PET imaging of islets would be able to localize the specific site where transplanted islets engraft in the liver, and to quantify the level of islets remain alive and functional over time. This information would be vital to establishing and evaluating the efficiency of pancreatic islet transplantation. Many novel imaging agents have been developed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of PET islet imaging. In this article, we summarize the latest developments in carbon-11, fluorine-18, copper-64, and gallium-68 labeled radioligands for the PET imaging of pancreatic islet cells. PMID:27721939

  8. [Methods and clinical applications of positron emission tomography in endocrinology].

    PubMed

    De Landsheere, C; Lamotte, D

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows to detect in coincidence photons issued from annihilation between positrons and electrons nearby situated. Tomographic detection (plane by plane) and tomographic reconstruction will lead to the quantitation of radioactive distribution per voxel, in the organ of interest. Recent tomographs can acquire simultaneously several transaxial slices, with a high sensitivity and a spatial resolution of 3-5 mm. Commonly used positron emitters have a short half-life: 2, 10, 20 and 110 min for 150, 13N, 11C and 18F, respectively. The use of these isotopes requires on line production of radionuclides and synthesis of selected molecules. In endocrinology, PET allows among others to study noninvasively the receptor density of hormone-dependent neoplasms such as breast, uterus, prostate tumors and prolactinomas. These last tumors represent a particular entity because of several combined characteristics: high turnover rate of amino acids, high density of dopaminergic receptors and response to bromocriptine (analogue of dopamine inhibiting the secretion of prolactin) in relation to the level of receptors. Because PET permits to evaluate the density of dopaminergic receptors and the metabolism of amino acids, theoretical response of the prolactinoma to bromocriptine can be predicted, the achieved therapeutic efficacy can be estimated and the long-term follow up of tumor growth can be assessed. This example illustrates the clinical value of PET in endocrinology.

  9. Modularized compact positron emission tomography detector for rapid system development.

    PubMed

    Xi, Daoming; Liu, Xiang; Zeng, Chen; Liu, Wei; Li, Yanzhao; Hua, Yuexuan; Mei, Xiongze; Kim, Heejong; Xiao, Peng; Kao, Chien-Min; Xie, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    We report the development of a modularized compact positron emission tomography (PET) detector that outputs serial streams of digital samples of PET event pulses via an Ethernet interface using the UDP/IP protocol to enable rapid configuration of a PET system by connecting multiple such detectors via a network switch to a computer. Presently, the detector is [Formula: see text] in extent (excluding I/O connectors) and contains an [Formula: see text] array of [Formula: see text] one-to-one coupled lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate/silicon photomultiplier pixels. It employs cross-wire and stripline readouts to merge the outputs of the 216 detector pixels to 24 channels. Signals at these channels are sampled using a built-in 24-ch, 4-level field programmable gate arrays-only multivoltage threshold digitizer. In the computer, software programs are implemented to analyze the digital samples to extract event information and to perform energy qualification and coincidence filtering. We have developed two such detectors. We show that all their pixels can be accurately discriminated and measure a crystal-level energy resolution of 14.4% to 19.4% and a detector-level coincidence time resolution of 1.67 ns FWHM. Preliminary imaging results suggests that a PET system based on the detectors can achieve an image resolution of [Formula: see text].

  10. Simultaneous laser speckle imaging and positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramer, M.; Feuerstein, D.; Backes, H.; Takagaki, M.; Kumagai, T.; Graf, R.

    2013-06-01

    Complex biological systems often require measurements of multiple parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution. Multimodal approaches and the combination of methods are therefore a powerful tool to address such scientific questions. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is an optical method that monitors dynamic changes in cortical blood flow (CBF) with high temporal resolution. Positron emission tomography (PET) allows for quantitative imaging of physiological processes and is a gold standard method to determine absolute cerebral blood flow. We developed a setup that allows simultaneous measurement with both modalities. Here, we simultaneously measured CBF with PET and LSI in rats and analyzed how the correlation of PET and LSI is modified when (1) different methods are used for the calculation of speckle inverse correlation time (ICT), (2) speckle data is acquired through thinned or craniectomized skull, (3) influence of surface vessels is removed from the speckle data. For the latter, a method for automated vessel segmentation from LSI data was developed. We obtained the best correlation (R² = 0.890, p<0.001) when correcting for surface vessel structures taking into account the contribution of static scatterers while keeping the coherence factor constant. However, using the originally published relation, which allows a 900 times faster computation of blood flow maps, still provided a good correlation (R2 = 0.879, p<0.001). Given the good correlation between LSI and PET we used our data to calibrate the speckle ICT. Thus, LSI provides CBF in absolute units at high temporal resolution.

  11. Guidelines for brain radionuclide imaging. Perfusion single photon computed tomography (SPECT) using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose. The Belgian Society for Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vander Borght, T; Laloux, P; Maes, A; Salmon, E; Goethals, I; Goldman, S

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of brain perfusion SPECT studies using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism PET studies using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These guidelines have been adapted and extended from those produced by the Society of Nuclear Medicine (Juni et al., 1998) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine by a Belgian group of experts in the field trained in neurology and/or nuclear medicine. Some indications are not universally approved (e.g. brain death), but largely supported by the literature. They have been included in these guidelines in order to provide recommendations and a standardised protocol.

  12. Positron emission tomography / computerized tomography evaluation of primary Hodgkin's disease of liver.

    PubMed

    Gota, V S; Purandare, N C; Gujral, S; Shah, S; Nair, R; Rangarajan, V

    2009-01-01

    Occurrence of primary Hodgkin's lymphoma (PHL) of the liver is extremely rare. We report on a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with liver mass and B-symptomatology. Hepatoma or hepatic metastasis from a gastrointestinal primary was initially suspected. Tumor markers like AFP, CEA, Total PSA, and CA-19.9 were within normal limits. Positron Emission Tomography / Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) revealed a large hepatic lesion and a nodal mass in the porta hepatis. A liver biopsy was consistent with Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was complete regression of the hepatic lesion and evidence of shrinkage of the nodal mass following four cycles of chemotherapy. 18F Fluro -de-oxy Glucose (FDG) PET / CT in this case helped in establishing a primary hepatic lymphoma by demonstrating the absence of pathologically hypermetabolic foci in any other nodes or organs. PET / CT scan is a useful adjunct to conventional imaging and histopathology, not only to establish the initial diagnosis, but also to monitor treatment response in PHL.

  13. Nonhuman primate positron emission tomography neuroimaging in drug abuse research.

    PubMed

    Howell, Leonard Lee; Murnane, Kevin Sean

    2011-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging in nonhuman primates has led to significant advances in our current understanding of the neurobiology and treatment of stimulant addiction in humans. PET neuroimaging has defined the in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of abused drugs and related these findings to the time course of behavioral effects associated with their addictive properties. With novel radiotracers and enhanced resolution, PET neuroimaging techniques have also characterized in vivo drug interactions with specific protein targets in the brain, including neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. In vivo determinations of cerebral blood flow and metabolism have localized brain circuits implicated in the effects of abused drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Moreover, determinations of the predisposing factors to chronic drug use and long-term neurobiological consequences of chronic drug use, such as potential neurotoxicity, have led to novel insights regarding the pathology and treatment of drug addiction. However, similar approaches clearly need to be extended to drug classes other than stimulants. Although dopaminergic systems have been extensively studied, other neurotransmitter systems known to play a critical role in the pharmacological effects of abused drugs have been largely ignored in nonhuman primate PET neuroimaging. Finally, the study of brain activation with PET neuroimaging has been replaced in humans mostly by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). There has been some success in implementing pharmacological fMRI in awake nonhuman primates. Nevertheless, the unique versatility of PET imaging will continue to complement the systems-level strengths of fMRI, especially in the context of nonhuman primate drug abuse research.

  14. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Manni, Carlo; Santoni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomic imaging procedures (computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) have become essential tools for brain tumor assessment. Functional images (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) can provide additional information useful during the diagnostic workup to determine the degree of malignancy and as a substitute or guide for biopsy. After surgery and/or radiotherapy, nuclear medicine examinations are essential to assess persistence of tumor, to differentiate recurrence from radiation necrosis and gliosis, and to monitor the disease. The combination of functional images with anatomic ones is of the utmost importance for a full evaluation of these patients, which can be obtained by means of imaging fusion. Despite the fast-growing diffusion of PET, in most cases of brain tumors, SPECT studies are adequate and provide results that parallel those obtained with PET. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with brain tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is the lack of precise anatomic details; this drawback is overcome by the fusion with morphological studies that provide an anatomic map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or MRI demonstrated usefulness for brain tumor assessment, but this process is often time consuming and not practical for everyday nuclear medicine studies. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which allow the acquisition of SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, and their co-registration by means of the hardware, has facilitated this process. In SPECT studies of brain tumors with various radiopharmaceuticals, fused images are helpful in providing the precise localization of neoplastic lesions, and in excluding the disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. This information is useful for optimizing diagnosis, therapy monitoring, and radiotherapy treatment planning, with a

  15. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... good manufacturing practices (CGMP) for PET drugs. The procedures were finalized and an implementation... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products--Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and...

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Methods with Potential for Increased Understanding of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundaram, Senthil K.; Chugani, Harry T.; Chugani, Diane C.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a technique that enables imaging of the distribution of radiolabeled tracers designed to track biochemical and molecular processes in the body after intravenous injection or inhalation. New strategies for the use of radiolabeled tracers hold potential for imaging gene expression in the brain during development…

  17. Revocation of regulation on positron emission tomography drug products--FDA. Final rule; revocation.

    PubMed

    1997-12-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revoking a regulation on positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical drug products. The regulation permits FDA to approve requests from manufacturers of PET drugs for exceptions or alternatives to provisions of the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations. FDA is taking this action in accordance with provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (Modernization Act). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice revoking two notices concerning certain guidance documents on PET drugs and the guidance documents to which the notices relate.

  18. Intraprocedural yttrium-90 positron emission tomography/CT for treatment optimization of yttrium-90 radioembolization.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Austin C; Chang, Ted T; Bradley, Yong C; Acuff, Shelley N; Pasciak, Alexander S

    2014-02-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres relies on delivery of appropriate treatment activity to ensure patient safety and optimize treatment efficacy. We report a case in which (90)Y positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) was performed to optimize treatment planning during a same-day, three-part treatment session. This treatment consisted of (i) an initial (90)Y infusion with a dosage determined using an empiric treatment planning model, (ii) quantitative (90)Y PET/CT imaging, and (iii) a secondary infusion with treatment planning based on quantitative imaging data with the goal of delivering a specific total tumor absorbed dose.

  19. Mycosis fungoides staged by 18F-flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Pang, Hua; Zhu, Jin; Chen, Xi; Guan, Lili; Wang, Jie; Chen, Jing; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Mycosis fungoides is a kind of malignant lymphoma arising from T cells, but primarily occurs in skin, and it is the most common type of cutaneous lymphoma. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare non-Hodgkin lymphoma but the most common type of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Because of unknown etiology and mechanism, and lack of typical clinical and histophysiological manifestations, the final diagnosis of MF is currently dependent on pathology and immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, tumor staging is very important. Different approaches would be taken according to varying degrees of cutaneous and extracutaneous lesions. Computed tomography (CT) scan has been chosen to stage tumors customarily. However, CT could only provide morphological information and analyze lymphadenopathy by the size criteria. 18F-flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) could provide morphological information and metabolic conditions simultaneously, which is helpful to locate and stage lesion. Conclusion: 18F-flurodeoxyglucose PET/CT could identify cutaneous and extracutaneous lesions in patients with MF. It could provide the range of lesions and biopsy target. PMID:27828842

  20. Contrast-Enhanced [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Staging and Radiotherapy Planning in Patients With Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bannas, Peter; Weber, Christoph; Adam, Gerhard; Frenzel, Thorsten; Derlin, Thorsten; Mester, Janos; Klutmann, Susanne

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: The practice of surgical staging and treatment of anal cancer has been replaced by noninvasive staging and combined modality therapy. For appropriate patient management, accurate lymph node staging is crucial. The present study evaluated the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and radiotherapy planning of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 consecutive patients (median age, 61 years old) with anal cancer underwent complete staging evaluation including physical examination, biopsy of the primary tumor, and contrast-enhanced (ce)-PET/CT. Patients were positioned as they would be for their subsequent radiotherapy. PET and CT images were evaluated independently for detectability and localization of the primary tumor, pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, and distant metastasis. The stage, determined by CT or PET alone, and the proposed therapy planning were compared with the stage and management determined by ce-PET/CT. Data from ce-PET/CT were used for radiotherapy planning. Results: ce-PET/CT revealed locoregional lymph node metastasis in 11 of 22 patients (50%). After simultaneous reading of PET and CT data sets by experienced observers, 3 patients (14%) were found to have sites of disease not seen on CT that were identified on PET. Two patients had sites of disease not seen on PET that were identified on CT. In summary, 2 patients were upstaged, and 4 patients were downstaged due to ce-PET/CT. However, radiotherapy fields were changed due to the results from ce-PET/CT in 23% of cases compared to CT or PET results alone. Conclusions: ce-PET/CT is superior to PET or CT alone for staging of anal cancer, with significant impact on therapy planning.

  1. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography – computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Rosângela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT) exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used. RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD) million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD) million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD) million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD) and 600 BRL (372.8 USD) million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD) and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD) million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated. PMID:26274871

  2. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Accuracy in the Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Review and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gómez León, Nieves; Escalona, Sofía; Bandrés, Beatriz; Belda, Cristobal; Callejo, Daniel; Blasco, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the performed clinical study was to compare the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of PET/CT in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and Methods. Cross-sectional and prospective study including 103 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC. All patients were examined using PET/CT with intravenous contrast medium. Those with disease stage ≤IIB underwent surgery (n = 40). Disease stage was confirmed based on histology results, which were compared with those of PET/CT and positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) separately. 63 patients classified with ≥IIIA disease stage by PET/CT did not undergo surgery. The cost-effectiveness of PET/CT for disease classification was examined using a decision tree analysis. Results. Compared with histology, the accuracy of PET/CT for disease staging has a positive predictive value of 80%, a negative predictive value of 95%, a sensitivity of 94%, and a specificity of 82%. For PET alone, these values are 53%, 66%, 60%, and 50%, whereas for CT alone they are 68%, 86%, 76%, and 72%, respectively. Incremental cost-effectiveness of PET/CT over CT alone was €17,412 quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). Conclusion. In our clinical study, PET/CT using intravenous contrast medium was an accurate and cost-effective method for staging of patients with NSCLC. PMID:25431665

  3. The Use and Misuse of Positron Emission Tomography in Lung Cancer Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fei; Rashtian, Afshin; Gould, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Positron emission tomography (PET) has been studied for a variety of indications in patients with known or suspected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this review, we discuss the potential benefits and limitations of PET for characterizing lung nodules, staging the mediastinum, identifying occult distant metastasis, determining prognosis and treatment response, guiding plans for radiation therapy, restaging during and after treatment, and selecting targets for tissue sampling. (Table 1) Evidence from randomized, controlled trials supports the use of PET for initial staging in NSCLC, while lower quality evidence from studies of diagnostic accuracy and modeling studies supports the use of PET for characterizing lung nodules. For most other indications in NSCLC, additional studies are required to clarify the role of PET and determine who is most likely to benefit. PMID:22054883

  4. Current status of positron emission tomography radiotracers for serotonin receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Luc; Le Bars, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission plays a key modulatory role in the brain. This system is critical for pathophysiological processes and many drug treatments for brain disorders interact with its 14 subtypes of receptors. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique tool for the study of the living brain in translational studies from animal models to patients in neurology or psychiatry. This short review is intended to cover the current status of PET radioligands used for imaging human brain 5-HT receptors. Here, we describe the available PET radioligands for the 5-HT1A , 5-HT1B , 5-HT2A , 5-HT4 and 5-HT6 receptors. Finally, we highlight the future challenges for a functional PET imaging of serotonin receptors, including the research towards specific PET radiotracers for yet unexplored serotonin receptors, the need of radiotracers for endogenous serotonin level measurement and the contribution of agonist radiotracers for functional imaging of 5-HT neurotransmission.

  5. Ameloblastic carcinoma of the mandible with metastasis to the skull and lung: advanced imaging appearance including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Devenney-Cakir, B; Dunfee, B; Subramaniam, R; Sundararajan, D; Mehra, P; Spiegel, J; Sakai, O

    2010-01-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a very rare malignant odontogenic tumour with characteristic histopathological and clinical features, which requires aggressive surgical treatment and surveillance and, therefore, differs from ameloblastoma. Metastasis typically occurs in the lung. Only one patient with metastasis to the skull has previously been described and no prior case reports have presented MRI and positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) imaging findings. We describe a case of ameloblastic carcinoma with metastasis to the skull and lung with emphasis on imaging features including MRI and PET-CT. PMID:20841465

  6. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  7. Photon shielding for a positron emission tomography suite.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J C; Mendez, P; Hidalgo-Salvatierra, O; Bujenovic, S

    2001-08-01

    This paper provides information on the effects of distance and attenuation in lead sheet and gypsum board of the 0.511 MeV photon produced by positron annihilation. Exposure rates are projected external to an adult injected with 185 MBq (5 mCi) of 18F in a fluorodeoxyglucose solution and for the same activity in a small unshielded container. These data have been applied to estimate the shielding requirements for the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) suite operated by the Nuclear Medicine Department of Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center. To assure that exposures are as low as reasonably achievable, lead was added to the walls of the room where the 18F is stored, handled, and injected into the patients. The PET scanner is installed in a room that formerly contained a Computerized Axial Tomography scanner; the existing 1.6 mm of lead sheet was left in place even though it is not required for personnel protection. During the initial phase of operation, a shield test program was conducted to estimate annual exposures to personnel inside and outside the suite. Projection of measured rates over a year of operation demonstrate that whole body doses are well below regulatory limits.

  8. Positron emission tomography in patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    McGeer, P L; Kamo, H; Harrop, R; Li, D K; Tuokko, H; McGeer, E G; Adam, M J; Ammann, W; Beattie, B L; Calne, D B

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen patients who had clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease with mild to severe dementia (mean age 69.1 years) were evaluated by calculation of local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMR-gl) based on uptake of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) detected with positron emission tomography (PET). PET scanning showed that the patients had significantly lower LCMR-gl values than 11 age-matched neurologically normal volunteers (mean age 66.3 years). The differences were most marked in the temporal cortex, followed by the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex. In each case the LCMR-gl value was below the lowest control value in at least one cortical area and usually in several; the reduction in LCMR-gl and the number of regions involved in the patients increased with the severity of the dementia. Deficits noted in neuropsychologic testing generally correlated with those predicted from loss of regional cortical metabolism. The patients with Alzheimer's disease were also examined with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography or both; the degree of atrophy found showed only a poor correlation with the neuropsychologic deficit. Significant atrophy was also noted in some of the controls. A detailed analysis of LCMR-gl values in selected cerebral regions of various sizes refuted the hypothesis that the reduction in cortical glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease is due to the filling by metabolically inert cerebrospinal fluid of space created by tissue atrophy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:3512063

  9. Positron emission tomography to assess hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verwer, Eline E; Boellaard, Ronald; van der Veldt, Astrid AM

    2014-01-01

    In lung cancer, tumor hypoxia is a characteristic feature, which is associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation therapy and chemotherapy. As the development of tumor hypoxia is associated with decreased perfusion, perfusion measurements provide more insight into the relation between hypoxia and perfusion in malignant tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive nuclear imaging technique that is suited for non-invasive in vivo monitoring of dynamic processes including hypoxia and its associated parameter perfusion. The PET technique enables quantitative assessment of hypoxia and perfusion in tumors. To this end, consecutive PET scans can be performed in one scan session. Using different hypoxia tracers, PET imaging may provide insight into the prognostic significance of hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. In addition, PET studies may play an important role in various stages of personalized medicine, as these may help to select patients for specific treatments including radiation therapy, hypoxia modifying therapies, and antiangiogenic strategies. In addition, specific PET tracers can be applied for monitoring therapy. The present review provides an overview of the clinical applications of PET to measure hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. Available PET tracers and their characteristics as well as the applications of combined hypoxia and perfusion PET imaging are discussed. PMID:25493221

  10. Seeing the unseen--bioturbation in 4D: tracing bioirrigation in marine sediment using positron emission tomography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Delefosse, Matthieu; Kristensen, Erik; Crunelle, Diane; Braad, Poul Erik; Dam, Johan Hygum; Thisgaard, Helge; Thomassen, Anders; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal patterns of bioirrigation induced by benthic fauna ventilation is critical given its significance on benthic nutrient exchange and biogeochemistry in coastal ecosystems. The quantification of this process challenges marine scientists because faunal activities and behaviors are concealed in an opaque sediment matrix. Here, we use a hybrid medical imaging technique, positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to provide a qualitative visual and fully quantitative description of bioirrigation in 4D (space and time). As a study case, we present images of porewater advection induced by the well-studied lugworm (Arenicola marina). Our results show that PET/CT allows more comprehensive studies on ventilation and bioirrigation than possible using techniques traditionally applied in marine ecology. We provide a dynamic three-dimensional description of bioirrigation by the lugworm at very high temporal and spatial resolution. Results obtained with the PET/CT are in agreement with literature data on lugworm ventilation and bioirrigation. Major advantages of PET/CT over methods commonly used are its non-invasive and non-destructive approach and its capacity to provide information that otherwise would require multiple methods. Furthermore, PET/CT scan is versatile as it can be used for a variety of benthic macrofauna species and sediment types and it provides information on burrow morphology or animal behavior. The lack of accessibility to the expensive equipment is its major drawback which can only be overcome through collaboration among several institutions.

  11. Seeing the Unseen—Bioturbation in 4D: Tracing Bioirrigation in Marine Sediment Using Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Delefosse, Matthieu; Kristensen, Erik; Crunelle, Diane; Braad, Poul Erik; Dam, Johan Hygum; Thisgaard, Helge; Thomassen, Anders; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal patterns of bioirrigation induced by benthic fauna ventilation is critical given its significance on benthic nutrient exchange and biogeochemistry in coastal ecosystems. The quantification of this process challenges marine scientists because faunal activities and behaviors are concealed in an opaque sediment matrix. Here, we use a hybrid medical imaging technique, positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to provide a qualitative visual and fully quantitative description of bioirrigation in 4D (space and time). As a study case, we present images of porewater advection induced by the well-studied lugworm (Arenicola marina). Our results show that PET/CT allows more comprehensive studies on ventilation and bioirrigation than possible using techniques traditionally applied in marine ecology. We provide a dynamic three-dimensional description of bioirrigation by the lugworm at very high temporal and spatial resolution. Results obtained with the PET/CT are in agreement with literature data on lugworm ventilation and bioirrigation. Major advantages of PET/CT over methods commonly used are its non-invasive and non-destructive approach and its capacity to provide information that otherwise would require multiple methods. Furthermore, PET/CT scan is versatile as it can be used for a variety of benthic macrofauna species and sediment types and it provides information on burrow morphology or animal behavior. The lack of accessibility to the expensive equipment is its major drawback which can only be overcome through collaboration among several institutions. PMID:25837626

  12. Advanced instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underly modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost. 71 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Fox, Josef J.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Schoder, Heiko; Price, Alison N.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens.

  14. [{sup 18}F]FDG-Positron Emission Tomography Coregistration With Computed Tomography Scans for Radiation Treatment Planning of Lymphoma and Hematologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kowalski, Alexander; McCann, Patrick; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Reiner, Anne; Goenen, Mithat; Kirov, Assen S.; Gonzales, Anne Marie; Schoeder, Heiko; Yahalom, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Positron emission-tomography (PET) using 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET) increases sensitivity and specificity of disease detection in lymphoma and thus is standard in lymphoma management. This study examines the effects of coregistering FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT) (PET/CT) scans on treatment planning for lymphoma patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients (30 positive PET scans) underwent PET/CT treatment planning from July 2004 to February 2007 and were retrospectively studied. For each patient, gross tumor volume was blindly contoured on the CT-only and PET/CT studies by a radiation oncologist. Treatment plans were generated for both the CT-only and PET/CT planning target volumes (PTVs) for all patients. Normal tissue doses and PTV coverage were evaluated using dose--volume histograms for all sites. Results: Thirty-two treatment sites were evaluated. Twenty-one patients had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 5 patients had Hodgkin lymphoma, and 3 patients had plasma cell neoplasms. Previously undetected FDG-avid sites were identified in 3 patients during PET/CT simulation, resulting in one additional treatment field. Due to unexpected PET/CT simulation findings, 2 patients did not proceed with radiation treatment. The addition of PET changed the volume of 23 sites (72%). The PTV was increased in 15 sites (47%) by a median of 11% (range, 6-40%) and reduced in 8 sites (25%) by a median of 20% (range, 6%-75%). In six (19%) replanned sites, the CT-based treatment plan would not have adequately covered the PTV defined by PET/CT. Conclusions: Incorporation of FDG-PET into CT-based treatment planning for lymphoma patients resulted in considerable changes in management, volume definition, and normal tissue dosimetry for a significant number of patients.

  15. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Lakshmanan, Ramesh Kumar; Sonik, Bhavay; Padmavathy, Rajagopalan; Gunaseelan, Rajamani Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor with low malignant potential. It occurs characteristically more often in young women. Radiological and pathological studies have revealed that the tumor is quite different from other pancreatic tumors. Limited information is available in the literature reporting their accumulation of fluorine-(18) fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Here, we report a case of pancreatic SPN imaged with contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT. A percutaneous fine needle aspiration from the metabolically active lesion revealed SPN, and it was confirmed with histopathological results. Recurrence or metastasis was not found after 7 months of follow-up.

  16. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Sampath; Lakshmanan, Ramesh Kumar; Sonik, Bhavay; Padmavathy, Rajagopalan; Gunaseelan, Rajamani Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor with low malignant potential. It occurs characteristically more often in young women. Radiological and pathological studies have revealed that the tumor is quite different from other pancreatic tumors. Limited information is available in the literature reporting their accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Here, we report a case of pancreatic SPN imaged with contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT. A percutaneous fine needle aspiration from the metabolically active lesion revealed SPN, and it was confirmed with histopathological results. Recurrence or metastasis was not found after 7 months of follow-up. PMID:27095862

  17. Positron emission tomography - a new approach to brain chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-11-11

    Positron emission tomography permits examination of the chemistry of the brain in living beings. Until recently, positron emission tomography had been considered a research tool, but it is rapidly moving into clinical practice. This report describes the uses and applications of positron emission tomography in examinations of patients with strokes, epilepsy, malignancies, dementias, and schizophrenia and in basic studies of synaptic neurotransmission.

  18. C-Arm Computed Tomography Compared With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Treatment Planning Before Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Christoph Waggershauser, Tobias; Tiling, Reinhold; Weckbach, Sabine; Johnson, Thorsten; Meissner, Oliver; Klingenbeck-Regn, Klaus; Reiser, Maximilian; Hoffmann, Ralf Thorsten

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rotational C-arm computed tomography (CT) allows visualization of liver metastases and adds relevant information for radioembolization (RE) treatment planning. Technetium angiography, together with C-arm CT, was performed in 47 patients to determine the feasibility for RE. C-arm CT images were compared with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the detection of liver tumors. The images were also rated according one of the following three categories: (1) images that provide no additional information compared with DSA alone; (2) images that do provide additional information compared with DSA; and (2) images that had an impact on eligibility determination for and planning of the RE procedure. In all patients, 283 FDG-positive liver lesions were detected by PET. In venous contrast-phase CT, 221 (78.1%) and 15 (5.3%) of these lesions were either hypodense or hyperdense, respectively. In C-arm CT, 103 (36.4%) liver lesions were not detectable because they were outside of either the field of view or the contrast-enhanced liver segment. Another 25 (8.8%) and 98 (34.6%) of the liver lesions were either hyperdense or presented primarily as hypodense lesions with a rim enhancement, respectively. With PET/CT as the standard of reference, venous CT and C-arm CT failed to detect 47 (16.6%) and 57 (20.1%) of all liver lesions, respectively. For RE planning, C-arm CT provided no further information, provide some additional information, or had an impact on the procedure in 20 (42.5%), 15 (31.9%) and 12 (25.6%) of patients, respectively. We conclude that C-arm CT may add decisive information in patients scheduled for RE.

  19. 18F-FDG positron emission tomography in oncology: main indications.

    PubMed

    Vercher-Conejero, J L; Gámez Cenzano, C

    2016-01-01

    The development of molecular and functional imaging with new imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET) among others, has greatly improved the detection of tumors, tumor staging, and the detection of possible recurrences. Furthermore, the combination of these different imaging modalities and the continual development of radiotracers for PET have advanced our understanding and knowledge of the different pathophysiological processes in cancer, thereby helping to make treatment more efficacious, improving patients' quality of life, and increasing survival. PET is one of the imaging techniques that has attracted the most interest in recent years for its diagnostic capabilities. Its ability to anatomically locate pathologic foci of metabolic activity has revolutionized the detection and staging of many tumors, exponentially broadening its potential indications not only in oncology but also in other fields such as cardiology, neurology, and inflammatory and infectious diseases.

  20. Review of cardiovascular imaging in The Journal of Nuclear Cardiology in 2014: Part 1 of 2: Positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and neuronal imaging.

    PubMed

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2015-06-01

    The year 2014 has been an exciting year for the cardiovascular imaging community with significant advances in the realm of nuclear and multimodality cardiac imaging. In this new feature of the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, we will summarize some of the breakthroughs that were published in the Journal in 2014 in 2 sister articles. This first article will concentrate on publications dealing with cardiac positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), and neuronal imaging.

