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Sample records for emittance flat beams

  1. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Piot, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ~37 MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25 μm (emittance ratio is ~400), 0.13 μm, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41 μm, 0.20 μm, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2-nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  2. Photoinjector production of a flat beam with transverse emittance ratio of 100

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Sun, Y.E.; Kim, K.J.; /Argonne

    2006-08-01

    The generation of a flat electron beam directly from a photoinjector is an attractive alternative to the electron damping ring as envisioned for linear colliders. It also has potential applications to light sources such as the generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses or Smith-Purcell free electron lasers. In this paper, we report on the experimental generation of a flat beam with a measured transverse emittance ratio of 100 {+-} 20 for a bunch charge of {approx_equal} 0.5 nC. The experimental data, obtained at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are compared with numerical simulations and the expected scaling laws. Possible improvement of the experiment along with application for such a flat beams are discussed.

  3. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  4. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  5. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  6. Beam emittance measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, t.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-05-04

    The RHIC proton polarimeters can operate in scanning mode, giving polarization profiles and transverse beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. The polarimeters function as wire scanners, providing a very good signal/noise ratio and high counting rate. This allows accurate bunch-by-bunch emittance measurements during fast target sweeps (<1 s) through the beam. Very thin carbon strip targets make these measurements practically non-destructive. Bunch by bunch emittance measurements are a powerful tool for machine set-up; in RHIC, individual proton beam transverse emittances can only be measured by CNI polarimeter scans. We discuss the consistency of these measurements with Ionization Profile Monitors (IPMs) and vernier scan luminosity measurements. Absolute accuracy limitations and cross-calibration of different techniques are also discussed.

  7. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  8. Single-knob beam line for transverse emittance partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottländer, P.

    2013-04-01

    Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the transverse rms Twiss parameters (αx,y and βx,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field strength.

  9. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  10. PROTON BEAM EMITTANCE GROWTH AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.; PTITSYN, V.

    2007-06-25

    With significant beam intensity improvement in RHIC polarized proton runs in 2005 and 2006, the emittance growth becomes a luminosity limiting factor. The beam emittance growth has a dependence on the dynamic pressure rise, which in RHIC proton runs is mainly caused by the electron cloud. The beam instability is usually absent, and the emittance growth rate is much slower than the ones caused by the head-tail instability. It is suspected that the emittance growth is caused by the electron cloud below the instability threshold.

  11. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  12. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-e

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  13. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  14. Beam spreading and emittance oscillation of an intense magnetized beam in free space.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-x.; Kim, K.-J.; Zhang, J. G.; Accelerator Systems Division; IIT

    2006-01-01

    Intense beams with large angular momentum have important applications in electron cooling and in producing flat beams suitable for ultrafast x-ray generation, Smith-Purcell radiators, and possibly for a future linear collider. To gain a basic understanding of the influence of beam angular momentum in an otherwise space-charge-dominated beam, the behavior of such a beam in free space will be examined here, in particular, beam spreading due to space-charge force, as well as emittance oscillation. Drift space is an important part of a split photoinjector and plays a significant role in emitance compensation of a high-brightness photoinjector.

  15. Beam emittance from ARPES for photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkay, Katherine; Spentzouris, Linda; Nemeth, Karoly; Droubay, Timothy; Chambers, Scott; Joly, Alan; Hess, Wayne

    2014-03-01

    A commonly-used beam emittance measurement for photoinjector sources involves accelerating a low-charge beam to a few megavolts in an electron gun, then using a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic to image the transverse charge distribution. The emission distribution at the cathode surface could in principle be deduced through simulations, but cannot be measured directly with this method. In the quest to develop ultra-bright photoinjectors, it would be advantageous to be able to measure the emission distribution directly, and use this as a screening process to characterize different photocathode candidates. Angle-resolved photoemission sepctroscopy (ARPES), used widely in surface science, has been proposed [H. Padmore (private communication)] as a method to measure the photocathode intrinsic emittance. A promising novel photocathode, a thin layer of MgO on Ag was recently fabricated and ARPES measurements were carried out [T.C. Droubay et al., PRL (in press)]. The analysis of these data and resulting emittance will be presented. Implications for its use in simulations and design of future photoinjectors will also be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Science (DE-AC02-06CH11357) and the National Science Foundation (No. PHY-0969989). The measurements were carried out at the EMSL user facility at PNNL.

  16. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  17. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  18. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  19. Beam emittance reduction during operation of Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar Kant, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam

    2015-11-15

    Indus-2 storage ring is a 2.5 GeV third generation synchrotron radiation source. This source was commissioned using a moderate optics. Beam injection was accomplished using an off momentum electron beam to avoid difficulties faced in storage of beam at 550 MeV. The injection procedure and relevant beam dynamical studies are discussed. The switch over from the moderate optics to low emittance optics is done at 2.5 GeV after storing the electron beam. The procedure evolved to reduce the beam emittance and its implementation during the operation is discussed.

  20. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  1. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  2. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Beam dynamics in rf guns and emittance correction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, Luca

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a general review of beam dynamics in a laser-driven rf gun. The peculiarity of such an accelerating structure versus other conventional multi-cell linac structures is underlined on the basis of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem, which is found to give a theoretical background for the well known Kim's model. A basic explanation for some proposed methods to correct rf induced emittance growth is also derived from the theorem. We also present three emittance correction techniques for the recovery of space-charge induced emittance growth, namely the optimum distributed disk-like bunch technique, the use of rf spatial harmonics to correct spherical aberration induced by space charge forces and the technique of emittance filtering by clipping the electron beam. The expected performances regarding the beam quality achievable with different techniques, as predicted by scaling laws and simulations, are analyzed, and, where available, compared to experimental results.

  4. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  5. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Connolly, R; Liu, C.; Summers, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  6. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  7. MICE Step 1: Beam Line Commissioning and First Emittance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coney, Linda R.; MICE Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The MICE beam line provides a pulsed muon beam in order to measure ionization cooling on a muon-by-muon basis. Commissioned in 2009, it now routinely produces beams of pions, muons, and electrons between 100-450 MeV/c. Particle ID is provided by Cherenkov detectors, time-of-flight hodoscopes (TOFs), and a lead-fiber electron pre-shower (KL). Particle production rates were determined and a first measurement of emittance has been performed.

  8. Square shaped flat-top beam in refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-08-01

    Lossless transformation of round Gaussian to square shaped flat-top collimated beam is important in building highpower solid state laser systems to improve optical pumping or amplification. There are industrial micromachining applications like scribing, display repair, which performance is improved when a square shaped spot with uniform intensity is created. Proved beam shaping solutions to these techniques are refractive field mapping beam shapers having some important features: flatness of output phase front, small output divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field, operation with TEM00 and multimode lasers. Usual approach to design refractive beam shapers implies that input and output beams have round cross-section, therefore the only way to create a square shaped output beam is using a square mask, which leads to essential losses. When an input laser beam is linearly polarized it is suggested to generate square shaped flat-top output by applying beam shaper lenses from birefringent materials or by using additional birefringent components. Due to birefringence there is introduced phase retardation in beam parts and is realized a square shaped interference pattern at the beam shaper output. Realization of this approach requires small phase retardation, therefore weak birefringence effect is enough and birefringent optical components, operating in convergent or divergent beams, can be made from refractive materials, which crystal optical axis is parallel to optical axis of entire beam shaper optical system. There will be considered design features of beam shapers creating square shaped flat-top beams. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  9. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  10. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  11. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  12. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  13. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  14. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Power, J. G.; Piot, P.; Sun, Y.-E.

    2009-01-22

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  15. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Kim, K. J.; Sun, Y. E.; Piot, P.; Rihaoui, M.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNAL

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  16. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.J.; Piot, Philippe; Power, John Gorham; Sun, Y.E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  17. Analysis of kicker noise induced beam emittance growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Blacker, I.M.; Brennan, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Marr, G.; Mernick, K.; Mi, J.; Minty, M.; Naylor, C.; Roser, T.; Shrey, T.; van Kuik, B.; Zelenski, A.

    2012-05-20

    Over the last few years, physicists have occasionally observed the presence of noise acting on the RHIC beams leading to emittance growth at high beam energies. While the noise was sporadic in the past, it became persistent during the Run-11 setup period. An investigation diagnosed the source as originating from the RHIC dump kicker system. Once identified the issue was quickly resolved. We report in this paper the investigation result, circuit analysis, measured and simulated waveforms, solutions, and future plans.

  18. THE LASER EMITTANCE SCANNER FOR 1 GEV H- BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Dong-O; Pogge, James R; Menshov, Alexander A; Nesterenko, Igor N; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Webster, Anthony W; Grice, Warren P

    2009-01-01

    A transverse phase space laser emittance scanner is proposed [1] and under development for the 1-GeV H- SNS linac, using a laser beam as a slit. For a 1-GeV H- beam, it is difficult to build a slit because the stopping distance is more than 50 cm in copper. We propose a Laser Emittance Scanner (LES) to use a laser beam as an effective slit by stripping off the outer electron of the H- (making it neutral) upstream of a bend magnet and measuring the stripped component downstream of the bend magnet. The design and modeling of the system will be discussed. We are expecting to make a preliminary measurement in 2009.

  19. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Asova, G.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Groß, M.; Hakobyan, L.; Isaev, I.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jachmann, L.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Köhler, W.; Mahgoub, M.; Malyutin, D.; Nozdrin, M.; Oppelt, A.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Rimjaem, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Vashchenko, G.; Weidinger, S.; Wenndorff, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Lederer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Templin, I.; Will, I.; Paramonov, V.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ). Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008-2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010-2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  20. Beam uniformity of flat top lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao; Cramer, Larry; Danielson, Don; Norby, James

    2015-03-01

    Many beams that output from standard commercial lasers are multi-mode, with each mode having a different shape and width. They show an overall non-homogeneous energy distribution across the spot size. There may be satellite structures, halos and other deviations from beam uniformity. However, many scientific, industrial and medical applications require flat top spatial energy distribution, high uniformity in the plateau region, and complete absence of hot spots. Reliable standard methods for the evaluation of beam quality are of great importance. Standard methods are required for correct characterization of the laser for its intended application and for tight quality control in laser manufacturing. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published standard procedures and definitions for this purpose. These procedures have not been widely adopted by commercial laser manufacturers. This is due to the fact that they are unreliable because an unrepresentative single-pixel value can seriously distort the result. We hereby propose a metric of beam uniformity, a way of beam profile visualization, procedures to automatically detect hot spots and beam structures, and application examples in our high energy laser production.

  1. Tunneling-enabled spectrally selective thermal emitter based on flat metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu; Luk, Ting S.; Tan, Yixuan; Ji, Dengxin; Zhou, Ming; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu

    2015-03-11

    Infrared thermal emission from metals has important energy applications in thermophotovoltaics, radiative cooling, and lighting. The emissivity of flat metal films is close to zero because the screening effect prevents metals' fluctuating currents from emitting to the far field. As a result, metal films are often used as reflecting mirrors instead of thermal emitters. Recently, nanostructured metals, such as metamaterials, have emerged as an interesting way to enhance and to spectrally control thermal emission based on plasmonic resonant effects. However, they require sophisticated lithography. Here, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a completely different mechanism to achieve spectrally selective metallic emitters based on atunneling effect. Furthermore, this effect allows a simple flat metal film to achieve a near-unity emissivity with controlled spectral selectivity for efficient heat-to-light energy conversion.

  2. Tunneling-enabled spectrally selective thermal emitter based on flat metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu; Tan, Yixuan; Zhou, Ming; Yu, Zongfu; Luk, Ting Shan; Ji, Dengxin; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-03-09

    Infrared thermal emission from metals has important energy applications in thermophotovoltaics, radiative cooling, and lighting. Unfortunately, the emissivity of flat metal films is close to zero because the screening effect prevents metals' fluctuating currents from emitting to the far field. As a result, metal films are often used as reflecting mirrors instead of thermal emitters. Recently, nanostructured metals, such as metamaterials, have emerged as an interesting way to enhance and to spectrally control thermal emission based on plasmonic resonant effects. However, they require sophisticated lithography. Here, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a completely different mechanism to achieve spectrally selective metallic emitters based on a tunneling effect. This effect allows a simple flat metal film to achieve a near-unity emissivity with controlled spectral selectivity for efficient heat-to-light energy conversion.

  3. BEAM EMITTANCE DIAGNOSTIC FOR THE DARHT SECOND AXIS INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    R. BARTSCH; C. EKDAHL; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Low beam emittance is key to achieving the required spot size at the output focus of the DARHT Second Axis. The nominal electron beam parameters at the output of the injector are 2 kA, 4.6 MeV, 2-microsecond pulse width and an rms radius less than 1 cm. Emittance is measured by bringing the beam to a focus in which the emittance is a dominant influence in determining the spot size. The spot size is measured from Cerenkov or optical transition radiation (OTR) generated from a target intercepted by the beam. The current density in the focused DARHT beam would melt this target in less than 1/2 microsec. To prevent this we have designed a DC magnetic transport system that defocuses the beam on the emittance target to prevent overheating, and uses a 125-ns half period pulsed solenoid to selectively focus the beam for short times during the beam pulse. During the development of the fast-focusing portion of this diagnostic it has been determined that the focusing pulse must rapidly sweep through the focus at the target to an over-focused condition to avoid target damage due to overheating. The fast focus produces {approx}1 kilogauss field over an effective length of {approx}50 cm to bring the beam to a focus on the target. The fast focus field is generated with a 12-turn coil located inside the beam-transport vacuum chamber with the entire fast coil structure within the bore of a D.C. magnet. The pulsed coil diameter of {approx}15 cm is dictated by the return current path at the nominal vacuum wall. Since the drive system is to use 40 kV to 50 kV technology and much of the inductance is in the drive and feed circuit, the coil design has three 120 degree segments. The coil, driver and feed system design, as well as beam envelope calculations and target heating calculations are presented below. Operation of the OTR imaging system will be discussed in separate publication (Ref. 1).

  4. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2006-12-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of {ge}200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while {ge}500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  5. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of {>=}200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while {>=}500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  6. Beam Emittance Measurement with Laser Wire Scanners in the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, I.; Blair, G.A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    Accurate measurement of the beam phase-space is essential for the next generation of electron accelerators. A scheme for beam optics optimization and beam matrix reconstruction algorithms for the diagnostics section of the beam delivery system of the International Linear Collider based on laser-wire beam profile monitors are discussed. Possible modes of operation of the laser-wire system together with their corresponding performance are presented. Based on these results, prospects for reconstructing the ILC beam emittance from representative laser-wire beam size measurements are evaluated.

  7. Emittance Analysis of the DIII-D Neutral Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, N. A.; Crowley, B.

    2014-10-01

    In a high powered neutral beam system ions are extracted from a low temperature plasma, through apertures in the arc chamber, by application of a potential to an external electrode. It has been determined that to increase the beam energy of the DIII-D neutral beam system beyond 95 keV the accelerator must be reconfigured to avoid excessive electrical breakdown in the grid gaps. Deciding exactly what modifications are to be made requires modeling and experimental effort. A basic problem is to find a geometry with which the extracted beam is intense, low divergence, free of aberrations, and does not strike the focusing electrodes. We present the results of modeling proposed reconfigurations to the accelerator geometry and source conditions. The quality of the beam produced from the various accelerator configurations is quantified through metrics such as the beam emittance and the average divergence per beamlet. By comparing the beam quality and power delivered for each proposed reconfiguration an optimal design is selected and recommended. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-15

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10{sup −9}–10{sup −6} ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a {sup 12}C{sup 5+} beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  9. The MICE spectrometers for the measurement of muon beam emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hideyuki

    2010-11-01

    Tracking detectors based on 350-μm scintillating fibers have been developed to measure muon-beam emittance at the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), the goal of which is to demonstrate ionization cooling by constructing and testing part of a cooling channel designed for a Neutrino Factory. The upstream and downstream trackers were assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2008 and 2009. The mechanical design and construction (including quality assurance) procedures used for the trackers are described in this paper. Results from the cosmic-ray test performed for the upstream tracker at RAL in 2008 are also presented.

  10. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, H. Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S.

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  11. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18-20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  12. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  13. Procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, I. Yu

    2016-09-01

    The procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam generated by RF gun and reconstruction of its longitudinal phase portrait is proposed. Measuring system consists of vertical deflecting RF cavity, horizontal bending dipole and screen. The beam spot on the screen is used to reconstruct the longitudinal phase portrait. In the proposed procedure an electromagnetic field of the vertical deflecting RF cavity can be approximated by the TM110 mode of pillbox cavity. This approximation allows analytically solve the motion equations of the electron motion in the vertical deflecting RF cavity. The report contains description of the vertical deflecting RF cavity and the dipole, the formulae underlying the procedure and the results of numerical simulation.