  1. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine: PET/Computed Tomography and Therapy Response Assessment in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Mena, Esther; Pattanayak, Puskar; Taghipour, Mehdi; Solnes, Lilja B; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to assess tumor response to therapy. Standardized qualitative criteria based on 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET/computed tomography have been proposed to evaluate the treatment effectiveness in specific cancers and these allow more accurate therapy response assessment and survival prognostication. Multiple studies have addressed the utility of the volumetric PET biomarkers as prognostic indicators but there is no consensus about the preferred segmentation methodology for these metrics. Heterogeneous intratumoral uptake was proposed as a novel PET metric for therapy response assessment. PET imaging techniques will be used to study the biological behavior of cancers during therapy.

  2. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Timothy P C; Yartsev, Slav; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene; He, Wenqing; Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L; Macdonald, David; Bauman, Glenn

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  3. Focal thyroid incidentaloma on whole body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in known cancer patients: A case-based discussion with a series of three examples.

    PubMed

    Targe, Mangala; Basu, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    The importance, imaging characteristics and outcome of focal thyroid incidentaloma on fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) have been illustrated in this report. This is drawn from a series of three case examples of proven malignancy at different locations, with three different thyroid cytopathological diagnoses. Subsequently, a case-based discussion on present consensus of the management of this entity has been undertaken including certain specific aspects of PET-CT interpretation and its role in this setting.

  4. Skeletal muscle metastases as the initial manifestation of an unknown primary lung cancer detected on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Navneet; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natarajan Balasubramanian; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastasis as the initial presentation of the unknown primary lung cancer is unusual. A 65-year-old male patient presented with pain and swelling of the right forearm. Fine needle aspiration of the swelling revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent whole body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to identify the site of the primary malignancy. The authors present PET/CT images showing FDG-avid metastases to the skeletal muscles along with a previously unknown primary tumor in the right lung, in a patient presenting with initial muscular symptoms without any pulmonary manifestations.

  5. Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen-targeted Ligand Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Immunohistochemical Findings in a Patient With Synchronous Metastatic Penile and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Kuithan, Friederike; Zöphel, Klaus; Heberling, Ulrike; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with synchronous metastatic penile and prostate cancer. 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) revealed tracer uptake in inguinal, pelvic, and retroperitoneal metastases. Lymph node biopsies and immunohistochemical staining revealed that both cancers involved the lymph nodes and expressed PSMA. In the deposits of penile squamous cell carcinoma, PSMA expression was seen in tumor vessels and may explain the PSMA-PET/CT positivity of inguinal nodes involved in squamous cell carcinoma. The interpretation of imaging in synchronous tumors should take this fact into consideration.

  6. “Drop” Metastases from an Operated Case of Intracranial Anaplastic Ependymoma Identified on Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    The seeding of tumor through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from primary intracranial tumors is very rare, often goes undetected, and is usually identified only on autopsy. CSF cytology along with magnetic resonance imaging constitutes the standard approach of diagnosing this grave condition. Use of fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in indentifying spinal metastases from primary intracranial malignancies is very limited and has been reported in patients with metastatic glioblastoma multiforme and medulloblastomas. We present a rare case of metastatic anaplastic ependymoma to show the potentially clinically utility of PET/CT in diagnosing leptomeningeal or the so-called “drop” metastases. PMID:28242994

  7. Late metastatic recurrence of penile carcinoma after 10 years: Demonstration with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Penile cancer is rare cancer. While inguinal and pelvic nodal metastasis is common, distant metastasis is rare. We here present the interesting case of a 59-year-old male patient with penile carcinoma, previously treated with penectomy and inguinal lymphadenectomy 10 years earlier. He presented with bone pains and given history of malignancy he was referred for an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). PET/CT demonstrated multiple 18F-FDG avid bone and lung metastases. No locoregional disease was seen. Biopsy from a lung nodule confirmed the diagnosis, and the patient was started on palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27385892

  8. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  9. Ocular Granulocytic Sarcoma as an Initial Clinical Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Identified on Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) or chloroma, rare extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia and not infrequently, can be presenting clinical feature. Multiple studies have demonstrated the clinical utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in early detection and follow-up assessment of GS after chemotherapy. Commonly involved areas include bones, lymph nodes, breasts, and skin and not uncommonly, the disease can be multifocal. We present a rare case of ocular GS, where FDG-PET/CT in addition to the identifying the ocular mass, revealed multiple clinically occult extramedullary lesions. PMID:28242990

  10. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine department. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer in your body ... blood sugar or blood insulin levels. Because the radioactive substance decays quickly and is effective for only a short ...

  11. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... perfusion scan ). evaluate brain abnormalities, such as tumors, memory disorders, seizures and other central nervous system disorders. map normal human brain and heart function. top of page How ...

  12. Effectiveness of positron emission tomography for the detection of melanoma metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Holder, W D; White, R L; Zuger, J H; Easton, E J; Greene, F L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and clinical utility of 18F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) total-body positron emission tomography (PET) scanning for the detection of metastases in patients with malignant melanoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent preliminary reports suggest that PET using FDG may be more sensitive and specific for detection of metastatic melanoma than standard radiologic imaging studies using computed tomography (CT). PET technology is showing utility in the detection of metastatic tumors from multiple primary sites including breast, lung, lymphoma, and melanoma. However, little information is available concerning the general utility, sensitivity, and specificity of PET scanning of patients with metastatic melanoma. METHODS: One hundred three PET scans done on 76 nonrandomized patients having AJCC stage II to IV melanoma were prospectively evaluated. Patients were derived from two groups. Group 1 (63 patients) had PET, CT (chest and abdomen), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; brain) scans as a part of staging requirements for immunotherapy protocols. Group 2 (13 nonprotocol patients) had PET, CT, and MRI scans as in group 1, but for clinical evaluation only. PET scans were done using 12 to 20 mCi of FDG given intravenously. Results of PET scans were compared to CT scans and biopsy or cytology results. RESULTS: PET scanning for the detection of melanoma metastases had a sensitivity of 94.2% and a specificity of 83.3% compared to 55.3% and 84.4%, respectively, for CT scanning. Factors that produced false-positive PET scans were papillary carcinoma of the thyroid (1), bronchogenic carcinoma (1), inflamed epidermal cyst (1), Warthin's tumor of the parotid gland (1), surgical wound inflammation (2), leiomyoma of the uterus (1), suture granuloma (1), and endometriosis (1). The four false-negative scans were thought to be due to smaller (<0.3 to 0.5 cm) and diffuse areas of melanoma without a mass

  13. Assessment of Cancer-Associated Biomarkers by Positron Emission Tomography: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Collier, T. Lee; Lecomte, Roger; McCarthy, Timothy J.; Meikle, Steve; Ruth, Thomas J.; Scopinaro, Francesco; Signore, Alberto; Van Brocklin, Henry; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Waterhouse, Rikki N.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful means to non-invasively image and quantify protein expression and biochemical changes in living subjects at nano- and picomolar levels. As the field of molecular imaging develops, and as advances in the biochemistry, pharmacology, therapeutics, and molecular biology of disease are made, there is a corresponding increase in the number of clinically relevant, novel disease-associated biomarkers that are brought to the attention of those developing imaging probes for PET. In addition, due to the high specificity of the PET radiotracers being developed, there is a demand for PET cameras with higher sensitivity and resolution. This manuscript reviews advances over the past five years in clinical and pre-clinical PET instrumentation and in new PET probes and imaging methods associated with the latest trends in the molecular imaging of cancer. Included in the PET tracer review is a description of new radioligands for steroid receptors, growth factor receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, sigma receptors, tumor-associated enzymes, gene reporter probes, markers for tumor hypoxia and metabolism, and sites associated with angiogenesis and cellular proliferation. The use of PET imaging in drug development, including the monitoring of cancer chemotherapy, also is discussed. PMID:14646039

  14. Respiratory motion correction in emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Mauricio; Malandain, Grégoire; Koulibaly, Pierre Malick; González Ballester, Miguel A; Darcourt, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    In Emission Tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations and imprecise diagnosis. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested with improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but with the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion correction directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous radiation detection in the hybrid tomography system ClearPET-XPAD3/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, H. Olaya; Sevilla, A. C.; Castro, H. F.; Martínez, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Geant4 based simulation framework SciFW1, a detailed simulation was performed for a detector array in the hybrid tomography prototype for small animals called ClearPET / XPAD, which was built in the Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille. The detector system consists of an array of phoswich scintillation detectors: LSO (Lutetium Oxy-ortosilicate doped with cerium Lu2SiO5:Ce) and LuYAP (Lutetium Ortoaluminate of Yttrium doped with cerium Lu0.7Y0.3AlO3:Ce) for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and hybrid pixel detector XPAD for Computed Tomography (CT). Simultaneous acquisition of deposited energy and the corresponding time - position for each recorded event were analyzed, independently, for both detectors. interference between detection modules for PET and CT. Information about amount of radiation reaching each phoswich crystal and XPAD detector using a phantom in order to study the effectiveness by radiation attenuation and influence the positioning of the radioactive source 22Na was obtained. The simulation proposed will improve distribution of detectors rings and interference values will be taken into account in the new versions of detectors.

  16. The role of positron emission tomography with computed tomography in the follow-up of asymptomatic cutaneous malignant melanoma patients with a high risk of disease recurrence.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rachel Angharad; Acland, Katharine M; Harries, Mark; O'Doherty, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of [F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a surveillance tool in asymptomatic patients with primary cutaneous melanoma with the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 3 disease. Thirty-four patients with primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 3 disease, who underwent at least one annual surveillance PET/CT scan, were retrospectively identified from our PET Centre Database in May 2008 and their characteristics, PET/CT results and disease course were reviewed. In 20 patients with microscopic stage 3 disease at diagnosis, annual surveillance PET/CT detected two of three recurrences and detected one incidental breast carcinoma. In 14 patients with macroscopic stage 3 disease at, or subsequent to, their initial diagnosis, annual PET/CT detected four of four recurrences, detected metastases in one patient who remains asymptomatic and detected one incidental thyroid carcinoma. PET/CT seems to be a useful surveillance tool in patients with macroscopic stage 3 disease, although the numbers in this study are small. However, the role of PET/CT in patients initially presenting with microscopic stage 3 disease requires further confirmation.

  17. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: a novel approach for the diagnosis of cholecystitis for equivocal diagnoses after ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, Yosef; Ourian, Ariel J; Waxman, Alan; D'Angolo, Alessandro; Thomson, Louise E; Margulies, Daniel R

    2012-10-01

    Although hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) scan is often used when the diagnosis of cholecystitis remains questionable after ultrasound, it carries a high false-positive rate and has other limitations. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18FDG PET-CT) has recently gained enthusiasm for its ability to detect infection and inflammation. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of 18FDG PET-CT in diagnosing cholecystitis. Nineteen patients with suspected cholecystitis (Group S) underwent PET-CT and 10 had positive PET-CT findings. Of these 10, nine underwent cholecystectomies, and pathology confirmed cholecystitis in all nine. One patient was managed nonoperatively as a result of multiple comorbidities. Of the nine patients with negative PET-CT, six were managed nonoperatively, safely discharged, and had no readmissions at 3-month follow-up. The other three patients with negative PET-CT underwent cholecystectomies, and two showed no cholecystitis on pathology. The third had mild to moderate cholecystitis with focal mucosal erosion/ulceration without gallbladder wall thickening on pathology. 18FDG PET-CT detected gallbladder inflammation in all but one patient with pathology-proven cholecystitis with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 1.00, respectively. 18FDG-PET-CT appears to be a promising, rapid, direct, and accurate test in diagnosing cholecystitis and could replace HIDA scan in cases that remain equivocal after ultrasound.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography for the Assessment of Myocardial Viability

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective was to update the 2001 systematic review conducted by the Institute For Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) on the use of positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing myocardial viability. The update consisted of a review and analysis of the research evidence published since the 2001 ICES review to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of PET in detecting left ventricular (LV) viability and predicting patient outcomes after revascularization in comparison with other noninvasive techniques. Background Left Ventricular Viability Heart failure is a complex syndrome that impairs the contractile ability of the heart to maintain adequate blood circulation, resulting in poor functional capacity and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. It is the leading cause of hospitalization in elderly Canadians. In more than two-thirds of cases, heart failure is secondary to coronary heart disease. It has been shown that dysfunctional myocardium resulting from coronary heart disease (CAD) may recover contractile function (i.e. considered viable). Dysfunctional but viable myocardium may have been stunned by a brief episode of ischemia, followed by restoration of perfusion, and may regain function spontaneously. It is believed that repetitive stunning results in hibernating myocardium that will only regain contractile function upon revascularization. For people with CAD and severe LV dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] <35%) refractory to medical therapy, coronary artery bypass and heart transplantation are the only treatment options. The opportunity for a heart transplant is limited by scarcityof donor hearts. Coronary artery bypass in these patients is associated with high perioperative complications; however, there is evidence that revascularization in the presence of dysfunctional but viable myocardium is associated with survival benefits and lower rates of cardiac events. The assessment of left

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestle, Ursula; Weber, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2009-01-01

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required.

  20. Clinical Application of In-Room Positron Emission Tomography for In Vivo Treatment Monitoring in Proton Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Chul Hee; Zhu, Xuping; Winey, Brian A.; Grogg, Kira; Testa, Mauro; El Fakhri, Georges; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of using in-room positron emission tomography (PET) for treatment verification in proton therapy and for deriving suitable PET scan times. Methods and Materials: Nine patients undergoing passive scattering proton therapy underwent scanning immediately after treatment with an in-room PET scanner. The scanner was positioned next to the treatment head after treatment. The Monte Carlo (MC) method was used to reproduce PET activities for each patient. To assess the proton beam range uncertainty, we designed a novel concept in which the measured PET activity surface distal to the target at the end of range was compared with MC predictions. The repositioning of patients for the PET scan took, on average, approximately 2 minutes. The PET images were reconstructed considering varying scan times to test the scan time dependency of the method. Results: The measured PET images show overall good spatial correlations with MC predictions. Some discrepancies could be attributed to uncertainties in the local elemental composition and biological washout. For 8 patients treated with a single field, the average range differences between PET measurements and computed tomography (CT) image-based MC results were <5 mm (<3 mm for 6 of 8 patients) and root-mean-square deviations were 4 to 11 mm with PET-CT image co-registration errors of approximately 2 mm. Our results also show that a short-length PET scan of 5 minutes can yield results similar to those of a 20-minute PET scan. Conclusions: Our first clinical trials in 9 patients using an in-room PET system demonstrated its potential for in vivo treatment monitoring in proton therapy. For a quantitative range prediction with arbitrary shape of target volume, we suggest using the distal PET activity surface.

  1. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  2. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using (15)O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich; Ladefoged, Claes N; Højgaard, Liselotte; Greisen, Gorm; Law, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MR) on a hybrid PET/MR in seven newborn piglets. Positron emission tomography was performed with IV injections of 20 MBq and 100 MBq (15)O-water to confirm CBF reliability at low activity. Cerebral blood flow was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment-model using two input functions: an arterial input function (AIF) or an image-derived input function (IDIF). The mean global CBF (95% CI) PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL at baseline were 27 (23; 32), 34 (31; 37), and 27 (22; 32) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At acetazolamide stimulus, PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 64 (55; 74), 76 (70; 83) and 79 (67; 92) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At baseline, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 22% (P<0.0001) and -0.7% (P=0.9). At acetazolamide, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 19% (P=0.001) and 24% (P=0.0003). In conclusion, PET-IDIF overestimated CBF. Injected activity of 20 MBq (15)O-water had acceptable concordance with 100 MBq, without compromising image quality. Single TI ASL was questionable for regional CBF measurements. Global ASL CBF and PET CBF were congruent during baseline but not during hyperperfusion.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent (18)F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1-4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer's disease dementia. The results were replicated after adjustments of different factors and when using different cut-offs for amyloid-β abnormality

  4. Radiation Dose from Whole-Body F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Nationwide Survey in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate average radiation exposure from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) examinations and to analyze possible factors affecting the radiation dose. A nation-wide questionnaire survey was conducted involving all institutions that operate PET/CT scanners in Korea. From the response, radiation doses from injected FDG and CT examination were calculated. A total of 105 PET/CT scanners in 73 institutions were included in the analysis (response rate of 62.4%). The average FDG injected activity was 310 ± 77 MBq and 5.11 ± 1.19 MBq/kg. The average effective dose from FDG was estimated to be 5.89 ± 1.46 mSv. The average CT dose index and dose-length product were 4.60 ± 2.47 mGy and 429.2 ± 227.6 mGy∙cm, which corresponded to 6.26 ± 3.06 mSv. The radiation doses from FDG and CT were significantly lower in case of newer scanners than older ones (P < 0.001). Advanced PET technologies such as time-of-flight acquisition and point-spread function recovery were also related to low radiation dose (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the average radiation dose from FDG PET/CT is estimated to be 12.2 mSv. The radiation dose from FDG PET/CT is reduced with more recent scanners equipped with image-enhancing algorithms. PMID:26908992

  5. FPGA-Based Pulse Parameter Discovery for Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Haselman, Michael; Hauck, Scott; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert S

    2009-10-24

    Modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex digital signal processing algorithms with clock rates well above 100MHz. This, combined with FPGA's low expense and ease of use make them an ideal technology for a data acquisition system for a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The University of Washington is producing a series of high-resolution, small-animal PET scanners that utilize FPGAs as the core of the front-end electronics. For these next generation scanners, functions that are typically performed in dedicated circuits, or offline, are being migrated to the FPGA. This will not only simplify the electronics, but the features of modern FPGAs can be utilizes to add significant signal processing power to produce higher resolution images. In this paper we report how we utilize the reconfigurable property of an FPGA to self-calibrate itself to determine pulse parameters necessary for some of the pulse processing steps. Specifically, we show how the FPGA can generate a reference pulse based on actual pulse data instead of a model. We also report how other properties of the photodetector pulse (baseline, pulse length, average pulse energy and event triggers) can be determined automatically by the FPGA.

  6. Comparison between 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Regional Lymph Nodal Staging in Patients with Melanoma: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mirk, Paoletta; Treglia, Giorgio; Salsano, Marco; Basile, Pietro; Giordano, Alessandro; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Aim. to compare 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for regional lymph nodal staging in patients with melanoma. Methods. We performed a literature review discussing original articles which compared FDG-PET to SLNB for regional lymph nodal staging in patients with melanoma. Results and Conclusions. There is consensus in the literature that FDG-PET cannot replace SLNB for regional lymph nodal staging in patients with melanoma. PMID:22242204

  7. Progressive degeneration of the right temporal lobe studied with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, P J; Warrington, E K; Frackowiak, R S; Rossor, M N

    1990-01-01

    A 79 year old man with a twelve year progressive history of prosopagnosia and recent naming difficulty, in whom other intellectual skills were preserved, is described. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed an area of right temporal lobe hypometabolism, with an additional area of less severe hypometabolism at the left temporal pole. This may represent an example of progressive focal cortical degeneration similar to that associated with primary progressive dysphasia, but affecting the right temporal lobe. Images PMID:2292695

  8. Bimedial rectus hypermetabolism in convergence spasm as observed on positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Oh, Young-Mi; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Ji Soo

    2008-09-01

    A 52-year-old man developed vertical gaze palsy, convergence spasm, and convergence-retraction nystagmus due to glioblastoma of the right thalamus. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) inadvertently demonstrated markedly increased metabolism in the medial rectus muscles. The hypermetabolism indicates active contraction of these extraocular muscles due to excessive convergence drive attributed to inappropriate activation or disrupted inhibition of convergence neurons by the diencephalic lesion.

  9. An Educational PET Camera Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Tegner, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are now in widespread use in hospitals. A model of a PET camera has been installed in Stockholm House of Science and is used to explain the principles of PET to school pupils as described here.

  10. Positron emission tomography molecular imaging of dopaminergic system in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Haifeng; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) is involved in drug reinforcement, but its role in drug addiction remains unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the first technology used for the direct measurement of components of the dopaminergic system in the living human brain. In this article, we reviewed the major findings of PET imaging studies on the involvement of DA in drug addiction, especially in heroin addiction. Furthermore, we summarized PET radiotracers that have been used to study the role of DA in drug addiction. To investigate presynaptic function in drug addiction, PET tracers have been developed to measure DA synthesis and transport. For the investigation of postsynaptic function, several radioligands targeting dopamine one (D1) receptor and dopamine two (D2) receptor are extensively used in PET imaging studies. Moreover, we also summarized the PET imaging findings of heroin addiction studies, including heroin-induced DA increases and the reinforcement, role of DA in the long-term effects of heroin abuse, DA and vulnerability to heroin abuse and the treatment implications. PET imaging studies have corroborated the role of DA in drug addiction and increase our understanding the mechanism of drug addiction.

  11. Utility of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Ammar A; Gul, Maryam; Gould, Elaine; Teng, Mathew; Baker, Kevin; Matthews, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has established itself as one of the key clinical tools in evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. However, MRI still has several key limitations which require supplemental information from additional modalities to complete evaluation of various disorders. This has led to the development hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)-MRI which is rapidly evolving to address key clinical questions by using the morphological strengths of MRI and functional information of PET imaging. In this article, we aim to review physical principles and techniques of PET-MRI and discuss clinical utility of functional information obtained from PET imaging and structural information obtained from MRI imaging for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. More specifically, this review highlights the role of PET-MRI in musculoskeletal oncology including initial diagnosis and staging, treatment planning and post-treatment follow-up. Also we will review utility of PET-MRI in evaluating musculoskeletal infections (especially in the immunocompromised and diabetics) and inflammatory condition. Additionally, common pitfalls of PET-MRI will be addressed. PMID:27027320

  12. Is Image Registration of Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Head-and-Neck Cancer Treatment Planning Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, David; Lawrence, Michael; Khandani, Amir H.; Rosenman, Julian; Cullip, Tim; Chera, Bhishamjit S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetry and patterns of failure related to fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-defined biological tumor volumes (BTVs) for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of 91 HNSCC patients who received pretreatment PET/CT scans that were not formally used for target delineation. The median follow-up was 34.5 months. Image registration was performed for PET, planning CT, and post-RT failure CT scans. Previously defined primary (CT{sub PRIMARY}) and nodal (CT{sub NODE}) gross tumor volumes (GTV) were used. The primary BTV (BTV{sub PRIMARY}) and nodal BTV (BTV{sub NODE}) were defined visually (PET{sub vis}). The BTV{sub PRIMARY} was also contoured using 40% and 50% peak PET activity (PET{sub 40,} PET{sub 50}). The recurrent GTVs were contoured on post-RT CT scans. Dosimetry was evaluated on the planning-CT and pretreatment PET scan. PET and CT dosimetric/volumetric data was compared for those with and without local-regional failure (LRF). Results: In all, 29 of 91 (32%) patients experienced LRF: 10 local alone, 7 regional alone, and 12 local and regional. BTVs and CT volumes had less than complete overlap. BTVs were smaller than CT-defined targets. Dosimetric coverage was similar between failed and controlled groups as well as between BTVs and CT-defined volumes. Conclusions: PET and CT-defined tumor volumes received similar RT doses despite having less than complete overlap and the inaccuracies of image registration. LRF correlated with both CT and PET-defined volumes. The dosimetry for PET- and/or CT-based tumor volumes was not significantly inferior in patients with LRF. CT-based delineation alone may be sufficient for treatment planning in patients with HNSCC. Image registration of FDG-PET may not be necessary.

  13. Development of novel emission tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  14. Positron Emission Tomography Reporter Genes and Reporter Probes: Gene and Cell Therapy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S.; Campbell, Dean O.; Radu, Caius G.; Czernin, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes (IRGs) and PET reporter probes (PRPs) are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials. PMID:22509201

  15. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD.

  16. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  17. Tumour response evaluation with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography: research technique or clinical tool?

    PubMed

    Anderson, H; Singh, N; Miles, K

    2010-10-04

    The evaluation of treatment response is an established role for imaging in oncologic research and clinical practice. In early phase trials, imaging response criteria are used to determine the presence and magnitude of the drug effect on tumour to aid decisions concerning progress to late phase trials, and to inform dose selection and scheduling. In late phase trials and clinical practice, the imaging response is used as a surrogate for clinical outcome. Due to the limitations of current anatomic response criteria, there is growing interest in the use of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) to assess treatment response. The technique is beginning to be adopted within mainstream approaches for evaluation of response in solid tumours and lymphoma. Difficulties with standardisation across PET centres and tumour types combined with uncertainty concerning the timing of assessment relative to treatment, have limited the use of quantitative measurements of FDG uptake to research applications. However, with a growing body of evidence that qualitative criteria such as the development of new PET lesions or complete metabolic response following treatment can provide surrogates marker for clinical outcome, [(18)F]FDG-PET is becoming established as a clinical technique for assessing tumour response, especially for FDG-avid lymphoma subtypes. Multimodality imaging using perfusion computed tomography/PET is an exciting novel technique with the potential to define treatment response in a new way.

  18. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): Applications and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Tumeh, S.S. )

    1990-01-26

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use.

  19. Impact of hybrid fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography on radiotherapy planning in esophageal and non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Bradley, Kristin; Mehta, Minesh . E-mail: mehta@humonc.wisc.edu; Howard, Andy; Khuntia, Deepak; Ritter, Mark; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a hybrid fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scanner in radiotherapy planning for esophageal and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 30 patients (16 with esophageal cancer, 14 with NSCLC) underwent an FDG-PET/CT for radiotherapy planning purposes. Noncontrast total-body spiral CT scans were obtained first, followed immediately by FDG-PET imaging which was automatically co-registered to the CT scan. A physician not involved in the patients' original treatment planning designed a gross tumor volume (GTV) based first on the CT dataset alone, while blinded to the FDG-PET dataset. Afterward, the physician designed a GTV based on the fused PET/CT dataset. To standardize PET GTV margin definition, background liver PET activity was standardized in all images. The CT-based and PET/CT-based GTVs were then quantitatively compared by way of an index of conformality, which is the ratio of the intersection of the two GTVs to their union. Results: The mean index of conformality was 0.44 (range, 0.00-0.70) for patients with NSCLC and 0.46 (range, 0.13-0.80) for patients with esophageal cancer. In 10 of the 16 (62.5%) esophageal cancer patients, and in 12 of the 14 (85.7%) NSCLC patients, the addition of the FDG-PET data led to the definition of a smaller GTV. Conclusion: The incorporation of a hybrid FDG-PET/CT scanner had an impact on the radiotherapy planning of esophageal cancer and NSCLC. In future studies, we recommend adoption of a conformality index for a more comprehensive comparison of newer treatment planning imaging modalities to conventional options.

  20. The diagnostic value of fused positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the localization of adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Farhat, Rafif; Al-Arifi, Abdullah; Al-Kahtani, Nora; Kanaan, Imad; Abouzied, Mohei

    2009-01-01

    Despite the high resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary gland, up to 40% of cases of Cushing's disease (CD) have normal MRI. Fused images of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) may have a potential diagnostic role in CD in general and in such cases in particular. Objective of this study is to explore the diagnostic potential of PET-CT for localization of adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas in CD. PET-CT was performed in 12 cases with de novo (7 cases) or persistent CD (5 cases) that were proven to have CD on biochemical, radiological and/or histopathological findings. These cases had a definite CD confirmed on histopathological and immunostaining examination of the subsequent transphenoidal surgical specimens (10 cases) and/or bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS, 4 cases). PET-CT was positive in 7 of the 12 cases of CD (58%) showing a focal area of uptake in the pituitary gland. In these seven cases, MRI was positive in six (85.7%) but negative in one case (14.3%). In the other five cases with negative PET-CT, MRI was positive in two and negative in three cases. Of four cases with negative MRI, PET-CT was positive in one case (25%). We conclude that PET-CT is positive in around 60% of the cases of CD. Although the majority of cases with positive PET-CT had positive MRI, PET-CT may detect some cases with negative MRI and thus provides important diagnostic information. If these findings are confirmed in larger studies, PET-CT might become an important diagnostic technique, especially when the more invasive and technically demanding procedure of IPSS is not available or inconclusive.

  1. Hypermetabolic Calcified Lymph Nodes on 18Fludeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in a Case of Treated Ovarian Cancer Recurrence: Residual Disease or Benign Formation?

    PubMed Central

    Nikaki, Alexandra; Alexopoulos, Athanasios; Vlachou, Fani; Filippi, Vasiliki; Andreou, Ioannis; Rapti, Vasiliki; Gogos, Konstantinos; Dalianis, Konstantinos; Efthymiadou, Roxani; Prassopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) in evaluating ovarian cancer recurrence even after a prolonged disease-free interval, and in therapy response is well-described. Calcifications observed in CT, although usually attributed to benign conditions, may actually represent active disease. Such an example of calcified formations is psammoma bodies. We present a case of 56-y. o. patient with ovarian cancer relapse at the supraclavicular area 18 years after complete response and disease-free interval. The patient received chemotherapy and underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of treatment response. Both CT corrected and uncorrected PET images showed hypermetabolism in the massively calcified lymph nodes in the neck, mediastinum, axilla and abdomen, indicative of active residual disease. PMID:27277326

  2. Spindle cell sarcoma of pulmonary artery mimicking thromboembolism with lung metastasis detected in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Pattabiraman, Vr; Mehta, Sangita; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS), although rare, must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). This tumor is highly malignant and the prognosis is very poor. As much as the standardized uptake values (SUVs) at fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) have helped in differentiating between benign and malignant tumors, visualization of a low-attenuation filling defect within a pulmonary artery on contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) can be suggestive of a malignancy, such as PAS, if the lesion shows high FDG uptake at PET. We present a case of PAS that showed high FDG uptake on integrated FDG PET/CT and with lung metastasis. Patient underwent endoscopic bronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), which confirmed spindle cell sarcoma.

  3. Spindle cell sarcoma of pulmonary artery mimicking thromboembolism with lung metastasis detected in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Pattabiraman, VR; Mehta, Sangita; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS), although rare, must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). This tumor is highly malignant and the prognosis is very poor. As much as the standardized uptake values (SUVs) at fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) have helped in differentiating between benign and malignant tumors, visualization of a low-attenuation filling defect within a pulmonary artery on contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) can be suggestive of a malignancy, such as PAS, if the lesion shows high FDG uptake at PET. We present a case of PAS that showed high FDG uptake on integrated FDG PET/CT and with lung metastasis. Patient underwent endoscopic bronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), which confirmed spindle cell sarcoma. PMID:25400365

  4. Determination of Internal Target Volume From a Single Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scan in Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Pan Tinsu; Clark, John W.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The use of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) to determine the tumor internal target volume (ITV) is usually characterized by high patient radiation exposure. The objective of this study was to propose and evaluate an approach that relies on a single static positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan to determine the ITV, thereby eliminating the need for 4D-CT and thus reduce patient radiation dose. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on the concept that the observed PET image is the result of a joint convolution of an ideal PET image (free from motion and partial volume effect) with a motion-blurring kernel (MBK) and partial volume effect. In this regard, the MBK and tumor ITV are then estimated from the deconvolution of this joint model. To test this technique, phantom and patient studies were performed using different sphere/tumor sizes and motion trajectories. In all studies, a 4D-CT and a PET/CT image of the sphere/tumor were acquired. The ITV from the proposed technique was then compared to the maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume of the 4D-CT images. A Dice coefficient of the two volumes was calculated to represent the similarity between the two ITVs. Results: The average ITVs of the proposed technique were 97.2% {+-} 0.3% and 81.0% {+-} 16.7% similar to the MIP volume in the phantom and patient studies, respectively. The average dice coefficients were 0.87 {+-} 0.05 and 0.73 {+-} 0.16, respectively, for the two studies. Conclusion: Using the proposed approach, a single static PET/CT scan has the potential to replace a 4D-CT to determine the tumor ITV. This approach has the added advantage of reducing patient radiation exposure and determining the tumor MBK compared to 4D-CT/MIP-CT.

  5. Advantages and disadvantages of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaozhou; Li, Xiaofeng; Song, Xiuyu; Dai, Dong; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Yanjia; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Huiqin; Xu, Wengui

    2016-11-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary is a type of malignant disease where the primary carcinoma cannot be identified by conventional examination, which presents challenges in diagnosis and therapy. This study aims to evaluate the detailed clinical value and indications of using fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in a large sample. A total of 449 patients who were selected under strict standards were retrospectively included in this study. F-18 FDG PET/CT accurately detected the primary carcinoma in 115 of 449 patients whose primaries could not be detected by conventional examination (25.6%), with additional 27 false-positive patients. The most common primary site was the lung (34.8%). In addition, except for in metastatic melanoma (1/19, 5.3%) and axillary metastasis patients (2/49, 4.1%), F-18 FDG PET/CT had a comparative performance in detecting primary carcinoma in other pathological types and anatomical locations. The scan is able to guide treatment strategy modifications to some extent (130/449, 29.0%). We strongly recommend the use of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the early phase of examination. It is also recommended as a supplementary radiological method, and certain patients may benefit from its application in cases where regular examination is inconclusive. However, in metastatic melanoma or axillary metastasis patients where the primary site cannot be identified by routine examination, regular application of F-18 FDG PET/CT for the sole purpose of detecting the primary carcinoma should not be encouraged.

  6. Advantages and disadvantages of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhou; Li, Xiaofeng; Song, Xiuyu; Dai, Dong; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Yanjia; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Huiqin; Xu, Wengui

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary is a type of malignant disease where the primary carcinoma cannot be identified by conventional examination, which presents challenges in diagnosis and therapy. This study aims to evaluate the detailed clinical value and indications of using fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in a large sample. A total of 449 patients who were selected under strict standards were retrospectively included in this study. F-18 FDG PET/CT accurately detected the primary carcinoma in 115 of 449 patients whose primaries could not be detected by conventional examination (25.6%), with additional 27 false-positive patients. The most common primary site was the lung (34.8%). In addition, except for in metastatic melanoma (1/19, 5.3%) and axillary metastasis patients (2/49, 4.1%), F-18 FDG PET/CT had a comparative performance in detecting primary carcinoma in other pathological types and anatomical locations. The scan is able to guide treatment strategy modifications to some extent (130/449, 29.0%). We strongly recommend the use of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the early phase of examination. It is also recommended as a supplementary radiological method, and certain patients may benefit from its application in cases where regular examination is inconclusive. However, in metastatic melanoma or axillary metastasis patients where the primary site cannot be identified by routine examination, regular application of F-18 FDG PET/CT for the sole purpose of detecting the primary carcinoma should not be encouraged. PMID:27895731

  7. A Conway-Maxwell-Poisson (CMP) model to address data dispersion on positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Della Latta, Daniele; Scipioni, Michele; Positano, Vincenzo; Landini, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) in medicine exploits the properties of positron-emitting unstable nuclei. The pairs of γ- rays emitted after annihilation are revealed by coincidence detectors and stored as projections in a sinogram. It is well known that radioactive decay follows a Poisson distribution; however, deviation from Poisson statistics occurs on PET projection data prior to reconstruction due to physical effects, measurement errors, correction of deadtime, scatter, and random coincidences. A model that describes the statistical behavior of measured and corrected PET data can aid in understanding the statistical nature of the data: it is a prerequisite to develop efficient reconstruction and processing methods and to reduce noise. The deviation from Poisson statistics in PET data could be described by the Conway-Maxwell-Poisson (CMP) distribution model, which is characterized by the centring parameter λ and the dispersion parameter ν, the latter quantifying the deviation from a Poisson distribution model. In particular, the parameter ν allows quantifying over-dispersion (ν<1) or under-dispersion (ν>1) of data. A simple and efficient method for λ and ν parameters estimation is introduced and assessed using Monte Carlo simulation for a wide range of activity values. The application of the method to simulated and experimental PET phantom data demonstrated that the CMP distribution parameters could detect deviation from the Poisson distribution both in raw and corrected PET data. It may be usefully implemented in image reconstruction algorithms and quantitative PET data analysis, especially in low counting emission data, as in dynamic PET data, where the method demonstrated the best accuracy.

  8. Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Niikura, Naoki; Yang Wei; Rohren, Eric; Valero, Vicente; Woodward, Wendy A.; Alvarez, Ricardo H.; Lucci, Anthony; Ueno, Naoto T.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes

  9. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  10. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Kobayashi, Y

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  11. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  12. Positron emission tomography microdosing: a new concept with application in tracer and early clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Mats; Grahnén, Anders; Långström, Bengt

    2003-09-01

    The realisation that new chemical entities under development as drug candidates fail in three of four cases in clinical trials, together with increased costs and increased demands of reducing preclinical animal experiments, have promoted concepts for improvement of early screening procedures in humans. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technology, which makes it possible to determine drug distribution and concentration in vivo in man with the drug labelled with a positron-emitting radionuclide that does not change the biochemical properties. Recently, developments in the field of rapid synthesis of organic compounds labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides have allowed a substantial number of new drug candidates to be labelled and potentially used as probes in PET studies. Together, these factors led to the logical conclusion that early PET studies, performed with very low drug doses-PET-microdosing-could be included in the drug development process as one means for selection or rejection of compounds based on performance in vivo in man. Another important option of PET, to evaluate drug interaction with a target, utilising a PET tracer specific for this target, necessitates a more rapid development of such PET methodology and validations in humans. Since only very low amounts of drugs are used in PET-microdosing studies, the safety requirements should be reduced relative to the safety requirements needed for therapeutic doses. In the following, a methodological scrutinising of the concept is presented. A complete pre-clinical package including limited toxicity assessment is proposed as a base for the regulatory framework of the PET-microdosing concept.

  13. Positron emission tomography imaging of braintumors with Cobalt-55 and L-[1-C11]-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim J.; Willemsen, A.T.M.

    1994-05-01

    The applicability of positron emission tomography (PET) with [C-11] tyrosine (TYR) and Cobalt-55 (Co) in patients with known primary brain tumors is reported. We used Co as a Calcium (Ca) marker to study Ca influx in degenerating neural tissue and TYR to indicate incorporation of amino acids into protein. Four patients showing a primary brain tumor with central necrosis on CT/MRI were studied with Co-PET. Additionally, 2 of these patients were consecutively studied with TYR-PET. Diagnostic confirmation was obtained by means of histology and/or cytology shortly after PET. Thirty-seven MBq Co was administered iv. approximately 24 hours before acquisition. The Co-scan was acquired for I hour. Immediately following Co-PET, 2 patients received 370 MBq TYR iv. TYR-PET acquisition was done dynamically for 55 minutes starting from the time of injection. The necrotic center of the tumor revealed no uptake of either Co or TYR. Vital tumor tissue showed intense uptake of TYR, indicating a high protein synthesis rate (PSR). The circumferent zone between necrotic and tumor tissue showed evident uptake of Co, suggesting cell-decay. In conclusion, TYR and Co are both suitable tracers for visualization of different aspects of brain malignancies, ie. PSR and cell-decay. Combining Co and TYR enables differentiation of necrosis vs. tumor growth with clear marking of the border zone. We think these complementary PET-techniques in conjunction with CT and/or MRI allow the visualization of different aspects of tumor tissue: central necrosis (CT/MRI), cell-decay (Co-PET) and vital tumor tissue (TYR-PET).

  14. Positron emission tomography demonstrated localized luxury perfusion in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H; Fueki, N; Yoneyama, H; Ogawa, M; Sakuragawa, N

    1990-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on two patients in different stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and compared with the concurrent computed tomography (CT) findings and clinical status. Case 1, which was in stage II, showed luxury perfusion in the anterior half of the cerebrum and decreases of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the right frontal watershed zone, where CT showed low density. Case 2, which was in stage III, showed marked decreases of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in all regions except the occipital region. The present PET study demonstrated that SSPE showed inflammatory-destructive progression and rostral-caudal progression. Further, it was suspected that low density on CT scan, especially in the watershed zone, resulted partly from disturbances in cerebral circulation.

  15. Positron emission tomography in minor ischemic stroke using oxygen-15 steady-state technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzilli, C.; Itoh, M.; Matsuzawa, T.; Fukuda, H.; Abe, Y.; Sato, T.; Takeda, S.; Ido, T.

    1987-04-01

    A study with positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on 10 patients with ischemic stroke and mild disability. The patients underwent cerebral angiography, x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan and regional cerebral measurements of CBF, CMRO2, oxygen extraction ratio (OER), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Only minor arterial involvement was detected by angiography. In all patients, PET images of functional defects were more extensive than the corresponding CT hypodensity, and there were statistically significant reductions in CBF, CMRO2, and CBF/CBV ratio as compared with control subjects. Half of the regions analyzed in the affected hemisphere demonstrated a disruption of the normal coupling between CBF and CMRO2 as reflected by OER values significantly higher or lower than those of the corresponding region of the contralateral hemisphere. The pathophysiological pattern of high OER combined with a reduction in CBF proportionally greater than the reduction in CMRO2 was particularly indicative of regional chronic hemodynamic compromise in these patients.

  16. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of 11C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    11C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of 11C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological 11C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during 11C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of 11C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of 11C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses. PMID:27134530

  17. High time-resolution photodetectors for PET applications

    DOE PAGES

    Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes recent developments aiming at the improvement of the time resolution of photodetectors used in positron emission tomography (PET). Promising photodetector candidates for future PET-time-of-flight (TOF) applications are also discussed.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Using Radiolabeled Inorganic Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  19. Positron emission tomography imaging using radiolabeled inorganic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  20. Regional changes in extravascular lung water detected by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D.P.; Marklin, G.F.; Mintun, M.A.

    1986-04-01

    Regional measurements of extravascular lung water (rEVLW) were made with positron emission tomography (PET) and 15O-labeled radionuclides. The label used to measure the total lung water (TLW) content fully equilibrated with TLW prior to scanning in both dogs with normal and low cardiac outputs, and nearly so in areas of lung made edematous by oleic acid injury (the TLW values used were 97% of maximum values). Regional EVLW measurements made by PET (EVLW-PET) and gravimetric techniques in both normal and edematous lung were closely correlated (r = 0.93), and EVLW-PET increased from an average of 0.20 to 0.37 mlH/sub 2/O/ml lung (P less than 0.05) after regional lung injury. PET measurements of regional blood volume always decreased (from an average of 0.12 to 0.09 ml blood/ml lung (P less than 0.05)) after cardiac output was lowered by hemorrhage in a separate set of animals. Total EVLW (by thermodye indicator dilution) did not change. Likewise, regional EVLW remained constant in areas below the left atrium but decreased in areas above the left atrium. We conclude that PET measurements are accurate, noninvasive, and reproducible and that regional changes may be detected even when measurements of total EVLW by other methods may fail to change significantly.

  1. The value of positron emission tomography scanning in the detection of subclinical metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Acland, K M; O'Doherty, M J; Russell-Jones, R

    2000-04-01

    We have undertaken a retrospective analysis of all positron emission tomography (PET) scans carried out at St Thomas' Hospital, London, since 1994 to establish the sensitivity and specificity of this radiologic technique in cutaneous malignant melanoma. In particular, we have identified those patients with primary cutaneous malignant melanoma in whom PET scanning revealed in-transit or regional spread to nodes and those patients with known regional spread in whom PET scanning revealed distant metastases. We defined our false-negative results as a negative scan result with positive histology or subsequent clinical progression of disease. False-positive results were defined as a suspect scan with negative histology or no subsequent progression of disease. PET scanning had an overall sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 87%; however, subset analysis (M. D. Anderson staging system) showed a sensitivity of 50% for stage I disease (34 patients and 35 scans) and 33% for stage II disease (9 patients and 9 scans) with specificities of 87% and 100%, respectively. For stage III disease (16 patients and 17 scans), PET showed a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 50%. Overall, 35% of patients with true-positive scans had their disease restaged. We can conclude therefore that PET is valuable as a staging procedure in patients with known regional spread but is suboptimal in the prediction of outcome in stage I or stage II disease.

  2. Modelling human drug abuse and addiction with dedicated small animal positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Dalley, Jeffrey W; Fryer, Tim D; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Brichard, Laurent; Richards, Hugh K; Hong, Young T; Baron, Jean-Claude; Everitt, Barry J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2009-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronically relapsing brain disorder, which causes substantial harm to the addicted individual and society as a whole. Despite considerable research we still do not understand why some people appear particularly disposed to drug abuse and addiction, nor do we understand how frequently co-morbid brain disorders such as depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) contribute causally to the emergence of addiction-like behaviour. In recent years positron emission tomography (PET) has come of age as a translational neuroimaging technique in the study of drug addiction, ADHD and other psychopathological states in humans. PET provides unparalleled quantitative assessment of the spatial distribution of radiolabelled molecules in the brain and because it is non-invasive permits longitudinal assessment of physiological parameters such as binding potential in the same subject over extended periods of time. However, whilst there are a burgeoning number of human PET experiments in ADHD and drug addiction there is presently a paucity of PET imaging studies in animals despite enormous advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of these disorders based on sophisticated animal models. This article highlights recent examples of successful cross-species convergence of findings from PET studies in the context of drug addiction and ADHD and identifies how small animal PET can more effectively be used to model complex psychiatric disorders involving at their core impaired behavioural self-control.

  3. Preclinical positron emission tomography scanner based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator: initial design study.

    PubMed

    Stolin, Alexander V; Martone, Peter F; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Raylman, Raymond R

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanners designed for imaging of small animals have transformed translational research by reducing the necessity to invasively monitor physiology and disease progression. Virtually all of these scanners are based on the use of pixelated detector modules arranged in rings. This design, while generally successful, has some limitations. Specifically, use of discrete detector modules to construct PET scanners reduces detection sensitivity and can introduce artifacts in reconstructed images, requiring the use of correction methods. To address these challenges, and facilitate measurement of photon depth-of-interaction in the detector, we investigated a small animal PET scanner (called AnnPET) based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator. The scanner was created by placing 12 flat facets around the outer surface of the scintillator to accommodate placement of silicon photomultiplier arrays. Its performance characteristics were explored using Monte Carlo simulations and sections of the NEMA NU4-2008 protocol. Results from this study revealed that AnnPET's reconstructed spatial resolution is predicted to be [Formula: see text] full width at half maximum in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. Peak detection sensitivity is predicted to be 10.1%. Images of simulated phantoms (mini-hot rod and mouse whole body) yielded promising results, indicating the potential of this system for enhancing PET imaging of small animals.

  4. An investigation into positron emission tomography contouring methods across two treatment planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Tony; Som, Seu; Sathiakumar, Chithradevi; Holloway, Lois

    2013-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to provide additional information regarding patient tumor location, size, and staging for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes. This additional information reduces interobserver variability and produces more consistent contouring. It is well recognized that different contouring methodology for PET data results in different contoured volumes. The goal of this study was to compare the difference in PET contouring methods for 2 different treatment planning systems using a phantom dataset and a series of patient datasets. Contouring methodology was compared on the ADAC Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and the CMS XiO Treatment Planning System. Contours were completed on the phantom and patient datasets using a number of PET contouring methods—the standardized uptake value 2.5 method, 30%, 40%, and 50% of the maximum uptake method and the signal to background ratio method. Differences of >15% were observed for PET-contoured volumes between the different treatment planning systems for the same data and the same PET contouring methodology. Contoured volume differences between treatment planning systems were caused by differences in data formatting and display and the different contouring tools available. Differences in treatment planning system as well as contouring methodology should be considered carefully in dose-volume contouring and reporting, especially between centers that may use different treatment planning systems or those that have several different treatment planning systems.

  5. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains. PMID:23820224

  6. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  7. Fan Beam Emission Tomography for Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Yudaya; Lim, Jongmook; Feikema, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining information on the instantaneous structure of turbulent and transient flames is important in a wide variety of applications such as fire safety, pollution reduction, flame spread studies, and model validation. Durao et al. has reviewed the different methods of obtaining structure information in reacting flows. These include Tunable Laser Absorption Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Emission Spectroscopy to mention a few. Most flames emit significant radiation signatures that are used in various applications such as fire detection, light-off detection, flame diagnostics, etc. Radiation signatures can be utilized to maximum advantage for determining structural information in turbulent flows. Emission spectroscopy is most advantageous in the infrared regions of the spectra, principally because these emission lines arise from transitions in the fundamental bands of stable species such as CO2 and H2O. Based on the above, the objective of this work was to develop a fan beam emission tomography system to obtain the local scalar properties such as temperature and mole fractions of major gas species from path integrated multi-wavelength infrared radiation measurements.

  8. Fuzzy-rule-based image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Rajan, K.

    2005-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography have revolutionized the field of medicine and biology. Penalized iterative algorithms based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation eliminate noisy artifacts by utilizing available prior information in the reconstruction process but often result in a blurring effect. MAP-based algorithms fail to determine the density class in the reconstructed image and hence penalize the pixels irrespective of the density class. Reconstruction with better edge information is often difficult because prior knowledge is not taken into account. The recently introduced median-root-prior (MRP)-based algorithm preserves the edges, but a steplike streaking effect is observed in the reconstructed image, which is undesirable. A fuzzy approach is proposed for modeling the nature of interpixel interaction in order to build an artifact-free edge-preserving reconstruction. The proposed algorithm consists of two elementary steps: (1) edge detection, in which fuzzy-rule-based derivatives are used for the detection of edges in the nearest neighborhood window (which is equivalent to recognizing nearby density classes), and (2) fuzzy smoothing, in which penalization is performed only for those pixels for which no edge is detected in the nearest neighborhood. Both of these operations are carried out iteratively until the image converges. Analysis shows that the proposed fuzzy-rule-based reconstruction algorithm is capable of producing qualitatively better reconstructed images than those reconstructed by MAP and MRP algorithms. The reconstructed images are sharper, with small features being better resolved owing to the nature of the fuzzy potential function.

  9. 11C-Choline-Avid but 18F-FDG-Nonavid Prostate Cancer with Lymph Node Metastases on Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Yamamoto, Shingo; Yamano, Toshiko; Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Yukako; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Nojima, Michio; Hirota, Shozo

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a new positron emission tomography (PET) tracer useful for detection of prostate cancer and metastatic lesions. We report a 70-year-old man with prostate cancer and multiple abdominal, pelvic, and inguinal node metastases. PET scans demonstrated accumulation of 11C-choline in the primary tumor and lymph node metastases but no accumulation of 18F-FDG. Choline PET/computed tomography may be useful for diagnosis of advanced prostate cancer with suspected metastatic lesions and treatment planning. PMID:27920703

  10. F-18 fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gayana, Shankaramurthy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Paramjeet; Prakash, Mahesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Femoral head avascular necrosis (FHAVN) is one of the increasingly common causes of musculoskeletal disability and poses a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been widely used in the diagnosis of FHAVN, positron emission tomography (PET) has recently been evaluated to assess vascularity of the femoral head. In this study, the authors compared F-18 fluoride PET/CT with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN. Patients and Methods: We prospectively studied 51 consecutive patients with a high clinical suspicion of FHAVN. All patients underwent MRI and F-18 fluoride PET/CT, the time interval between the two scans being 4–10 (mean 8) days. Two nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the MRI report read the PET/CT scans. Clinical assessment was also done. Final diagnoses were made by surgical pathology or clinical and radiologic follow-up. Results: A final diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) was made in 40 patients. MRI was 96.5% sensitive, 100% specific, and 98.03% accurate while PET/CT was 100% sensitive, specific, and accurate in diagnosing FHAVN. The agreement between the two imaging modalities for the diagnosis of AVN was 96.07%. Conclusion: F-18 fluoride PET/CT showed good agreement with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN and can be better than MRI in detecting early disease. PMID:26917886

  11. Diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia: a preliminary comparison of positron emission tomography and proton magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-11-16

    The use of positron emission tomography with (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to study glucose metabolism in dementia is described and compared with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. These studies suggest that physiological imaging with PET may be superior to MR as it is currently used in the diagnosis of dementia-like diseases. Pet is currently limited to a few centers; however, single photon emission CT can provide regional physiological data without the need for a local cyclotron. 15 references, 2 tables.

  12. Positron emission tomography and [18F]BPA: a perspective application to assess tumour extraction of boron in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, L; Cionini, L; Sauerwein, W A; Altieri, S; Solin, O; Minn, H; Salvadori, P A

    2009-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a key imaging tool in clinical practice and biomedical research to quantify and study biochemical processes in vivo. Physiologically active compounds are tagged with positron emitters (e.g. (18)F, (11)C, (124)I) while maintaining their biological properties, and are administered intravenously in tracer amounts (10(-9)-10(-12)M quantities). The recent physical integration of PET and computed tomography (CT) in hybrid PET/CT scanners allows a combined anatomical and functional imaging: nowadays PET molecular imaging is emerging as powerful pharmacological tool in oncology, neurology and for treatment planning as guidance for radiation therapy. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of boron carrier for BNCT and the quantification of (10)B in living tissue were performed by PET in the late nineties using compartmental models based on PET data. Nowadays PET and PET/CT have been used to address the issue of pharmacokinetic, metabolism and accumulation of BPA in target tissue. The added value of the use of L-[(18)F]FBPA and PET/CT in BNCT is to provide key data on the tumour extraction of (10)B-BPA versus normal tissue and to predict the efficacy of the treatment based on a single-study patient analysis. Due to the complexity of a binary treatment like BNCT, the role of PET/CT is currently to design new criteria for patient enrolment in treatment protocols: the L-[(18)F]BPA/PET methodology could be considered as an important tool in newly designed clinical trials to better estimate the concentration ratio of BPA in the tumour as compared to neighbouring normal tissues. Based on these values for individual patients the decision could be made whether BNCT treatment could be advantageous due to a selective accumulation of BPA in an individual tumour. This approach, applicable in different tumour entities like melanoma, glioblastoma and head and neck malignancies, make this methodology as reliable prognostic and therapeutic indicator for

  13. Disease-specific cardiovascular positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging: a brief review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is a new imaging tool that has garnered immense research interest for its potentials to assist clinical investigations. PET/MR combines the quantitative measurement of PET with dynamic functional and anatomic assessment of MR and can deliver a robust clinical examination. Currently, simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging remains in the pre-clinical research stage, and most institutions have not adopted a clinical PET/MR clinical imaging service. Nevertheless, PET/MR examination has unique promises in several areas of cardiovascular medicine, and in recent years more and more research publications have become available to lend us insight into its utility in cardiovascular imaging. Here we review the existing literature on simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging, with an emphasis on organizing the current literature into disease-specific discussions. These areas include coronary artery disease (CAD), carotid atherosclerosis, various infiltrative, inflammatory and hereditary heart diseases, myocarditis, vasculitis, and cardiac mass assessment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of cardiovascular PET/MR clinical imaging, in a disease-specific manner, from a clinician’s perspective. Potential limitations of simultaneous PET/MR, such as cost effectiveness, artifacts, contraindications, and radiation exposure, are briefly discussed. PMID:27429913

  14. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  18. Super-resolution in respiratory synchronized positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Daphné; Lamare, Frédéric; Kontaxakis, Giorgos; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory motion is a major source of reduced quality in positron emission tomography (PET). In order to minimize its effects, the use of respiratory synchronized acquisitions, leading to gated frames, has been suggested. Such frames, however, are of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as they contain reduced statistics. Super-resolution (SR) techniques make use of the motion in a sequence of images in order to improve their quality. They aim at enhancing a low-resolution image belonging to a sequence of images representing different views of the same scene. In this work, a maximum a posteriori (MAP) super-resolution algorithm has been implemented and applied to respiratory gated PET images for motion compensation. An edge preserving Huber regularization term was used to ensure convergence. Motion fields were recovered using a B-spline based elastic registration algorithm. The performance of the SR algorithm was evaluated through the use of both simulated and clinical datasets by assessing image SNR, as well as the contrast, position and extent of the different lesions. Results were compared to summing the registered synchronized frames on both simulated and clinical datasets. The super-resolution image had higher SNR (by a factor of over 4 on average) and lesion contrast (by a factor of 2) than the single respiratory synchronized frame using the same reconstruction matrix size. In comparison to the motion corrected or the motion free images a similar SNR was obtained, while improvements of up to 20% in the recovered lesion size and contrast were measured. Finally, the recovered lesion locations on the SR images were systematically closer to the true simulated lesion positions. These observations concerning the SNR, lesion contrast and size were confirmed on two clinical datasets included in the study. In conclusion, the use of SR techniques applied to respiratory motion synchronized images lead to motion compensation combined with improved image SNR and contrast

  19. Early postischemic hyperperfusion: pathophysiologic insights from positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Marchal, G; Young, A R; Baron, J C

    1999-05-01

    Early postischemic hyperperfusion (EPIH) has long been documented in animal stroke models and is the hallmark of efficient recanalization of the occluded artery with subsequent reperfusion of the tissue (although occasionally it may be seen in areas bordering the hypoperfused area during arterial occlusion). In experimental stroke, early reperfusion has been reported to both prevent infarct growth and aggravate edema formation and hemorrhage, depending on the severity and duration of prior ischemia and the efficiency of reperfusion, whereas neuronal damage with or without enlarged infarction also may result from reperfusion (so-called "reperfusion injury"). In humans, focal hyperperfusion in the subacute stage (i.e., more than 48 hours after onset) has been associated with tissue necrosis in most instances, but regarding the acute stage, its occurrence, its relations with tissue metabolism and viability, and its clinical prognostic value were poorly understood before the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), in part because of methodologic issues. By measuring both CBF and metabolism, PET is an ideal imaging modality to study the pathophysiologic mechanism of EPIH. Although only a few PET studies have been performed in the acute stage that have systematically assessed tissue and clinical outcome in relation to EPIH, they have provided important insights. In one study, about one third of the patients with first-ever middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory stroke studied within 5 to 18 hours after symptom onset exhibited EPIH. In most cases, EPIH affected large parts of the cortical MCA territory in a patchy fashion, together with abnormal vasodilation (increased cerebral blood volume), "luxury perfusion" (decreased oxygen extraction fraction), and mildly increased CMRO2, which was interpreted as postischemic rebound of cellular metabolism in structurally preserved tissue. In that study, the spontaneous outcome of the tissue exhibiting EPIH was good, with late

  20. Incidental abnormal FDG uptake in the prostate on 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Pil Moon; Seo, Won Ik; Lee, Sun Seong; Bae, Sang Kyun; Kwak, Ho Sup; Min, Kweonsik; Kim, Wansuk; Kang, Dong Il

    2014-01-01

    18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) scans are commonly used for the staging and restaging of various malignancies, such as head and neck, breast, colorectal and gynecological cancers. However, the value of FDG PET/CT for detecting prostate cancer is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of incidental prostate 18F-FDG uptake on PET/CT scans. We reviewed 18F-FDG PET/CT scan reports from September 2009 to September 2013, and selected cases that reported focal/diffuse FDG uptake in the prostate. We analyzed the correlation between 18F-FDG PET/CT scan findings and data collected during evaluations such as serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, digital rectal examination (DRE), transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), and/or biopsy to confirm prostate cancer. Of a total of 18,393 cases, 106 (0.6%) exhibited abnormal hypermetabolism in the prostate. Additional evaluations were performed in 66 patients. Serum PSA levels were not significantly correlated with maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) in all patients (rho 0.483, p=0.132). Prostate biopsies were performed in 15 patients, and prostate cancer was confirmed in 11. The median serum PSA level was 4.8 (0.55-7.06) ng/mL and 127.4 (1.06-495) ng/mL in the benign and prostate cancer groups, respectively. The median SUVmax was higher in the prostate cancer group (mean 10.1, range 3.8-24.5) than in the benign group (mean 4.3, range 3.1-8.8), but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.078). There was no significant correlation between SUVmax and serum PSA, prostatic volume, or Gleason score. 18F-FDG PET/CT scans did not reliably differentiate malignant or benign from abnormal uptake lesions in the prostate, and routine prostate biopsy was not usually recommended in patients with abnormal FDG uptake. Nevertheless, patients with incidental prostate uptake on 18F-FDG PET/ CT scans should not be ignored and should be undergo

  1. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  2. Dosage optimization in positron emission tomography: state-of-the-art methods and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Fokou, Eleni; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used nowadays for tumor staging and therapy response in the clinic. However, average PET radiation exposure has increased due to higher PET utilization. This study aims to review state-of-the-art PET tracer dosage optimization methods after accounting for the effects of human body attenuation and scan protocol parameters on the counting rate. In particular, the relationship between the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and the dosage (NECR-dosage curve) for a range of clinical PET systems and body attenuation sizes will be systematically studied to prospectively estimate the minimum dosage required for sufficiently high NECR. The optimization criterion can be determined either as a function of the peak of the NECR-dosage curve or as a fixed NECR score when NECR uniformity across a patient population is important. In addition, the systematic NECR assessments within a controllable environment of realistic simulations and phantom experiments can lead to a NECR-dosage response model, capable of predicting the optimal dosage for every individual PET scan. Unlike conventional guidelines suggesting considerably large dosage levels for obese patients, NECR-based optimization recommends: i) moderate dosage to achieve 90% of peak NECR for obese patients, ii) considerable dosage reduction for slimmer patients such that uniform NECR is attained across the patient population, and iii) prolongation of scans for PET/MR protocols, where longer PET acquisitions are affordable due to lengthy MR sequences, with motion compensation becoming important then. Finally, the need for continuous adaptation of dosage optimization to emerging technologies will be discussed.