  14. Emittance growth of an nonequilibrium intense electron beam in a transport channel with discrete focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    The author analyzes the emittance growth mechanisms for a continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. The emittance grows from the effect of nonlinear forces arising from (1) current density nonuniformities, (2) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (3) axial variations in the radial vector potential, (4) an axial velocity shear along the beam, and (5) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The emittance growth is studied analytically and numerically for the cases of balanced flow, tight focusing, and slight beam scalloping, and is additionally studied numerically for an existing 6-MeV induction linear accelerator. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are established. Some emittance growth will always occur, both from current density nonuniformities that arise along the transport and from beam radius changes along the transport.

  15. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  16. Relaxation and emittance growth of a thermal charged-particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Teles, Tarcisio N.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2009-10-26

    We present a theory that allows us to accurately calculate the distribution functions and the emittance growth of a thermal charged-particle beam after it relaxes to equilibrium. The theory can be used to obtain the fraction of particles, which will evaporate from the beam to form a halo. The calculated emittance growth is found to be in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  17. SU-E-T-635: Quantitative Study On Beam Flatness Variation with Beam Energy Change

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Eldib, A; Ma, C; Lin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam flatness check has been proposed for beam energy check for photon beams with flattering filters. In this work, beam flatness change with beam energy was investigated quantitatively using the Monte Carlo method and its significance was compared with depth dose curve change. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations for a linear accelerator with flattering filter were performed with different initial electron energies for photon beams of 6MV and 10MV. Dose calculations in a water phantom were then perform with the phase space files obtained from the simulations. The beam flatness was calculated based on the dose profile at 10 cm depth for all the beams with different initial electron energies. The percentage depth dose (PDD) curves were also analyzed. The dose at 10cm depth (D10) and the ratio of the dose at 10cm and 20cm depth (D10/D20) and their change with the beam energy were calculated and compared with the beam flatness variation. Results: It was found that the beam flatness variation with beam energy change was more significant than the change of D10 and the ratio between D10 and D20 for both 6MV and 10MV beams. Half MeV difference on the initial electron beam energy brought in at least 20% variation on the beam flatness but only half percent change on the ratio of D10 and D20. The change of D10 or D20 alone is even less significant. Conclusion: The beam energy impact on PDD is less significant than that on the beam flatness. If the PDD is used for checking the beam energy, uncertainties of the measurement could possibly disguise its change. Beam flatness changes more significantly with beam energy and therefore it can be used for monitoring the energy change for photon beams with flattering filters. However, other factors which may affect the beam flatness should be watched as well.

  18. Emittance growth and instability induced by space charge effect during final beam bunching in HIF accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beam dynamics and emittance growth are investigated by using particle-in-cell simulations during a final beam bunching for a driver system of inertial fusion driven by intense heavy ion beams. Space-charge-dominated beams are transported by a transverse confinement lattice with longitudinal compression, and the emittance increases along the longitudinal beam bunching. Dipole oscillations are excited due to the initial displacement of the beam center. The displacement causes the additional emittance growth during the final beam bunching.

  19. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  20. Influence of emitter ring manufacturing tolerances on electron beam quality of high power gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Illy, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of manufacturing imperfections and possible misalignments of the emitter ring in the gyrotron cathode structure on the electron beam quality has been performed. It has been shown that a possible radial displacement of the emitter ring of the order of few tens of microns can cause dramatic effects on the beam quality and therefore the gyrotron operation. Two different design approaches are proposed in order to achieve an electron beam which is less sensitive to manufacturing imperfections.

  1. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  2. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Bohler, D.; Ding, Y.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Ratner, D.; Vetter, S.

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  3. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  4. Universal envelope equation and emittance evolution of high-brightness beam in linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-01-01

    We report a universal beam envelope equation that governs the transverse linear dynamics of high-intensity and high-brightness relativistic beams under constant acceleration in axisymmetric linear accelerators. This dimensionless and almost parameter-free nonlinear equation is useful for understanding scaling properties and for investigating nonlinear behaviors that are beyond analytical analysis. Particularly, we explore emittance compensation in high-brightness beams evolving from the space-charge regime to the thermal-emittance regime, a transition that commonly occurs during acceleration but is not well studied. A new formula is given for correctly computing the rms bunch emittance from slice envelopes, which is different from the commonly used quadratic sum of the thermal emittance and the rms emittance in the envelope phase space.

  5. The HEB at flat top: Arranging for the HEB to collider beam transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    The flat top for the High Energy Booster (HEB) is planned to last for only 6.5 seconds, yet during this time the beam must be made to: (1) have the correct central momentum; (2) have the correct bunch-to-bunch spacing; (3) have the correct central phase; and (4) have the correct momentum spread and longitudinal length. All of these attributes must match what the Collider expects or unwanted emittance growth will occur. This paper outlines the techniques necessary to achieve a proper HEB-to-Collider beam transfer within the 6.5 s time constraint. A novel means for cogging is proposed and evaluated. The hardware necessary to implement the beam manipulation and to achieve the four goals is specified, and tolerances on the hardware are evaluated.

  6. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Colwyn Bartnik, Adam Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-02

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9–9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  7. Improvement of beam emittance of the CEA high intensity proton source SILHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, R.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.

    1999-06-01

    The emittance of the intense proton beam extracted by the source SILHI at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA)-Saclay is a key parameter for the design of the IPHI Project RFQ. This parameter has a relevant role even for the design of an intense proton source for the TRASCO project of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The tests performed in the framework of CEA-INFN collaboration have been mainly devoted to a 75 mA beam emittance investigation injecting different gases in the beam line. The results show that the rms normalized emittance decreases up to a factor 3 while the beam losses induced by recombination are contained within 5%. Normalized emittance in r-r' plane of about 0.1 π min mrad have been obtained using Ar and Kr.

  8. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  9. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9-9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  10. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  11. Ultra low emittance electron beams from multi-alkali antimonide photocathode operated with infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, L.; Gulliford, C.; Bartnik, A.; Lee, H.; Bazarov, I.

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated from a multi-alkali photocathode operated in a high voltage DC gun is reported. The photocathode showed sensitivity extending to the infrared part of the spectrum up to 830 nm. The measured intrinsic emittances of electron beams generated with light having wavelength longer than 800 nm are approaching the limit imposed by the thermal energy of electrons at room temperature with quantum efficiencies comparable to metallic photocathodes used in operation of modern photoinjectors.

  12. Space-charge driven emittance growth in a 3D mismatched anisotropic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Hofmann, I.

    2002-12-03

    In this paper we present a 3D simulation study of the emittance growth in a mismatched anisotropic beam. The equipartitioning driven by a 4th order space-charge resonance can be significantly modified by the presence of mismatch oscillation and halo formation. This causes emittance growth in both the longitudinal and transverse directions which could drive the beam even further away from equipartition. The averaged emittance growth per degree freedom follows the upper bound of the 2D free energy limit plus the contributions from equipartitioning.

  13. Experimental generation of longitudinally-modulated electron beams using an emittance exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.; Maxwell, T.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; /FERMILAB

    2010-08-01

    We report our experimental demonstration of longitudinal phase space modulation using a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange technique. The experiment is carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermi National Accelerator Lab. A vertical multi-slit plate is inserted into the beamline prior to the emittance exchange, thus introducing beam horizontal profile modulation. After the emittance exchange, the longitudinal phase space coordinates (energy and time structures) of the beam are modulated accordingly. This is a clear demonstration of the transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange. In this paper, we present our experimental results on the measurement of energy profile as well as numerical simulations of the experiment.

  14. Development of a pepper pot emittance probe and its application for ECR ion beam studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Vinogradov, N.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2009-07-21

    A pepper pot-scintillator screen system has been developed and used to measure the emittance of DC ion beams extracted from a high-intensity permanent magnet ECR ion source. The system includes a fast beam shutter with a minimum dwell time of 18 ms to reduce the degradation of the CsI(Tl) scintillator by DC ion beam irradiation and a CCD camera with a variable shutter speed in the range of 1 {micro}s-65 s. On-line emittance measurements are performed by an application code developed on a LabVIEW platform. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to measure the emittance of DC ion beams with current densities down to about 100 nA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance of all ion species extracted from the ECR ion source and post-accelerated to an energy of 75-90 keV/charge have been measured downstream of the LEBT. As the mass-to-charge ratio of ion species increases, the normalized RMS emittances in both transverse phase planes decrease from 0.5-1.0 {pi} mm mrad for light ions to 0.05-0.09 {pi} mm mrad for highly charged {sup 209}Bi ions. The dependence of the emittance on ion's mass-to-charge ratio follows very well the dependence expected from beam rotation induced by decreasing ECR axial magnetic field. The measured emittance values cannot be explained by only ion beam rotation for all ion species and the contribution to emittance of ion temperature in plasma, non-linear electric fields and non-linear space charge is comparable or even higher than the contribution of ion beam rotation.

  15. On the focused beam parameters of an electron gun with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, S.; Rempe, N.; Beniyash, A.; Murray, N.

    2014-11-01

    The report presents the measurement results of the focused beam brightness in the electron gun with plasma emitter. The beam brightness was approximately 1010 A·m-2·sr-1 under the beam power up to 4 kW and an electron energy of 60 keV at the focal distance of 0.5 m. Qualitative assessment of the beam parameters was performed by welding test pieces. The results describing the possibility in principle of using the guns with a plasma emitter in nonvacuum technological devices are presented.

  16. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  17. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Rao, S V L S; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P

    2015-07-01

    A 400 keV deuteron (D(+)) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H(+) and D(+) beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D(+) beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally. PMID:26233371

  18. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V. Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P.

    2015-07-15

    A 400 keV deuteron (D{sup +}) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H{sup +} and D{sup +} beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D{sup +} beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally.

  19. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  20. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  1. Observations on the luminosity lifetimes, emittance growth rates and intra-beam scattering at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L.G. Lebrun et al.

    2003-05-22

    A record luminosity of 4.2 10{sup 31}has been reached at the Fermilab p-{bar p} collider. The lifetime of this luminosity at the beginning of the store is about 10 hours. This lifetime can be explained by the measured loss of anti-protons and protons due to collisions and emittance growths. We report on transverse emittance growth rates based on our Synchrotron Light Monitor. Longitudinal emittance growth rate measurements are based on the TeV Sampled Bunch Display data. It is shown that Intra Beam Scattering is a significant source of emittance growth rates. We comment on other possible factors for these observed emittance growth rates. Finally, we comment on future luminosity lifetimes, as we hope to further increase our peak luminosity.

  2. Effect of secondary electrons suppression on emittance measurement of an intense, low-energy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, L.

    2014-02-15

    Transversal emittance measurements of intense low-energy beams involve use of collimators. As most of the beam is stopped by a collimator, a question arises whether the special conditions in the vicinity of the collimator influence emittance measurement. In particular, the secondary electrons emitted from the slit surface may affect the measurement of the beam phase distribution. We have observed significant modification in the measured phase space distribution of a 5–6 mA DC proton beam at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility low-energy transport after application of a weak magnetic field in the plane of the slit collimator. The periphery region of the phase distribution was mostly affected. The overall effect on the emittance value was as large as 20%.

  3. Recent developments in measurement and tracking of the APS storage ring beam emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingxin; Lumpkin, Alex H.; Emery, Louis; Borland, Michael

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray pinhole camera is used at the APS storage ring to measure the beam emittance. The measured data are archived during user operation. At 1 Hz bandwidth, we have achieved better than 1 μm stability in the measured horizontal beam size, typically of 143 μm, corresponding to 8 nmṡrad. During user runs, beam size variations up to 2.5 μm were observed (corresponding to emittance variations of 0.4 nmṡrad), which were strongly correlated and attributed to the variation of electron energy loss in the insertion devices. In other words, the user-initiated insertion device gap changes are the major factor in observed beam emittance variations during user runs.

  4. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  5. Design of a Standing-Wave Multi-Cavity Beam-Monitor for Simultaneous Beam Position and Emittance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Miller, Roger; Nantista, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    A high precision emittance measurement requires precise beam position at the measurement location. At present there is no existing technique, commercial or otherwise, for non-destructive pulse-to-pulse simultaneous beam position and emittance measurement. FAR-TECH, Inc. is currently developing a high precision cavity-based beam monitor for simultaneous beam position and emittance measurements pulse-to-pulse, without beam interception and without moving parts. The design and anlysis of a multi-cavity standing wave structure for a pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement system in which the quadrupole and the dipole standing wave modes resonate at harmonics of the beam operating frequency is presented. Considering the Next Linear Collider beams, an optimized 9-cavity standing wave system is designed for simultaneous high precision beam position and emittance measurements. It operates with the π - quadrupole mode resonating at 16th harmonic of the NLC bunch frequency, and the 3 π /4 dipole mode at 12th harmonic (8.568 GHz). The 9-cavity system design indicates that the two dipoles resonate almost at the same frequency 8.583 GHz and the quadrupole at 11.427 GHz according to the scattering parameter calculations. The design can be trivially scaled so that the dipole frequency is at 8.568 GHz, and the quadrupole frequency can then be tuned during fabrication to achieve the desired 11.424 GHz. The output powers from these modes are estimated for the NLC beams. An estimated rms-beam size resolution is sub micro-meters and beam positions in sub nano-meters.

  6. Specialty flat-top beam delivery fibers with controlled beam parameter product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollivet, C.; Farley, K.; Conroy, M.; Abramczyk, J.; Belke, S.; Becker, F.; Tankala, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam delivery fibers have been used widely for transporting the optical beams from the laser to the subject of irradiation in a variety of markets including industrial, medical and defense applications. Standard beam delivery fibers range from 50 to 1500 μm core diameter and are used to guide CW or pulsed laser light, generated by solid state, fiber or diode lasers. Here, we introduce a novel fiber technology capable of simultaneously controlling the beam profile and the angular divergence of single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) beams using a single-optical fiber. Results of beam transformation from a SM to a MM beam with flat-top intensity profile are presented in the case of a controlled BPP at 3.8 mm*mrad. The scaling capabilities of this flat-top fiber design to achieve a range of BPP values while ensuring a flat-top beam profile are discussed. In addition, we demonstrate, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the homogenizer capabilities of this novel technology, able to transform random MM beams into uniform flat-top beam profiles with very limited impact on the beam brightness. This study is concluded with a discussion on the scalability of this fiber technology to fit from 50 up to 1500 μm core fibers and its potential for a broader range of applications.

  7. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility HRIBF at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams RIBs. Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma EBP ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 IRIS2, for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  8. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A. J. II; Liu, Y.

    2010-02-15

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  9. Extraction Simulations and Emittance Measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Electron Beam Plasma Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  10. Design and characterization of a movable emittance meter for low-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Catani, Luciano; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Tazzari, Sergio; Boscolo, Manuela; Castellano, Michele; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Fusco, Valeria; Filippetto, Daniele; Palumbo, Luigi; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vicario, Carlo; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-09-15

    In order to characterize and optimize the beam emittance compensation scheme [L. Serafini and J. B. Rosenzweig, Phys. Rev. E 55, 7565 (1997)] of the Sorgente Pulsata Autoamplificata di Radiazione Coerente project [D. Alesini et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 507, 345 (2003)] high brightness preinjector a system to accurately measure the beam rms emittance evolution downstream of the rf gun has been developed. Since in a space charge dominated beam the quadrupole-scan method is not applicable, a movable emittance measurement device has been built based on the pepper-pot technique. The device consists of a double system of horizontal and vertical slit arrays and a downstream screen, all installed on a longitudinally movable support equipped with bellows and spanning the {approx_equal}1.2 m long drift space between gun and first accelerating section. The system allows the measuring of the beam rms emittance all along the spanned region so as to accurately reconstruct its evolution along the beam trajectory. More than a simple improvement over more conventional beam emittance measurement tools this device defines a new strategy for characterizing high performance photoinjectors as it allows a detailed analysis of the beam behavior over a section of the accelerator where crucial beam shaping takes place. Numerical simulations of the measurement, mainly based on PARMELA [J. Billen, PARMELA Report No. LA-UR 96-1835, 1996 (unpublished)], have been used to estimate the achievable accuracy and to optimize the experimental setup. Wake field effects induced by the beam propagation through the bellows have also been investigated with HOMDYN [M. Ferrario et al., LCLS Report No. SLAC-PUB 84000, 1999 (unpublished)]. A series of laboratory tests to evaluate its performance has been carried out at LNF in Frascati. The system was then moved to DESY Zeuthen and installed on the Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ, for further testing with beam. Design criteria and tests

  11. Tight, Flat, Smooth, Ultrathin Metal Foils for Locating Synchrotron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Connie S.; Stoner, John O.