  3. Positron emission tomography in the follow-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Maria; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas; Fischer, Barbara MB

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has a high risk of dissemination to regional lymph nodes and visceral organs. Recurrences are most frequently seen within the first 2-3 years after initial treatment, but these patients have a life-long risk of relapse. The prognosis is highly dependent on lymph node involvement and distant metastases, accentuating the importance of close surveillance to identify disease progression at an early stage, and thereby detect recurrences amenable to treatment. Positron emission tomography (PET) has already been proven useful in the staging of CMM, but the utility of PET in follow-up programs for asymptomatic patients in high risk of relapse to detect systemic recurrences has yet to be investigated. We performed a systematic literature search in PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and identified 7 original studies on the diagnostic value of FDG-PET in the follow-up of CMM. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated to examine PET’s diagnostic value in detecting relapse. The mean sensitivity of PET was 96% and the specificity was 92%. The positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 92% and 95%. Overall, PET has a high diagnostic value and the many advantages of PET indicate utility in the routine follow-up program of CMM. However, the number of prospective studies of high quality is scarce, and as the use of PET and PET/CT is becoming more widespread and the technology is expensive, there is an urgent need for systematic assessment of the diagnostic value. PMID:24380042

  4. [Neurotransmitter systems in the human brain studied by positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Shinotoh, H

    1996-12-01

    Positron emission tomography with appropriate tracers provides unique opportunity to study neurotransmitter systems in the living human brain. PET with [18F] 6-fluoro-L-dopa (FD) provides an index of the integrity of nigrostriatal pathway, and striatal FD uptake correlates linearly with the density of nigral neurons. PET allows us to assess the progression of the nigral lesions in Parkinson's disease (PD). A 68-year-old normal female volunteer was scanned by FD-PET. Subsequently, she developed parkinsonism 3.7 years after the scan. A repeated FD-PET scan revealed a significant reduction of FD uptake by 20% over the 5.2 year interval. The results suggest a relatively short presymptomatic period with fast initial losses of nigral neurons in PD. FD-PET has been used to determine the viability of fetal graft implanted in the striatum for the treatment of PD. PET imaging of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may be useful for the differential diagnosis of PD and striatonigral degeneration. PET reveals significant reduction of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor binding in the putamen of patients with SND, while D1 and D2 receptor binding is normal or slightly upregulated in PD. We found hypersensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the frontal cortex of patients with PD by using PET. The result suggests a loss of ascending cholinergic system in the frontal cortex in PD, which may cause the frontal lobe dysfunction in PD. Recently, acetylcholine analogs labelled with positron emitter have been developed for measurement of brain acetylcholinesterase activity in vivo. These tracers may be useful for the assessment of ascending cholinergic system in Alzheimer's disease and PD.

  5. Dementias appear to have individual profiles in single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-17

    A number of researchers are seeking clinical applications for single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of demented patients. They have found that dementias have somewhat individual SPECT profiles. The challenge now, they say, is to determine if the SPECT information is meaningful to the clinician and to develop more specific radiotracers, such as tracers for individual neuroreceptors. The initial work was done with positron emission tomography (PET), a sometimes more sensitive, but much more expensive technique. Recently, a number of centers began trying to duplicate the PET findings using SPECT. Developing SPECT could actually make dementia scanning fairly available, they say. Radiologists estimate that three fourths of the nation's nuclear medicine departments have SPECT scanning machines-either rotating or multiaperature gamma cameras.

  6. Positron emission tomography in the diagnostic work-up of screening-detected lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia; Travaini, Laura L; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Bellomi, Massimo; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer can reduce lung cancer mortality, but overdiagnosis, false positives and invasive procedures for benign nodules are worrying. We evaluated the utility of positron emission tomography (PET)-CT in characterising indeterminate screening-detected lung nodules. 383 nodules, examined by PET-CT over the first 6 years of the COSMOS (Continuous Observation of Smoking Subjects) study to diagnose primary lung cancer, were reviewed and compared with pathological findings (surgically-treated patients) or follow-up (negative CT for ⩾2 years, considered negative); 196 nodules were malignant. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET-CT for differentially diagnosing malignant nodules were, respectively, 64%, 89% and 76% overall, and 82%, 92% and 88% for baseline-detected nodules. Performance was lower for nodules found at repeat annual scans, with sensitivity ranging from 22% for nonsolid to 79% for solid nodules (p=0.0001). Sensitivity (87%) and specificity (73%) were high for nodules ⩾15 mm, better (sensitivity 98%) for solid nodules ⩾15 mm. PET-CT was highly sensitive for the differential diagnosis of indeterminate nodules detected at baseline, nodules ⩾15 mm and solid nodules. Sensitivity was low for sub-solid nodules and nodules discovered after baseline for which other methods, e.g. volume doubling time, should be used.

  7. Positron emission tomography in aging and dementia: effect of cerebral atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chawluk, J.B.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Hurtig, H.I.; Bais, S.; Kushner, M.J.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1987-04-01

    The spatial resolution of current positron emission tomography (PET) scanners does not allow a distinction between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing spaces and contiguous brain tissue. Data analysis strategies which therefore purport to quantify cerebral metabolism per unit mass brain tissue are in fact measuring a value which may be artifactually reduced due to contamination by CSF. We studied cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in 17 healthy elderly individuals and 24 patients with Alzheimer's dementia using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose and PET. All subjects underwent x-ray computed tomography (XCT) scanning at the time of their PET study. The XCT scans were analyzed volumetrically, in order to determine relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue. Global CMRglc was calculated before and after correction for contamination by CSF (cerebral atrophy). A greater increase in global CMRglc after atrophy correction was seen in demented individuals compared with elderly controls (16.9% versus 9.0%, p less than 0.0005). Additional preliminary data suggest that volumetric analysis of proton-NMR images may prove superior to analysis of XCT data in quantifying the degree of atrophy. Appropriate corrections for atrophy should be employed if current PET scanners are to accurately measure actual brain tissue metabolism in various pathologic states.

  8. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Response as Assessed by Sequential {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography During Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Heerim; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic role of metabolic response by the use of serial sets of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cervical cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients who were treated with CCRT between February 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed. Three sequential PET/CT images were acquired for each patient: pre-CCRT, during-CCRT at 4 weeks of CCRT, and 1 month post-CCRT PET/CT. Metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively. The percentage changes in the maximum values of standardized uptake value (ΔSUV{sub max}%) from the PET/CT images acquired pre-CCRT and during-CCRT were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict complete response (CR) on the post-CCRT PET/CT and to identify the best cutoff value. Prognostic factors of progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Results: During-CCRT PET/CT showed that 8 patients (13%) had CR, and the other 52 patients (87%) had partial response (PR). On the post-CCRT PET/CT, 43 patients (73%) had CR, 12 patients (20%) had PR, and 4 patients (7%) had progressive disease. The average SUV{sub max} in primary tumors was 16.3 (range, 6.4-53.0) on the pre-CCRT PET/CT images and 5.3 (range, 0-19.4) on the during-CCRT PET/CT images. According to ROC curve analysis, ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict CR response on post-CCRT PET/CT (P<.001, cutoff value of 59.7%). In all patients, the PFS rate was 71.9% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis showed that ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% (P=.045) and CR response on the post-CCRT PET/CT (P=.012) were statistically significant predictors of PFS. Conclusion: Metabolic responses on the during-CCRT images at 4 weeks of treatment and 1-month post-CCRT PET/CT images may predict treatment outcomes in patients with cervical cancer. ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% at 4 weeks of CCRT may predict CR response

  9. Positron Emission Tomography Application to Drug Development and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, Piero A.

    The research for the identification and development of new drugs represents a very complex process implying long times and massive investments. This process was not able to parallel the rate of discoveries made in the field of genomic and molecular biology and a gap created between demand of new drugs and the ability of pharmaceutical companies to select good candidates. Positron Emission Tomography, among the different Molecular Imaging modalities, could represent a new tool for the early assessment and screening of new drug candidates and, due to its physical performances and the characteristics of positron-labeled tracers, gain the role of "Biomarker" accepted by the Companies and the Regulatory Bodies of Drug Agencies. To fulfil this task PET has to exploit all of its special features such as data absolute quantification and modelling, high spatial resolution and dynamic imaging. Relevant efforts need to be directed to the careful design and validation of experimental protocols with the main goal of achieving consistency in multi- centric trials.

  10. Role of Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/Computed Tomography in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Endocrine Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David A; Hofman, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    This review provides practical guidance for clinicians involved in the management of endocrine malignancies, including endocrinologists, medical oncologists, surgeons and nuclear medicine specialists regarding the indications and use of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose F-18 (FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT), particularly with respect to targeted radionuclide therapy. Key principles of FDG PET/CT for radionuclide therapy are explored in detail using gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors as a prototype endocrine malignancy. The relevant literature is reviewed, and practical application in this new and emerging field is highlighted with the use of case examples.

  11. Imaging of cellular proliferation in liver metastasis by [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography: effect of therapy.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Kaiyumars; Challapalli, Amarnath; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Rosso, Lula; Wasan, Harpreet; Stebbing, Justin; Kenny, Laura; Mangar, Stephen; Riddle, Pippa; Palmieri, Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Sharma, Rohini; Turkheimer, Federico; Coombes, R Charles; Aboagye, Eric

    2012-06-07

    Although [(18)F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) permits estimation of tumor thymidine kinase-1 expression, and thus, cell proliferation, high physiological uptake of tracer in liver tissue can limit its utility. We evaluated FLT-PET combined with a temporal-intensity information-based voxel-clustering approach termed kinetic spatial filtering (FLT-PET(KSF)) for detecting drug response in liver metastases. FLT-PET and computed tomography data were collected from patients with confirmed breast or colorectal liver metastases before, and two weeks after the first cycle of chemotherapy. Changes in tumor FLT-PET and FLT-PET(KSF) variables were determined. Visual distinction between tumor and normal liver was seen in FLT-PET(KSF) images. Of the 33 metastases from 20 patients studied, 26 were visible after kinetic filtering. The net irreversible retention of the tracer (Ki; from unfiltered data) in the tumor, correlated strongly with tracer uptake when the imaging variable was an unfiltered average or maximal standardized uptake value, 60 min post-injection (SUV(60,av): r = 0.9, SUV(60,max): r = 0.7; p < 0.0001 for both) and occurrence of high intensity voxels derived from FLT-PET(KSF) (r = 0.7, p < 0.0001). Overall, a significant reduction in the imaging variables was seen in responders compared to non-responders; however, the two week time point selected for imaging was too early to allow prediction of long term clinical benefit from chemotherapy. FLT-PET and FLT-PET(KSF) detected changes in proliferation in liver metastases.

  12. Comparison of three image segmentation techniques for target volume delineation in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Drever, Laura A; Roa, Wilson; McEwan, Alexander; Robinson, Don

    2007-03-09

    Incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) data into radiotherapy planning is currently under investigation for numerous sites including lung, brain, head and neck, breast, and prostate. Accurate tumor-volume quantification is essential to the proper utilization of the unique information provided by PET. Unfortunately,target delineation within PET currently remains a largely unaddressed problem. We therefore examined the ability of three segmentation methods-thresholding, Sobel edge detection, and the watershed approach-to yield accurate delineation of PET target cross-sections. A phantom study employing well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes and activity distributions provided an opportunity to assess the relative efficacy with which the three approaches could yield accurate target delineation in PET. Results revealed that threshold segmentation can accurately delineate target cross-sections, but that the Sobel and watershed techniques both consistently fail to correctly identify the size of experimental volumes. The usefulness of threshold-based segmentation is limited, however, by the dependence of the correct threshold (that which returns the correct area at each image slice) on target size.

  13. Quantitative experimental monitoring of molecular diffusion in clay with positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Gründig, Marion; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Clay plays a prominent role as barrier material in the geosphere. The small particle sizes cause extremely small pore sizes and induce low permeability and high sorption capacity. Transport of dissolved species by molecular diffusion, driven only by a concentration gradient, is less sensitive to the pore size. Heterogeneous structures on the centimetre scale could cause heterogeneous effects, like preferential transport zones, which are difficult to assess. Laboratory measurements with diffusion cells yield limited information on heterogeneity, and pore space imaging methods have to consider scale effects. We established positron emission tomography (PET), applying a high-resolution PET scanner as a spatially resolved quantitative method for direct laboratory observation of the molecular diffusion process of a PET tracer on the prominent scale of 1-100 mm. Although PET is rather insensitive to bulk effects, quantification required significant improvements of the image reconstruction procedure with respect to Compton scatter and attenuation. The experiments were conducted with 22Na and 124I over periods of 100 and 25 days, respectively. From the images we derived trustable anisotropic diffusion coefficients and, in addition, we identified indications of preferential transport zones. We thus demonstrated the unique potential of the PET imaging modality for geoscientific process monitoring under conditions where other methods fail, taking advantage of the extremely high detection sensitivity that is typical of radiotracer applications.

  14. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry with iodine-124: a non-standard radiohalogen for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Divgi, Chaitanya R

    2011-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful molecular imaging technology with the ability to image and monitor molecular events in vivo and in real time. With the increased application of PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging physiological and pathological processes in vivo, there is a demand for versatile positron emitters with longer physical and biological half-lives. Traditional PET radionuclides, such as carbon-11 ((11)C) and fluorine-18 ((18)F), have relatively short half-lives (20 min and 110 min, respectively). Among the currently available positron emitters, the non-standard radiohalogen iodine-124 ((124)I) has the longest physical half-life at 4.2 d. This, combined with the well characterized radiochemistry of radioiodine, is contributing to the increasing utility of (124)I in investigating slow and complex pharmacokinetic processes in clinical nuclear medicine and small animal PET imaging studies. This review will summarize the progress to date on the potential of (124)I as a positron emitting nuclide for molecular imaging purposes, beginning with the production of (124)I. Particular emphasis will be placed on the basic radiochemistry as it applies to the production of various (124)I-labeled compounds, from small molecules, to biomolecules such as peptides and proteins, and finally to macromolecules like nanoparticles. The review will conclude by highlighting promising future directions in using (124)I as a positron emitter in PET radiochemistry and molecular imaging.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative dementias

    PubMed Central

    Del Sole, Angelo; Malaspina, Simona; Biasina, Alberto Magenta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neuroimaging, both with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), has gained a pivotal role in the diagnosis of primary neurodegenerative diseases. These two techniques are used as biomarkers of both pathology and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and to differentiate AD from other neurodegenerative diseases. MRI is able to identify structural changes including patterns of atrophy characterizing neurodegenerative diseases, and to distinguish these from other causes of cognitive impairment, e.g. infarcts, space-occupying lesions and hydrocephalus. PET is widely used to identify regional patterns of glucose utilization, since distinct patterns of distribution of cerebral glucose metabolism are related to different subtypes of neurodegenerative dementia. The use of PET in mild cognitive impairment, though controversial, is deemed helpful for predicting conversion to dementia and the dementia clinical subtype. Recently, new radiopharmaceuticals for the in vivo imaging of amyloid burden have been licensed and more tracers are being developed for the assessment of tauopathies and inflammatory processes, which may underlie the onset of the amyloid cascade. At present, the cerebral amyloid burden, imaged with PET, may help to exclude the presence of AD as well as forecast its possible onset. Finally PET imaging may be particularly useful in ongoing clinical trials for the development of dementia treatments. In the near future, the use of the above methods, in accordance with specific guidelines, along with the use of effective treatments will likely lead to more timely and successful treatment of neurodegenerative dementias. PMID:28072381

  16. INSIDE in-beam positron emission tomography system for particle range monitoring in hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Attili, Andrea; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Belcari, Nicola; Camarlinghi, Niccolo'; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Coli, Silvia; Del Guerra, Alberto; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrero, Veronica; Fiorina, Elisa; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Kostara, Eleftheria; Morrocchi, Matteo; Pennazio, Francesco; Peroni, Cristiana; Piliero, Maria Antonietta; Pirrone, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel D; Rosso, Valeria; Sala, Paola; Sportelli, Giancarlo; Wheadon, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The quality assurance of particle therapy treatment is a fundamental issue that can be addressed by developing reliable monitoring techniques and indicators of the treatment plan correctness. Among the available imaging techniques, positron emission tomography (PET) has long been investigated and then clinically applied to proton and carbon beams. In 2013, the Innovative Solutions for Dosimetry in Hadrontherapy (INSIDE) collaboration proposed an innovative bimodal imaging concept that combines an in-beam PET scanner with a tracking system for charged particle imaging. This paper presents the general architecture of the INSIDE project but focuses on the in-beam PET scanner that has been designed to reconstruct the particles range with millimetric resolution within a fraction of the dose delivered in a treatment of head and neck tumors. The in-beam PET scanner has been recently installed at the Italian National Center of Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) in Pavia, Italy, and the commissioning phase has just started. The results of the first beam test with clinical proton beams on phantoms clearly show the capability of the in-beam PET to operate during the irradiation delivery and to reconstruct on-line the beam-induced activity map. The accuracy in the activity distal fall-off determination is millimetric for therapeutic doses.

  17. Effect of {sup 11}C-Methionine-Positron Emission Tomography on Gross Tumor Volume Delineation in Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Skull Base Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Astner, Sabrina T. Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Essler, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralf A.; Sai, Heitetsu; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of trimodal image fusion using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for gross tumor volume delineation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of skull base meningiomas. Patients and Methods: In 32 patients with skull base meningiomas, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on CT scans fused to contrast-enhanced MRI (GTV-MRI/CT). A second GTV, encompassing the MET-PET positive region only (GTV-PET), was generated. The additional information obtained by MET-PET concerning the GTV delineation was evaluated using the PET/CT/MRI co-registered images. The sizes of the overlapping regions of GTV-MRI/CT and GTV-PET were calculated and the amounts of additional volumes added by the complementing modality determined. Results: The addition of MET-PET was beneficial for GTV delineation in all but 3 patients. MET-PET detected small tumor portions with a mean volume of 1.6 {+-} 1.7 cm{sup 3} that were not identified by CT or MRI. The mean percentage of enlargement of the GTV using MET-PET as an additional imaging method was 9.4% {+-} 10.7%. Conclusions: Our data have demonstrated that integration of MET-PET in radiotherapy planning of skull base meningiomas can influence the GTV, possibly resulting in an increase, as well as in a decrease.

  18. High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; Niessen, K.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

    2011-02-01

    We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile, lack of high voltage

  19. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Herraiz, J. L.; Sitek, A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. Methods: The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. Results: The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. Conclusions: A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data.

  20. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Herraiz, J. L.; Sitek, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. Methods: The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. Results: The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. Conclusions: A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data. PMID:26520759

  1. Clustering-initiated factor analysis application for tissue classification in dynamic brain positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Baker, Suzanne L; Jagust, William J; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-07-01

    The goal is to quantify the fraction of tissues that exhibit specific tracer binding in dynamic brain positron emission tomography (PET). It is achieved using a new method of dynamic image processing: clustering-initiated factor analysis (CIFA). Standard processing of such data relies on region of interest analysis and approximate models of the tracer kinetics and of tissue properties, which can degrade accuracy and reproducibility of the analysis. Clustering-initiated factor analysis allows accurate determination of the time-activity curves and spatial distributions for tissues that exhibit significant radiotracer concentration at any stage of the emission scan, including the arterial input function. We used this approach in the analysis of PET images obtained using (11)C-Pittsburgh Compound B in which specific binding reflects the presence of β-amyloid. The fraction of the specific binding tissues determined using our approach correlated with that computed using the Logan graphical analysis. We believe that CIFA can be an accurate and convenient tool for measuring specific binding tissue concentration and for analyzing tracer kinetics from dynamic images for a variety of PET tracers. As an illustration, we show that four-factor CIFA allows extraction of two blood curves and the corresponding distributions of arterial and venous blood from PET images even with a coarse temporal resolution.

  2. Response to intra-arterial oncolytic virotherapy with the herpes virus NV1020 evaluated by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sze, Daniel Y; Iagaru, Andrei H; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; De Haan, Hans A; Reid, Tony R

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy poses unique challenges to the evaluation of tumor response. We hypothesized that the addition of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to standard computed tomography (CT) evaluation would improve diagnostic and prognostic power of the measurement of tumor response to oncolytic virotherapy. A phase I/II trial was conducted to investigate treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma using intra-arterial administration of the oncolytic herpes virus NV1020. Both contrast-enhanced CT and FDG PET were obtained on each patient at each time point. Quantitative FDG PET and CT responses were correlated with each other and with clinical outcome metrics. A majority of patients showed initial post-viral infusion increases in tumor size (69%) or in standardized uptake value (SUV) (80%) large enough to qualify as progressive disease. Most showed subsequent decreases in tumor size (64%) or SUV (83%) enough to be reclassified as partial response or stable disease. Late PET and CT imaging results correlated well with each other and with clinical outcomes, but results from early in the treatment scheme did not correlate with each other, with later results, or with clinical outcomes. The addition of FDG PET to the evaluation of tumor response to the oncolytic virus NV1020 did not provide useful diagnostic or prognostic data. More sophisticated molecular imaging will need to be developed to monitor the effects of this novel class of antineoplastic agents.

  3. Prognostic value of metabolic parameters on preoperative 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with stage III gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Na, Sae Jung; O, Joo Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Han Hee; Lee, Sung Hak; Song, Kyo Young; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Park, Cho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the prognostic value of metabolic parameters determined by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with stage III gastric cancer. Patients with pre-operative PET/CT and confirmed stage III after curative surgical resection were retrospectively enrolled. Parameters evaluated from pre-operative PET/CTwere maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and peak SUV (SUVpeak) of primary tumor, SUVmax or SUVpeak of tumor to liver ratio (TLRmax and TLRpeak). Volumetric parameters, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), were also evaluated. These PET/CT parameters were compared with the overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). From total of 133 consecutive patients, tumor recurrence was found in 54 patients (40.6%) and 53 died during the follow-up period (median, 43 mo; range 5-62). In univariate analysis, SUVmax, SUVpeak, TLRmax and TLRpeak were significantly associated with the OS and RFS. In multivariate analysis, high TLRmax and TLRpeak were significantly unfavorable prognostic factors for RFS (both P<0.05) even after adjusting for age, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, and chemotherapy. MTV and TLG showed no statistically significant correlation with outcome. In conclusion, glucose metabolism of primary tumor measured by pre-operative PET/CT provides prognostic information, especially for recurrence, in stage III gastric cancer. PMID:27564108

  4. Whole-body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography images before and after chemotherapy for Kaposi sarcoma and highly active antiretrovirus therapy.

    PubMed

    Morooka, Miyako; Ito, Kimiteru; Kubota, Kazuo; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shida, Yoshitaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Ito, Tateki; Tasato, Daisuke; Honda, Haruhito; Teruya, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2010-12-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related disease that mainly involves the skin, gastrointestinal gut, and lungs. Whole-body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scanning is useful for simultaneous detection of multiple lesions of Kaposi sarcoma. We present a 67-year-old man with a history of infection with human immunodeficiency virus who presented with numerous cutaneous lesions. FDG-PET/CT images showed lesions in the skin, lung, and lymph nodes. The gastrointestinal lesions were detected using gastric fiberscopy (GF) and colon fiberscopy (CF). After Kaposi sarcoma therapy, the uptake in the lesions of the skin, lung, and lymph nodes decreased, but new lesions were detected in the pancreas and lumbar spine. He had pancreatitis and Candida spondilitis. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT is useful for detecting lesions and determining the extension to which the disease has spread, adding the gastrointestinal lesions by GF and CF. After therapy, FDG-PET/CT can be used to demonstrate which lesions remain active and to determine the overall response to treatment. In this case, we show how useful FDG-PET/CT is and how difficult it is to treat Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. Postchemoradiotherapy Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Pathologic Response and Survival in Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jayachandran, Priya; Pai, Reetesh K.; Quon, Andrew; Graves, Edward; Krakow, Trevor E.; La, Trang; Loo, Billy W.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To correlate the prechemoradiotherapy (CRT) and post-CRT metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with the pathologic response and survival in patients receiving preoperative CRT for esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 37 patients with histologically confirmed Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer treated with CRT with or without surgical resection were reviewed. Of the 37 patients, 21 received preoperative CRT (57%) and 16 received definitive CRT (43%). All patients had a pre-CRT and 32 had a post-CRT PET scan. The MTV was measured on the pre-CRT PET and post-CRT PET scan, respectively, using a minimum standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold x, where x = 2, 2.5, 3, or the SUV maximum Multiplication-Sign 50%. The total glycolytic activity (TGA{sub x}) was defined as the mean SUV Multiplication-Sign MTV{sub x}. The MTV ratio was defined as the pre-CRT PET MTV/post-CRT MTV. The SUV ratio was defined similarly. A single pathologist scored the pathologic response using a tumor regression grade (TRG) scale. Results: The median follow-up was 1.5 years (range, 0.4-4.9). No significant correlation was found between any parameters on the pre-CRT PET scan and the TRG or overall survival (OS). Multiple post-CRT MTV values and post-TGA values correlated with the TRG and OS; however, the MTV{sub 2.5Post} and TGA{sub 2.5Post} had the greatest correlation. The MTV{sub 2} ratio correlated with OS. The maximum SUV on either the pre-CRT and post-CRT PET scans or the maximum SUV ratio did not correlate with the TRG or OS. Patients treated preoperatively had survival similar compared with those treated definitively with a good PET response (p = 0.97) and significantly better than that of patients treated definitively with a poor PET response (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The maximum SUV was not a predictive or prognostic parameter. The MTV{sub 2.5} and TGA{sub 2.5} were useful markers for predicting the response and

  6. [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron-emission tomography and MR imaging coregistration for presurgical evaluation of medically refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, K K; Salamon, N

    2009-11-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population of the world. Approximately one third of patients with epilepsy remain refractory to medical therapy. For these patients, surgery is a curative option. In order for surgery to be considered, precise localization of the structural abnormality is needed. When MR imaging findings are normal, more sensitive techniques such as positron-emission tomography (PET) can help find the abnormality. Combining MR imaging and PET information increases the sensitivity of the presurgical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the clinical applications of coregistration of [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET with MR imaging for medically refractory epilepsy. Because FDG-PET/MR imaging coregistration has been a routine component of the presurgical evaluation for patients with epilepsy at our institution since 2004, we also included cases from our data base that exemplify the utility of this technology to obtain better postsurgical outcomes.

  7. 68Ga-prostate-specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose M.; Gomes, Catarina; Faria, Diogo B.; Vieira, Tiago S.; Silva, Fernando A.; Vale, Joana; Pimentel, Francisco L.