    2007-01-01

    It is often desired to locate a synchrotron x-ray beam precisely in space with minimal disturbance of its spatial profile and spectral content. This can be done by passing the beam through an ultrathin, flat, smooth metal foil having well-defined composition, preferably a single chemical element such as chromium, titanium or aluminum. Localized fluorescence of the foil at characteristic x-ray lines where the x-ray beam passes through the foil serves to locate the beam in two dimensions. Use of two such foils along the beam direction locates the x-ray beam spatially and identifies precisely its direction. The accuracy of determining these parameters depends in part upon high uniformity in the thickness of the foil(s), good planarity, and smoothness of the foil(s). In practice, several manufacturing steps to produce a foil must be carried out with precision. The foil must be produced on a smooth removable substrate in such a way that its thickness (or areal density) is as uniform as possible. The foil must be fastened to a support ring that maintains the foil's surface quality, and it must be then stretched onto a frame that produces the desired mirror flatness. These steps are illustrated and some of the parameters specifying the quality of the resulting foils are identified.

  12. Scaled, circular-emitter Penning SPS for intense H/sup -/ beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Sherman, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos versions of the Penning Surface-Plasma Source (SPS) routinely generate H/sup -/ ion beams with pulsed currents over 100 mA. However, these sources employ geometries that result in the extraction of slit beams (0.5 x 10 mm/sup 2/). Our modeling with the SNOW code indicates that the beam from a 5.4-mm-diam circular emitter will have lower emittance and divergence for transport to and injection into our radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This paper describes a newly constructed Penning SPS that has most of its discharge chamber dimensions scaled up by a factor of 4 to accommodate this circular emitter.

  13. Emittance control of a beam by shaping the transverse charge distribution, using a tomography diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.J.

    1998-06-01

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested and implemented using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work the authors give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  14. EMITTANCE CONTROL OF A BEAM BY SHAPING THE TRANSVERSE CHARGE DISTRIBUTION, USING A TOMOGRAPHY DIAGNOSTIC.

    SciTech Connect

    YAKIMENKO,V.

    1998-06-26

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved [1]. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested [2] and implemented [3,4] using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  15. Low Emittance, High Brilliance Relativistic Electron Beams from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Raj, G.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-11-19

    Progress in laser wakefield accelerators indicates their suitability as a driver of compact free-electron lasers (FELs). High brightness is defined by the normalized transverse emittance, which should be less than 1{pi} mm mrad for an x-ray FEL. We report high-resolution measurements of the emittance of 125 MeV, monoenergetic beams from a wakefield accelerator. An emittance as low as 1.1{+-}0.1{pi} mm mrad is measured using a pepper-pot mask. This sets an upper limit on the emittance, which is comparable with conventional linear accelerators. A peak transverse brightness of 5x10{sup 15} A m{sup -1} rad{sup -1} makes it suitable for compact XUV FELs.

  16. Reduction of Beam Emittance of Pep-X Using Quadruple Bend Achromat Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is studying an option of building a high brightness synchrotron light source machine, PEP-X, in the existing PEP-II tunnel [1, 2]. By replacing 6 arcs of FODO cells of PEPII High Energy Ring (HER) with two arcs of DBA and four arcs of TME and installation of 89.3 m long damping wiggler an ultra low beam emittance of 0.14 nm-rad (including intra-beam scattering) at 4.5 GeV is achieved. In this paper we study the possibility to further reduce the beam emittance by releasing the constraint of the dispersion free in the DBA straight. The QBA (Quadruple Bend Achromat) cell is used to replace the DBA. The ratio of outer and inner bending angle is optimized. The dispersion function in the non-dispersion straight is controlled to compromise with lower emittance and beam size at the dispersion straight. An undulator of period length 23 mm, maximum magnetic field of 1.053 T, and total periods of 150 is used to put in the 30 straights to simulate the effects of these IDs on the beam emittance and energy spread. The brightness including all the ID effects is calculated and compared to the original PEP-X design.

  17. Emittance reconstruction from measured beam sizes in ATF2 and perspectives for ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faus-Golfe, A.; Navarro, J.; Fuster Martinez, N.; Resta Lopez, J.; Giner Navarro, J.

    2016-05-01

    The projected emittance (2D) and the intrinsic emittance (4D) reconstruction method by using the beam size measurements at different locations is analyzed in order to study analytically the conditions of solvability of the systems of equations involved in this process. Some conditions are deduced and discussed, and general guidelines about the locations of the measurement stations have been obtained to avoid unphysical results. The special case of the multi-Optical Transition Radiation system (m-OTR), made of four measurement stations, in the Extraction Line (EXT) of Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) has been simulated in much detail and compared with measurements. Finally a feasibility study of a multi-station system for fast transverse beam size measurement, emittance reconstruction and coupling correction in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) of International Linear Collider (ILC) Diagnostic sections of the RTML has been discussed in detail.

  18. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castaño, Carlos H.; Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana

    2014-04-07

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm{sup 2} could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO{sub 2} insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

  19. Wire scanners for beam size and emittance measurements at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Bong, E.; Hendrickson, L.; McCormick, D.; Sanchez-Chopitea, L.

    1991-05-01

    The SLC wire scanner beam profile monitors provide accurate beam size and emittance measurements for each bunch in the three bunch SLC beam. The beam size measurement error for typical 50GeV SLC linac beams (100{mu}m {sigma}({sub x,y})) is better than 5{mu}m. Beam profile measurements can be performed throughout much of the SLC with no interruption to normal machine operation and no adverse impact on interaction region detector backgrounds. The linac input and output emittance is determined using sets of four scanners spaced by {approximately}45{degrees} betatron phase advance. Each scanner contains three wires, x, y and u (45{degrees}), from which an estimate of the x-y coupling can be obtained. Advanced high level control software allows the use of wire scanner data in feedback and beam optimization procedures. Non-invasive scans are performed almost continually and the results are logged so that long term trends in emittance can be examined. In this paper we describe the design, construction, performance and uses of SLC wire scanners. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  1. Photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, David U.; Clendenin, James E.; Kirby, Robert E.

    2004-06-01

    A photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electric beam. The accelerator includes a tube having an inner wall, the inner tube wall being coated by a getter material. A portable, or demountable, cathode plug is mounted within said tube, the surface of said cathode having a semiconductor material formed thereon.

  2. Particle and power profile calculations for the ATA beam dump and emittance box

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.R.

    1982-08-19

    Electron-photon transport calculations have been carried out for the 50 MeV electron beam generated by ATA when it is incident on a carbon beam dump. Energy spectra are calculated at various points within the dump for the purpose of determining the power density profile. In addition, energy spectra of scattered electrons transported through small holes in the dump are calculated for the purpose of determining the extent to which they would interfere with a beam-emittance and beam-energy diagnostic based on the extraction of small beamlets through penetrations in the dump.

  3. Simultaneous cancellation of beam emittance and energy spread in the CEBAF nuclear physics injector chopping system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Bisognano, J.

    1993-06-01

    The CEBAF nuclear physics injector will utilize a unique chopping system consisting of two identical square box RF cavities with an inverting lens and a chopper aperture in-between. This system produces three interleaved 499 MHz cw electron beams from a 100 kV input beam. In this paper, we present our theoretical and numerical studies on how both emittance and energy spread are cancelled simultaneously in the dechopping process in the second cavity.

  4. Verification of the AWA Photoinjector Beam Parameters Required for a Transverse-to-Longitudinal Emittance Exchange Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.M.; Piot, P.; Power, J.G.; Mihalcea, D.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    A transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange experiment is in preparation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). The experiment aims at exchanging a low ({var_epsilon}{sub z} < 5 {micro}m) longitudinal emittance with a large ({var_epsilon}{sub x} > 15 {micro}m) transverse horizontal emittance for a bunch charge of {approx}100 pC. Achieving such initial emittance partitioning, though demonstrated via numerical simulations, is a challenging task and needs to be experimentally verified. In this paper, we report preliminary emittance measurements of the beam in the transverse and longitudinal planes performed at {approx}12 MeV. The measurements are compared with numerical simulations.

  5. Investigations of the emittance and brightness of ion beams from an electron beam ion source of the Dresden EBIS type

    SciTech Connect

    Silze, Alexandra; Ritter, Erik; Zschornack, Guenter; Schwan, Andreas; Ullmann, Falk

    2010-02-15

    We have characterized ion beams extracted from the Dresden EBIS-A, a compact room-temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS) with a permanent magnet system for electron beam compression, using a pepper-pot emittance meter. The EBIS-A is the precursor to the Dresden EBIS-SC in which the permanent magnets have been replaced by superconducting solenoids for the use of the source in high-ion-current applications such as heavy-ion cancer therapy. Beam emittance and brightness values were calculated from data sets acquired for a variety of source parameters, in leaky as well as pulsed ion extraction mode. With box shaped pulses of C{sup 4+} ions at an energy of 39 keV root mean square emittances of 1-4 mm mrad and a brightness of 10 nA mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} were achieved. The results meet the expectations for high quality ion beams generated by an electron beam ion source.

  6. Investigations of the emittance and brightness of ion beams from an electron beam ion source of the Dresden EBIS type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silze, Alexandra; Ritter, Erik; Zschornack, Günter; Schwan, Andreas; Ullmann, Falk

    2010-02-01

    We have characterized ion beams extracted from the Dresden EBIS-A, a compact room-temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS) with a permanent magnet system for electron beam compression, using a pepper-pot emittance meter. The EBIS-A is the precursor to the Dresden EBIS-SC in which the permanent magnets have been replaced by superconducting solenoids for the use of the source in high-ion-current applications such as heavy-ion cancer therapy. Beam emittance and brightness values were calculated from data sets acquired for a variety of source parameters, in leaky as well as pulsed ion extraction mode. With box shaped pulses of C4+ ions at an energy of 39 keV root mean square emittances of 1-4 mm mrad and a brightness of 10 nA mm-2 mrad-2 were achieved. The results meet the expectations for high quality ion beams generated by an electron beam ion source.

  7. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte Carlo simulations with SHIELD-HIT10Areasonably matched the most abundant PET isotopes (11)C and (15)O. We observed an ion-energy (i.e., depth) dependence of the agreement between SHIELD-HIT10Aand measurement. Improved modeling requires more accurate measurements of cross-section values.

  8. Opto-acoustic interactions in gravitational wave detectors: Comparing flat-top beams with Gaussian beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gras, S.; Blair, D. G.; Ju, L.

    2010-02-15

    To reduce the thermal noise in the future generation of gravitational wave detectors, flat-top beams have been proposed to replace conventional Gaussian beams, so as to obtain better averaging over the Brownian motion of the test masses. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the unwanted opto-acoustic interactions in such interferometers, which can lead to the phenomenon of parametric instability. Our results show that the increased overlap of the Mesa beams with the test masses leads to approximately 3 times as many unstable modes in comparison to a similar interferometer with Gaussian beams.

  9. Emittance and Energy Measurements of Low-Energy Electron Beam Using Optical Transition Radiation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Iijima, Hokuto; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Imai, Takayuki; Ueda, Toru; Watanabe, Takahiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2005-03-01

    Emittance and energy of an electron beam in the range of 8 to 22 MeV were measured via optical transition radiation (OTR) techniques. The beam divergence effect on observations of the far-field OTR image at low energies was studied by means of numerical analysis. The numerical analysis indicates that if the beam divergence is under 1.5 mrad, a simultaneous single-shot measurement of emittance and energy is possible. The results of the single-shot experiment agree with independent measurements conducted using the quadrupole scan method and an electron spectrometer. The experiments were performed with an S-band linac at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo (UTNL).

  10. System for transporting an electron beam to the atmosphere for a gun with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the results of simulation of the gas flow in a gun with a plasma emitter and in the system for extracting the electron beam to the atmosphere, constructed on the basis of standard gasdynamic windows (GDWs). The design of the gun and GDWs is described. Calculations are performed for a pressure of about 10-3 Torr in the electron beam generation range. It is shown that the pressure drop to the atmospheric pressure in the system of electron beam extraction to the atmosphere can be ensured by two GDW stages evacuated by pumps with optimal performance.

  11. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  12. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-04-19

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  13. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; et al

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  14. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  15. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  16. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S.

    2013-02-15

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical direction, is scanned horizontally through the ion beam. This has the advantage that the emittance can also be measured at locations along the beam line where the beam has a large horizontal divergence. A set of multi-channel plates, scintillation screen, and ccd camera is used as a position-sensitive ion detector allowing a large range of beam intensities that can be handled. This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of the instrument as well as the data analysis used to reconstruct the four-dimensional phase-space distribution of an ion beam. Measurements on a 15 keV He{sup +} beam are used as an example.

  17. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between transverse phase space (x,x') and longitudinal phase space (z,{delta}), where x is the transverse position, x' is the transverse divergence, and z and {delta} are relative longitudinal position and energy deviation with respect to the reference particle. Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e., mapping x to z, x' to {delta}, z to x, and {delta} to x', are suggested. Schemes to mitigate and completely compensate for the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are studied. Some applications of the phase space exchange for advanced beam manipulation and diagnostics are discussed.

  18. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  19. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  20. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A; Sing Babu, P; Srivastava, S; Pandit, V S

    2015-11-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results. PMID:26628123

  1. Neutralization of Space Charge Effects for Low Energy Ion Beams Using Field Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaescu, D.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2008-11-03

    The paper presents models and computations for neutralization of space charge effects using electrons provided by field emitter arrays. Different ion species ({sup 11}B{sup +},{sup 31}P{sup +},{sup 75}As{sup +}) with energy in the range E{sub ion} = 200 eV-1 keV have been considered. The ion beam divergence is studied as a function of electron beam geometry and physical parameters (electron and ion energy, electron/ion current ratio I{sub el}/I{sub ion}). The electron beam geometry takes into account electron source positions and initial launching angles. It is shown that optimal ion beam neutralization occurs for low energy electrons emitted parallel to the ion beam.

  2. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  3. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Fartoukh, Stephane; Valishev, Alexander; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical $\\beta^{\\ast}$values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  4. Dose rate and beam profile measurement of proton beam using a flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Min

    2015-10-01

    A 20-MeV or 100-MeV proton beam is provided to users for their proton beam irradiation experiments at KOrea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. Radiochromic film (Gafchromic / HDV2) has been used to measure the dose rate and the profile of an incident proton beam during irradiation experiments. However, such measurements using radiochromic film have some inconveniences because an additional scanning process of is required to quantify the film's image. Therefore, we tried to measure the dose rate and beam profile by using a flat panel detector (FPD), which was developed for X-ray radiography as a substitute for radiochromic film because the FPD can measure the beam profile and the dose rate directly through a digitized image with a high spatial resolution. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of using a FPD as a substitute for radiochromic film. The preliminary results for the beam profile and the dose rate measured by using the flat panel detector are reported in the paper.

  5. Optimization and beam control in large-emittance accelerators: Neutrino factories;

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Johnstone

    2004-08-23

    Schemes for intense sources of high-energy muons require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large emittances must be reduced or ''cooled'' both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated. Therefore, formation of muon beams sufficiently intense to drive a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider requires multi-stage preparation. Further, because of the large beam phase space which must be successfully controlled, accelerated, and transported, the major stages that comprise such a facility: proton driver, production, capture, phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and storage are complex and strongly interlinked. Each of the stages must be consecutively matched and simultaneously optimized with upstream and downstream systems, meeting challenges not only technically in the optics and component design, but also in the modeling of both new and extended components. One design for transverse cooling, for example, employs meter-diameter solenoids to maintain strong focusing--300-500 mr beam divergences--across ultra-large momentum ranges, {ge} {+-}20% {delta}p/p, defying conventional approximations to the dynamics and field representation. To now, the interplay of the different systems and staging strategies has not been formally addressed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the staging strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  6. Stable two-plane focusing for emittance-dominated sheet-beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Earley, L. M.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Russell, S. J.; Potter, J. M.; Ferguson, P.; Humphries, S.