    2017-01-01

    The 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ( 68Ga-PSMA) has been recently developed to be used, as a ligand, in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) prostate cancer imaging, to detect prostate disease. The main objective of this review was to collect data and findings from other studies and articles to assess, theoretically, if 68GA-PSMA PET/CT is a more appropriate prostate cancer diagnostic technique in comparison with others available such as CT, 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET/CT, or 18F-fluoromethylcholine ( 18F-choline) PET/CT. For that purpose, PubMed, the online scientific articles’ database, was consulted where the keywords “PSMA” and “PET” were used to find relevant articles. The clinicaltrials.gov, clinical trials’ database, was also consulted where the keywords “68Ga-PSMA” and “prostate” were used to search clinical trials. Based on the reviewed scientific literature, several studies were conducted to assess and compare the 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT detection rate in prostate cancer with other available techniques. One of those studies, conducted by Giesel et al., concluded, within study sample, that 75% of patients with lymph nodes detected by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT would have not been identified using other conventional morphological criteria based techniques. In Eiber et al.'s study, 68Ga-PSMA PET detected prostatic disease findings in 67% of patients with prostate-specific antigen levels <1 ng/mL, when compared with choline-based PET that presented detection rates between 19% and 36%. In Bluemel et al.'s study, 68Ga-PSMA identified positive prostatic disease in 43.8% of the patients with negative findings in F-choline PET/CT. Findings from this review demonstrate that 68Ga-PSMA PET/C is more effective in detecting metastases, lymph nodes, and recurrent prostate cancer when compared to 18F-choline-based PET/CT and CT. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT presents also more imaging contrast and can be more cost-effective. 68Ga-PSMA has already

  8. [Positron emission tomography in the Netherlands: need to expand the capacity].

    PubMed

    Comans, E F I; Smit, E F

    2002-09-28

    Positron emission tomography with 18fluor-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET) is increasingly used in clinical practice, especially in oncology. However, in the Netherlands, guidelines for its routine use are lacking, probably due to the limited availability and costs of PET technology. The increasing demand for evidence of a positive effect on patient management (and outcome) following the introduction of new diagnostic tests, also plays an important role. For non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) such evidence is now available. In a prospective randomised multicentre study performed in the Comprehensive Cancer Centre in Amsterdam, FDG-PET reduced the number of futile thoracotomies in patients with suspected NSCLC by 50%. This and other studies resulted in a regional guideline (formulated by pulmonologists, surgeons, radiotherapists, radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians) for the use of FDG-PET in patients with (suspected) NSCLC. Several, predominantly multicentre, studies to evaluate the effectiveness of FDG-PET in subgroups of patients with colorectal cancer, breast cancer, oesophageal cancer, ENT tumours, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and NSCLC (early in the diagnostic workup), are currently being undertaken in the Netherlands. The results of these might facilitate a cost-effective positioning of PET technology for routine patient care in the Netherlands. A recent report from the Comprehensive Cancer Centre in the south of the Netherlands, based on scenarios in Belgium and the United States, indicates that the availability of PET facilities should increase substantially over the next decade, so as to ensure access to all patients who may benefit from this technology.

  9. Vision 20/20: Positron emission tomography in radiation therapy planning, delivery, and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Katia

    2015-12-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly considered as an effective imaging method to support several stages of radiation therapy. The combined usage of functional and morphological imaging in state-of-the-art PET/CT scanners is rapidly emerging to support the treatment planning process in terms of improved tumor delineation, and to assess the tumor response in follow-up investigations after or even during the course of fractionated therapy. Moreover, active research is being pursued on new tracers capable of providing different insights into tumor function, in order to identify areas of the planning volume which may require additional dosage for improved probability of tumor control. In this respect, major progresses in the next years will likely concern the development and clinical investigation of novel tracers and image processing techniques for reliable thresholding and segmentation, of treatment planning and beam delivery approaches integrating the PET imaging information, as well as improved multimodal clinical instrumentation such as PET/MR. But especially in the rapidly emerging case of ion beam therapy, the usage of PET is not only limited to the imaging of external tracers injected to the patient. In fact, a minor amount of positron emitters is formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions between the impinging ions and the tissue, bearing useful information for confirmation of the delivered treatment during or after therapeutic irradiation. Different implementations of unconventional PET imaging for therapy monitoring are currently being investigated clinically, and major ongoing research aims at new dedicated detector technologies and at challenging applications such as real-time imaging and time-resolved in vivo verification of motion compensated beam delivery. This paper provides an overview of the different areas of application of PET in radiation oncology and discusses the most promising perspectives in the years to come for radiation therapy

  10. Patient self-attenuation and technologist dose in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeff, Benjamin W.; Yester, Michael V.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), with 511-keV radiation and long patient-uptake times, presents unique radiation safety concerns. This two-part study considers aspects of PET radiation safety as they relate to PET suite design, dose to the public, and technologist occupational dose. In the first part of the study, the self-attenuation of radiation by patients' bodies was quantified. The radiation exposure was measured at three positions from 64 patients injected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during the uptake period. Compared with an in vitro control used as a point source, a significant decrease in exposure (>40% at 1 m) was observed due to nonuniform distribution of FDG and attenuation within the patients. The attenuation data are consistent with results from simulations [M. E. Phelps, ''Comments and Perspectives,'' J. Nucl. Med. 45, 1601 (2004)] that treat the body as a uniform, water-filled cylinder. As distance is often the principal source of protection for 511-keV radiation, the considerable self-attenuation may allow for more compact PET suites. However, despite high patient self-attenuation, shielding, and standard precautionary measures, PET technologist occupational doses can remain quite high ({approx}12 mSv/year). The second part of this study tracked the daily dose received by PET technologists. Close technologist-patient interaction both during and following FDG administration, as much as 20 min/study, contribute to the high doses and point to the need for a more innovative approach to radiation protection for PET technologists.

  11. Transconvolution and the virtual positron emission tomograph-A new method for cross calibration in quantitative PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prenosil, George A.; Weitzel, Thilo; Hentschel, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) measurements on small lesions are impaired by the partial volume effect, which is intrinsically tied to the point spread function of the actual imaging system, including the reconstruction algorithms. The variability resulting from different point spread functions hinders the assessment of quantitative measurements in clinical routine and especially degrades comparability within multicenter trials. To improve quantitative comparability there is a need for methods to match different PET/CT systems through elimination of this systemic variability. Consequently, a new method was developed and tested that transforms the image of an object as produced by one tomograph to another image of the same object as it would have been seen by a different tomograph. The proposed new method, termed Transconvolution, compensates for differing imaging properties of different tomographs and particularly aims at quantitative comparability of PET/CT in the context of multicenter trials. Methods: To solve the problem of image normalization, the theory of Transconvolution was mathematically established together with new methods to handle point spread functions of different PET/CT systems. Knowing the point spread functions of two different imaging systems allows determining a Transconvolution function to convert one image into the other. This function is calculated by convolving one point spread function with the inverse of the other point spread function which, when adhering to certain boundary conditions such as the use of linear acquisition and image reconstruction methods, is a numerically accessible operation. For reliable measurement of such point spread functions characterizing different PET/CT systems, a dedicated solid-state phantom incorporating {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga filled spheres was developed. To iteratively determine and represent such point spread functions, exponential density functions in combination

  12. PET/Computed Tomography and Thermoablation (Radiofrequency, Microwave, Cryotherapy, Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy).

    PubMed

    Bonichon, Françoise; Godbert, Yann; Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier; Palussière, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Thermal ablation (radiofrequency, microwave, cryosurgery, laser interstitial thermal therapy) is being used more frequently as a local treatment of secondary but also primary cancers and benign lesions. It has a low morbidity and is repeatable. The problem is that computed tomographic scan has limits, and RECIST criteria are not applicable. The objective of this article is to summarize the usefulness and pitfalls of PET/computed tomography in detecting a relapse after thermal ablation as soon as possible.

  13. Predictive value of dobutamine echocardiography and positron emission tomography in identifying hibernating myocardium in patients with postischaemic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, D; Bonser, R; Townend, J; Ordoubadi, F; Lorenzoni, R; Camici, P

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To compare the predictive value of dobutamine echocardiography (DE) and positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying reversible chronic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (hibernating myocardium) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and overt heart failure.
Patients—30 patients (four women) with CAD and heart failure undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
Methods—Myocardial viability was assessed with DE (5 and 10 µg/kg/min) and PET with [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) under hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. Regional (echo) and global LV function (MUGA) were assessed at baseline and six months after CABG.
Results—192 of the 336 (57%) dysfunctional LV segments improved function following CABG (hibernating) and the LV ejection fraction (EF) increased from 23(7) to 32(9)% (p < 0.0001) (in 17 patients > 5%). DE and PET had similar positive predictive values (68% and 66%) in the identification of hibernating myocardium, but DE had a significantly lower negative predictive value than PET (54% v 96%; p < 0.0001). A significant linear correlation was found between the number of PET viable segments and the changes in EF following CABG (r = 0.65; p = 0.0001). Stepwise logistic regression identified the number of PET viable segments as an independent predictor of improvement in EF > 5%, whereas the number of DE viable segments, the baseline LVEF, and wall motion were not.
Conclusions—DE has a higher false negative rate than PET in identifying recoverable LV dysfunction in patients with severe postischaemic heart failure. The amount of PET viable myocardium correlates with the functional outcome following CABG.

 Keywords: dobutamine echocardiography;  positron emission tomography;  coronary artery disease;  heart failure;  hibernating myocardium PMID:9602663

  14. [Development of analysis software package for the two kinds of Japanese fluoro-d-glucose-positron emission tomography guideline].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Endo, Keigo

    2013-06-01

    Two kinds of Japanese guidelines for the data acquisition protocol of oncology fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans were created by the joint task force of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Technology (JSNMT) and the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine (JSNM), and published in Kakuigaku-Gijutsu 27(5): 425-456, 2007 and 29(2): 195-235, 2009. These guidelines aim to standardize PET image quality among facilities and different PET/CT scanner models. The objective of this study was to develop a personal computer-based performance measurement and image quality processor for the two kinds of Japanese guidelines for oncology (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans. We call this software package the "PET quality control tool" (PETquact). Microsoft Corporation's Windows(™) is used as the operating system for PETquact, which requires 1070×720 image resolution and includes 12 different applications. The accuracy was examined for numerous applications of PETquact. For example, in the sensitivity application, the system sensitivity measurement results were equivalent when comparing two PET sinograms obtained from the PETquact and the report. PETquact is suited for analysis of the two kinds of Japanese guideline, and it shows excellent spec to performance measurements and image quality analysis. PETquact can be used at any facility if the software package is installed on a laptop computer.

  15. Reversal of cerebral glucose hypometabolism on positron emission tomography with electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient with a psychotic episode.

    PubMed

    Hassamal, Sameer; Jolles, Paul; Pandurangi, Ananda

    2016-11-01

    AB, a 74-year-old Caucasian woman, was admitted for acute onset of psychosis, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Pharmacotherapy was unsuccessful and the patient was referred for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Pre-ECT, (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography showed extensive frontal, parietal, and temporal cortical hypometabolism suggestive of a neurodegenerative disease. After eight ECT sessions, the psychotic and anxiety symptoms as well as the cognitive impairment resolved. The rapid improvement in symptoms was more suggestive of a psychotic episode rather than dementia. Two days after the ECT course, (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography showed improvements in cerebral cortical hypometabolism, especially in the left parietal cortex, left temporal/occipital cortex. and bifrontal regions. At a follow-up visit 2 months after the ECT course, the psychotic episode was still in remission, and (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography continued to show improved cerebral cortical hypometabolism in these areas. This case illustrated the effect of ECT in reversing cerebral glucose hypometabolism on PET. The improvement in cerebral glucose hypometabolism may represent the neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in the treatment of a psychotic episode. Improved cerebral glucose hypometabolism was present 2 months post-ECT, which suggests that ECT caused sustained functional neural changes.

  16. Detection and Assessment Using Positron Emission Tomography of Genetically Determined Defects in Myocardial Fatty Acid Utilization. Final report, 8/1/93-6/30/97

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Steven R.

    2000-04-09

    An approach using positron emission tomography (PET) was developed, validated and used to measure myocardial fatty acid metabolism in patients with inherited forms of heart failure. Abnormalities were correlated with the severity of the clinical illness. The approach developed was also shown to identify abnormalities in myocardial fatty acid metabolism in some patients with acquired forms of heart failure. The PET technique thus permits identification of abnormal fatty acid metabolism and provides an approach to evaluate the efficacy of interventional strategies.

  17. [Study of regional cerebral glucose metabolism, in man, while awake or asleep, by positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Franck, G; Salmon, E; Poirrier, R; Sadzot, B; Franco, G

    1987-03-01

    Measurements of regional cerebral glucose uptake by the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose technique (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) along with polygraph recordings were made serially during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of nocturnal sleep in two right-handed normal volunteers. During stage III-IV sleep, values declined diffusely in both hemispheric regions (-31%), thalamus (-33%), cerebellum (-33%) and brain stem (-25%). During paradoxical sleep regional values increased diffusely compared with slow wave sleep. Compared to wakefulness, regional metabolic values seemed to increase but the results were more variable from one volunteer to the other. These preliminary data indicate important regional alterations in cerebral metabolism between sleep states.

  18. Current status and future needs for standards of radionuclides used in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, B E

    2013-06-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is being increasingly used as a quantitative technique for detecting disease and monitoring patient progress during treatment. To ensure the validity of the quantitative information derived from the imaging data, it is imperative that all radioactivity measurements that are part of the imaging procedure be traceable to national or international standards. This paper reviews the current status of standards for positron emitting radionuclides (e.g., (18)F, (68)Ge/(68)Ga, and (124)I) and suggests needs for future work.

  19. Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography: highlights on the European marketing approval.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Blanco, Anabel; Prieto-Yerro, Concha; Martinez-Lazaro, Raul; Zamora, Javier; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Haberkamp, Marion; Pohly, Johannes; Enzmann, Harald; Zinserling, Jörg; Strassmann, Valerie; Broich, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been recently approved in Europe to estimate β-amyloid neuritic plaque density in the brain when the subject is still alive. Such density is one of the key issues for the definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at autopsy. This capability of florbetapir (18F) is regarded as a significant improvement in the diagnostic procedures for adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for AD and other causes of cognitive impairment. The current paper highlights the specific characteristics of the European marketing authorization of florbetapir (18F).

  20. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael Doster

    2008-12-19

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

  1. Identification of ischemic and hibernating myocardium: feasibility of post-exercise F-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Marwick, T.H.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Salcedo, E.E.; Go, R.T.; Saha, G.; Beachler, A. )

    1991-02-01

    The identification of ischemic and hibernating myocardium facilitates the selection of patients most likely to benefit from revascularization. This study examined the feasibility of metabolic imaging, using post-exercise F-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the diagnosis of both ischemia and hibernation in 27 patients with known coronary anatomy. Normal post-exercise FDG uptake was defined in each patient by reference to normal resting perfusion and normal coronary supply. Abnormal elevation of FDG (ischemia or hibernation) was compared in 13 myocardial segments in each patient, with the results of dipyridamole stress perfusion imaging performed by rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-PET). Myocardial ischemia was diagnosed by either FDG-PET or Rb-PET in 34 segments subtended by significant local coronary stenoses. Increased FDG uptake was present in 32/34 (94%) and a reversible perfusion defect was identified by Rb-PET in 22/34 (65%, p less than .01). In 3 patients, ischemia was identified by metabolic imaging alone. In 16 patients with previous myocardial infarction, perfusion defects were present at rest in 89 regions, 30 of which (34%) demonstrated increased FDG uptake, consistent with the presence of hibernation. Increased post-exercise FDG uptake appears to be a sensitive indicator of ischemia and myocardial hibernation. Increased post-exercise FDG uptake, appears to be a sensitive indicator of ischemia and myocardial hibernation. This test may be useful in selecting post-infarction patients for revascularization.

  2. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scan in an Unusual Case of Lymphoma with Secondary Involvement of Uterine Cervix Presenting as a Pathological Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M. R. A.; Thomas, Boben

    2017-01-01

    A 48-year-old female presented with a pathological fracture of the right femur. 99mTc methylene diphosphonate bone scan revealed multiple areas of increased osteoblastic activity consistent with metastatic disease. Serum electrophoresis revealed monoclonal gammopathy. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) scan revealed metabolically active lesions in bulky uterine cervix and osteolytic skeletal lesions. Unusual pattern of FDG uptake in uterine cervix and osteolytic skeletal lesions warranted a biopsy of the uterine cervix which revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. 18F-FDG PET/CT scan helped in guiding the site of biopsy to reach a final diagnosis in this unusual case of lymphoma with a secondary involvement of uterine cervix presenting as a pathological fracture. PMID:28242988

  3. Subcutaneous fatty tissue metastasis from renal cell carcinoma detected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tatoğlu, Mehmet Tarιk; Özülker, Tamer; Değirmenci, Hülya; Sayιlgan, Ayşe Tülay

    2011-01-01

    A patient who had undergone left radical nephrectomy 11 years ago for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was referred to our clinic for restaging. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F18-FDG PET/CT) showed hypometabolic area in left frontal region of the brain and increased FDG uptake in the subcutaneous fatty tissues of the right thigh. Histopathological examination of the biopsy material from the left frontal region and right gluteal region revealed metastasis of clear cell type RCC. Seven months later, a magnetic resonance ımaging (MRI) of right cruris showed a contrast-enhancing lesion with a diameter of 3.5 cm, located at the subcutaneous area of posterior part of right cruris. A concomitant F18-FDG PET/CT detected an increased FDG uptake focus in the proximal third of right cruris adjacent to the muscle planes and this finding was consistent with metastasis of RCC. PMID:21969776

  4. Paraneoplastic syndrome turned out to be non-Hodgkin's lymphoma on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Arunraj, S T; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) are commonly encountered with underlying malignant pathology. Though anti--neuronal antibodies play a major role in the diagnosis of the underlying malignant pathology but at many times it becomes inconclusive. As early detection of the primary cause and its treatment gives the best result in such situations, there arises an early and accurate diagnostic need. We present a 65--year--old patient presenting with rapidly progressive quadriparesis with both distal and proximal involvement. With all routine work--up tests within normal limits, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was done which revealed multiple findings that suggested a diagnosis of lymphoma. In our case, PET/CT proved to be an important modality for finding the underlying malignant pathology in a suspected case of PNS.

  5. Paraneoplastic syndrome turned out to be non-Hodgkin's lymphoma on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Arunraj, S. T.; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) are commonly encountered with underlying malignant pathology. Though anti--neuronal antibodies play a major role in the diagnosis of the underlying malignant pathology but at many times it becomes inconclusive. As early detection of the primary cause and its treatment gives the best result in such situations, there arises an early and accurate diagnostic need. We present a 65--year--old patient presenting with rapidly progressive quadriparesis with both distal and proximal involvement. With all routine work--up tests within normal limits, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was done which revealed multiple findings that suggested a diagnosis of lymphoma. In our case, PET/CT proved to be an important modality for finding the underlying malignant pathology in a suspected case of PNS. PMID:27833317

  6. [Positron emission tomography in neuroscience. An integrative part of clinical diagnostic methods and experimental research].

    PubMed

    Schaller, B

    2005-02-01

    The role of molecular neuroimaging techniques is increasing in the understanding of pathophysiological mechanism of diseases. To date, positron emission tomography is the most powerful tool for the non-invasive study of biochemical and molecular processes in humans and animals in vivo. With the development in radiochemistry and tracer technology, a variety of endogenously expressed and exogenously introduced genes can be analyzed by PET. This opens up the exciting and rapidly field of molecular imaging, aiming at the non-invasive localisation of a biological process of interest in normal and diseased cells in animal models and humans in vivo. Besides its usefulness for basic research positron emission tomography has been proven to be superior to conventional diagnostic methods in several clinical indications. This is illustrated by detection of biological or anatomic changes that cannot be demonstrated by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, as well as even before symptoms are expressed. The present review summarizes the clinical use of positron emission tomography in neuroscience that has helped elucidate the pathophysiology of a number of diseases and has suggested strategies in the treatment of these patients. Special reference is given to the neurovascular, neurodegenerative and neurooncological disease.

  7. Evaluation of response to immune checkpoint inhibitors: Is there a role for positron emission tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Bauckneht, Matteo; Piva, Roberta; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Grossi, Francesco; Morbelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Strategies targeting intracellular negative regulators such as immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs) have demonstrated significant antitumor activity across a wide range of solid tumors. In the clinical practice, the radiological effect of immunotherapeutic agents has raised several more relevant and complex challenges for the determination of their imaging-based response at single patient level. Accordingly, it has been suggested that the conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors assessment alone, based on dimensional evaluation provided by computed tomography (CT), tends to underestimate the benefit of ICPIs at least in a subset of patients, supporting the need of immune-related response criteria. Different from CT, very few data are available for the evaluation of immunotherapy by means of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Moreover, since the antineoplastic activity of ICPIs is highly related to the activation of T cells against cancer cells, FDG accumulation might cause false-positive findings. Yet, discrimination between benign and malignant processes represents a huge challenge for FDG-PET in this clinical setting. Consequently, it might be of high interest to test the complex and variegated response to ICPIs by means of PET and thus it is worthwhile to ask if a similar introduction of immune-related PET-based criteria could be proposed in the future. Finally, PET might offer a new insight into the biology and pathophysiology of ICPIs thanks to a growing number of non-invasive immune-diagnostic approaches based on non-FDG tracers. PMID:28298962

  8. Comparison of Physical Examination and Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography 4-6 Months After Radiotherapy to Assess Residual Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zundel, M. Tracy; Michel, Michelle A.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Blumin, Joel; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang, Dian

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and physical examination 4-6 months after radiotherapy for assessing residual head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 through March 2006, 52 HNC patients underwent definitive radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Categoric assessments of residual tumor by PET/CT and physical examination 4-6 months after therapy were correlated and compared with clinical outcomes. Pretreatment data, including tumor stage and primary site standardized uptake value, were also gathered retrospectively and correlated with clinical outcomes. Median follow-up time was 58 months. Results: Twenty-one patients had either locoregionally 'positive' (17 of 21) or 'equivocal' (4 of 21) PET/CT scans, whereas 31 patients had locoregionally negative scans. Four patients failed treatment and had biopsy-confirmed residual or recurrent local disease. All patients, including patients with locally suspicious scans or examinations who refused biopsies, were followed clinically for a minimum of 29 months after therapy, with no other cases of treatment failure detected during this time. No patient had residual nodal disease after therapy. Sensitivities of PET/CT vs. physical examination for early detection of treatment failure were 100% vs. 50%, whereas the specificities of the two modalities were 64.6% vs. 89.6%, respectively. Higher initial T stage and American Joint Commission on Cancer stage correlated with increased incidence of positive/equivocal PET/CT results and treatment failure. Maximal standardized uptake value was not predictive of any clinical outcome. Conclusions: A negative result on PET/CT obtained 4-6 months after radiotherapy is highly sensitive and correlates with successful locoregional control. Patients with negative scans may reasonably be spared invasive diagnostic procedures, such as biopsy and neck dissection, unless recurrent disease is suspected

  9. Defining risk groups of patients with cancer of unknown primary site and cervical nodal metastases by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Yung-Yueh; Chen, Shih-Shin; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-08-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical utility of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in Taiwanese patients with cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) and cervical nodal metastases. We also aimed to study the impact of F-18 FDG PET/CT on clinical treatment priority in this patient group. Between September 2006 and May 2014, patients with CUP and cervical nodal metastases who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging study were retrospectively identified. The clinicopathological risk factors and PET parameters were analyzed in relation to 2-year overall survival (OS) rates using univariate and multivariate analyses. Two-year OS curves were plotted with the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the eligible patients (n = 54), 12 (22.2%) had distant metastases (DM) at presentation. A total of 13 (24.1%) and 15 (27.8%) primary tumors were identified by FDG PET/CT imaging and an additional triple biopsy, respectively. The results of multivariate analysis identified smoking [p = 0.033, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.197-40.342], a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of cervical nodes ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.035, 95% CI = 1.134-28.029), and DM at presentation (p = 0.031, 95% CI = 1.257-114.854) as independent predictors of 2-year OS. Specifically, patients who carried ≥ 2 risk factors showed poorer outcomes (70.3% vs. 11.8%, p < 0.001). Fifteen study patients (27.8%) had their treatment modified by FDG PET/CT findings. We conclude that FDG PET/CT is clinically useful in CUP patients not only for tumor staging, but also for modifying treatment regimens.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and 68Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography for imaging skull base meningiomas with infracranial extension treated with stereotactic radiotherapy - a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) with 68Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography (68Ga-DOTATOC-PET) were compared retrospectively for their ability to delineate infracranial extension of skull base (SB) meningiomas treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Fifty patients with 56 meningiomas of the SB underwent MRI, CT, and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT prior to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The study group consisted of 16 patients who had infracranial meningioma extension, visible on MRI ± CT (MRI/CT) or PET, and were evaluated further. The respective findings were reviewed independently, analyzed with respect to correlations, and compared with each other. Results Within the study group, SB transgression was associated with bony changes visible by CT in 14 patients (81%). Tumorous changes of the foramen ovale and rotundum were evident in 13 and 8 cases, respectively, which were accompanied by skeletal muscular invasion in 8 lesions. We analysed six designated anatomical sites of the SB in each of the 16 patients. Of the 96 sites, 42 had infiltration that was delineable by MRI/CT and PET in 35 cases and by PET only in 7 cases. The mean infracranial volume that was delineable in PET was 10.1 ± 10.6 cm3, which was somewhat larger than the volume detectable in MRI/CT (8.4 ± 7.9 cm3). Conclusions 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET allows detection and assessment of the extent of infracranial meningioma invasion. This method seems to be useful for planning fractionated stereotactic radiation when used in addition to conventional imaging modalities that are often inconclusive in the SB region. PMID:22217329

  11. Myelin imaging with C-11 labeled diphenylmethanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Dischino, D.D.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have recently studied several C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for their suitability as myelin imaging agents with positron emission tomography (PET). C-11 diphenylmethanol (DPM) was selected on the basis of its in vivo metabolic stability and high extraction and lipophilicity. PET studies were performed in three normal subjects and in one patient with multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin distribution was imaged following the bolus intravenous administration of 25-30 mCi of C-11 DPM. Sequential scans were obtained after radiotracer administration to measure the DPM distribution as a function of time. In addition, regional cerebral blood flow was measured after the bolus intravenous injection of 0-15 water. A tomographic slice through the centrum semiovale was used to obtain regional data for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM).

  12. Imaging amyloid in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2009-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease with later dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are pathologically characterized by the presence of intraneuronal Lewy inclusion bodies, amyloid deposition is also associated to varying degrees with both these disorders. Fibrillar amyloid load can now be quantitated in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) using imaging biomarkers. Here the reported findings of 11C-PIB PET studies concerning the amyloid load associated with PD and its influence on dementia are reviewed. It is concluded that the presence of amyloid acts to accelerate the dementia process in Lewy body disorders, though has little influence on its nature. Anti-amyloid strategies could be a relevant approach for slowing dementia in a number of DLB and PDD cases.

  13. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  14. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Del Sole, Angelo; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases.

  15. Parametric imaging via kinetics-induced filter for dynamic positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Lu, Lijun; Ma, Jianhua; Zeng, Dong; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the noisy measurement of the voxel-wise time activity curve (TAC), parametric imaging for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is a challenging task. To address this problem, some spatial filters, such as Gaussian filter, bilateral filter, wavelet-based filter, and so on, are often performed to reduce the noise of each frame. However, these filters usually just consider local properties of each frame without exploring the kinetic information. In this paper, aiming to improve the quantitative accuracy of parametric imaging, we present a kinetics-induced filter to lower the noise of dynamic PET images by incorporating the kinetic information. The present kinetics-induced filter is designed via the similarity between voxel-wise TACs under the framework of bilateral filter. Experimental results with a simulation study demonstrate that the present kinetics-induced filter can achieve noticeable gains than other existing methods for parametric images in terms of quantitative accuracy measures.

  16. [Fluorodeoxyglucose and bronchopulmonary cancer. Initial French results with positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Vaylet, F; Foehrenbach, H; De Dreuille, O; Maszelin, P; Merlet, P; Bendriem, B; L'Her, P; Syrota, A; Gaillard, J F

    1998-09-01

    Despite recent advances, the contribution of medical imaging techniques is limited, particularly in terms of tissue characterization, in the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and search for extension of bronchogenic cancer. The metabolic properties of the glucose analog deoxyglucose labeled with 18F1 would allow metabolic imaging. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides clinicians with quality images with an interesting sensitivity. We report the results of a feasibility study conducted in our first 17 patients. We observed 14 true positives, 1 true negative and 1 false positive and 1 false negative in patients with a malignant primary lesion. We analyzed the causes of error. Ten disseminated localizations were identified. Possible developments in terms of therapeutic strategy are discussed. The agreement between our findings and data reported in the literature prompted us to develop a study protocol using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET in patients with bronchogenic cancer.

  17. Hypoxia imaging using Positron Emission Tomography in non-small cell lung cancer: implications for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Wiegman, Erwin M; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-12-01

    Tumour hypoxia is an important contributor to radioresistance. Thus, increasing the radiation dose to hypoxic areas may result in improved locoregional tumour control. However, this strategy requires accurate detection of the hypoxic sub-volume using PET imaging. Secondly, hypoxia imaging may also provide prognostic information and may be of help to monitor treatment response. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was carried out on the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image Tumour hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More specifically, the purpose of this review was (1) to summarize the different hypoxia tracers used, (2) to investigate whether Tumour hypoxia can be detected in NSCLC and finally (3) whether the presence of hypoxia can be used to predict outcome.