    2005-06-01

    Two-plane focusing of sheet electron beams will be an essential technology for an emerging class of high-power, 100 to 300 GHz rf sources [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 85 (2005), ITPSBD, 0093-3813, 10.1109/TPS.2004.841172]. In these devices, the beam has a unique asymmetry in which the transport is emittance dominated in the sheet’s thin dimension and space-charge dominated in the sheet’s wide dimension. Previous work has studied the stability of the transport of beams in the emittance-dominated regime for both wiggler and periodic permanent magnet (PPM) configurations with single-plane focusing, and has found that bigger envelope scalloping occurs for equilibrium transport, as compared to space-charge dominated beams [Carlsten et al., this issue, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 062001 (2005), PRABFM, 1098-4402]. In this paper, we describe the differences in transport stability when two-plane focusing is included. Two-plane wiggler focusing degrades the transport stability slightly, whereas two-plane PPM focusing greatly compromises the transport. On the other hand, single-plane PPM focusing can be augmented with external quadrupole fields to provide weak focusing in the sheet’s wide dimension, which has stability comparable to two-plane wiggler transport.

  7. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-06-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% - 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%.

  8. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  9. HIGH AVERAGE CURRENT LOW EMITTANCE BEAM EMPLOYING CW NORMAL CONDUCTING GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KEWISCH, J.; PAI, C.

    2007-06-25

    CW normal conducting guns usually do not achieve very high field gradient and waste much RF power at high field gradient compared to superconducting cavities. But they have less trapped modes and wakefields compared to the superconducting cavities due to their low Q. The external bucking coil can also be applied very close to the cathode to improve the beam quality. By using a low frequency gun with a recessed cathode and a carefully designed beam line we can get a high average current and a high quality beam with acceptable RF power loss on the cavity wall. This paper shows that the CW normal conducting gun can be a backup solution for those projects which need high peak and average current, low emittance electron beams such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) e-cooling project and Energy Recovery Linac (Em) project.

  10. Ultralow emittance, multi-MeV proton beams from a laser virtual-cathode plasma accelerator.

    PubMed

    Cowan, T E; Fuchs, J; Ruhl, H; Kemp, A; Audebert, P; Roth, M; Stephens, R; Barton, I; Blazevic, A; Brambrink, E; Cobble, J; Fernández, J; Gauthier, J-C; Geissel, M; Hegelich, M; Kaae, J; Karsch, S; Le Sage, G P; Letzring, S; Manclossi, M; Meyroneinc, S; Newkirk, A; Pépin, H; Renard-LeGalloudec, N

    2004-05-21

    The laminarity of high-current multi-MeV proton beams produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultraintense lasers has been measured. For proton energies >10 MeV, the transverse and longitudinal emittance are, respectively, <0.004 mm mrad and <10(-4) eV s, i.e., at least 100-fold and may be as much as 10(4)-fold better than conventional accelerator beams. The fast acceleration being electrostatic from an initially cold surface, only collisions with the accelerating fast electrons appear to limit the beam laminarity. The ion beam source size is measured to be <15 microm (FWHM) for proton energies >10 MeV.

  11. BEAM LIFETIME AND EMITTANCE GROWTH MEASUREMENTS OF GOLD BEAMS IN RHIC AT STORAGE.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; DREES,A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CONNOLLY,R.; FLILLER,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    During stores of gold beams, longitudinal and transverse beam sizes were recorded. Longitudinal profiles were obtained with a wall current monitor. Transverse profiles were reconstructed from gold-gold collision rates at various relative transverse beam positions. The total beam lifetime was measured with a beam current transformer, the bunched beam lifetime with the wall current monitor. Diffusion rates in the beam halo were determined from the change in the loss rate when a scraper is retracted. The measurements are used to determine the lifetime limiting effects. Beam growth measurements are compared with computations of beam-growth times from intra-beam scattering.

  12. Emittance dependence on anode morphology of an ion beam provided by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we studied the characteristics of ion beams generated by Platone accelerator in different anode configurations. The accelerator is a laser ion source with two gaps which accelerate the ions in cascade. The laser is a ns pulsed KrF able to apply irradiances of 109-1010 W/cm2. The target ablated was pure disk of Cu. The accelerating voltage applied in this work was 60 kV. The emittance evaluation was performed by the pepper pot method utilizing radio-chromic films, EBT Gafchromic, as sensible targets. The study was performed by varying the geometric configuration of the anode (the extracting electrode), modifying the hole morphology, e.g. a plane and curved grid were mounted in order to change the extraction configuration. The results were compared with the ones obtained with the extraction hole without any grid. For the normalized emittance the lowest value was 0.20π mm mrad.

  13. On the Emittance dependence on anode morphology of laser induced ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we studied the characteristics of ion beams generated by PLATONE accelerator in different anode configurations. The accelerator is a laser ion source with two gaps which accelerate the ions in cascade. The laser is an excimer KrF able to work at irradiances of 108-1010 W/cm2. The target ablated was disk of Cu. The accelerating voltage applied in this work was 60 kV. The emittance evaluation was performed by the pepper pot method utilising radio-chromic films, EBT Gafchromic, as sensible targets. The study was performed by varying the geometric configuration of the anode (the extracting electrode), modifying the hole morphology. A plane and curved grids were mounted in order to change the extraction configuration. The results were compared with the ones obtained with the extraction hole without any grid. For the normalized emittance the lowest value found was 0.20 π mm mrad.

  14. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are {sup 12}C nuclei, {sup 16}O nuclei, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP

  15. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shunsuke Sekine, Megumi; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-15

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  16. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  17. Halo formation and emittance growth in the transport of spherically symmetric mismatched bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corrêa da Silva, Thales M. Pakter, Renato; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Levin, Yan

    2015-02-15

    The effect of an initial envelope mismatch on the transport of bunched spherically symmetric beams is investigated. A particle-core model is used to estimate the maximum radius that halo particles can reach. The theory is used to obtain an empirical formula that provides the halo size as a function of system parameters. Taking into account, the incompressibility property of the Vlasov dynamics and the resulting Landau damping, an explicit form for the final stationary distribution attained by the beam is proposed. The distribution is fully self-consistent, presenting no free fitting parameters. The theory is used to predict the relevant beam transport properties, such as the final particle density distribution, the emittance growth, and the fraction of particles that will be expelled to form halo. The theoretical results are compared to the explicit N-particle dynamics simulations, showing a good agreement.

  18. Monolithic integration of a quantum emitter with a compact on-chip beam-splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Prtljaga, N. Coles, R. J.; O'Hara, J.; Royall, B.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Clarke, E.

    2014-06-09

    A fundamental component of an integrated quantum optical circuit is an on-chip beam-splitter operating at the single-photon level. Here, we demonstrate the monolithic integration of an on-demand quantum emitter in the form of a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot (QD) with a compact (>10 μm), air clad, free standing directional coupler acting as a beam-splitter for anti-bunched light. The device was tested by using single photons emitted by a QD embedded in one of the input arms of the device. We verified the single-photon nature of the QD signal by performing Hanbury Brown-Twiss measurements and demonstrated single-photon beam splitting by cross-correlating the signal from the separate output ports of the directional coupler.

  19. Beam propagation factor of partially coherent flat-topped beams in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dan, Youquan; Zhang, Bin

    2008-09-29

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) has been used to study the beam propagation factor (M(2)-factor) for partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) beams with circular symmetry in a turbulent atmosphere. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of the WDF, an expression for the WDF of PCFT beams in turbulence has been given. By use of the second-order moments of the WDF, the analytical formulas for the root-mean-square (rms) spatial width, the rms angular width, and the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence have been derived, which can be applied to cases of different spatial power spectra of the refractive index fluctuations. The rms angular width and the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence have been discussed with numerical examples. It can be shown that the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence depends on the beam order, degree of global coherence of the source, waist width, wavelength, spatial power spectrum of the refractive index fluctuations, and propagation distance.

  20. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  1. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  2. Effect of nonlinear radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on the emittance of bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadte, D. S.; Patidar, C. B.

    2013-07-01

    Gap transformations are frequently used in ion Linac codes, to efficiently describe the particle dynamics. Using similar approach, we analyze the uniformly bunched beam passing through an axis-symmetric radiofrequency (RF) cavity. The method can be used for other distributions as well using a similar six dimensional analysis. The effect of non-linear RF field in radial and axial directions in an RF cavity and the finite phase width of the bunch, on the transverse and longitudinal emittance growth have been studied. The expressions obtained have been verified for the two types of cavity cells namely the zero mode DTL and pi mode CCL type used frequently in ion linacs. The results are seen to be valid for the entire maximum phase acceptance up to 360 degrees. Simulations with the equivalent beams of non-uniform distributions namely Waterbag and Gaussian show that at synchronous phases closer to the wave crest, the results give a good approximation of emittance growth in both planes for non-uniform beams.

  3. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  4. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  5. Reducing the longitudinal emittance of the 8-GeV beam via the rf manipulation in a booster cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Lebedev, Valeri A.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    Bunch rotation will cause the longitudinal emittance growth whenever there are far more A rf stations than B rf stations, or vice versa. An alternate method via optimizing the RFSUM curve in a Booster cycle has been investigated using the ESME simulation. Since the rf manipulation at transition crossing can reduce the longitudinal emittance 31% and the momentum spread 17%, eventually, the rms momentum spread of 2.98 MeV and the longitudinal emittance of 0.061 eV {center_dot} sec with 95% of the beam can be achieved at 8-GeV.

  6. The primary test of measuremental system for the actual emittance of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Fu; Tai-bin Du; Xin Chen

    1995-12-31

    Recent, a new measuremental system has been established basically in Tsinghua University PRA. This system is able to measure the lower emittance of the electron beams from the RF accelerators for the FEL. It consists of a scanning magnetic field, a slit, a fluorescent screen, and a TV camera, an image processing system, a CAD 386 computer. Using it an actual phase diagram is obtained for 4-10 Mev electron beams, The principle and structure of the facility were reported in the Proceeding of the 15th FEL Conference. This paper describes the performance of the main components and the results of first measurement for the electron gun and 4Mev standing wave LINAC, Some new suggests are related too.

  7. High-energy flat-top beams for laser launching using a Gaussian mirror.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroki; Brown, Kathryn E; Dlott, Dana D

    2010-07-01

    Converting a Gaussian to a flat-top beam is useful for many applications including laser-launched thin-foil flyer plates. A flat-top beam is needed to maintain a constant launch velocity across the flyer; otherwise, the flyer can disintegrate in flight. Here we discuss and demonstrate the use of a variable reflectivity mirror (VRM) with a Gaussian reflectivity profile with an additional hard aperture and compare it to a refractive beam shaper. An ideal VRM would generate a flat-top beam with 37% efficiency. Readily available high-power Gaussian or super-Gaussian mirrors create an approximate flat-top profile, but there is a trade-off between flatness and efficiency. We show that a super-Gaussian mirror can, in principle, convert an input Gaussian beam with 30% efficiency to a flat-top beam with 3% (maximum-to-minimum) variation. With a Gaussian mirror and a high-energy pulsed Nd:YAG laser having relatively poor beam quality, we generate flat-top beams with 25% conversion efficiency having 6% variation (standard deviation sigma=4.2%). The beams are used to launch 400 microm diameter, 25 microm thick Al flyer plates, whose flight was monitored by a high-speed displacement interferometer. The plates flew across a 300 microm gap at 1.3 km/s. The distribution of arrival times at the witness plate was 5 ns, as determined by the rise time of the impact emission. Compared to a total flight time of 260 ns, the velocity spread of different parts of the flyer plate was 2%.

  8. BER of flat-topped Gaussian beam in slant path turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fang; Han, Yanyan; Han, Xiang-e.; Yang, Rui-ke

    2013-08-01

    Based on the theory of optical wave propagation in the slant path and the ITU-R turbulence structure constant model which is dependent on altitude, the on-axis scintillation index of the flat-topped Gaussian beam at the receiver plane in slant path turbulence was given by using Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence power spectrum model. The influences of the link altitudes, atmospheric refractive index structure constant C0 at the ground,the source size and the beam order on scintillation index of the flat-topped Gaussian beam are discussed in detail. The result shows that the scintillation index increased first and then decreased with the increase of the beam order. The advantage of a flat-topped Gaussian beam over a single Gaussian beam is restricted to small source sizes, which is consistent with the case of the horizontal path. To find the average bit error rate under weak slant path turbulence, the log-normal distribution model of the intensity fluctuation was used. The influence of beam order and source size on BER was discussed. The result indicates that the smaller sized flat-topped Gaussian beam will bring average bit error rate advantage over the same size Gaussian beam. Our results correctly reduce to the result of the horizontal path with atmospheric structure constant fixed.

  9. Characterization of the heavily doped emitter and junction regions of silicon solar cells using an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1986-01-01

    Heavily doped emitter and junction regions of silicon solar cells are investigated by means of the electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) technique. Although the experimental EBIC data are collected under three-dimensional conditions, it is analytically demonstrated with two numerical examples that the solutions obtained with one-dimensional numerical modeling are adequate. EBIC data for bare and oxide-covered emitter surfaces are compared with theory. The improvement in collection efficiency when an emitter surface is covered with a 100-A SiO2 film varies with beam energy; for a cell with a junction depth of 0.35 microns, the improvement is about 54 percent at 2 keV.

  10. Studies of emittance growth and halo particle production in intense charged particle beams using the Paul Trap Simulator Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Chung, Moses; Gutierrez, Michael S.; Kabcenell, Aaron N.

    2010-05-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame-of-reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by the same set of equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes in the laboratory frame are equivalent to the spatially periodic magnetic fields applied in the AG system. The transverse emittance of the charge bunch, which is a measure of the area in the transverse phase space that the beam distribution occupies, is an important metric of beam quality. Maintaining low emittance is an important goal when defining AG system tolerances and when designing AG systems to perform beam manipulations such as transverse beam compression. Results are reviewed from experiments in which white noise and colored noise of various amplitudes and durations have been applied to the PTSX electrodes. This noise is observed to drive continuous emittance growth and increase in root-mean-square beam radius over hundreds of lattice periods. Additional results are reviewed from experiments that determine the conditions necessary to adiabatically reduce the charge bunch's transverse size and simultaneously maintain high beam quality. During adiabatic transitions, there is no change in the transverse emittance. The transverse compression can be achieved either by a gradual change in the PTSX voltage waveform amplitude or frequency. Results are presented from experiments in which low emittance is achieved by using focusing-off-defocusing-off waveforms.

  11. Acceleration of Ultra-Low Emittance Proton and Ion Beams with High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas E.

    2002-11-01

    Intense beams of several MeV protons and ions, generated by the interaction of high-intensity short pulse lasers with thin foils, have been observed by many researchers in recent years.(S.P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000); T.E. Cowan et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 455, 130 (2000); R.A. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000); S.C. Wilks et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 532 (2000); E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 670 (2000).) In experiments performed at the 100 TW LULI laser, we have succeeded to control the ion acceleration process to produce ultra high quality proton beams, whose transverse emittance is <0.006 π mm-mrad (rms-normalized), a factor of 100 lower than is typical of conventional RF linear accelerators. Within the envelope of the entire beam, we could focus individual proton beamlets to 100 nm spatial scales. This required control of the laser-plasma interaction, of the transport of MA currents of relativistic electrons through the target substrate, and of the surface topology and source material layering on the target foil rear-surface.(M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 061002 (2002).) By varying the source material, we also accelerated light ion beams, such as He-like fluorine, to over 5 MeV/nucleon.(M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).) From PIC simulations we understand the highest-energy and lowest-divergence proton acceleration as a transient laser-driven virtual cathode effect occurring at the target rear-surface. We have also confirmed the acceleration of ions from the front surface (A. Maksimchuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4108 (2000).), which we find exhibits an intense low-energy component, but only a tenuous high-energy component, in agreement with PIC simulations. This work was performed with corporate support of General Atomics.

  12. Studies of Emittance Growth and Halo Particle Production in Intense Charged Particle Beams Using the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik

    2009-11-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame-of-reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by the same set of equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes are equivalent to the spatially-periodic magnetic fields applied in the AG system. The transverse emittance of the charge bunch, which is the area in the transverse phase space that the beam distribution occupies, is an important metric of beam quality. Maintaining low emittance is an important goal when defining AG system tolerances and when designing AG systems to perform beam manipulations such as transverse beam compression. Results will be presented from experiments in which white noise and colored noise of various amplitudes and durations has been applied to the PTSX electrodes. This noise is observed to drive continuous emittance growth over hundreds of lattice periods. Additional results will be presented from experiments that determine the conditions necessary to adiabatically reduce the charge bunch's transverse size. During adiabatic transitions, there is no change in the transverse emittance. The transverse compression can be achieved either by a gradual change in the PTSX voltage waveform amplitude or frequency.

  13. Simulations of an acceleration scheme for producing high intensity and low emittance antiproton beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent; Bhat, C.M.; MacLachlan, J.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During Fermilab collider operation, the Main Injector (MI) provides high intensity and low emittance proton and antiproton beams for the Tevatron. The present coalescing scheme for antiprotons in the Main Injector yields about a factor of two increase in the longitudinal emittance and a factor of 5% to 20% decrease in intensity before injection to the Tevatron. In order to maximize the integrated luminosity delivered to the collider experiments, it is important to minimize the emittance growth and maximize the intensity of the MI beam. To this end, a new scheme using a combination of 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz accelerations has been developed and tested. This paper describes the full simulation of the new acceleration scheme, taking account of space charge, 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz beam loading, and the effect of residual 53 MHz rf voltage during 2.5 MHz acceleration and rf manipulations. The simulations show the longitudinal emittance growth at the 10% level with no beam loss. The experimental test of the new scheme is reported in another PAC05 paper.

  14. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    DOEpatents

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  15. Investigations of a flat-panel detector for quality assurance measurements in ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Bernadette; Telsemeyer, Julia; Huber, Lucas; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-01-01

    Increased accuracy in radiation delivery to a patient provided by scanning particle beams leads to high demands on quality assurance (QA). To meet the requirements, an extensive quality assurance programme has been implemented at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Currently, high-resolution radiographic films are used for beam spot position measurements and homogeneity measurements for scanned fields. However, given that using this film type is time and equipment demanding, considerations have been made to replace the radiographic films in QA by another appropriate device. In this study, the suitability of the flat-panel detector RID 256 L based on amorphous silicon was investigated as an alternative method. The currently used radiographic films were taken as a reference. Investigations were carried out for proton and carbon ion beams. The detectors were irradiated simultaneously to allow for a direct comparison. The beam parameters (e.g. energy, focus, position) currently used in the daily QA procedures were applied. Evaluation of the measurements was performed using newly implemented automatic routines. The results for the flat-panel detector were compared to the standard radiographic films. Additionally, a field with intentionally decreased homogeneity was applied to test the detector's sensitivities toward possible incorrect scan parameters. For the beam position analyses, the flat-panel detector results showed good agreement with radiographic films. For both detector types, deviations between measured and planned spot distances were found to be below 1% (1 mm). In homogeneously irradiated fields, the flat-panel detector showed a better dose response homogeneity than the currently used radiographic film. Furthermore, the flat-panel detector is sensitive to field irregularities. The flat-panel detector was found to be an adequate replacement for the radiographic film in QA measurements. In addition, it saves time and equipment because no post

  16. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Heeres, P. N.; Biegun, A. K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M.-J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, providing the largest number of counts, the least biological washout and the fastest feedback. In this implementation, all nuclides, independent of their half-life, will contribute. As a first step towards assessing the relevance of short-lived nuclides (half-life shorter than that of 10C, T1/2  =  19 s) for in vivo dose delivery verification using beam-on PET, we measured their production in the stopping of 55 MeV protons in water, carbon, phosphorus and calcium The most copiously produced short-lived nuclides and their production rates relative to the relevant long-lived nuclides are: 12N (T1/2  =  11 ms) on carbon (9% of 11C), 29P (T1/2  =  4.1 s) on phosphorus (20% of 30P) and 38mK (T1/2  =  0.92 s) on calcium (113% of 38gK). No short-lived nuclides are produced on oxygen. The number of decays integrated from the start of an irradiation as a function of time during the irradiation of PMMA and 4 tissue materials has been determined. For (carbon-rich) adipose tissue, 12N dominates up to 70 s. On bone tissue, 12N dominates over 15O during the first 8-15 s (depending on carbon-to-oxygen ratio). The short-lived nuclides created on phosphorus and calcium provide 2.5 times more beam-on PET counts than the long-lived ones produced on these elements during a 70 s irradiation. From the estimated number of 12N PET counts, we conclude that, for any tissue, 12N PET imaging potentially provides equal to superior proton range information compared to prompt gamma imaging with an optimized knife-edge slit camera. The practical implementation of 12N PET imaging is discussed.

  17. Flat-Lens Focusing of Electron Beams in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yang; Cao, Xiyuan; Guo, Ran; Zhang, Yanyan; Che, Zhiyuan; Yannick, Fouodji T.; Zhang, Weiping; Du, Junjie

    2016-09-01

    Coupling electron beams carrying information into electronic units is fundamental in microelectronics. This requires precision manipulation of electron beams through a coupler with a good focusing ability. In graphene, the focusing of wide electron beams has been successfully demonstrated by a circular p-n junction. However, it is not favorable for information coupling since the focal length is so small that the focal spot locates inside the circular gated region, rather than in the background region. Here, we demonstrate that an array of gate-defined quantum dots, which has gradually changing lattice spacing in the direction transverse to propagation, can focus electrons outside itself, providing a possibility to make a coupler in graphene. The focusing effect can be understood as due to the gradient change of effective refractive indices, which are defined by the local energy band in a periodic potential. The strong focusing can be achieved by suitably choosing the lattice gradient and the layer number in the incident direction, offering an effective solution to precision manipulation of electron beams with wide electron energy range and high angular tolerance.

  18. Flat-Lens Focusing of Electron Beams in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Cao, Xiyuan; Guo, Ran; Zhang, Yanyan; Che, Zhiyuan; Yannick, Fouodji T; Zhang, Weiping; Du, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Coupling electron beams carrying information into electronic units is fundamental in microelectronics. This requires precision manipulation of electron beams through a coupler with a good focusing ability. In graphene, the focusing of wide electron beams has been successfully demonstrated by a circular p-n junction. However, it is not favorable for information coupling since the focal length is so small that the focal spot locates inside the circular gated region, rather than in the background region. Here, we demonstrate that an array of gate-defined quantum dots, which has gradually changing lattice spacing in the direction transverse to propagation, can focus electrons outside itself, providing a possibility to make a coupler in graphene. The focusing effect can be understood as due to the gradient change of effective refractive indices, which are defined by the local energy band in a periodic potential. The strong focusing can be achieved by suitably choosing the lattice gradient and the layer number in the incident direction, offering an effective solution to precision manipulation of electron beams with wide electron energy range and high angular tolerance. PMID:27628099

  19. Flat-Lens Focusing of Electron Beams in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Cao, Xiyuan; Guo, Ran; Zhang, Yanyan; Che, Zhiyuan; Yannick, Fouodji T; Zhang, Weiping; Du, Junjie

    2016-09-15

    Coupling electron beams carrying information into electronic units is fundamental in microelectronics. This requires precision manipulation of electron beams through a coupler with a good focusing ability. In graphene, the focusing of wide electron beams has been successfully demonstrated by a circular p-n junction. However, it is not favorable for information coupling since the focal length is so small that the focal spot locates inside the circular gated region, rather than in the background region. Here, we demonstrate that an array of gate-defined quantum dots, which has gradually changing lattice spacing in the direction transverse to propagation, can focus electrons outside itself, providing a possibility to make a coupler in graphene. The focusing effect can be understood as due to the gradient change of effective refractive indices, which are defined by the local energy band in a periodic potential. The strong focusing can be achieved by suitably choosing the lattice gradient and the layer number in the incident direction, offering an effective solution to precision manipulation of electron beams with wide electron energy range and high angular tolerance.

  20. Flat-Lens Focusing of Electron Beams in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yang; Cao, Xiyuan; Guo, Ran; Zhang, Yanyan; Che, Zhiyuan; Yannick, Fouodji T.; Zhang, Weiping; Du, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Coupling electron beams carrying information into electronic units is fundamental in microelectronics. This requires precision manipulation of electron beams through a coupler with a good focusing ability. In graphene, the focusing of wide electron beams has been successfully demonstrated by a circular p-n junction. However, it is not favorable for information coupling since the focal length is so small that the focal spot locates inside the circular gated region, rather than in the background region. Here, we demonstrate that an array of gate-defined quantum dots, which has gradually changing lattice spacing in the direction transverse to propagation, can focus electrons outside itself, providing a possibility to make a coupler in graphene. The focusing effect can be understood as due to the gradient change of effective refractive indices, which are defined by the local energy band in a periodic potential. The strong focusing can be achieved by suitably choosing the lattice gradient and the layer number in the incident direction, offering an effective solution to precision manipulation of electron beams with wide electron energy range and high angular tolerance. PMID:27628099

  1. Measurement of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-emittance of an intense uranium beam at 11.4 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Gerhard, P.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Vormann, H.

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-parameters is essential for applications that involve lattice elements that couple the two transverse degrees of freedom (planes). Usually pepper-pots are used for measuring these beam parameters. However, for ions their application is limited to energies below 150 keV/u. This contribution is on measurements of the full transverse four-dimensional second-moments beam matrix of high intensity uranium ions at an energy of 11.4 MeV/u. The combination of skew quadrupoles with a slit/grid emittance measurement device has been successfully applied.

  2. Transverse emittance-preserving arc compressor for high-brightness electron beam-based light sources and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-03-01

    Bunch length magnetic compression is used in high-brightness linacs driving free-electron lasers (FELs) and particle colliders to increase the peak current of the injected beam. To date, it is performed in dedicated insertions made of few degrees bending magnets and the compression factor is limited by the degradation of the beam transverse emittance owing to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We reformulate the known concept of CSR-driven optics balance for the general case of varying bunch length and demonstrate, through analytical and numerical results, that a 500 pC charge beam can be time-compressed in a periodic 180 deg arc at 2.4 GeV beam energy and lower, by a factor of up to 45, reaching peak currents of up to 2 kA and with a normalized emittance growth at the 0.1 μ \\text{m} rad level. The proposed solution offers new schemes of beam longitudinal gymnastics; an application to an energy recovery linac driving FEL is discussed.

  3. Calibration of an amorphous-silicon flat panel portal imager for exit-beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Josephine; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Morin, Olivier; Aubin, Michele; Pouliot, Jean

    2006-03-15

    Amorphous-silicon flat panel detectors are currently used to acquire digital portal images with excellent image quality for patient alignment before external beam radiation therapy. As a first step towards interpreting portal images acquired during treatment in terms of the actual dose delivered to the patient, a calibration method is developed to convert flat panel portal images to the equivalent water dose deposited in the detector plane and at a depth of 1.5 cm. The method is based on empirical convolution models of dose deposition in the flat panel detector and in water. A series of calibration experiments comparing the response of the flat panel imager and ion chamber measurements of dose in water determines the model parameters. Kernels derived from field size measurements account for the differences in the production and detection of scattered radiation in the two systems. The dissimilar response as a function of beam energy spectrum is characterized from measurements performed at various off-axis positions and for increasing attenuator thickness in the beam. The flat panel pixel inhomogeneity is corrected by comparing a large open field image with profiles measured in water. To verify the accuracy of the calibration method, calibrated flat panel profiles were compared with measured dose profiles for fields delivered through solid water slabs, a solid water phantom containing an air cavity, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Open rectangular fields of various sizes and locations as well as a multileaf collimator-shaped field were delivered. For all but the smallest field centered about the central axis, the calibrated flat panel profiles matched the measured dose profiles with little or no systematic deviation and approximately 3% (two standard deviations) accuracy for the in-field region. The calibrated flat panel profiles for fields located off the central axis showed a small -1.7% systematic deviation from the measured profiles for the in-field region

  4. Intensity fluctuations of flat-topped beam in non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gerçekcioğlu, Hamza; Baykal, Yahya

    2012-02-01

    Results obtained on the intensity fluctuations of flat-topped Gaussian beams in weakly turbulent non-Kolmogorov horizontal atmospheric optics links are represented. Effects on the scintillation index of the power law α that describes the non-Kolmogorov spectrum are examined. Our results correctly reduce to the existing intensity fluctuations of flat-topped beams in Kolmogorov turbulence. Variation of the scintillation index against non-Kolmogorov power law α exhibits a peak at the worst power law α(w), which happens to be smaller than the Kolmogorov power law of 11/3. If the power law is smaller (larger) than α(w), increase in α will increase (decrease) the intensity fluctuations. Evaluation of the scintillation index at the worst power law results in smaller fluctuations for a Gaussian beam at short propagation distances; however, at long propagation distances flatter beams happen to possess smaller fluctuations. The scintillation change versus the source size follows a similar trend regardless whether the flat-topped beam propagates in a Kolmogorov or non-Kolmogorov medium.

  5. RECENT PROGRESS IN EMITTANCE CONTROL OF THE PHOTOELECTRON BEAM USING TRANSVERSE LASER SHAPE MODULATION AND TOMOGRAPHY TECHNIQUE.

    SciTech Connect

    BABZIEN,M.; BEN-ZVI,I.; MALONE,R.; WANG,X.J.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    1999-03-29

    A low emittance beam is very important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a reasonable charge. Accurate phase space reconstruction and an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases was demonstrated in previous publication. Relatively long time of measurements (approximately 30 minutes) was improved by installing Hall probes into each quadrupole magnet. This eliminated necessity to degauss all quadrupoles between each measurement points. Additional phase control of RF system and driving laser should also improve confidence in 5 dimensional phase space reconstruction.

  6. Performance of standard fluoroscopy antiscatter grids in flat-detector-based cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias; Schaefer, Dirk; Conrads, Norbert; Timmer, Jan; Aach, Til; Rose, Georg

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, the performance of focused lamellar anti-scatter grids, which are currently used in fluoroscopy, is studied in order to determine guidelines of grid usage for flat detector based cone beam CT. The investigation aims at obtaining the signal to noise ratio improvement factor by the use of anti-scatter grids. First, the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations as well as measurements are presented. From these the general characteristics of the impinging field of scattered and primary photons are derived. Phantoms modeling the head, thorax and pelvis regions have been studied for various imaging geometries with varying phantom size, cone and fan angles and patient-detector distances. Second, simulation results are shown for ideally focused and vacuum spaced grids as best case approach as well as for grids with realistic spacing materials. The grid performance is evaluated by means of the primary and scatter transmission and the signal to noise ratio improvement factor as function of imaging geometry and grid parameters. For a typical flat detector cone beam CT setup, the grid selectivity and thus the performance of anti-scatter grids is much lower compared to setups where the grid is located directly behind the irradiated object. While for small object-to-grid distances a standard grid improves the SNR, the SNR for geometries as used in flat detector based cone beam CT is deteriorated by the use of an anti-scatter grid for many application scenarios. This holds even for the pelvic region. Standard fluoroscopy anti-scatter grids were found to decrease the SNR in many application scenarios of cone beam CT due to the large patient-detector distance and have, therefore, only a limited benefit in flat detector based cone beam CT.

  7. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  8. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H(-) ion source.

    PubMed

    Ueno, A; Koizumi, I; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Yamazaki, S; Oguri, H

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H(-) ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H(-) ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H(-) ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  9. Propagation of flat-topped multi-Gaussian beams through a double-lens system with apertures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanqi; Zhu, Baoqiang; Liu, Daizhong; Lin, Zunqi

    2009-07-20

    A general model for different apertures and flat-topped laser beams based on the multi-Gaussian function is developed. The general analytical expression for the propagation of a flat-topped beam through a general double-lens system with apertures is derived using the above model. Then, the propagation characteristics of the flat-topped beam through a spatial filter are investigated by using a simplified analytical expression. Based on the Fluence beam contrast and the Fill factor, the influences of a pinhole size on the propagation of the flat-topped multi-Gaussian beam (FMGB) through the spatial filter are illustrated. An analytical expression for the propagation of the FMGB through the spatial filter with a misaligned pinhole is presented, and the influences of the pinhole offset are evaluated.

  10. Exact cone beam reconstruction formulae for functions and their gradients for spherical and flat detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2016-11-01

    We derive unified inversion formulae for the cone beam transform similar to the Radon transform. Reinterpreting Grangeat’s formula we find a relation between the Radon transform of the gradient of the searched-for function and a quantity computable from cone beam data. This gives a uniqueness result for the cone beam transform of compactly supported functions under much weaker assumptions than the Tuy-Kirillov condition. Furthermore this relation leads to an exact formula for the direct calculation of derivatives of the density distribution; but here, similar to the classical Radon transform, complete Radon data are needed, hence the Tuy-Kirillov condition has to be imposed. Numerical experiments reported in Hahn B N et al (2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 125601) indicate that these calculations are less corrupted by beam-hardening noise. Finally, we present flat detector versions for these results, which are mathematically less attractive but important for applications.