  18. Positron emission tomography studies in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Eidelberg, D

    1992-05-01

    PET imaging is a rapidly expanding technique with growing clinical utility. In this review, we have discussed the contribution of functional neuroimaging with PET in elucidating the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. In addition, we emphasize the growing role of this technique in the clinical setting. FDG/PET has become increasingly available at major medical centers and is especially suitable as an aid in the clinical assessment of patients with akinetic-rigid or other movement disorders. Although this technique is essentially quantitative and ideally suited for broad population studies, qualitative and semiquantitative approaches may suffice in the evaluation of individual patients. To the extent that several of the functional imaging models are linear with raw count rates, blood sampling may not be needed in each instance. Moreover recent advances in SPECT perfusion imaging may permit the extension of PET diagnostic criteria to other imaging modalities that are less costly and more accessible in the community setting. New statistical methods for the detection of regional metabolic covariation patterns hold special promise for the development of disease-specific imaging markers, which may permit rapid differential diagnosis, improved drug trials, and possible preclinical detection. F-dopa/PET has provided many important in vivo insights into the nigrostriatal dopamine system and its role in the development of parkinsonism. In contrast to FDG/PET, this technique demands specialized radiochemistry, plasma analysis, and modeling approaches that currently restrict its applicability to a few research PET centers. Several promising developments in radiochemical synthesis, data acquisition, and kinetic modeling may simplify the technique sufficiently to be used in the clinical domain. F-dopa/PET holds particular promise in preclinical screening of individuals at risk for Parkinson's disease on genetic or environmental grounds. This has great significance in view of the

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  20. Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease with 18F-Fludeoxyglucose Uptake in Cervical Lymph Nodes on Dual-time-point Imaging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Mimicking Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Ken-ichi; Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Uchibori, Masahiro; Ota, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD) is a benign but self-limiting disorder. However, KFD is often misdiagnosed as a malignant disease. Although 18F-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is useful in distinguishing malignant from benign disease, the latter sometimes mimics malignancy on DTPI PET/CT, resulting in a misdiagnosis. Here, we describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who complained of cervical lymphadenopathy. PET showed increased FDG uptake in multiple lymph nodes, with a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 19.0 in the early phase to 21.8 in the late phase. A biopsy was performed, and pathological examination revealed KFD. KFD with FDG uptake in lymph nodes on DTPI PET/CT is rare and difficult to be distinguished from a malignant disease. PMID:28217024

  1. Identifying active vascular microcalcification by 18F-sodium fluoride positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Irkle, Agnese; Vesey, Alex T.; Lewis, David Y.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Bird, Joseph L. E.; Dweck, Marc R.; Joshi, Francis R.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.; Warburton, Elizabeth A.; Bennett, Martin R.; Brindle, Kevin M.; Newby, David E.; Rudd, James H.; Davenport, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex biological process that is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. While macrocalcification confers plaque stability, microcalcification is a key feature of high-risk atheroma and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of atherosclerosis using 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) has the potential to identify pathologically high-risk nascent microcalcification. However, the precise molecular mechanism of 18F-NaF vascular uptake is still unknown. Here we use electron microscopy, autoradiography, histology and preclinical and clinical PET/CT to analyse 18F-NaF binding. We show that 18F-NaF adsorbs to calcified deposits within plaque with high affinity and is selective and specific. 18F-NaF PET/CT imaging can distinguish between areas of macro- and microcalcification. This is the only currently available clinical imaging platform that can non-invasively detect microcalcification in active unstable atherosclerosis. The use of 18F-NaF may foster new approaches to developing treatments for vascular calcification. PMID:26151378

  2. Impact of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Before and After Definitive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Apparently Solitary Plasmacytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Paul J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Wirth, Andrew; Ryan, Gail; Seymour, John F.; Prince, H. Miles

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on management of patients with apparently isolated plasmacytoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with apparently solitary plasmacytoma who underwent FDG-PET for staging or restaging were identified from a central PET database. They were either candidates for or had received definitive radiation therapy (RT). Results: Seventeen patients had initial staging scans for bone (n = 11) or soft tissue (n = 6) plasmacytomas, and 11 had PET scans after RT. Only 1 of 14 known untreated sites of plasmacytoma was not identified on staging PET (lesion sensitivity = 93%). Three plasmacytomas were excised before PET. Staging PET influenced management in 6 of 17 patients (35%) by showing multiple myeloma (n = 1), discouraging RT after complete resection (n = 1), excluding plasmacytoma at a second site (n = 1), by increasing RT fields (n = 2), or by suggesting sarcoidosis (n = 1). Fifteen of 17 patients with initial staging PET scans received definitive RT. Restaging PET scans after RT showed complete metabolic response in 8 of 11 cases and progressive disease in 2. Two patients with either no response or partial metabolic response had late responses. Staging sestamibi and PET scans were concordant in five of six occasions (one sestamibi scan was false negative). Conclusions: FDG-PET has value for staging and RT planning in plasmacytoma and potentially could have a role in response-assessment after RT. Slow resolution of FDG uptake posttreatment does not necessarily imply an adverse prognosis.

  3. Effect of α-Methyl versus α-Hydrogen Substitution on Brain Availability and Tumor Imaging Properties of Heptanoic [F-18]Fluoroalkyl Amino Acids for Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Ahlem; Alyami, Wadha; Li, Aixiao; Yuan, Liya; Rich, Keith; McConathy, Jonathan

    2016-04-14

    Two [(18)F]fluoroalkyl substituted amino acids differing only by the presence or absence of a methyl group on the α-carbon, (S)-2-amino-7-[(18)F]fluoro-2-methylheptanoic acid ((S)-[(18)F]FAMHep, (S)-[(18)F]14) and (S)-2-amino-7-[(18)F]fluoroheptanoic acid ((S)-[(18)F]FAHep, (S)-[(18)F]15), were developed for brain tumor imaging and compared to the well-established system L amino acid tracer, O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET), in the delayed brain tumor (DBT) mouse model of high-grade glioma. Cell uptake, biodistribution, and PET/CT imaging studies showed differences in amino acid transport of these tracer by DBT cells. Recognition of (S)-[(18)F]15 but not (S)-[(18)F]14 by system L amino acid transporters led to approximately 8-10-fold higher uptake of the α-hydrogen substituted analogue (S)-[(18)F]15 in normal brain. (S)-[(18)F]15 had imaging properties similar to those of (S)-[(18)F]FET in the DBT tumor model while (S)-[(18)F]14 afforded higher tumor to brain ratios due to much lower uptake by normal brain. These results have important implications for the future development of α-alkyl and α,α-dialkyl substituted amino acids for brain tumor imaging.

  4. Microwave accelerated labeling methods in the synthesis of radioligands for positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Kallmerten, Amy E; Alexander, Abigail; Wager, Krista M; Jones, Graham B

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear imaging using positron emission tomography [PET] is a powerful technique with clinical applications which include oncology, cardiovascular disease and CNS disorders. Conventional chemical syntheses of the short half-life radionuclides used in the process however imposes numerous limitations on scope of available ligands. By utilizing microwave assisted synthesis methods many of these limitations can be overcome, paving the way for the design of diverse families of agents with defined cellular targets. This review will survey recent developments in the field with emphasis on the period 2006-2011. Positron emission tomography [PET] has become one of the most powerful in vivo imaging modalities, capable of delivering mm3 resolution of radiotracer distribution and metabolism [1]. When combined with anatomic imaging methods (MRI, CT) co-registered multimode images offer the potential to track metabolic and physiologic events in diseased states and guide and accelerate clinical trials of investigational new drugs. Also, this same methodology can be used to evaluate first pass pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in early stage drug discovery. Though powerful as a technique only a limited number of drugs have seen clinical use and to date only one drug 2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has received FDA approval [2]. One of the drawbacks of PET imaging is the need for tracers labeled with an appropriate nuclide and the half-lives of these agents places special constraints on the chemical synthesis. Among the most popular are 11C (t½ =20.4 min) and 18F (t ½ =109.8 min) labeled compounds and this has resulted in a resurgence of interest in practical application of their chemistries [3,4]. This review will focus on microwave mediated methods of acceleration of organic reactions used for the production of labeled PET image contrast agents, with emphasis on the five year period 2006 to 2011.

  5. The prognostic value of interim positron emission tomography scans combined with immunohistochemical data in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fields, Paul A; Mikhaeel, George; Hutchings, Martin; van der Walt, Jon; Nunan, Tom; Schey, Steve A

    2005-12-01

    The treatment of hematologic malignancies is moving towards risk-stratified directed therapy, whereby treatment is based on the disease's biological characteristics and response to treatment. We investigated whether BCL2 and BCL6 status could add to the prognostic information yielded by an interim positron emission tomography (PET) scan in the ability to predict outcome. Negative interim scans and BCL2-negative status correlated with continuing remission (p<0.005) at a median follow up of 24 months.

  6. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in benign and malignant bone disease.

    PubMed

    Horger, Marius; Bares, Roland

    2006-10-01

    Radiological (plain radiographs, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and nuclear medicine methods (bone scan, leukocyte scan) both provide unique information about the status of the skeleton. Both have typical strengths and weaknesses, which often lead to the sequential use of different procedures in daily routine. This use causes the unnecessary loss of time and sometimes money, if redundant information is obtained without establishing a final diagnosis. Recently, new devices for hybrid imaging (single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography [SPECT/CT], positron emission tomography/computed tomography [PET/CT]) were introduced, which allow for direct fusion of morphological (CT) and functional (SPECT, PET) data sets. With regard to skeletal abnormalities, this approach appears to be extremely useful because it combines the advantages of both techniques (high-resolution imaging of bone morphology and high sensitivity imaging of bone metabolism). By the accurate correlation of both, a new quality of bone imaging has now become accessible. Although researchers undertaking the initial studies exclusively used low-dose CT equipment, a new generation of SPECT/CT devices has emerged recently. By integrating high-resolution spiral CT, quality of bone imaging may improve once more. Ongoing prospective studies will have to show whether completely new diagnostic algorithms will come up for classification of bone disease as a consequence of this development. Besides, the role of ultrasonography and MRI for bone and soft-tissue imaging also will have to be re-evaluated. Looking at the final aim of all imaging techniques--to achieve correct diagnosis in a fast, noninvasive, comprehensive, and inexpensive way--we are now on the edge of a new era of multimodality imaging that will probably change the paths and structure of medicine in many ways. Presently, hybrid imaging using SPECT/CT has been proven to increase sensitivity and specificity

  7. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, R.; Sitek, A.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  8. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Boutchko, R; Sitek, A; Gullberg, G T

    2013-05-07

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  9. Positron Emission Tomography for Neck Evaluation Following Definitive Treatment with Chemoradiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ad, Voichita; Mishra, Mark; Ohri, Nitin; Intenzo, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the current review was to assess published data on the role of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for evaluation of nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Studies were identified by searching PubMed electronic databases. Only studies using a post-chemoradiotherapy PET for nodal residual disease evaluation were included in the present review. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included. Information regarding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET for detecting nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC was extracted and analyzed. Results Twenty published studies were included in the present review. Existing data suggest that a negative post-chemoradiotherapy PET scan is associated with a negative predictive value up to 100%. The sensitivity of PET in detecting nodal residual disease is greater for scans performed ≥ 10 weeks after definitive treatment with chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC. Conclusions Further studies are needed to quantify the reliability of PET in detecting nodal residual disease after chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced HNSCC. The optimal timing of PET imaging after chemoradiotherapy remains to be defined. PMID:21864252

  10. Active transport of C-11-Methyl-D-Glucose and 3-F-18-Deoxyglucose in acute ischemic brain disease and Huntington's chorea, studied by positron-emission-tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Magloire, R.; Schuier, F.; Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.; Lange, W.; Becker, V.; Spohr, G.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    C-11-Methyl-D-Glucose (CMG) and 3-F-18-Deoxyglucose (3FDG) were demonstrated to be non-metabolizable glucose analogues which are transported across the blood-brain-barrier into and out of tissue via the glucose carrier system (GCS). These two substances were used as indicators for determining the perfusion-independent rate constant of GCS in the brain. Five normals with informed consent, 12 patients with acute ischemic brain disease and 9 patients with initial and advanced Huntington's chorea were examined by PET after i.v. application of 5 mCi of GMG or 3FDG. In each patient 30 transaxial images were registered in 1 selected plane, image collection time being 1 min. Time-activity curves were created from different regions of interest. The slope to tracer steady state between tissue and blood yields the perfusion-independent rate constant of GCS from tissue to blood (k/sub 2/). In normals k/sub 2/ for CMG was 0.235 +- 0.03/min, as expected, and for 3FDG 0.47 +- 0.07/min indicating a higher affinity to GCS for 3FDG than CMG. In acute ischemic brain disease k/sub 2/ was normal or reduced at the site of insult for both CMG and 3FDG. In Huntington's chorea, k/sub 2/ was reduced in the basal ganglia but normal or occasionally significantly increased in frontal or occipital cortical areas, for CMG and 3FDG. The authors conclude that CMG permits noninvasive analysis of the perfusion-independent rate constant of CCS. 3FDG shows a higher affinity for CCS than CMC but gives comparable information.

  11. Detection of neuronal damage in degenerative brain disease with cobalt-55 and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim, J.; Paans, A.M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We suggest Cobalt-55 (Co) as a Calcium (Ca)-marker to visualize Ca transport across the neuronal membrane. Elevation of intracellular Ca is closely linked with the process of neuronal cell-decay. Co-uptake is correlated with Ca-accumulation through divalent cation-permeable kainate (KA)-activated receptor-operated channels in the neuronal membrane. This hypothesis was studied with position emission tomography (PET) both in patients with a ischemic cerebro-vascular accident (CVA) and in patients with relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Co-PET studies were performed in a dynamic mode (6 frames of 10 minutes) 20-25 hours after iv.-administration of 1-2 mCi Co. Regional specific accumulation irrespective of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity in the (clinically appropriate) affected cerebral region could be demonstrated in CVA-patients, thus suggesting neuronal decay in (the early phase of) infarction. In MS, inhomogeneous cerebral distribution of Co was detected, in contrast to healthy volunteers. This suggests focal accumulation of Co in multiple spots of neuronal decay, possibly related to MS-lesions on MRI. In conclusion, Co-PET may prove to be a valuable tool for the early detection of neuronal decay not only in CVA and MS, but in other brain-pathology as well. The usefulness of Co-PET in imaging brain-tumors and myocardial ischemia has already been established.

  12. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    PubMed

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  13. Positron emission tomography--examination of chemical transmission in the living human brain. Development of radioligands.

    PubMed

    Farde, L; Hall, H

    1992-02-01

    The imaging technique Positron Emission Tomography (PET) allows examination of chemical neurotransmission in brain. Of key importance for PET-research on neuroreceptors is the development of suitable radiolabelled tracers (ligands). This paper illustrates the multidisciplinary research activities necessary for ligand development. The selective D1- and D2-dopamine receptor antagonists SCH 23390 and raclopride (CAS 84225-95-6), respectively, were labelled with [3H] and characterized in biochemical studies in vitro on human brain homogenates and in autoradiographic studies on cryosections from human hemispheres. The experimental information was used to interpret and support the PET-findings with [11C]-labelled SCH 23390 and raclopride in vivo in humans. In conclusion, these ligands can be used to quantitatively examine dopamine receptors in the human basal ganglia in vivo. An applied study for PET-determination of D1- and D2-dopamine receptor occupancy during antipsychotic drug treatment indicates that the D2-dopamine receptor and possibly also the D1-dopamine receptor are targets for neuroleptic drug action.

  14. Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography as a screening tool for occult malignancy in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Chauchard, Maria; Benali, Khadija; Papo, Thomas; Sacre, Karim

    2014-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be the first clinical manifestation of an occult malignancy. We aimed to assess the value, in daily practice, of positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) for occult malignancy diagnosis in patients with unprovoked VTE.All PET-CTs performed over 5-years period (from January 2009 to October 2013) in adult patients followed in the Department of Internal Medicine (Bichat Hospital, Paris, France) were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical history, imaging findings, and additional diagnostic tests performed because of PET-CT findings were analyzed.From January 2009 to October 2013, PET-CT was performed for malignancy diagnosis in 67 consecutive patients with unprovoked VTE. Seventeen patients were excluded because of congenital or acquired thrombophilia, known cancer, estrogen use, inability to confirm VTE diagnosis, or missing data. Fifty patients (25 women; mean age, 65.2 ± 15.9 years) were included. VTE was a first episode in 84% of cases. In 22 (44%) patients, PET-CT showed increased uptake suspicious for malignancy. After additional procedures, malignancy was confirmed in 12/22 patients. In all cases of confirmed malignancies, conventional computed tomography scan (CT-scan) had similar diagnosis yield, as compared with PET-CT. In 10/22 cases, the suspected diagnosis of malignancy could not be confirmed despite extensive workup including specialist visits (n = 5), magnetic resonance imaging (n = 4), gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (n = 3), endometrial biopsies (n = 2), and hysterectomy (n = 1). The cost of additional diagnosis procedures performed because of false positive PET-CT amounted to є1956/patient. Interestingly, considering CT-scan findings only, no further investigation would have been scheduled. No patient with negative or false positive PET-CT was diagnosed with cancer during a mean follow-up of 22 ± 13.6 months.A diagnosis strategy based on PET-CT screening for

  15. Positron Emission Tomography Image-Guided Drug Delivery: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important modality in the field of molecular imaging, which is gradually impacting patient care by providing safe, fast, and reliable techniques that help to alter the course of patient care by revealing invasive, de facto procedures to be unnecessary or rendering them obsolete. Also, PET provides a key connection between the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of disease and the according targeted therapies. Recently, PET imaging is also gaining ground in the field of drug delivery. Current drug delivery research is focused on developing novel drug delivery systems with emphasis on precise targeting, accurate dose delivery, and minimal toxicity in order to achieve maximum therapeutic efficacy. At the intersection between PET imaging and controlled drug delivery, interest has grown in combining both these paradigms into clinically effective formulations. PET image-guided drug delivery has great potential to revolutionize patient care by in vivo assessment of drug biodistribution and accumulation at the target site and real-time monitoring of the therapeutic outcome. The expected end point of this approach is to provide fundamental support for the optimization of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that could contribute to emerging concepts in the field of “personalized medicine”. This review focuses on the recent developments in PET image-guided drug delivery and discusses intriguing opportunities for future development. The preclinical data reported to date are quite promising, and it is evident that such strategies in cancer management hold promise for clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in enhanced quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24865108

  16. Metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cancer: Pairing lipid metabolism with glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Sandi A; Lim, John

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in detecting some cancers has prompted a longstanding search for other positron emission tomography (PET) tracers to complement the imaging of glycolysis in oncology, with much attention paid to lipogenesis based on observations that the production of various lipid and lipid-containing compounds is increased in most cancers. Radiolabeled analogs of choline and acetate have now been used as oncologic PET probes for over a decade, showing convincingly improved detection sensitivity over FDG for certain cancers. However, neither choline nor acetate have been thoroughly validated as lipogenic biomarkers, and while acetyl-CoA produced from acetate is used in de-novo lipogenesis to synthesize fatty acids, acetate is also consumed by various other synthetic and metabolic pathways, with recent experimental observations challenging the assumption that lipogenesis is its predominant role in all cancers. Since tumors detected by acetate PET are also frequently detected by choline PET, imaging of choline metabolism might serve as an alternative albeit indirect marker of lipogenesis, particularly if the fatty acids produced in cancer cells are mainly destined for membrane synthesis through incorporation into phosphatidylcholines. Aerobic glycolysis may or may not coincide with changes in lipid metabolism, resulting in combinatorial metabolic phenotypes that may have different prognostic or therapeutic implications. Consequently, PET imaging using dual metabolic tracers, in addition to being diagnostically superior to imaging with individual tracers, could eventually play a greater role in supporting precision medicine, as efforts to develop small-molecule metabolic pathway inhibitors are coming to fruition. To prepare for this advent, clinical and translational studies of metabolic PET tracers must go beyond simply estimating tracer diagnostic utility, and aim to uncover potential therapeutic avenues associated with

  17. What have positron emission tomography and 'Zippy' told us about the neuropharmacology of drug addiction?

    PubMed

    Cumming, Paul; Caprioli, Daniele; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2011-08-01

    Translational molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and allied technologies offer unrivalled applications in the discovery of biomarkers and aetiological mechanisms relevant to human disease. Foremost among clinical PET findings during the past two decades of addiction research is the seminal discovery of reduced dopamine D(2/3) receptor expression in the striatum of drug addicts, which could indicate a predisposing factor and/or compensatory reaction to the chronic abuse of stimulant drugs. In parallel, recent years have witnessed significant improvements in the performance of small animal tomographs (microPET) and a refinement of animal models of addiction based on clinically relevant diagnostic criteria. This review surveys the utility of PET in the elucidation of neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying drug addiction. It considers the consequences of chronic drug exposure on regional brain metabolism and neurotransmitter function and identifies those areas where further research is needed, especially concerning the implementation of PET tracers targeting neurotransmitter systems other than dopamine, which increasingly have been implicated in the pathophysiology of drug addiction. In addition, this review considers the causal effects of behavioural traits such as impulsivity and novelty/sensation-seeking on the emergence of compulsive drug-taking. Previous research indicates that spontaneously high-impulsive rats--as exemplified by 'Zippy'--are pre-disposed to escalate intravenous cocaine self-administration, and subsequently to develop compulsive drug taking tendencies that endure despite concurrent adverse consequences of such behaviour, just as in human addiction. The discovery using microPET of pre-existing differences in dopamine D(2/3) receptor expression in the striatum of high-impulsive rats suggests a neural endophenotype that may likewise pre-dispose to stimulant addiction in humans.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Pelegrí-Martinez, Laura; Lopez-Aznar, Diego; Cózar-Santiago, María del Puig

    2015-01-01

    Gradually, FDG-PET/CT has been strengthening within the diagnostic algorithms of oncological diseases. In many of these, PET/CT has shown to be useful at different stages of the disease: diagnosis, staging or re-staging, treatment response assessment, and recurrence. Some of the advantages of this imaging modality versus CT, MRI, bone scan, mammography, or ultrasound, are based on its great diagnostic capacity since, according to the radiopharmaceutical used, it reflects metabolic changes that often occur before morphological changes and therefore allows us to stage at diagnosis. Moreover, another advantage of this technique is that it allows us to evaluate the whole body so it can be very useful for the detection of distant disease. With regard to breast cancer, FDG-PET/CT has proven to be important when recurrence is suspected or in the evaluation of treatment response. The technological advancement of PET equipment through the development of new detectors and equipment designed specifically for breast imaging, and the development of more specific radiopharmaceuticals for the study of the different biological processes of breast cancer, will allow progress not only in making the diagnosis of the disease at an early stage but also in enabling personalized therapy for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26854143

  19. ATLAAS: an automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced image segmentation in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Marshall, Christopher; Evans, Mererid; Spezi, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and reliable tumour delineation on positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for radiotherapy treatment planning. PET automatic segmentation (PET-AS) eliminates intra- and interobserver variability, but there is currently no consensus on the optimal method to use, as different algorithms appear to perform better for different types of tumours. This work aimed to develop a predictive segmentation model, trained to automatically select and apply the best PET-AS method, according to the tumour characteristics. ATLAAS, the automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced segmentation is based on supervised machine learning using decision trees. The model includes nine PET-AS methods and was trained on a 100 PET scans with known true contour. A decision tree was built for each PET-AS algorithm to predict its accuracy, quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), according to the tumour volume, tumour peak to background SUV ratio and a regional texture metric. The performance of ATLAAS was evaluated for 85 PET scans obtained from fillable and printed subresolution sandwich phantoms. ATLAAS showed excellent accuracy across a wide range of phantom data and predicted the best or near-best segmentation algorithm in 93% of cases. ATLAAS outperformed all single PET-AS methods on fillable phantom data with a DSC of 0.881, while the DSC for H&N phantom data was 0.819. DSCs higher than 0.650 were achieved in all cases. ATLAAS is an advanced automatic image segmentation algorithm based on decision tree predictive modelling, which can be trained on images with known true contour, to predict the best PET-AS method when the true contour is unknown. ATLAAS provides robust and accurate image segmentation with potential applications to radiation oncology.

  20. Comparison of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose and F-18 Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Recurrent Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enslow, Michael S.; Zollinger, Lauren V.; Morton, Kathryn A.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Butterfield, Regan I.; Christian, Paul E.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Heilbrun, Marta E.; Jensen, Randy L.; Hoffman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Report The objective was to compare F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) in differentiating radiation necrosis from recurrent glioma. Materials and methods Visual and quantitative analyses were derived from static FDG PET and static and dynamic FLT PET in 15 patients with suspected recurrence of treated ≥ grade II glioma with a new focus of Gd-contrast enhancement on MRI. For FDG PET, SUVmax and the ratio of lesion SUVmax to the SUVmean of contralateral white matter were measured. For FLT PET, SUVmax and Patlak-derived metabolic flux parameter Kimax were measured for the same locus. A 5-point visual confidence scale was applied to FDG PET and FLT PET. ROC analysis was applied to visual and quantitative results. Differences between recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis were tested by Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Based on follow-up Gd-MRI imaging, lesion-specific recurrent tumor was defined as a definitive increase in size of the lesion, and radiation necrosis as stability or regression. Results For FDG SUVmax, FDG ratio lesion:white matter and FLT Kimax, there was a significant difference between mean values for recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis. Recurrent tumor was best identified by FDG ratio of lesion:contralateral normal white matter (AUC 0.98, CI 0.91–1.00, sens. 100%, spec. 75% for an optimized cut-off value of 1.82). Conclusion Both quantitative and visual determinations allow accurate differentiation between recurrent glioma and radiation necrosis by both FDG and FLT PET. In this small series, FLT PET offers no advantage over FDG PET. PMID:22889774

  1. Incremental Prognostic Value of Global Longitudinal Strain and 18F-Fludeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Systemic Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sperry, Brett W; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Negishi, Kazuaki; Negishi, Tomoko; Patel, Parag; Popović, Zoran B; Culver, Daniel; Brunken, Richard; Marwick, Thomas H; Tamarappoo, Balaji

    2017-03-01

    In independent studies, abnormal global longitudinal strain (GLS) and myocardial inflammation or scar detected by 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are associated with poor prognosis among patients with high likelihood for cardiac sarcoidosis. However, commonly used imaging modalities have not been evaluated in the same population. Our goals were to examine the relation between GLS and FDG-PET, and to evaluate the incremental prognostic value of these imaging techniques for predicting major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients suspected to have cardiac sarcoidosis. We identified patients with systemic sarcoidosis who underwent an echocardiogram and FDG-PET within 60 days. Regional strain (average of base, mid, and apical segmental strains from each of 6 wall regions) was calculated and compared with regional FDG-PET findings. The associations among GLS, FDG-PET findings, and MACE (defined as death, ventricular tachycardia, heart failure hospitalization, or transplantation) were evaluated using a Cox model. Of 84 patients, 51 had abnormal FDG-PET. GLS was impaired in patients with abnormal versus normal FDG-PET (-14.2 ± 4.7% vs -17.9 ± 3.5%, p <0.01). After adjusting for clinical risk factors, both GLS and the number of segments with abnormal perfusion and metabolism on FDG-PET were associated with adverse cardiac events (p <0.01 for both). In conclusion, GLS and regional LS are impaired in patients with abnormal perfusion and metabolism detected using FDG-PET. Additionally, both GLS and abnormal FDG-PET have incremental prognostic value for predicting MACE in patients with systemic sarcoidosis.

  2. Effective dose to staff members in a positron emission tomography/CT facility using zirconium-89

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 (89Zr) is complicated by its complex decay scheme. In this study, we quantified the effective dose from 89Zr and compared it with fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Methods: Effective dose distribution in a PET/CT facility in Riyadh was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX. The positron bremsstrahlung, the annihilation photons, the delayed gammas from 89Zr and those emissions from 18F-FDG were modelled in the simulations but low-energy characteristic X-rays were ignored. Results: On the basis of injected activity, the dose from 89Zr was higher than that of 18F-FDG. However, the dose per scan from 89Zr became less than that from 18F-FDG near the patient, owing to the difference in injected activities. In the corridor and control rooms, the 89Zr dose was much higher than 18F-FDG, owing to the difference in attenuation by the shielding materials. Conclusion: The presence of the high-energy photons from 89Zr-labelled immuno-PET radiopharmaceuticals causes a significantly higher effective dose than 18F-FDG to the staff outside the patient room. Conversely, despite the low administered activity of 89Zr, it gives rise to a comparable or even lower dose than 18F-FDG to the staff near the patient. This interesting result raises apparently contradictory implications in the radiation protection considerations of a PET/CT facility. Advances in knowledge: To the best of our knowledge, radiation exposure to staff and public in the PET/CT unit using 89Zr has not been investigated. The ultimate output of this study will lead to the optimal design of the facility for routine use of 89Zr. PMID:23934963

  3. Occupational per-patient radiation dose from a conservative protocol for veterinary (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Nicole E; Kraft, Susan L; Gibbons, Debra S; Arceneaux, Billie K; Stewart, Jeffrey A; Mama, Khursheed R; Johnson, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    The occupational external radiation dose to human medical personnel from positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals has been documented, but to date no corresponding veterinary staff dose data are available. Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) were used in this study to measure the per-patient external radiation doses to veterinary staff using a PET/CT (PET combined with computed tomography) protocol in which the patient radiopharmaceutical dose was injected after anesthetic induction. Radiation doses were recorded for the nuclear medicine technologists, the on-duty anesthesiology technologist, and an occasional observer from 19 veterinary (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT studies. Patient mass range was 2.8 to 61.0 kg (22.3 kg mean) and injected activity averaged 6 MBq kg(-1) . The dose range received by nuclear medicine technologists per procedure was 0-30 μSv (9.1 μSv mean), by anesthetists 1-22 μSv (8.2 μSv mean), and by the observer 0-2 μSv (0.5 μSv mean). In both feline and canine studies, placement of the EPD on staff was a significant predictor of radiation dose. Additional significant predictors of staff radiation dose from canine studies included job position and injected activity. The per-patient occupational radiation doses to veterinary PET/CT technologists were slightly greater than those reported for human nuclear medicine PET/CT technologists, but were comparable to estimated radiation doses for nurses caring for nonambulatory human PET/CT patients. Efforts toward maintaining staff radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) will be important as veterinary PET/CT caseload increases.