  11. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  12. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  13. Measurements and Simulations of Ultra-Low Emittance and Ultra-Short Electron Beams in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2009-02-03

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently in a commissioning phase at SLAC. We report here on very low emittance measurements made at low bunch charge, and a few femtosecond bunch length produced by the LCLS bunch compressors. Start-to-end simulations associated with these beam parameters show the possibilities of generating hundreds of GW at 1.5 {angstrom} x-ray wavelength and nearly a single longitudinally spike at 1.5 nm with 2-fs duration.

  14. Lattice and beam optics design for suppression of CSR-induced emittance growth at the KEK-ERL test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, M.; Yokoya, K.; Suwada, T.; Enomoto, A.

    2007-06-01

    The lattice and beam optics of the arc section of the KEK-ERL test facility, having an energy of 200 MeV, were optimized to efficiently suppress emittance growth based on a simulation using a particle-tracking method taking coherent synchrotron radiation effects into account. The lattice optimization in the arc section was performed under two conditions: a high-current mode with a bunch charge of 76.9 pC without bunch compression, and a short-bunch mode with bunch compression, producing a final bunch length of around 0.1 ps. The simulation results showed that, in the high-current mode, emittance growth was efficiently suppressed by keeping a root-mean-square (rms) bunch length of 1 ps at a bunch charge of 76.9 pC, and in the short-bunch mode, emittance growth was kept within permissible limits with a maximum allowable bunch charge of 23.1 pC at an rms bunch length of 0.1 ps.

  15. Gaussian versus flat-top spatial beam profiles for optical stimulation of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the CN surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5-ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. The threshold for ONS was approximately 0.14 J/cm2, corresponding to a temperature increase of 6-8°C at the CN surface after a stimulation time of 15 s. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of CN's during prostate

  16. Ugrades of beam diagnostics in support of emittance-exchange experiments at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Johnson, A.S.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.-E.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using electron beam phase space manipulations to support a free-electron laser accelerator design optimization has motivated our research. An ongoing program demonstrating the exchange of transverse horizontal and longitudinal emittances at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector has benefited recently from the upgrade of several of the key diagnostics stations. Accurate measurements of these properties upstream and downstream of the exchanger beamline are needed. Improvements in the screen resolution term and reduced impact of the optical system's depth-of-focus by using YAG:Ce single crystals normal to the beam direction will be described. The requirement to measure small energy spreads (<10 keV) in the spectrometer and the exchange process which resulted in bunch lengths less than 500 fs led to other diagnostics performance adjustments and upgrades as well. A longitudinal to transverse exchange example is also reported.

  17. Radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array in non-Kolmogorov medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huilong; Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Chen, Dong; He, Wei; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2016-08-22

    The analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density, the average intensity and the complex degree of spatial coherence of a radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array propagating through non-Kolmogorov medium are obtained by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The evolution behaviors of a radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array propagating through non-Kolmogorov medium are studied in detail. It is shown that the evolution behaviors of average intensity depend on beam parameters including the spatial correlation length, the radius of the beam array, as well as the propagation distance. A radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array with high coherence evolves more rapidly than that with low coherence.

  18. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  19. High Power Beam Test and Measurement of Emittance Evolution of a 1.6-Cell Photocathode RF Gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Huang, Jung-Yun; Xiang, Dao; Wang, Xijie; Ko, In Soo

    2007-04-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement.

  20. Intense nonneutral beam propagation in a periodic solenoidal field using a macroscopic fluid model with zero thermal emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Stoltz, P.; Chen, C.

    1997-08-01

    A macroscopic fluid model is developed to describe the nonlinear dynamics and collective processes in an intense high-current beam propagating in the z-direction through a periodic focusing solenoidal field B{sub z}(z + S) = B{sub z}(z), where S is the axial periodicity length. The analysis assumes that space-charge effects dominate the effects of thermal beam emittance, Kr{sub b}{sup 2} {much_gt} {epsilon}{sub th}{sup 2}, and is based on the macroscopic moment-Maxwell equations, truncated by neglecting the pressure tensor and higher-order moments. Assuming a thin beam with r{sub b} {much_lt} S, azimuthally symmetric beam equilibria with {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}t = 0 = {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{theta} are investigated. To illustrate the considerable flexibility of the macroscopic formalism, assuming (nearly) uniform axial flow velocity V{sub b} over the beam cross section, beam equilibrium properties are calculated for two examples: (a) uniform radial density profile over the interval 0 {le} r < r{sub b}(z), and (b) an infinitesimally thin annular beam centered at r = r{sub b}(z). The analysis generally allows for the azimuthal flow velocity V{sub {theta}b}(r,z) to differ from the Larmor frequency, and the model is used to calculate the (leading-order) correction {delta}V{sub zb}(r,z) to the axial flow velocity for the step-function density profile in case (a) above.

  1. Ring artifact corrections in flat-panel detector based cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jaegon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md. Kamrul

    2011-03-01

    The use of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) is becoming increasingly popular in the cone beam volume and multi-slice CT imaging. But due to the deficient semiconductor array processing, the diagnostic quality of the FPD-based CT images in both CT systems is degraded by different types of artifacts known as the ring and radiant artifacts. Several techniques have been already published in eliminating the stripe artifacts from the projection data of the multi-slice CT system or in other words, from the sinogram image with a view to suppress the ring and radiant artifacts from the 2-D reconstructed CT images. On the other hand, till now a few articles have been reported to remove the artifacts from the cone beam CT images. In this paper, an effective approach is presented to eliminate the artifacts from the cone beam projection data using the sinogram based stripe artifact removal methods. The improvement in the required diagnostic quality is achieved by applying them both in horizontal and vertical sinograms constituted sequentially from the stacked cone beam projections. Finally, some real CT images have been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique in eliminating the ring and radiant artifacts from the cone beam volume CT images. A comparative study with the conventional sinogram based approaches is also presented to see the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  2. Development of a pepper-pot device to determine the emittance of an ion beam generated by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeier, M.; Benitez, J. Y.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Bantel, M.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the recent development and commissioning of a pepper-pot emittance meter at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). It is based on a potassium bromide (KBr) scintillator screen in combination with a charged coupled device camera. Pepper-pot scanners record the full four-dimensional transverse phase space emittances which are particularly interesting for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. The strengths and limitations of evaluating emittances using optical pepper-pot scanners are described and systematic errors induced by the optical data acquisition system will be presented. Light yield tests of KBr exposed to different ion species and first emittance measurement data using ion beams extracted from the 6.4 GHz LBNL electron cyclotron resonance ion source are presented and discussed.

  3. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-01

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  4. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  5. Momentum Flux Determination Using the Multi-beam Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolls, M. J.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, Diego; Heinselman, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an estimator for the vertical flux of horizontal momentum with arbitrary beam pointing, applicable to the case of arbitrary but fixed beam pointing with systems such as the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). This method uses information from all available beams to resolve the variances of the wind field in addition to the vertical flux of both meridional and zonal momentum, targeted for high-frequency wave motions. The estimator utilises the full covariance of the distributed measurements, which provides a significant reduction in errors over the direct extension of previously developed techniques and allows for the calculation of an error covariance matrix of the estimated quantities. We find that for the PFISR experiment, we can construct an unbiased and robust estimator of the momentum flux if sufficient and proper beam orientations are chosen, which can in the future be optimized for the expected frequency distribution of momentum-containing scales. However, there is a potential trade-off between biases and standard errors introduced with the new approach, which must be taken into account when assessing the momentum fluxes. We apply the estimator to PFISR measurements on 23 April 2008 and 21 December 2007, from 60-85 km altitude, and show expected results as compared to mean winds and in relation to the measured vertical velocity variances.

  6. Fine-structure characteristics in the emittance images of a strongly focusing He{sup +} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Kisaki, M.; Takahashi, H.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Kaneko, O.; Tsumori, K.; Shinto, K.; Wada, M.

    2010-02-15

    The phase space distribution of a strongly focused He{sup +} ion beam source equipped with concave multiaperture electrodes was measured using a pepper-pot plate and a Kapton foil. The substructure of 301 merging He beamlets was clearly observed on a footprint of pepper-pot hole at the beam waist, where the beam density was 500 mA/cm{sup 2}. The position and the width of each beamlet substructure show the effect of interference of beamlets with surrounding one.

  7. Beam characteristics and a new operation method of a HARP field-emitter image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanba, Masakazu; Yamagishi, Toshio; Okazaki, Saburo; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Takayama, Katsumi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shigeo

    1999-04-01

    A new type of image sensor featuring a unique structure is studied with the aim of achieving both super-high sensitivity and ultrahigh-definition. This image sensor combines a field emitter array (FEA) and a high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor target. We investigated the conditions for improving resolution in a vacuum chamber by inserting a mesh electrode between the FEA and the target. The results indicate that the resolution can be improved by strengthening the accelerating electric field between the FEA gate and the mesh, and by placing the mesh closer to the FEA. We also propose a new parallel readout system that is suitable for an ultrahigh-definition image sensor. Dividing the target into multiple segments and reading out signals for each segment simultaneously enables us to decrease the drive frequency. In our first attempt, we synthesized a good 60 X 60 pixel image from two 30 X 60 pixel segments.

  8. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  9. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  10. Stability of an emittance-dominated sheet-electron beam in planar wiggler and periodic permanent magnet structures with natural focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Earley, L. M.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Russell, S. J.; Potter, J. M.; Ferguson, P.; Humphries, S.

    2005-06-01

    A sheet-beam traveling-wave amplifier has been proposed as a high-power generator of rf from 95 to 300 GHz, using a microfabricated rf slow-wave structure [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 85 (2005), ITPSBD, 0093-3813, 10.1109/TPS.2004.841172], for emerging radar and communications applications. The planar geometry of microfabrication technologies matches well with the nearly planar geometry of a sheet beam, and the greater allowable beam current leads to high-peak power, high-average power, and wide bandwidths. Simulations of nominal designs using a vane-loaded waveguide as the slow-wave structure have indicated gains in excess of 1 dB/mm, with extraction efficiencies greater than 20% at 95 GHz with a 120-kV, 20-A electron beam. We have identified stable sheet-beam formation and transport as the key enabling technology for this type of device. In this paper, we describe sheet-beam transport, for both wiggler and periodic permanent magnet (PPM) magnetic field configurations, with natural (or single-plane) focusing. For emittance-dominated transport, the transverse equation of motion reduces to a Mathieu equation, and to a modified Mathieu equation for a space-charge dominated beam. The space-charge dominated beam has less beam envelope ripple than an emittance-dominated beam, but they have similar stability thresholds (defined by where the beam ripple continues to grow without bound along the transport line), consistent with the threshold predicted by the Mathieu equation. Design limits are derived for an emittance-dominated beam based on the Mathieu stability threshold. The increased beam envelope ripple for emittance-dominated transport may impact these design limits, for some transport requirements. The stability of transport in a wiggler field is additionally compromised by the beam’s increased transverse motion. Stable sheet-beam transport with natural focusing is shown to be achievable for a 120-kV, 20-A, elliptical beam with a cross section of

  11. Feasibility of optical diffraction radiation for a non-invasive low-emittance beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, J.; Hayano, H.; Kubo, K.; Kuroda, S.; Terunuma, N.; Kuriki, M.; Okugi, T.; Naito, T.; Araki, S.; Potylitsyn, A.; Naumenko, G.; Karataev, P.; Potylitsyna, N.; Vnukov, I.; Hirose, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Muto, T.; Ikezawa, M.; Shibata, Y.

    2001-10-01

    A "proof-of-principle" experiment on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as a single-pulse beam profile monitor is planned using an electron beam extracted from the KEK-ATF damping ring. The main goals of this experiment are the following: (i) To measure the yield and the angular distributions of the optical diffraction radiation from a large-size target at different wavelengths, impact parameters and beam characteristics for a comparison with analogous characteristics of optical transition radiation from a foil with identical optical parameters and for a verification of the model assumption (perfectly conducting semi-infinite target). (ii) To investigate the ODR angular distributions from a tilted target with a slit for observing the interference effects. (iii) To compare the results obtained by simulations based on classical approaches, taking into account the optical characteristics of the equipment and the beam parameters. (iv) To estimate the prospects of using ODR as a new non-invasive tool for ultrarelativistic beams. We estimated that the ODR photon yield in 10% bandwidth for 500 nm is about 10 6 photons/bunch with an impact parameter of 100 μm. This indicates that the ODR monitor is a promising candidate for single-pulse beam-profile measurements, and that it will be an extremely useful instrument for future linear colliders (JLC, NLC, TESLA and CLIC).

  12. Novel beam delivery fibers for delivering flat-top beams with controlled BPP for high power CW and pulsed laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollivet, C.; Farley, K.; Conroy, M.; Abramczyk, J.; Belke, S.; Becker, F.; Tankala, K.

    2016-03-01

    Single-mode (SM) kW-class fiber lasers are the tools of choice for material processing applications such as sheet metal cutting and welding. However, application requirements include a flat-top intensity profile and specific beam parameter product (BPP). Here, Nufern introduces a novel specialty fiber technology capable of converting a SM laser beam into a flat-top beam suited for these applications. The performances are demonstrated using a specialty fiber with 100 μm pure silica core, 0.22 NA surrounded by a 120 μm fluorine-doped layer and a 360 μm pure silica cladding, which was designed to match the conventional beam delivery fibers. A SM fiber laser operating at a wavelength of 1.07 μm and terminated with a large-mode area (LMA) fiber with 20 μm core and 0.06 NA was directly coupled in the core of the flat-top specialty fiber using conventional splicing technique. The output beam profile and BPP were characterized first with a low-power source and confirmed using a 2 kW laser and we report a beam transformation from a SM beam into a flat-top intensity profile beam with a 3.8 mm*mrad BPP. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful beam transformation from SM to MM flat-top with controlled BPP in a single fiber integrated in a multi-kW all-fiber system architecture.

  13. Inner scale effect on scintillation index of flat-topped beam in non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhihong; Luo, Xiujuan; Xia, Aili; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Bei

    2015-04-01

    A simpler generalized expression of irradiance fluctuation for flat-topped beams is presented based on the Born and Rytov perturbation methods. The theoretical expression of the on-axis scintillation index in non-Kolmogorov weak atmospheric optics links is developed using the generalized von Kármán spectrum model, and using the equivalent structure constant that is different for all power-law exponents. The effect of the inner scale on the on-axis scintillation index is examined comprehensively. It is observed that flat-topped beams happen to possess smaller scintillation indices at larger inner scale. The effects of the power law, flat-topped order, source size of the fundamental Gaussian beam, propagation distance, and wavelength are also analyzed.

  14. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  15. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  16. First experimental test of quadrupole lens-free multiple profile monitor technique for electron beam emittance measurement with a PW laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krus, M.; Levato, T.; Kim, H. T.; Grittani, G.; Margarone, D.; Jeong, T. M.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    The quadrupole lens free multiple profile emittance measurement method is an adaptation of the standard multiple profile monitor method for electron beam emittance measurement which was tested at PW laser system. This single shot technique allows to obtain the emittance from beam profile radii fit by means of Twiss (Courant-Snyder) parameters. Lanex scintillating screens were used as profile monitors due to their high yield of visible photons. However, on the other hand, the screen is a source of multiple Coulomb scattering which can influence the beam profile on the following screens at relatively low electron energies. Nevertheless, the contribution of the multiple scattering can be effectively subtracted from the signal by e.g. Bayes unfolding. For high energy beams (E > 0.5 GeV), the multiple scattering contribution is negligible. The presented diagnostics is easy to be implemented into standard experimental setups without any special requests for alignment procedure. Moreover, it can be useful in the optimization phase of the laser plasma accelerator where beam fundamental parameters (energy, energy spread, divergence, pointing) typically fluctuate shot-to- shot.

  17. Intensity fluctuations of flat-topped beam in non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence: comment.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    In J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29, 169 (2012), Gerçekcioğlu and Baykal presented an investigation of the dependence of the scintillation index of flat-topped Gaussian beams on the exponent α of the power-law-type spectra of non-Kolmogorov turbulence. In particular, they found that the scintillation index reaches a maximum at α≈3.2. We show that this conclusion is an artifact of their specific calculation, and depends on the choice of the length unit. Gerçekcioğlu and Baykal's calculations are made for the 3<α<5 range of the spectral exponent. We show that for the homogeneous and isotropic turbulence the correct range is 3<α<4, when Markov approximation is used.

  18. Scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT: analysis of voxelized patient simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a systematic assessment of scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT. The analysis is based on simulated scatter projections of voxelized CT images of different body regions allowing to accurately quantify scattered radiation of realistic and clinically relevant patient geometries. Using analytically computed primary projection data of high spatial resolution in combination with Monte-Carlo simulated scattered radiation, practically noise-free reference data sets are computed with and without inclusion of scatter. The impact of scatter is studied both in the projection data and in the reconstructed volume for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions. Currently available anti-scatter grid geometries do not sufficiently compensate scatter induced cupping and streak artifacts, requiring additional software-based scatter correction. The required accuracy of scatter compensation approaches increases with increasing patient size.

  19. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  20. Production of clinically useful positron emitter beams during carbon ion deceleration.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, M; Brahme, A

    2011-03-21

    In external beam radiation therapy, radioactive beams offer the best clinical solution to simultaneously treat and in vivo monitor the dose delivery and tumor response using PET or PET-CT imaging. However, difficulties mainly linked to the low production efficiency have so far limited their use. This study is devoted to the analysis of the production of high energy (11)C fragments, preferably by projectile fragmentation of a stable monodirectional and monoenergetic primary (12)C beam in different absorbing materials (decelerators) in order to identify the optimal elemental composition. The study was performed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT07. The track length and fluence of generated secondary particles were scored in a uniform absorber of 300 cm length and 10 cm radius, divided into slices of 1 cm thickness. The (11)C fluence build-up and mean energy variation with increasing decelerator depth are presented. Furthermore, the fluence of the secondary (11)C beam was studied as a function of its mean energy and the corresponding remaining range in water. It is shown that the maximum (11)C fluence build-up is high in compounds where the fraction by weight of hydrogen is high, being the highest in liquid hydrogen. Furthermore, a cost effective alternative solution to the single medium initially envisaged is presented: a two-media decelerator that comprises a first liquid hydrogen section followed by a second decelerating section made of a hydrogen-rich material, such as polyethylene (C(2)H(4)). The purpose of the first section is to achieve a fast initial (11)C fluence build-up, while the second section is primarily designed to modulate the mean energy of the generated (11)C beam in order to reach the tumor depth. Finally, it was demonstrated that, if the intensity of the primary (12)C beam can be increased by an order of magnitude, a sufficient intensity of the secondary (11)C beam is achieved for therapy and subsequent therapeutic PET imaging sessions. Such an

  1. Production of clinically useful positron emitter beams during carbon ion deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, M.; Brahme, A.

    2011-03-01

    In external beam radiation therapy, radioactive beams offer the best clinical solution to simultaneously treat and in vivo monitor the dose delivery and tumor response using PET or PET-CT imaging. However, difficulties mainly linked to the low production efficiency have so far limited their use. This study is devoted to the analysis of the production of high energy 11C fragments, preferably by projectile fragmentation of a stable monodirectional and monoenergetic primary 12C beam in different absorbing materials (decelerators) in order to identify the optimal elemental composition. The study was performed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT07. The track length and fluence of generated secondary particles were scored in a uniform absorber of 300 cm length and 10 cm radius, divided into slices of 1 cm thickness. The 11C fluence build-up and mean energy variation with increasing decelerator depth are presented. Furthermore, the fluence of the secondary 11C beam was studied as a function of its mean energy and the corresponding remaining range in water. It is shown that the maximum 11C fluence build-up is high in compounds where the fraction by weight of hydrogen is high, being the highest in liquid hydrogen. Furthermore, a cost effective alternative solution to the single medium initially envisaged is presented: a two-media decelerator that comprises a first liquid hydrogen section followed by a second decelerating section made of a hydrogen-rich material, such as polyethylene (C2H4). The purpose of the first section is to achieve a fast initial 11C fluence build-up, while the second section is primarily designed to modulate the mean energy of the generated 11C beam in order to reach the tumor depth. Finally, it was demonstrated that, if the intensity of the primary 12C beam can be increased by an order of magnitude, a sufficient intensity of the secondary 11C beam is achieved for therapy and subsequent therapeutic PET imaging sessions. Such an increase in the

  2. Microwave measurements and beam dynamics simulations of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA emittance-compensated 1.6-cell photocathode rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Dennis T.; Miller, Roger H.; Winick, Herman; Wang, Xi J.; Batchelor, Kenneth; Woodle, Martin H.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    1995-09-01

    A dedicated low energy (2 to 10 MeV) experimental beam line is now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory/Accelerator Test Facility (BNL/ATF) for photocathode RF gun testing and photoemission experiments. Microwave measurements of the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun have been conducted along with beam dynamics simulations of the emittance compensated low energy beam. These simulations indicate that the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun in combination with solenoidal emittance compensation will be capable of producing a high brightness beam with a normalization rms emittance of (epsilon) n,rms approximately equals 1 (pi) mm mrad. The longitudinal accelerating field Ez has been measured as a function of azimuthal angle in the full cell of the cold test model for the 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA #3 S-band RF Gun using a needle rotation/frequency perturbation technique. These measurements were conducted before and after symmetrizing the full cell with a vacuum pump out port and an adjustable short. Two different waveguide to full cell coupling schemes were studied. Experimental and theoretical studies of the field balance versus mode separation were conducted. The dipole mode of the full cell using the (theta) - coupling scheme is an order of magnitude less severe before symmetrization than the Z- coupling scheme. The multi-pole contribution to the longitudinal field asymmetry are calculated using standard Fourier series techniques for both coupling schemes. The Panofsky- Wenzel theorem is used in estimating the transverse emittance due to the multipole components of Ez. Detailed beam dynamics simulations were performed for the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun injector using a solenoidal emittance compensation technique. The design of the experimental line along with a proposed experimental program using the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA RF gun collaboration is presented. This experimental program includes measurements of beam loading caused

  3. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  4. Stokes parameters of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammady, Sh; Ghafary, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, generalized Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the unified theory of coherence and polarization have been reported. Analytical formulas for 2  ×  2 cross-spectral density matrix elements, and consequently Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere have been formulated. Effects of many physical attributes such as wavelength, turbulence strength, flatness order and other source parameters on the Stokes parameters, and therefore spectral degree of polarization upon propagation have been studied thoroughly. The behaviour of the spectral degree of coherence of a delineated beam for different source conditions has been investigated. It can be shown that four generalized Stokes parameters increase by raising the flatness order at the same propagation distance. Increasing the number of beams leads to a decrease in the Stokes parameters to zero slowly. The results are of utmost importance for optical communications.

  5. Stokes parameters of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammady, Sh; Ghafary, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, generalized Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle and the unified theory of coherence and polarization have been reported. Analytical formulas for 2  ×  2 cross-spectral density matrix elements, and consequently Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere have been formulated. Effects of many physical attributes such as wavelength, turbulence strength, flatness order and other source parameters on the Stokes parameters, and therefore spectral degree of polarization upon propagation have been studied thoroughly. The behaviour of the spectral degree of coherence of a delineated beam for different source conditions has been investigated. It can be shown that four generalized Stokes parameters increase by raising the flatness order at the same propagation distance. Increasing the number of beams leads to a decrease in the Stokes parameters to zero slowly. The results are of utmost importance for optical communications.

  6. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  7. Multi-emitter laser multiplexer using a two-mirror beam shaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Joshua M.; Brennan, John; Bhatia, Vikram

    2014-12-01

    A system was designed and built to spatially multiplex four broad area laser diodes (BALD) and condense the light into a multi-mode fiber with a core diameter of 105 um and an NA of 0.15. The lasers were efficiently combined with an étendue aspect ratio scaler (EARS) optic. The EARS works under the principle of a two mirror beam shaper. We were able to successfully couple more than 87% of the optical energy into the fiber. The design of the optical system and the results of several built systems are discussed.

  8. Evidence for high-energy and low-emittance electron beams using ionization injection of charge in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Welch, E. C.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-03-01

    Ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator was investigated experimentally using two lithium plasma sources of different lengths. The ionization of the helium gas, used to confine the lithium, injects electrons in the wake. After acceleration, these injected electrons are observed as a distinct group from the drive beam on the energy spectrometer. They typically have a charge of tens of pC, an energy spread of a few GeV, and a maximum energy of up to 30 GeV. The emittance of this group of electrons can be many times smaller than the initial emittance of the drive beam. The energy scaling for the trapped charge from one plasma length to the other is consistent with the blowout theory of the plasma wakefield.

  9. Electron beam collimation with a 40 000 tip metallic double-gate field emitter array and in-situ control of nanotip sharpness distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Helfenstein, P.; Guzenko, V. A.; Tsujino, S.; Fink, H.-W.

    2013-01-28

    The generation of highly collimated electron beams from a double-gate field emitter array with 40000 metallic tips and large collimation gate apertures is reported. Field emission beam measurements demonstrated the reduction of the beam envelope down to the array size by applying a negative potential to the on-chip gate electrode for the collimation of individual field emission beamlets. Owing to the optimized gate structure, the concomitant decrease of the emission current was minimal, leading to a net enhancement of the current density. Furthermore, a noble gas conditioning process was successfully applied to the double-gate device to improve the beam uniformity in-situ with orders of magnitude increase of the active emission area. The results show that the proposed double-gate field emission cathodes are promising for high current and high brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers and THz power devices.

  10. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  11. Portable emittance measurement device

    SciTech Connect

    Liakin, D.; Seleznev, D.; Orlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Kropachev, G.; Kulevoy, T.; Yakushin, P.

    2010-02-15

    In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the portable emittance measurements device is developed. It provides emittance measurements both with ''pepper-pot'' and ''two slits'' methods. Depending on the method of measurements, either slits or pepper-pot mask with scintillator are mounted on the two activators and are installed in two standard Balzer's cross chamber with CF-100 flanges. To match the angle resolution for measured beam, the length of the stainless steel pipe between two crosses changes is adjusted. The description of the device and results of emittance measurements at the ITEP ion source test bench are presented.

  12. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Bulanov, Stepan; Chen, Min; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Vay, J.; Yu, Lule; Leemans, Wim

    2015-05-21

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2O3 laser for ionization injection.

  13. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  14. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  15. Photocathode rf gun emittance measurements using variable-length laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerge, John F.; Hernandez, Mike; Hogan, Mark J.; Reis, David A.; Winick, Herman

    1999-07-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) was created to develop an appropriate injector for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS design requires the injector to produce a beam with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter pulse with no greater than 1 (pi) mm-mrad normalized rms emittance. The first photoinjector under study at the GTF is a 1.6 cell S-band symmetrized gun with an emittance compensation solenoid. Emittance measurements, reported here, were made as function of the transverse laser pulse shape and the Gaussian longitudinal laser pulse length. The lowest achieved emittance to data with 1 nC of charge is 5.6 (pi) mm-mrad and was obtained with both a Gaussian longitudinal and transverse pulse shape with 5 ps FWHM and 2.4 mm FWHM respectively. The measurement is in agreement with a PARMELA simulation using measured beam parameters. There are indications that the accelerator settings used in the results presented here were not optimal. Simulations indicate that a normalized emittance meeting the LCLS requirement can be obtained using appropriately shaped transverse and temporal laser/electron beam pulses. Work has begun on producing temporal flat top laser pulses which combined with transverse clipping of the laser is expected to lower the emittance to approximately 1 (pi) mm-mrad for 1 nC beams with optimal accelerator settings.

  16. Cone-beam CT breast imaging with a flat panel detector: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Tu, Shu-Ju; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Kappadath, S. C.

    2005-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a flat panel based cone-beam computer tomography (CT) system for 3-D breast imaging with computer simulation and imaging experiments. In our simulation study, 3-D phantoms were analytically modeled to simulate a breast loosely compressed into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients were estimated to represent various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications to generate realistic image signal and contrast. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the two-views mammography comparable dose level on the central axis of the phantom (also the rotation axis), x-ray kVp/filtration, transmittance through the phantom, detected quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to estimate the phantom noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis. This estimated noise level was then used with the random number generator to produce and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulated detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian-like kernel is designed to suppress the noise fluctuation that inherently originates from projection images so that the reconstructed image detectability of low contrast masses phantom can be improved. Image reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. With 600 mrads mean glandular dose (MGD) at the phantom center, soft tissue masses as small as 1 mm in diameter can be detected in a 10 cm diameter 50% glandular 50% adipose or fatter breast tissue, and 2 mm or larger

  17. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO2 as a mask. Deposition of a SiO2 insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO2 using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V.

  18. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, T.; Tzoganis, V.; Kase, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO2 (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF2, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy 12C4+, 16O4+, and 40Ar11+ ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  19. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, T; Tzoganis, V; Kase, M; Kamigaito, O; Nakagawa, T

    2016-02-01

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO2 (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF2, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy (12)C(4+), (16)O(4+), and (40)Ar(11+) ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  20. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, Francois; Mihalcea, Daniel; Piot, Philippe; Zhu, Jun

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  1. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Unholtz, D; Kurz, C; Parodi, K

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β(+) activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β(+) activity induced in the investigated

  2. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J.; Unholtz, D.; Kurz, C.; Parodi, K.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β+ activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β+ activity induced in the investigated

  3. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Razin, S. Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-15

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80–100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2–1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  4. Non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement by using laser beam and laser distance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Fan, Bo; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2015-07-01

    Large-scale separated surface is very common in modern manufacturing industry. The measurement of the flatness of such surfaces is one of the most important procedures when evaluating the manufacturing quality. Usually, the measurement needs to be accomplished in an in-situ and non-contact way. Although there are many conventional approaches such as autocollimator, capacitance displacement sensor and even CMM, they can not meet the needs from the separated surfaces measurement either because of their contact-nature or inapplicable to separated surfaces. A non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement device utilizing laser beam and laser distance sensor (LDS) is proposed. The laser beam is rotated to form an optical reference plane. The LDS is used to measure the distance between the surface and the sensor accurately. A Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) is mounted with the LDS firmly to determine the distance between the LDS and the reference plane and then the distance between the surface and the reference plane can be obtained by subtracting the two distances. The device can be easily mounted on a machine-tool spindle and is moved to measure all the separated surfaces. Then all the data collected are used to evaluate the flatness of these separated surfaces. The accuracy analysis, the corresponding flatness evaluation algorithm, the prototype construction and experiments are also discussed. The proposed approach and device feature as high accuracy, in-situ usage and the higher degree of automatic measurement, and can be used in the areas that call for non-contact and separated surfaces measurement.

  5. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-10

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO(2) as a mask. Deposition of a SiO(2) insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO(2) using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V. PMID:21828872

  6. The effects of external beam irradiation on the growth of flat bones in children: Modeling a dose-volume effect

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J. . E-mail: mathew.krasin@stjude.org; Xiong Xiaoping; Wu Shengjie; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To model the effects of external beam irradiation on the developing flat bones of pediatric patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for tumors involving the musculoskeletal system. Methods and Materials: Patients with image-guided RT plans including areas adjacent to facial or pelvic flat bones underwent retrospective contouring of nontumor involved flat bones ipsilateral and contralateral to the treatment side. Radiation dose-volume information and bone volume data (initial and the most recent follow-up) were analyzed in 15 paired flat bones from 10 patients (ages 1.0-17.0 years). The models to predict bone growth after completion of RT (v {sub post}) were based on initial bone volume (v {sub pre}), the patient's age, time to follow-up (t), and the dose-volume parameter (v{sub Int35+} ). Results: We developed a dose effects model as follows: Log (v{sub post} / v{sub pre} ) = {beta}{sub time}t + {beta}{sub agegroup}t + {beta}{sub dose}t v{sub Int35} . The dose-volume parameter v{sub Int35} predicted significantly for alterations in growth in younger patients, but not for older patients. The predictability of the fitted model for relative change in bone growth improved in the younger age group with the addition of the dose-volume term v{sub Int35} (correlation coefficient of r = 0.5510 to r = 0.6760 with the addition v{sub Int35} ). Conclusions: Our model accurately predicted flat bone growth and is notable for the inclusion of radiation dose-volume information, which is now available in the image-guided RT era. Further refinement of this model in a prospective patient population is underway.