  4. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography evaluation of subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetskiy, Vadim R; Mukhortova, Olga V; Aslanidis, Irakli P; Klapper, Wolfram; Probatova, Natalya A

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a very rare variant of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Currently, there is no standard imaging method for staging of SPTCL nor for assessment of treatment response. Here, we describe our use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and monitoring of treatment response in 3 cases of SPTCL. Primary staging by PET/CT showed that all 3 patients had multiple foci in the subcutaneous fat tissue, with SUVmax from 10.5 to 14.6. Involvement of intra-abdominal fat with high SUVmax was identified in 2 of the patients. Use of the triple drug regimen of gemcitabine, cisplatin and methylprednisolone (commonly known as “GEM-P”) as first-line therapy or second-line therapy facilitated complete metabolic response for all 3 cases. FDG PET/CT provides valuable information for staging and monitoring of treatment response and can reveal occult involvement of the intra-abdominal visceral fat. High FDG uptake on pre-treatment PET can identify patients with aggressive disease and help in selection of first-line therapy. PMID:27672640

  5. Role of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in management of pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinomas and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Majhi, Urmila

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma (PMEC) is a rare tumor of bronchial gland origin with a striking resemblance to MEC of the salivary glands. The World Health Organization classifies PMECs as “salivary gland type” tumors along with pulmonary adenoid cystic carcinomas and epimyoepithelial lung carcinomas. Their description in literature is largely limited to a few case series/case reports. Further, the experience of imaging in these tumors with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ( 18F-FDG PET-CT) is also limited and evolving largely due to rarity of PMEC. We recently managed an interesting case of a PMEC and reviewed the literature surrounding this rare tumor with an emphasis on the role of 18F-FDG PET-CT in its management. An 18F-FDG PET-CT appears to be a useful imaging modality for predicting the tumor grade of patients with PMECs; further, there is emerging data to suggest the role of 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting the long-term prognosis of patients with PMEC. PMID:27095092

  6. Role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging in surgery for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Hisao; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Otani, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Takanori; Yachida, Shinichi; Okano, Keiichi; Izuishi, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of positron emission tomo-graphy using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the surgical management of patients with pancreatic cancer, including the diagnosis, staging, and selection of patients for the subsequent surgical treatment. METHODS: This study involved 53 patients with proven primary pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity of diagnosing the primary cancer was examined for FDG-PET, CT, cytological examination of the bile or pancreatic juice, and the serum levels of carcinoembrionic antigens (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Next, the accuracy of staging was compared between FDG-PET and CT. Finally, FDG-PET was analyzed semiquantitatively using the standard uptake value (SUV). The impact of the SUV on patient management was evaluated by examining the correlations between the SUV and the histological findings of cancer. RESULTS: The sensitivity of FDG-PET, CT, cytological examination of the bile or pancreatic juice, and the serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 were 92.5%, 88.7%, 46.4%, 37.7% and 69.8%, respectively. In staging, FDG-PET was superior to CT only in diagnosing distant disease (bone metastasis). For local staging, the sensitivity of CT was better than that of FDG-PET. The SUV did not correlate with the pTNM stage, grades, invasions to the vessels and nerve, or with the size of the tumor. However, there was a statistically significant difference (4.6 ± 2.9 vs 7.8 ± 4.5, P = 0.024) in the SUV between patients with respectable and unresectable disease. CONCLUSION: FDG-PET is thus considered to be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. However, regarding the staging of the disease, FDG-PET is not considered to be a sufficiently accurate diagnostic modality. Although the SUV does not correlate with the patho-histological prognostic factors, it may be useful in selecting patients who should undergo subsequent surgical treatment. PMID:18176963

  7. Clinical importance of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of patients with bronchoalveolar carcinoma: Role in the detection of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Skoura, Evangelia; Datseris, Ioannis E; Exarhos, Dimitrios; Chatziioannou, Sophia; Oikonomopoulos, Georgios; Samartzis, Alexandros; Giannopoulou, Chariklia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2013-05-01

    [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been reported to have a low sensitivity in the initial diagnosis of bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) due to BAC's low metabolic activity. The aim of this study was to assess the value of [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT in the detection of BAC recurrence. Between February 2007 and September 2011, the [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans that were performed on patients with known, histologically proven BAC were studied. A total of 24 [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans were performed in 22 patients, including 16 males and 6 females, with a mean age of 65±9 years. Among the scans, 15 were performed to assess for possible recurrence with equivocal findings in conventional imaging methods and 9 for restaging post-therapy. In all cases conventional imaging studies (CT and MRI) were performed 5-30 days prior to PET/CT. Among the 24 [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans, 18 were positive and 6 negative. Among the 15 [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans performed for suspected recurrence, 34 lesions were detected and the mean maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was 6.8±3.26. In nine scans, upstaging was observed, while two were in agreement with the findings of the conventional modalities. A greater number of lesions were detected in two scans and fewer lesions were detected in one, with no change in staging. Only one scan was negative. By contrast, in patients examined for restaging, there were only five lesions with a mean SUVmax of 4.86±3.18. Agreement between the findings of [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT and the conventional modalities was observed in 8 out of 9 cases. Although [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT has been reported to have a low sensitivity in the initial diagnosis of BAC, the present results indicate that when there is recurrence, the lesions become [(18)F]FDG avid. [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT may provide further information in patients evaluated for recurrence and thus improve patient management.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed...

  9. Impact of computed tomography and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose coincidence detection emission tomography image fusion for optimization of conformal radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deniaud-Alexandre, Elisabeth; Touboul, Emmanuel . E-mail: emmanuel.touboul@tnn.aphp.fr; Lerouge, Delphine; Grahek, Dany; Foulquier, Jean-Noel; Petegnief, Yolande; Gres, Benoit; El Balaa, Hanna; Keraudy, Katia; Kerrou, Kaldoun; Montravers, Francoise; Milleron, Bernard; Lebeau, Bernard; Talbot, Jean-Noel

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To report a retrospective study concerning the impact of fused {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 patients consecutively treated for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer were studied. Each patient underwent CT and FDG-hybrid PET for simulation treatment in the same treatment position. Images were coregistered using five fiducial markers. Target volume delineation was initially performed on the CT images, and the corresponding FDG-PET data were subsequently used as an overlay to the CT data to define the target volume. Results: {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose-PET identified previously undetected distant metastatic disease in 8 patients, making them ineligible for curative conformal radiotherapy (1 patient presented with some positive uptake corresponding to concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis). Another patient was ineligible for curative treatment because the fused PET-CT images demonstrated excessively extensive intrathoracic disease. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was decreased by CT-PET image fusion in 21 patients (23%) and was increased in 24 patients (26%). The GTV reduction was {>=}25% in 7 patients because CT-PET image fusion reduced the pulmonary GTV in 6 patients (3 patients with atelectasis) and the mediastinal nodal GTV in 1 patient. The GTV increase was {>=}25% in 14 patients owing to an increase in the pulmonary GTV in 11 patients (4 patients with atelectasis) and detection of occult mediastinal lymph node involvement in 3 patients. Of 81 patients receiving a total dose of {>=}60 Gy at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point, after CT-PET image fusion, the percentage of total lung volume receiving >20 Gy increased in 15 cases and decreased in 22. The percentage of total heart volume receiving >36 Gy increased in 8

  10. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated particle filter framework for positron emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengchao; Liu, Huafeng; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of the random nature of photon emissions and detections, the data collected by a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging system can be shown to be Poisson distributed. Meanwhile, there have been considerable efforts within the tracer kinetic modeling communities aimed at establishing the relationship between the PET data and physiological parameters that affect the uptake and metabolism of the tracer. Both statistical and physiological models are important to PET reconstruction. The majority of previous efforts are based on simplified, nonphysical mathematical expression, such as Poisson modeling of the measured data, which is, on the whole, completed without consideration of the underlying physiology. In this paper, we proposed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated reconstruction strategy that can take both statistical model and physiological model into consideration with the aid of state-space evolution equations. The proposed strategy formulates the organ activity distribution through tracer kinetics models and the photon-counting measurements through observation equations, thus making it possible to unify these two constraints into a general framework. In order to accelerate reconstruction, GPU-based parallel computing is introduced. Experiments of Zubal-thorax-phantom data, Monte Carlo simulated phantom data, and real phantom data show the power of the method. Furthermore, thanks to the computing power of the GPU, the reconstruction time is practical for clinical application.

  11. Assessment of Tumor Volumes in Skull Base Glomus Tumors Using Gluc-Lys[{sup 18}F]-TOCA Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Astner, Sabrina T.; Bundschuh, Ralph A.; Beer, Ambros J.; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca L.; Essler, Markus

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess a threshold for Gluc-Lys[{sup 18}F]-TOCA positron emission tomography (PET) in target volume delineation of glomus tumors in the skull base and to compare with MRI-based target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The threshold for volume segmentation in the PET images was determined by a phantom study. Nine patients with a total of 11 glomus tumors underwent PET either with Gluc-Lys[{sup 18}F]-TOCA or with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC (in 1 case). All patients were additionally scanned by MRI. Positron emission tomography and MR images were transferred to a treatment-planning system; MR images were analyzed for lesion volume by two observers, and PET images were analyzed by a semiautomated thresholding algorithm. Results: Our phantom study revealed that 32% of the maximum standardized uptake value is an appropriate threshold for tumor segmentation in PET-based target volume delineation of gross tumors. Target volume delineation by MRI was characterized by high interobserver variability. In contrast, interobserver variability was minimal if fused PET/MRI images were used. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) determined by PET (GTV-PET) showed a statistically significant correlation with the GTVs determined by MRI (GTV-MRI) in primary tumors; in recurrent tumors higher differences were found. The mean GTV-MRI was significantly higher than mean GTV-PET. The increase added by MRI to the common volume was due to scar tissue with strong signal enhancement on MRI. Conclusions: In patients with glomus tumors, Gluc-Lys[{sup 18}F]-TOCA PET helps to reduce interobserver variability if an appropriate threshold for tumor segmentation has been determined for institutional conditions. Especially in patients with recurrent tumors after surgery, Gluc-Lys[{sup 18}F]-TOCA PET improves the accuracy of GTV delineation.

  12. An online emission spectral tomography system with digital signal processor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiong; Xiong, Wenlin; Zhang, Zhimin; Chang, Fangfei

    2009-03-30

    Emission spectral tomography (EST) has been adopted to test the three-dimensional distribution parameters of fluid fields, such as burning gas, flame and plasma etc. In most cases, emission spectral data received by the video cameras are enormous so that the emission spectral tomography calculation is often time-consuming. Hence, accelerating calculation becomes the chief factor that one must consider for the practical application of EST. To solve the problem, a hardware implementation method was proposed in this paper, which adopted a digital signal processor (DSP) DM642 in an emission spectral tomography test system. The EST algorithm was fulfilled in the DSP, then calculation results were transmitted to the main computer via the user datagram protocol. Compared with purely VC++ software implementations, this new approach can decrease the calculation time significantly.

  13. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in carcinoma nasopharynx: Can we predict outcomes and tailor therapy based on postradiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Baijal, Gunjan; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Purandare, Nilendu; Sengar, Manju; Shah, Sneha; Gupta, Tejpal; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Murthy, Vedang; Pai, Prathamesh S.; D’Cruz, A. K.; Agarwal, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is an emerging modality for staging and response evaluation in carcinoma nasopharynx. This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of PET-CT in assessing response and outcomes in carcinoma nasopharynx. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients of nonmetastatic carcinoma nasopharynx who underwent PET-CT for response evaluation at 10-12 weeks posttherapy between 2004 and 2009 were evaluated. Patients were classified as responders (Group A) if there was a complete response on PET-CT or as nonresponders (Group B) if there was any uptake above the background activity. Data regarding demographics, treatment, and outcomes were collected from their records and compared across the Groups A and B. Results: The median age was 41 years. 42 out of 45 (93.3%) patients had WHO Grade 2B disease (undifferentiated squamous carcinoma). 24.4%, 31.1%, 15.6, and 28.8% patients were in American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage IIb, III, Iva, and IVb. All patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Forty-five patients, 28 (62.2%) were classified as responders, whereas 17 (37.8%) were classified as nonresponders. There was no significant difference in the age, sex, WHO grade, and stage distribution between the groups. Compliance to treatment was comparable across both groups. The median follow-up was 25.3 months (759 days). The disease-free survival (DFS) of the group was 57.3% at 3 years. The DFS at 3 years was 87.3% and 19.7% for Group A and B, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed Groups to be the only significant factor predicting DFS (P value 0.002 and < 0.001, respectively). In Group B, the most common site of disease failure was distant (9, 53%). Conclusion: PET-CT can be used to evaluate response and as a tool to identify patients at higher risk of distant failure. Further, this could be exploited to identify

  14. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3

  15. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sweet Ping; David, Steven; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  16. Patient Study of In Vivo Verification of Beam Delivery and Range, Using Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography Imaging After Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Katia . E-mail: Katia.Parodi@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Fischman, Alan J.; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3 GyE and 10 GyE (for an ocular melanoma) per fraction were delivered in 1 or 2 fields. Imaging was performed with a commercial PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting within 20 min after treatment. The same treatment immobilization device was used during imaging for all but 2 patients. Measured PET/CT images were coregistered to the planning CT and compared with the corresponding PET expectation, obtained from CT-based Monte Carlo calculations complemented by functional information. For the ocular case, treatment position was approximately replicated, and spatial correlation was deduced from reference clips visible in both the planning radiographs and imaging CT. Here, the expected PET image was obtained from an analytical model. Results: Good spatial correlation and quantitative agreement within 30% were found between the measured and expected activity. For head-and-neck patients, the beam range could be verified with an accuracy of 1-2 mm in well-coregistered bony structures. Low spine and eye sites indicated the need for better fixation and coregistration methods. An analysis of activity decay revealed as tissue-effective half-lives of 800-1,150 s. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of postradiation PET/CT for in vivo treatment verification. It also indicates some technological and methodological improvements needed for optimal clinical application.

  17. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    DOEpatents

    Falen, Steven W [Carmichael, CA; Hoefer, Richard A [Newport News, VA; Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; McKisson, John [Hampton, VA; Kross, Brian [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Stolin, Alexander [Newport News, VA; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  18. Prospective Study of 68Ga-DOTATATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Detecting Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Unknown Primary Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M.; Neychev, Vladimir; Millo, Corina; Shih, Joanna; Nilubol, Naris; Herscovitch, Peter; Pacak, Karel; Marx, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) are increasing in incidence, and accurate staging is important for selecting the appropriate treatment. 68Ga-DOTATATE imaging is a promising approach for detecting GEPNETs and could help in selecting optimal therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the clinical utility of 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in detecting unknown primary and metastatic GEPNETs. Patients and Methods One hundred thirty-one patients were enrolled in a prospective study of patients undergoing 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 111In-pentetreotide single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and multiphasic CT scan, and/or magnetic resonance imaging in a blinded fashion with comprehensive biochemical testing. The primary outcome measure was the detection of lesions by each imaging study. Results 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging detected 95.1% of lesions (95% CI, 92.4% to 96.8%) with an average maximum standardized uptake value of 65.4 ± 47 (range, 6.9 to 244), anatomic imaging detected 45.3% of lesions (95% CI, 37.9% to 52.9%), and 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT detected 30.9% of lesions (95% CI, 25.0% to 37.5%), with a significant difference between imaging modalities (P < .001). In four of 14 patients (28.6%), 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT found a previously unknown primary tumor, and detected primary GEPNET, lymph node, and distant metastases correctly in 72 of 113 lesions (63.7%) when compared with histopathology, with 22.1% and 38.9% detected by using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and anatomic imaging, respectively. On the basis of findings with 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 43 of 131 patients (32.8%) had a change in management recommendation. In patients with carcinoid symptoms but negative biochemical testing, 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT detected lesions in 65.2% of patients, 40% of which were detected neither by anatomic imaging nor by 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT. Conclusion

  19. Interpretation and Prognostic Value of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography After Induction Chemotherapy With or Without Radiation in IIIA-N2 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Receive Curative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Guk Jin; Jeong, Songmi; Kwak, Yoo-Kang; Kim, Hoon-Kyo; Cho, Deog Gon; Park, Young Ha; Yu, Mina; Yoon, Sei Chul

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the correlation of clinical staging on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and pathologic staging and the prognostic value of PET-CT after induction chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 42 cases of clinical stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC who receive 2 to 4 cycles of preoperative chemotherapy with or without radiation followed by curative resection. The maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the suspected lesion on PET-CT was recorded. PET-CT findings after induction chemotherapy were compared with those of initial PET-CT and pathology after surgery. The accuracy of PET-CT in restaging of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy was 50.0%. Eighteen (42.8%) of 42 patients were underestimated ycT stage, and 3 (7.1%) of 42 patients was overestimated ycT stage by PET-CT scan. The accuracy of PET-CT in restaging of the nodal disease was 71.4%. Six (14.3%) of 42 patients were underestimated ycN stage, and 6 (14.3%) of 42 patients were overestimated ycN stage as compared with pathologic staging. The 2-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rate were 68.5% and 40.9%, respectively. Complete responders (ycT0N0M0) on PET-CT after induction chemotherapy had a significantly longer RFS time than did incomplete responders (28.3 vs 9.1 months, P = 0.021). Complete response on PET-CT after induction chemotherapy with or without radiation was a good prognosticator for RFS in stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC patients who received surgery. However, response evaluation on PET-CT after induction chemotherapy should be interpreted with caution due to its unacceptable accuracy.

  20. Pilot study of F(18)-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/computerised tomography in Wilms' tumour: correlation with conventional imaging, pathology and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Begent, Joanna; Sebire, Neil J; Levitt, Gill; Brock, Penelope; Jones, Kathy Pritchard; Ell, Peter; Gordon, Isky; Anderson, John

    2011-02-01

    Wilms' tumour is the second most common paediatric solid tumour. Prognosis is good although higher stage disease carries significant mortality and treatment related morbidity. In the UK, risk stratification is based on histological response to pre-operative chemotherapy. F(18)-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (F(18)FDG-PET) is an emerging functional imaging technique in paediatric oncology. Little is known about the relationship between F(18)FDG-PET images and the disease process of Wilms' tumour. We performed F(18)FDG-PET/CT scans in seven children with Wilms' tumour after induction chemotherapy, immediately before surgery. The standard uptake values (SUV) of F(18)FDG-PET/CT images were related to conventional imaging and histopathological findings. In total seven children were studied. F(18)FDG-PET/CT was consistently safely performed. All tumours showed F(18)FDG activity. Four tumours had activity with SUV/bw max >5 g/ml. Histological examination of these active areas revealed viable anaplastic Wilms' tumour. Furthermore, in these four tumours GLUT-1 and Ki67 immunostaining was strongly positive. Three further tumours demonstrated lower uptake (SUV/bw max <5 g/ml), which represented areas of microscopic foci of residual viable tumour mixed with post chemotherapy change. Metastatic disease was F(18)FDG avid in two of four children with stage four diseases. In conclusion, following chemotherapy, active Wilms' tumour is F(18)FDG avid and higher SUV was seen in histologically high risk disease.

  1. The Usefulness of Positron-Emission Tomography Findings in the Management of Anterior Mediastinal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Fumitoshi; Ohashi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Uematsu, Shugo; Suzuki, Takashi; Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a retrospective analysis to evaluate the usefulness of positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) findings in the classification and management of anterior mediastinal tumors. Methods: Between 2006 and 2015, 105 patients with anterior mediastinal tumor received PET/CT. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET images were obtained 60 minutes after the injection of 18F-FDG. Results: The histological classifications were as follows: thymoma (n = 49), thymic carcinoma (TC) (n = 19), malignant lymphoma (ML) (n = 8), teratoma (n = 7), thymic cyst (n = 14), and others (n = 8). Upon visual inspection (SUV max: >2.0), all of the malignant tumors showed 18F-FDG accumulation (with the exception of one type A thymoma). Two of the 14 thymic cysts and three of the seven teratomas showed slight 18F-FDG accumulation. The SUV max values of the low-grade thymomas, high-grade thymomas, TCs and MLs were 3.14 ± 0.73, 4.34 ± 1.49, 8.59 ± 3.05, and 10.08 ± 2.53, respectively, with significant differences between the low- and high-grade thymomas, and between TCs and MLs. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18F-FDG in the detection of low-grade thymomas and thymomas with a maximum diameter of ≤50 mm and an SUV max of ≤3.4 were 85%, 48%, and 60%, respectively. Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT is an objective and useful modality in the differential diagnosis and management of anterior mediastinal tumors. PMID:28123154

  2. Digital contrast enhancement of 18Fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Sharma, Punit; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is limited for detection of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to low contrast to the tumor, and normal hepatocytes (background). The aim of the present study was to improve the contrast between the tumor and background by standardizing the input parameters of a digital contrast enhancement technique. Materials and Methods: A transverse slice of PET image was adjusted for the best possible contrast, and saved in JPEG 2000 format. We processed this image with a contrast enhancement technique using 847 possible combinations of input parameters (threshold “m” and slope “e”). The input parameters which resulted in an image having a high value of 2nd order entropy, and edge content, and low value of absolute mean brightness error, and saturation evaluation metrics, were considered as standardized input parameters. The same process was repeated for total nine PET-computed tomography studies, thus analyzing 7623 images. Results: The selected digital contrast enhancement technique increased the contrast between the HCC tumor and background. In seven out of nine images, the standardized input parameters “m” had values between 150 and 160, and for other two images values were 138 and 175, respectively. The value of slope “e” was 4 in 4 images, 3 in 3 images and 1 in 2 images. It was found that it is important to optimize the input parameters for the best possible contrast for each image; a particular value was not sufficient for all the HCC images. Conclusion: The use of above digital contrast enhancement technique improves the tumor to background ratio in PET images of HCC and appears to be useful. Further clinical validation of this finding is warranted. PMID:26917889

  3. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Findings During Therapy Predict Outcome in Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With Chemotherapy Alone but Not in Those Who Receive Consolidation Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Hess, Kenneth; Shihadeh, Ferial; Podoloff, Donald A.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Mawlawi, Osama; Arzu, Isidora; Oki, Yasuhiro; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Fayad, Luis E.; Rodriguez, Alma

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of mid-therapy positron emission tomography (PET) findings for predicting survival and disease progression in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, considering type of therapy (chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 294 patients with histologically confirmed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with respect to age, sex, disease stage, International Prognostic Index score, mid-therapy PET findings (positive or negative), and disease status after therapy and at last follow-up. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared according to mid-therapy PET findings. Results: Of the 294 patients, 163 (55%) were male, 144 (49%) were age >61 years, 110 (37%) had stage I or II disease, 219 (74%) had International Prognostic Index score ≤2, 216 (73%) received ≥6 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, and 88 (30%) received consolidation radiation therapy. Five-year PFS and OS rates were associated with mid-therapy PET status: PFS was 78% for those with PET-negative (PET−) disease versus 63% for PET-positive (PET+) disease (P=.024), and OS was 82% for PET− versus 62% for PET+ (P<.002). These associations held true for patients who received chemotherapy only (PFS 71% for PET− vs 52% PET+ [P=.012], OS 78% for PET− and 51% for PET+ [P=.0055]) but not for those who received consolidation radiation therapy (PFS 84% PET− vs 81% PET+ [P=.88]; OS 90% PET− vs 81% PET+ [P=.39]). Conclusion: Mid-therapy PET can predict patient outcome, but the use of consolidation radiation therapy may negate the significance of mid-therapy findings.

  4. Clinical implications of defining the gross tumor volume with combination of CT and {sup 18}FDG-positron emission tomography in non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S. . E-mail: igrills@beaumont.edu; Yan Di; Black, Quinten C.; Wong, Ching-Yee O.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the planning target volume (PTV) definitions for computed tomography (CT) vs. positron emission tomography (PET) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 21 patients with NSCLC underwent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning. All underwent a staging F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-position emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG-PET) scan and underwent treatment simulation using CT plus a separate planning {sup 18}FDG-PET scan. Three sets of target volumes were defined: Set 1, CT volumes (CT tumor + staging PET nodal disease); Set 2, PET volumes (planning PET tumor {l_brace}gross tumor volume (GTV) = [(0.3069 x mean standardized uptake value) + 0.5853]){r_brace}; Set 3, composite CT-PET volumes (fused CT-PET tumor). Sets 1 and 2 were compared using a matching index. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created using the Set 1 (CT) volumes; and coverage of the Set 3 (composite) volumes was evaluated. Separate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were designed for the Set 3 volumes. Results: For the primary tumor GTV, the Set 1 (CT) volume was larger than the Set 2 (PET) volume in 48%, smaller in 33%, and equal in 19%. The mean matching index was 0.65 (35% CT-PET mismatch). Although quantitatively similar, the volumes differed qualitatively. The Set 3 (composite) volume was larger than either CT or PET alone in 62%, smaller in 24%, and equal in 14%. The dose-volume histogram parameters did not differ among the plans for Set 1 (CT) vs. Set 3 (composite) volumes. Small portions of the Set 3 PTV were significantly underdosed in 40% of cases using the CT-only plan. Conclusion: Computed tomography and PET are complementary and should be obtained in the treatment position and fused to define the GTV for NSCLC. Although the quantitative absolute target volume is sometimes similar, the qualitative target locations can be substantially different, leading to underdosage of the target when planning is

  5. Use of 18F-2-Fluorodeoxyglucose to Label Antibody Fragments for Immuno-Positron Emission Tomography of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We generated 18F-labeled antibody fragments for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using a sortase-mediated reaction to install a trans-cyclooctene-functionalized short peptide onto proteins of interest, followed by reaction with a tetrazine-labeled-18F-2-deoxyfluoroglucose (FDG). The method is rapid, robust, and site-specific (radiochemical yields > 25%, not decay corrected). The availability of 18F-2-deoxyfluoroglucose avoids the need for more complicated chemistries used to generate carbon–fluorine bonds. We demonstrate the utility of the method by detecting heterotopic pancreatic tumors in mice by PET, using anti-Class II MHC single domain antibodies. We correlate macroscopic PET images with microscopic two-photon visualization of the tumor. Our approach provides easy access to 18F-labeled antibodies and their fragments at a level of molecular specificity that complements conventional 18F-FDG imaging. PMID:26955657

  6. The Role of Iodine-124-Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in the Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ravinder K; Lubberink, Mark; Pentlow, Keith S; Larson, Steven M

    2007-07-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biologic processes at the molecular and cellular levels in human beings and other living systems. In thyroid cancer, this includes imaging iodine transport, which is active in about 80% of well-differentiated thyroid malignancies. Iodine-124 imaging with positron emission tomography (I-124-PET) is ideal for this purpose because PET provides tomographic images with spatial and contrast resolution. Because iodine-131 is the mainstay for therapy in thyroid cancer, and because success or failure of therapy depends on the degree of iodine uptake by the tumor cells, I-124-PET imaging will increasingly act as a surrogate for this treatment. This approach may serve as a model for individualized therapeutic interventions for many other malignant and nonmalignant diseases.

  7. 18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography-guided diagnosis of a malignant intramedullary spinal cord tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kebir, Sied; Kimmich, Okka; Niehusmann, Pitt; Gaertner, Florian C.; Essler, Markus; Landsberg, Jennifer; Klockgether, Thomas; Simon, Matthias; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Glas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis in patients with a suspected malignant intramedullary lesion that requires biopsy for definitive diagnosis may be challenging, as spinal cord surgery carries the risk of irreversible neurological deficits. The current study presents the first case of 18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a patient with a spinal cord tumor. The patient was unsuitable for magnetic resonance imaging due to his implanted cardiac defibrillator. 18F-FET PET indicated a high-grade malignancy of the spinal cord, justifying tumor biopsy. Histological analysis was compatible with a malignant melanoma. This is also the first report demonstrating the FET-PET appearance/metabolic phenotype of a malignant melanoma of the spinal cord. PMID:28105177

  8. Diagnostic efficacy of bone scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography in bone metastases of myxoid liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Conill, Carlos; Setoain, Xavier; Colomo, Luis; Palacín, Antonio; Combalia-Aleu, Andreu; Pomés, Jaime; Marruecos, Jordi; Vargas, Mauricio; Maurel, Joan

    2008-03-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas (MLS) have a tendency to metastasize to unusual sites. We report an unusual case of bone metastases not detected by bone scan and neither by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET-FDG) and successfully identified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with metachronic MLS. Histopathological examination of the primary tumor evidenced a tumor with unfavorable prognostic markers, and the biopsy of an iliac bone lesion confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic disease. On histological grounds, the tumor showed features of a more differentiated neoplasm without foci of round cells or necrosis in the latter. MRI allowed the identification of disseminated disease compared to computed tomography (CT) and PET scans. Thus, because of the heterogeneous histological features of MLS and the biological behavior of the disease, a combined approach of FDGPET-CT and MRI, may allow a more accurate staging of soft tissue sarcomas.

  9. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  10. Interrogating Tumor Metabolism and Tumor Microenvironments Using Molecular Positron Emission Tomography Imaging. Theranostic Approaches to Improve Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Orit

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging technology that is becoming increasingly important for the measurement of physiologic, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at cellular and molecular levels in patients with cancer. Formation, development, and aggressiveness of tumor involve a number of molecular pathways, including intrinsic tumor cell mutations and extrinsic interaction between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Currently, evaluation of these processes is mainly through biopsy, which is invasive and limited to the site of biopsy. Ongoing research on specific target molecules of the tumor and its microenvironment for PET imaging is showing great potential. To date, the use of PET for diagnosing local recurrence and metastatic sites of various cancers and evaluation of treatment response is mainly based on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG), which measures glucose metabolism. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer and does not give enough insight into tumor biology and/or its vulnerability to potential treatments. Hence, there is an increasing need for the development of selective biologic radiotracers that will yield specific biochemical information and allow for noninvasive molecular imaging. The possibility of cancer-associated targets for imaging will provide the opportunity to use PET for diagnosis and therapy response monitoring (theranostics) and thus personalized medicine. This article will focus on the review of non-[18F]FDG PET tracers for specific tumor biology processes and their preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:24064460

  11. Role of Positron Emission Tomography in the Treatment of Occult Disease in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark H.; Smith, Wade P.; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine under what conditions positron emission tomography (PET) imaging will be useful in decisions regarding the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of clinically occult lymph node metastases in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A decision model of PET imaging and its downstream effects on radiotherapy outcomes was constructed using an influence diagram. This model included the sensitivity and specificity of PET, as well as the type and stage of the primary tumor. These parameters were varied to determine the optimal strategy for imaging and therapy for different clinical situations. Maximum expected utility was the metric by which different actions were ranked. Results: For primary tumors with a low probability of lymph node metastases, the sensitivity of PET should be maximized, and 50 Gy should be delivered if PET is positive and 0 Gy if negative. As the probability for lymph node metastases increases, PET imaging becomes unnecessary in some situations, and the optimal dose to the lymph nodes increases. The model needed to include the causes of certain health states to predict current clinical practice. Conclusion: The model demonstrated the ability to reproduce expected outcomes for a range of tumors and provided recommendations for different clinical situations. The differences between the optimal policies and current clinical practice are likely due to a disparity between stated clinical decision processes and actual decision making by clinicians.

  12. Positron emission tomography and gene therapy: basic concepts and experimental approaches for in vivo gene expression imaging.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, Iván; Boán, JoséF; Martí-Climent, Josep M; Sangro, Bruno; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús; Richter, José A

    2004-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research have allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where its use for the treatment of human pathologies has been considerably increased in the last years. However, many crucial questions remain to be solved in this challenging field. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of the appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide invaluable qualitative and quantitative information to answer multiple unsolved questions about gene therapy. PET imaging could be used to define parameters not available by other techniques that are of substantial interest not only for the proper understanding of the gene therapy process, but also for its future development and clinical application in humans. This review focuses on the molecular biology basis of gene therapy and molecular imaging, describing the fundamentals of in vivo gene expression imaging by PET, and the application of PET to gene therapy, as a technology that can be used in many different ways. It could be applied to avoid invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring; accurately diagnose the pathology for better planning of the most adequate therapeutic approach; as treatment evaluation to image the functional effects of gene therapy at the biochemical level; as a quantitative noninvasive way to monitor the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression over time; and would also help to a better understanding of vector biology and pharmacology devoted to the development of safer and more efficient vectors.

  13. Impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging in newly diagnosed classical Hodgkin lymphoma: fewer cases with stage I disease and more with skeletal involvement.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Mylam, Karen Juul; Brown, Peter de Nully; Bukh, Anne; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kamper, Peter; Loft, Annika; Iyer, Victor; Gormsen, Lars Christian; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Bøgsted, Martin; d'Amore, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) is a highly accurate staging method in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). We retrospectively compared the staging results obtained in two large cohorts of patients with cHL diagnosed before (n = 324) and after (n = 406) the introduction of PET/CT staging in a retrospective study. In PET/CT staged patients, stage I disease was less frequent (16% vs. 27%, p < 0.001) while stage IV disease was more frequent (17% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Imaging-detected skeletal involvement was recognized more often in PET/CT staged patients (17% vs. 2%, p < 0.001), and the presence of focal skeletal PET/CT lesions was associated with higher risk of progression (hazard ratio [HR] 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-3.36). The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) risk classification (early, intermediate, advanced disease) predicted outcome in PET/CT staged patients. In conclusion, PET/CT led to higher disease stages, and the more frequently diagnosed skeletal lesions may be an adverse prognostic factor.

  14. Imaging substance P receptors (NK1) in the living human brain using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Substance P (SP)-neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor pathways have been implicated in the pathophysiology of emesis and depression. Autoradiographic studies in monkey and human brains have shown a high expression of NK1 receptors in regions important for the regulation of affective behaviors and the neurochemical response to stress. Furthermore, clinical studies demonstrated that treatment with the SP (NK1 receptor) antagonist (SPA) aprepitant (also known as MK-0869) significantly improves depression symptoms and reduces the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. An important objective of all neuroscience drug discovery and development programs is to establish the correlation between dose, receptor occupancy, and the observed clinical effect (the dose-response relationship). These goals can be achieved using radioactive receptor-specific tracers and dynamic noninvasive brain imaging modalities, such as positron emission tomography (PET). In the SPA program, a tracer [18F]SPA-RQ was chosen for PET studies on the basis of several criteria, including high affinity for the NK1 receptor, low nonspecific binding, and good blood-brain barrier penetration. PET imaging studies in rhesus monkeys and humans confirmed these tracer features and established the usefulness of this probe for in vivo NK1 receptor occupancy studies. Subsequent PET occupancy studies in humans predicted that very high levels of central NK1 receptor occupancy (> 90%) were associated with therapeutically significant antidepressant and antiemetic effects. Future PET imaging studies will focus on quantification of NK1 receptor expression in depressed patients, both before and after successful treatment with antidepressants.

  15. Optimised motion tracking for positron emission tomography studies of brain function in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Kyme, Andre Z; Zhou, Victor W; Meikle, Steven R; Baldock, Clive; Fulton, Roger R

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to study functional processes within the body. High resolution PET scanners designed for imaging rodents and non-human primates are now commonplace in preclinical research. Brain imaging in this context, with motion compensation, can potentially enhance the usefulness of PET by avoiding confounds due to anaesthetic drugs and enabling freely moving animals to be imaged during normal and evoked behaviours. Due to the frequent and rapid motion exhibited by alert, awake animals, optimal motion correction requires frequently sampled pose information and precise synchronisation of these data with events in the PET coincidence data stream. Motion measurements should also be as accurate as possible to avoid degrading the excellent spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art scanners. Here we describe and validate methods for optimised motion tracking suited to the correction of motion in awake rats. A hardware based synchronisation approach is used to achieve temporal alignment of tracker and scanner data to within 10 ms. We explored the impact of motion tracker synchronisation error, pose sampling rate, rate of motion, and marker size on motion correction accuracy. With accurate synchronisation (<100 ms error), a sampling rate of >20 Hz, and a small head marker suitable for awake animal studies, excellent motion correction results were obtained in phantom studies with a variety of continuous motion patterns, including realistic rat motion (<5% bias in mean concentration). Feasibility of the approach was also demonstrated in an awake rat study. We conclude that motion tracking parameters needed for effective motion correction in preclinical brain imaging of awake rats are achievable in the laboratory setting. This could broaden the scope of animal experiments currently possible with PET.

  16. Optimization and Reproducibility of Aortic Valve 18F-Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, Timothy R.G.; Jenkins, William S.A.; Adamson, Philip D.; Robson, Phillip; Lucatelli, Christophe; Van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Prendergast, Bernard; Denison, Alan R.; Forsyth, Laura; Rudd, James H.F.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Fletcher, Alison; Tuck, Sharon; Newby, David E.; Dweck, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Background— 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) can measure disease activity and progression in aortic stenosis. Our objectives were to optimize the methodology, analysis, and scan–rescan reproducibility of aortic valve 18F-fluoride PET-CT imaging. Methods and Results— Fifteen patients with aortic stenosis underwent repeated 18F-fluoride PET-CT. We compared nongated PET and noncontrast CT, with a modified approach that incorporated contrast CT and ECG-gated PET. We explored a range of image analysis techniques, including estimation of blood-pool activity at differing vascular sites and a most diseased segment approach. Contrast-enhanced ECG-gated PET-CT permitted localization of 18F-fluoride uptake to individual valve leaflets. Uptake was most commonly observed at sites of maximal mechanical stress: the leaflet tips and the commissures. Scan–rescan reproducibility was markedly improved using enhanced analysis techniques leading to a reduction in percentage error from ±63% to ±10% (tissue to background ratio MDS mean of 1.55, bias −0.05, limits of agreement −0·20 to +0·11). Conclusions— Optimized 18F-fluoride PET-CT allows reproducible localization of calcification activity to different regions of the aortic valve leaflet and commonly to areas of increased mechanical stress. This technique holds major promise in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis and as a biomarker end point in clinical trials of novel therapies. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02132026. PMID:27733431

  17. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and the risk of subsequent aortic complications in giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Liozon, Eric; Lambert, Marc; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Artigues, Nicolas; Geffray, Loïk; Boutemy, Jonathan; Ollivier, Yann; Maigné, Gwénola; Ly, Kim; Huglo, Damien; Hachulla, Eric; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Aouba, Achille; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies reported a 2- to 17-fold higher risk of aortic complications (dilation or dissection) in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We aimed to determine whether or not GCA patients with large-vessel involvement demonstrated by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) have a higher risk of aortic complications. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study between 1995 and 2014. Patients were included if they fulfilled at least 3 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with extratemporal biopsy-proven giant-cell vasculitis; they underwent at least 1 FDG-PET/CT scan at diagnosis or during follow-up; and the morphology of the aorta was assessed by medical imaging at diagnosis. Patients with an aortic complication at the time of diagnosis were excluded. Of the 130 patients included [85 women (65%), median age 70 (50–86)], GCA was biopsy proven in 77 (59%). FDG-PET/CT was performed at diagnosis in 63 (48%) patients and during the follow-up period in the 67 (52%) remaining patients. FDG-PET/CT was positive in 38/63 (60%) patients at diagnosis and in 31/67 (46%) patients when performed during follow-up (P = NS). One hundred four patients (80%) underwent at least 1 morphological assessment of the aorta during follow-up. Nine (9%) patients developed aortic complications (dilation in all and dissection in 1) at a median time of 33 (6–129) months after diagnosis. All of them displayed large-vessel inflammation on previous FDG-PET/CT. A positive FDG-PET/CT was significantly associated with a higher risk of aortic complications (P = 0.004). In our study, a positive FDG-PET/CT was associated with an increased risk of aortic complications at 5 years. PMID:27367985

  18. Correlation of Positron Emission Tomography Standard Uptake Value and Pathologic Specimen Size in Cancer of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J. Rangaswamy, Balasubramanya; Kostakoglu, Lale; Hoch, Benjamin; Genden, Eric M.; Som, Peter M.; Kao, Johnny

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To correlate positron emission tomography (PET) standard uptake value (SUV) with pathologic specimen size in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with Stage II-IVB head-and-neck cancer with 27 tumors who underwent PET and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the head and neck followed by surgical resection were selected for this study. Various SUV thresholds were examined, including the software default (SUV{sub def}), narrowing the window by 1 standard deviation (SD) of the maximum (SUV-1SD), and SUV cutoff values of 2.5 or greater (SUV2.5) and 40% or greater maximum (SUV40). Volumetric pathologic data were available for 12 patients. Tumor volumes based on pathologic examination (gold standard), CT, SUV{sub def}, SUV-1SD, SUV2.5, and SUV40 were analyzed. Results: PET identified five tumors not seen on CT. The sensitivity of PET for identifying primary tumors was 94% (17 of 18). The Sensitivity of PET for staging the neck was 90% (9 of 10), whereas the specificity was 78% (7 of 9). The SUV2.5 method was most likely to overestimate tumor volume, whereas SUV{sub def} and SUV-1SD were most likely to underestimate tumor volume. Conclusions: The PET scan provides more accurate staging of primary tumors and nodal metastases for patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer than CT alone. Compared with the gold standard, significant variability exists in volumes obtained by using various SUV thresholds. A combination of clinical, CT, and PET data should continue to be used for optimal treatment planning. The SUV40 method appears to offer the best compromise between accuracy and reducing the risk of underestimating tumor extent.

  19. GATE - Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Jan, S.; Santin, G.; Strul, D.; Staelens, S.; Assié, K.; Autret, D.; Avner, S.; Barbier, R.; Bardiès, M.; Bloomfield, P. M.; Brasse, D.; Breton, V.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Buvat, I.; Chatziioannou, A. F.; Choi, Y.; Chung, Y. H.; Comtat, C.; Donnarieix, D.; Ferrer, L.; Glick, S. J.; Groiselle, C. J.; Guez, D.; Honore, P.-F.; Kerhoas-Cavata, S.; Kirov, A. S.; Kohli, V.; Koole, M.; Krieguer, M.; van der Laan, D. J.; Lamare, F.; Largeron, G.; Lartizien, C.; Lazaro, D.; Maas, M. C.; Maigne, L.; Mayet, F.; Melot, F.; Merheb, C.; Pennacchio, E.; Perez, J.; Pietrzyk, U.; Rannou, F. R.; Rey, M.; Schaart, D. R.; Schmidtlein, C. R.; Simon, L.; Song, T. Y.; Vieira, J.-M.; Visvikis, D.; Van de Walle, R.; Wieërs, E.; Morel, C.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is an essential tool in emission tomography that can assist in the design of new medical imaging devices, the optimization of acquisition protocols, and the development or assessment of image reconstruction algorithms and correction techniques. GATE, the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission, encapsulates the Geant4 libraries to achieve a modular, versatile, scripted simulation toolkit adapted to the field of nuclear medicine. In particular, GATE allows the description of time-dependent phenomena such as source or detector movement, and source decay kinetics. This feature makes it possible to simulate time curves under realistic acquisition conditions and to test dynamic reconstruction algorithms. This paper gives a detailed description of the design and development of GATE by the OpenGATE collaboration, whose continuing objective is to improve, document, and validate GATE by simulating commercially available imaging systems for PET and SPECT. Large effort is also invested in the ability and the flexibility to model novel detection systems or systems still under design. A public release of GATE licensed under the GNU Lesser General Public License can be downloaded at the address http://www-lphe.ep.ch/GATE/. Two benchmarks developed for PET and SPECT to test the installation of GATE and to serve as a tutorial for the users are presented. Extensive validation of the GATE simulation platform has been started, comparing simulations and measurements on commercially available acquisition systems. References to those results are listed. The future prospects toward the gridification of GATE and its extension to other domains such as dosimetry are also discussed. PMID:15552416

  20. Thoracic [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake measured by positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Frille, Armin; Steinhoff, Karen Geva; Hesse, Swen; Grachtrup, Sabine; Wald, Alexandra; Wirtz, Hubert; Sabri, Osama; Seyfarth, Hans-Juergen

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualizes increased cellular [F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([F]FDG) uptake. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is conceived of a proliferative disease of the lung vessels. Increased glucose uptake can be quantified as pulmonary [F]FDG uptake via PET imaging. Because the angioproliferative mechanisms in PH are still in need of further description, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether [F]FDG PET/CT imaging can elucidate these pathophysiologic mechanisms in different etiologies of PH.Patients (n = 109) with end-stage pulmonary disease being evaluated for lung transplant were included in this observational study. Mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) of predefined regions of interest in lung parenchyma (LP), left (LV), and right ventricle (RV) of the heart, and SUVmax in pulmonary artery (PA) were determined and normalized to liver uptake. These SUV ratios (SUVRs) were compared with results from right heart catheterization (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP], pulmonary vascular resistance [PVR]), and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Group comparisons were performed and Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were calculated.The [F]FDG uptake ratios in LP, RV, RV/LV, and PA, but not in LV, were found to be significantly higher in both patients with mPAP ≥25 mm Hg (P = 0.013, P = 0.006, P = 0.049, P = 0.002, P = 0.68, respectively) and with PVR ≥480 dyn·s/cm (P < 0.001, P = 0.045, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.26, respectively). The [F]FDG uptake in these regions positively correlated also with mPAP, PVR, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. The SUVR of PA positively correlated with the SUVR of LP and RV (r = 0.55, r = 0.42, respectively).Pulmonary and cardiac [F]FDG uptake in PET imaging positively correlated with the presence and severity of PH in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease. Increased glucose metabolism in the central PAs seems to

  1. Thoracic [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake measured by positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Frille, Armin; Steinhoff, Karen Geva; Hesse, Swen; Grachtrup, Sabine; Wald, Alexandra; Wirtz, Hubert; Sabri, Osama; Seyfarth, Hans-Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Positron emission tomography (PET) visualizes increased cellular [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) uptake. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is conceived of a proliferative disease of the lung vessels. Increased glucose uptake can be quantified as pulmonary [18F]FDG uptake via PET imaging. Because the angioproliferative mechanisms in PH are still in need of further description, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether [18F]FDG PET/CT imaging can elucidate these pathophysiologic mechanisms in different etiologies of PH. Patients (n = 109) with end-stage pulmonary disease being evaluated for lung transplant were included in this observational study. Mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) of predefined regions of interest in lung parenchyma (LP), left (LV), and right ventricle (RV) of the heart, and SUVmax in pulmonary artery (PA) were determined and normalized to liver uptake. These SUV ratios (SUVRs) were compared with results from right heart catheterization (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP], pulmonary vascular resistance [PVR]), and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Group comparisons were performed and Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were calculated. The [18F]FDG uptake ratios in LP, RV, RV/LV, and PA, but not in LV, were found to be significantly higher in both patients with mPAP ≥25 mm Hg (P = 0.013, P = 0.006, P = 0.049, P = 0.002, P = 0.68, respectively) and with PVR ≥480 dyn·s/cm5 (P < 0.001, P = 0.045, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.26, respectively). The [18F]FDG uptake in these regions positively correlated also with mPAP, PVR, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. The SUVR of PA positively correlated with the SUVR of LP and RV (r = 0.55, r = 0.42, respectively). Pulmonary and cardiac [18F]FDG uptake in PET imaging positively correlated with the presence and severity of PH in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease. Increased glucose metabolism

  2. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration for diagnosis and intraoperative localization in recurrent nelson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Eric B; Tomlin, Jeffery M; Chengazi, Vaseem; Vates, G Edward

    2013-06-01

    Recurrent pituitary disease presents unique challenges, including in some cases difficulty localizing a tumor radiographically. Here, we present the case of a patient with recurrent Nelson syndrome whose radiographic work-up was complicated by a significant parasellar metallic artifact. Positron emission tomography ultimately localized the lesion, and coregistration with computed tomography allowed for accurate intraoperative navigation. Additionally, we review a range of imaging techniques available in the evaluation of pituitary disease.

  3. The impact of fluor-18-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in the management of colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wiering, Bastiaan; Krabbe, Paul F M; Jager, Gerrit J; Oyen, Wim J G; Ruers, Theo J M

    2005-12-15

    Fluor-18-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has emerged as a promising diagnostic modality in recurrent colorectal carcinoma. Whole-body FDG-PET may be an accurate diagnostic modality to determine whether patients with recurrent hepatic disease are suitable candidates for curative resection. Reports on the use of FDG-PET in patients with recurrent colorectal carcinoma are scarce, especially those on colorectal liver metastases. To assess the usefulness of this emerging modality for the selection of patients to undergo resection for colorectal liver metastases, a systematic (meta)-analysis of the current literature was conducted. In the absence of randomized controlled clinical trials, a traditional meta-analysis could not be performed. An alternative strategy was designed to evaluate the current literature. After a literature search, an index score was devised to evaluate the articles with regard to the impact of FDG-PET in patients with colorectal liver metastases. The index scored articles on several items and, as such, could be considered an objective approach for the assessment of diagnostic, nonrandomized clinical trials. The proposed index proved to be an independent instrument for judging several research questions and was used systematically to address the sensitivity, specificity, and clinical impact of FDG-PET in patients with colorectal liver metastases. For FDG-PET, the pooled sensitivity and specificity results were 88.0% and 96.1%, respectively, for hepatic disease and 91.5% and 95.4%, respectively, for extrahepatic disease. For the 6 articles that reported the highest scores on the index, the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for hepatic metastatic disease were 79.9% and 92.3%, respectively, and 91.2% and 98.4%, respectively, for extrahepatic disease, respectively. For computed tomography, the pooled sensitivity and specificity results were 82.7% and 84.1%, respectively, for hepatic lesions and 60.9% and 91.1%, respectively, for

  4. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C; Martel, Mary K; Pelizzari, Charles A

    2007-11-01

    The increased interest in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an "analysis region" to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  5. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-11-15

    The increased interest in {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an 'analysis region' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of

  6. Single Photon Emission Local Tomography (SPELT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1996-12-31

    Local tomography uses truncated projection data to reconstruct a region of interest, and is important in medical imaging and industrial non-destructive evaluation using micro X-ray CT. The popular filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm does not reconstruct a reliable image, which varies with the degree and location of truncation due to its global convolution kernel. A typical local tomography method uses a second derivative local operator to replace the global convolution kernel in the filtered backprojection algorithm (LFBP). By using a local filter, the reconstructed region depends only on the local projections. The singularities (edges) are preserved, but the exact image value cannot be recovered. This paper, using the data consistency conditions, developed a pre-processing technique that uses the FBP algorithm, which outperforms direct FBP and LFBP.

  7. A Prospective Analysis of Positron Emission Tomography and Conventional Imaging for Detection of Stage IV Metastatic Melanoma in Patients Undergoing Metastasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Steven E.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Hoffman, John M.; Galen, Barbara; Choyke, Peter; White, Donald E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Sherry, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG-PET) is available for evaluation of patients with melanoma. This study evaluates the potential of FDG-PET to improve on conventional imaging (CI) in patients with stage IV melanoma undergoing metastasectomy. Methods This was a prospective study comparing radiological evaluation of patients who underwent metastasectomy for palliation or cure. Patients underwent preoperative evaluation by physical examination, CI by computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, and FDG-PET. Independent observers performed three separate analyses of CI alone, FDG-PET alone, or FDG-PET read with knowledge of CI (FDG-PET + CI). Abnormalities were reported as benign or malignant and assessed by pathologic analysis or by clinical outcome determined by disease progression detected on serial evaluations. Results Ninety-four lesions were noted in 18 patients who underwent preoperative assessment, metastasectomy, and long-term follow up (median, 24 months). Lesion-by-lesion analysis for CI demonstrated a sensitivity of 76%, a specificity of 87%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 86%, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 76%. FDG-PET demonstrated a sensitivity of 79%, a specificity of 87%, a PPV of 86%, and an NPV of 80%. For FDG-PET + CI, the sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 91%, and PPV and NPV were 91% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions Combined use of FDG-PET and CI may be an accurate strategy to identify sites of disease in patients with stage IV melanoma being considered for metastasectomy. Interpreted independently, FDG-PET and CI seemed to be equivalent modalities. FDG-PET + CI had both the highest sensitivity on lesion-by-lesion analysis and the best accuracy on patient-by-patient analysis. PMID:15249335

  8. Positron Emission Tomography-Guided, Focal-Dose Escalation Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira . E-mail: indira@krtkg1.ugent.be; Duthoy, Wim; Derie, Cristina R.N.; De Gersem, Werner Ir.; Boterberg, Tom; Saerens, Micky; Jacobs, Filip Ir.; Gregoire, Vincent; Lonneux, Max; Vakaet, Luc; Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Bauters, Wouter; Bonte, Katrien; Thierens, Hubert; Neve, Wilfried de

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using positron emission tomography (PET)-guided dose escalation, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was designed to escalate the dose limited to the [{sup 18}-F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)-delineated subvolume within the gross tumor volume. Positron emission tomography scanning was performed in the treatment position. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with an upfront simultaneously integrated boost was employed. Two dose levels were planned: 25 Gy (level I) and 30 Gy (level II), delivered in 10 fractions. Standard IMRT was applied for the remaining 22 fractions of 2.16 Gy. Results: Between 2003 and 2005, 41 patients were enrolled, with 23 at dose level I, and 18 at dose level II; 39 patients completed the planned therapy. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 14 months. Two cases of dose-limiting toxicity occurred at dose level I (Grade 4 dermitis and Grade 4 dysphagia). One treatment-related death at dose level II halted the study. Complete response was observed in 18 of 21 (86%) and 13 of 16 (81%) evaluated patients at dose levels I and II (p < 0.7), respectively, with actuarial 1-year local control at 85% and 87% (p n.s.), and 1-year overall survival at 82% and 54% (p = 0.06), at dose levels I and II, respectively. In 4 of 9 patients, the site of relapse was in the boosted {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-delineated region. Conclusions: For head and neck cancer, PET-guided dose escalation appears to be well-tolerated. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached at the investigated dose levels.

  9. FEASIBILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN PROTON BEAM CANCER THERAPY.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE - WANG,J.J.; DILMANIAN,F.A.; PEGGS,S.G.; SCHLYEER,D.J.; VASKA,P.

    2002-06-03

    Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than x-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O. These radioisotopes, mainly {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N and {sup 15}O, allow imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting PET images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner.

  10. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Krishnendu; Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J.; Chen, Yu.

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  11. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Cell Metabolism and Application to Therapy Response Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Challapalli, Amarnath; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells do reprogram their energy metabolism to enable several functions, such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article, we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET) to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogs of choline, including [11C]choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogramed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism. PMID:26973812

  12. Cognitive processes and cerebral cortical fundi: findings from positron-emission tomography studies.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Tulving, E

    1994-10-25

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) studies of regional cerebral blood flow have provided evidence relevant to localization of cognitive functions. The critical loci identified in these studies are typically described in terms of macroanatomically labeled cortical and subcortical regions. We report the results of a meta-analysis of localization of changes in blood flow, based on nearly 1000 cerebral cortical peaks of activity obtained from groups of subjects in 30 PET studies. The results showed that, on average, 47% of these peaks were localized within the fundus regions of cortical sulci. This is an unexpectedly high proportion because fundal regions compose < 8% of the cortical mantle. Further analysis suggested a coarse correlation between the extent of fundal activation observed in different studies and the estimated cognitive complexity of the tasks used in the studies. These findings are potentially interesting because (i) the preponderance of fundal activation has implications for the interpretation of the PET data, (ii) they suggest that cortical sulcal and fundal regions may play a distinctive role in higher cognitive processing, or (iii) both of the above.

  13. Metabolizer in vivo of fullerenes and metallofullerenes by positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Yang, Wenjiang; Cui, Rongli; Wang, Dongliang; Chang, Yanan; Gu, Weihong; Yin, Wenyan; Bai, Xue; Chen, Kui; Xia, Lin; Geng, Huan; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-04-01

    Fullerenes (C60) and metallofullerenes (Gd@C82) have similar chemical structure, but the bio-effects of both fullerene-based materials are distinct in vivo. Tracking organic carbon-based materials such as C60 and Gd@C82 is difficult in vivo due to the high content of carbon element in the living tissues themselves. In this study, the biodistribution and metabolism of fullerenes (C60 and Gd@C82) radiolabeled with 64Cu were observed by positron emission tomography (PET). 64Cu-C60 and 64Cu-Gd@C82 were prepared using 1, 4, 7, 10-tetrakis (carbamoylmethyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetra-azacyclodo-decanes grafted on carbon cages as a chelator for 64Cu, and were obtained rapidly with high radiochemical yield (≥90%). The new radio-conjugates were evaluated in vivo in the normal mouse model and tissue distribution by small animal PET/CT imaging and histology was carried out. The PET imaging, the biodistribution and the excretion of C60 and Gd@C82 indicated that C60 samples have higher blood retention and lower renal clearance than the Gd@C82 samples in vivo and suggested that the differences in metabolism and distribution in vivo were caused by the structural differences of the groups on the fullerene cages though there is chemical similarity between C60 and Gd@C82.

  14. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with 18F positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Psaltis, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of 18Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of 18Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  15. Pretargeted Positron Emission Tomography Imaging That Employs Supramolecular Nanoparticles with in Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuang; Choi, Jin-Sil; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Xing, Yan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Ziyue K; Ro, Tracy; Wu, Lily; Stout, David B; Tomlinson, James S; Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Lin, Wei-Yu

    2016-01-26

    A pretargeted oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that leverages the power of supramolecular nanoparticles with in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry was demonstrated for the clinically relevant problem of tumor imaging. The advantages of this approach are that (i) the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of tumor-targeting and imaging agents can be independently altered via chemical alteration to achieve the desired in vivo performance and (ii) the interplay between the two PKs and other controllable variables confers a second layer of control toward improved PET imaging. In brief, we utilized supramolecular chemistry to synthesize tumor-targeting nanoparticles containing transcyclooctene (TCO, a bioorthogonal reactive motif), called TCO⊂SNPs. After the intravenous injection and subsequent concentration of the TCO⊂SNPs in the tumors of living mice, a small molecule containing both the complementary bioorthogonal motif (tetrazine, Tz) and a positron-emitting radioisotope ((64)Cu) was injected to react selectively and irreversibly to TCO. High-contrast PET imaging of the tumor mass was accomplished after the rapid clearance of the unreacted (64)Cu-Tz probe. Our nanoparticle approach encompasses a wider gamut of tumor types due to the use of EPR effects, which is a universal phenomenon for most solid tumors.

  16. Imaging of the pancreas using dynamic positron emission tomography with N-13 ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, N.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Adachi, H.; Senda, M.; Saji, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-05-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new imaging technique of the pancreas. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 3 normal volunteers, 9 patient without the evidence of pancreatic diseases, 2 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head and one patient with islet cell carcinoma. Immediately after the intravenous injection of 10-20mCi of N-13 ammonia, data were obtained every 150 seconds for 30 minutes using a multi-slice whole-body PET scanner. In two cases of adenocarcinoma, the pancreas was not imaged, probably because the nontumorous portion of the pancreas was also suffered from severe pancreatitis due to the