  7. Dual-axis beam correction for an array of single-mode diode laser emitters using a laser-written custom phase-plate.

    PubMed

    Trela, Natalia; Baker, Howard J; Wendland, Jozef J; Hall, Denis R

    2009-12-21

    A single optical component for a diode laser bar combines fast-axis smile and lens error correction with slow-axis collimation. Produced by laser-machining/polishing, it provides 0.9 mm focal length, 200 microm pitch slow-axis collimation on the same surface that corrects fast-axis errors. Custom fabrication enables fill-factor optimization for the 49 single-mode beams and gives parallel collimation with rms pointing errors of 3% and 6% of the far-field divergence for the fast- and slow-axis array respectively. Sub-micron pitch mismatch between the slow-axis lens and emitter arrays, and beam pointing changes by thermal expansion of the laser bar are detected. PMID:20052066

  8. Effect of external static magnetic field on the emittance and total charge of electron beams generated by laser-Wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Zhidkov, Alexei; Maekawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-08-18

    Significant enhancement of emittance and an increase of the total charge of femtosecond electron beams produced by a 12 TW, 40 fs laser pulse, tightly focused in a He gas jet, are observed after applying a static magnetic field, B> or =0.2 T, directed along the axis of laser pulse propagation. The effect appears when plasma produced by a laser prepulse becomes magnetized in the vicinity of the focus point: the electron Larmor frequency exceeds the collisional frequency, while periphery of the plasma remains unmagnetized. The entailed change in the shape of the plasma suppresses the diffraction of the main laser pulse that results in a much higher charge of electrons self-injected during the longitudinal wave breaking of the laser wake as well as the excellent stability of the beams.

  9. Empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) for the precorrection of beam hardening and scatter for flat panel CT

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, Rainer; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Scatter and beam hardening are prominent artifacts in x-ray CT. Currently, there is no precorrection method that inherently accounts for tube voltage modulation and shaped prefiltration. Methods: A method for self-calibration based on binary tomography of homogeneous objects, which was proposed by B. Li et al. [''A novel beam hardening correction method for computed tomography,'' in Proceedings of the IEEE/ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering CME 2007, pp. 891-895, 23-27 May 2007], has been generalized in order to use this information to preprocess scans of other, nonbinary objects, e.g., to reduce artifacts in medical CT applications. Further on, the method was extended to handle scatter besides beam hardening and to allow for detector pixel-specific and ray-specific precorrections. This implies that the empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) technique is sensitive to spectral effects as they are induced by the heel effect, by shaped prefiltration, or by scanners with tube voltage modulation. The presented method models the beam hardening correction by using a rational function, while the scatter component is modeled using the pep model of B. Ohnesorge et al. [''Efficient object scatter correction algorithm for third and fourth generation CT scanners,'' Eur. Radiol. 9(3), 563-569 (1999)]. A smoothness constraint is applied to the parameter space to regularize the underdetermined system of nonlinear equations. The parameters determined are then used to precorrect CT scans. Results: EBTC was evaluated using simulated data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner with tube voltage modulation and bow-tie prefiltration and using real data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner. In simulation studies, where the ground truth is known, the authors' correction model proved to be highly accurate and was able to reduce beam hardening by 97% and scatter by about 75%. Reconstructions of measured data showed significantly less artifacts than

  10. Increased efficiency of short-pulse laser-generated proton beams from novel flat-top cone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Albright, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Letzring, S.; Shimada, T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; D'Humieres, E.; Rassuchine, J.; Bakeman, M.; Renard-LeGalloudec, N.; Sentoku, Y.; Cowan, T. E.; Gaillard, S. A.; Schollmeier, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Harres, K.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-15

    Ion-driven fast ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI due to the potentially large reduction in the amount of energy required for the ignition beam and the laser driver. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility employing novel Au flat-top cone targets have produced a fourfold increase in laser-energy to ion-energy efficiency, a 13-fold increase in the number of ions above 10 MeV, and a few times increase in the maximum ion energy compared to Au flat-foil targets. Compared to recently published scaling laws, these gains are even greater. If the efficiency scales with intensity in accordance to flat-foil scaling, then, with little modification, these targets can be used to generate the pulse of ions needed to ignite thermonuclear fusion in the fast ignitor scheme. A proton energy of at least 30 MeV was measured from the flat-top cone targets, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy may be as high as 40-45 MeV at modest intensity of 1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with 20 J in 600 fs. Simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone target's ability to guide laser light into the neck to produce hot electrons and transport these electrons to the flat-top of the cone where they can be heated to much higher temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations also elucidate the critical parameters for obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/plasma prefill, as well as longitudinal and transverse laser pointing, and cone geometry. These novel cones have the potential to revolutionize inertial confinement fusion target design and fabrication via their ability to be mass produced. In addition, they could have an impact on the general physics community studying basic electron and radiation transport phenomena or as better sources of particle beams to study equations of state

  11. Transverse emittance measurements from a photocathode RF gun with variable laser pulse length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, D. A.; Hernandez, M.; Schmerge, J. F.; Winick, H.; Hogan, M. J.

    1999-06-01

    The gun test facility (GTF) at SSRL was started in 1996 to develop an appropriate injector for the proposed linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS design requires the injector to produce a beam with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter pulse with no greater than 1π mm mrad normalized rms emittance. The photoinjector at the GTF is 1.6 cell S-band symmetrized gun and emittance compensation solenoid. Emittance measurements, reported here, were made as function of laser pulse width using Gaussian longitudinal pulses. The lowest achieved emittance to date with 1 nC of charge is 5.6π mm mrad and was obtained with a pulse width of 5 ps (FWHM) and is in agreement with simulation. There are indications that the accelerator settings for these results may not have been optimal. Simulations also indicate that a normalized emittance meeting the LCLS requirement can be obtained using appropriately shaped transverse and temporal laser/electron beam pulses. Work has begun on producing temporal flat top laser pulses which combined with transverse clipping of the laser is expected to lower the emittance to approximately 1π mm mrad for 1 nC with optimal accelerator settings.

  12. Design analysis and performance evaluation of a two-dimensional camera for accelerated positron-emitter beam injection by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Batho, E.K.; Poskanzer, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    The characteristics and design of a high-accuracy and high-sensitivity 2-dimensional camera for the measurement of the end-point of the trajectory of accelerated heavy ion beams of positron emitter isotopes are described. Computer simulation methods have been used in order to insure that the design would meet the demanding criteria of ability to obtain the location of the centroid of a point source in the X-Y plane with errors smaller than 1 mm, with an activity of 100 nanoCi, in a counting time of 5 sec or less. A computer program which can be developed into a general purpose analysis tool for a large number of positron emitter camera configurations is described in its essential parts. The validation of basic simulation results with simple measurements is reported, and the use of the program to generate simulated images which include important second order effects due to detector material, geometry, septa, etc. is demonstrated. Comparison between simulated images and initial results with the completed instrument shows that the desired specifications have been met.

  13. An equation-based nonlinear model for non-flat MEMS fixed-fixed beams with non-vertical anchoring supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Juan; Garg, Anurag; Kovacs, Andrew; Bajaj, Anil K.; Peroulis, Dimitrios

    2015-05-01

    Anchor supports in MEMS beams are often far from the ideally assumed built-in or step-up conditions. Practical fabrication processes often result in non-vertical anchoring supports (referred to as inclined supports in the following text) which significantly influence the post-release performance of the beam. This paper brings attention to the presence of the inclined supports in surface micromachined fixed-fixed beams and models the mechanical and electromechanical effects of inclined supports for the first time. Specifically, we calculate and validate the effects of residual stress and loading on the post-release beam behavior including their nonlinear large-displacement characteristics. In addition the model accounts for non-flat beam profiles caused by residual stress and/or a non-flat sacrificial layer profile. Inclined supports are modeled as cantilever beams connected to a horizontal beam. The Euler-Bernoulli equations for all beams are simultaneously solved to calculate the axial stress of the horizontal beam and the axial, translational, and rotational compliance of the supports. Nonlinear effects due to stretching and residual stress are also included. The calculated beam displacements agree with FEM models to within 1.1% in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Furthermore, experimentally-obtained displacements of six fabricated beams with inclined supports agree to within 5.2% with the presented model.

  14. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  15. Transverse-transverse and transverse-longitudinal phase-space converters for enhanced beam applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.-J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    Emittance exchange and flat beam transform are two phase-space converting techniques being developed recently to enhance the performance of electron beams for various applications. We review these applications, the basic principles of the converters, and the status of experimental demonstration of these techniques.

  16. A fully coherent electron beam from a noble-metal covered W(111) single-atom emitter.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Cheng; Kuo, Hong-Shi; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Tsong, Tien T

    2009-03-18

    In quantum mechanics, a wavefunction contains two factors: the amplitude and the phase. Only when the probing beam is fully phase coherent, can complete information be retrieved from a particle beam based experiment. Here we use the electron beam field emitted from a noble-metal covered W(111) single-atom tip to image single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in an electron point projection microscope (PPM). The interference fringes of an SWNT bundle exhibit a very high contrast and the fringe pattern extends throughout the entire beam width. This indicates good phase correlation at all points transverse to the propagation direction. Application of these sources can significantly improve the performance and expand the capabilities of current electron beam based techniques. New instrumentation based on the full spatial coherence may allow determination of the three-dimensional atomic structures of nonperiodic nanostructures and make many advanced experiments possible.

  17. Emittance concept and growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The authors present an introduction to the subjects of emittance and space-charge effects in charged-particle beams. This is followed by a discussion of three important topics that are at the frontier of this field. The first is a simple model, describing space-charge-induced emittance growth, which yields scaling formulas and some physical explanations for some of the surprising results. The second is a discussion of beam halo, an introduction to the particle-core model, and a brief summary of its results. The third topic is an introduction to the hypothesis of equipartitioning for collisionless particle beams.

  18. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  19. mARC Treatment of Hypopharynx Carcinoma with Flat and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Energies – A Planning Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Katharina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently implemented mARC-rotation-technique is capable to deliver high dose rate bursts. For the case of hypopharynx cancer plans we evaluate whether the mARC can achieve an advantage in treatment time in comparison to IMRT. These plans consider two arcs with flat and flattening filter free (FFF) beam energies. Materials and Methods For 8 hypopharynx-cancer patients step-and-shoot-IMRT and mARC plans were created retrospectively using flat and FFF beam energy. The comparison of the plan scenarios considered measures of quality for PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk. All plans were irradiated on an anthromorphic phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure scattered dose and treatment times. Results A visual comparison of the dose distribution did not show a marked preference for either technique or energy. The statistical evaluation yielded significant differences in favor of the mARC technique and the FFF energy. Scattered dose could be decreased markedly by the use of the mARC technique. Treatment times could be reduced up to 3 minutes with the use of mARC in comparison to IMRT. The high dose rate energy results in another time advantage of about 1 minute. Conclusions All four plan scenarios yielded equally good quality plans. A combination of the mARC technique with FFF 7 MV high dose rate resulted in a decrease of treatment times from about 9 minutes to 5–6 minutes in comparison to 6 MV IMRT. PMID:27741272

  20. Emittance measurements for optimum operation of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The transverse emittances of the source were measured with various conditions to find out the optimum operation conditions minimizing the horizontal and vertical rms normalized emittances. The transverse emittances were most effectively reduced by operating the source with the plasma electrode temperature lower than 70°C. The optimum value of the cesium (Cs) density around the beam hole of the plasma electrode seems to be proportional to the plasma electrode temperature. The fine control of the Cs density is indispensable, since the emittances seem to increase proportionally to the excessiveness of the Cs density. Furthermore, the source should be operated with the Cs density beyond a threshold value, since the plasma meniscus shape and the ellipse parameters of the transverse emittances seem to be changed step-function-likely on the threshold Cs value.

  1. Effect of secondary particles on image quality of dynamic flat panels in carbon ion scanning beam treatment

    PubMed Central

    Amano, S; Furukawa, T; Shirai, T; Noda, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Real-time markerless tumour tracking using radiographic fluoroscopic imaging is one of the better solutions to improving respiratory-gated radiotherapy. However, particle beams cause secondary particles from patients, which could affect radiographs. Here, we evaluated the quality of radiographs during carbon ion pencil beam scanning (CPBS) irradiation for respiratory gating. Methods: A water phantom and chest phantom were used. The phantoms were irradiated with CPBS at 290 MeV n−1 from orthogonal directions. Dose rates were 3.4 × 108, 1.14 × 108 and 3.79 × 107 particles per second. A dynamic flat panel detector (DFPD) was installed on the upstream (DFPD1) or downstream (DFPD2) side of the vertical irradiation port. DFPD images were acquired during CPBS at 15.00, 7.50 and 3.75 frames per second (fps). Charge on the DFPD was cleaned using fast readout technique every 30 fps. DFPD images were acquired during CPBS with radiographic exposure, and results with and without fast readout technique were compared. Results: Secondary particles were visualized as spots or streak-like shapes. Capture of secondary particles from the horizontal beam direction was lower with fast readout technique than without it. With regard to beam irradiation direction dependency, CPBS from the horizontal direction resulted in a greater magnitude of secondary particles reaching DFPD2 than reaching DFPD1. When CPBS was delivered from the vertical direction, however, the magnitude of secondary particles on both DFPDs was very similar. Conclusion: Fast readout technique minimized the effect of secondary particles on DFPD images during CPBS. Advances in knowledge: This technique may be useful for markerless tumour tracking for respiratory gating. PMID:25536444

  2. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  3. Efficient upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Burkett, Allan; Blackwell, Ashley; Taylor, Keylantra; Walker, Vernell; Sarkisov, Sergey; Koplitz, Brent

    2014-09-01

    We report on fabrication and investigation of optical and morphological properties of highly efficient (a quantum yield of 1%) upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the new technique of double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE). Polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) host was evaporated on a silicon substrate using a 1064-nm pulsed laser beam using a target made of frozen (to the temperature of liquid nitrogen) solution of PMMA in chlorobenzene. Concurrently, the second 532-nm pulsed beam from the same laser was used to impregnate the polymer host with the inorganic nanoparticulate made of the rare earth upconversion compounds NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+, NaYF4: Yb3+, Ho3+, and NaYF4: Yb3+, Tm3+. The compounds were initially synthesized using the wet process, baked, and compressed in solid pellet targets. The proposed DB-MAPLE method has the advantage of making highly homogeneous nanocomposite films with precise control of the doping rate due to the optimized overlapping of the plumes produced by the ablation of the organic and inorganic target with the infrared and visible laser beams respectively. X-ray diffraction, electron and atomic force microscopy, and optical fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that the inorganic nanoparticulate preserved its crystalline structure and upconversion properties (strong emission in green, red, and blue bands upon illumination with 980-nm laser diode) after being transferred from the target in the polymer nanocomposite film. The produced films can be used in applications varying from the efficiency enhancement of the photovoltaic cells, optical sensors and biomarkers to anti-counterfeit labels.

  4. Coherence preservation and beam flatness of a single-bounce multilayer monochromator (beamline ID19—ESRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Weitkamp, T.; Zanette, I.; Morawe, Ch.; Vivo Rommeveaux, A.; Tafforeau, P.; Cloetens, P.; Ziegler, E.; Rack, T.; Cecilia, A.; Vagovič, P.; Harmann, E.; Dietsch, R.; Riesemeier, H.

    2011-09-01

    Larger spectral bandwidth and higher photon flux density are the major advantages of multilayer monochromators over crystal-based devices. Especially for synchrotron-based hard X-ray microimaging applications the increased photon flux density is important in order to achieve high contrast and resolution in space and/or time. However, the modifications on the beam profile induced by reflection on a multilayer are a drawback which can seriously harm the performance of such a monochromator. A recent study [A. Rack, T. Weitkamp, M. Riotte, D. Grigoriev, T. Rack, L. Helfen, T. Baumbach, R. Dietsch, T. Holz, M. Krämer, F. Siewert, M. Meduňa, P. Cloetens, E. Ziegler, J. Synchrotron Radiat. 17 (2010) 496-510] has shown that the modifications in terms of beam flatness and coherence preservation can be influenced via the material composition of the multilayer coating. The present article extends this knowledge by studying further material compositions used on a daily basis for hard X-ray monochromatization at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

  5. Cone-beam breast computed tomography with a displaced flat panel detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo; Lanconelli, Nico; Meo, Sergio Lo

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and in particular in cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT), an important issue is the reduction of the image artifacts produced by photon scatter and the reduction of patient dose. In this work, the authors propose to apply the detector displacement technique (also known as asymmetric detector or ''extended view'' geometry) to approach this goal. Potentially, this type of geometry, and the accompanying use of a beam collimator to mask the unirradiated half-object in each projection, permits some reduction of radiation dose with respect to conventional CBBCT and a sizeable reduction of the overall amount of scatter in the object, for a fixed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Methods: The authors consider a scan configuration in which the projection data are acquired from an asymmetrically positioned detector that covers only one half of the scan field of view. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements, with their CBBCT laboratory scanner, were performed using PMMA phantoms of cylindrical (70-mm diameter) and hemiellipsoidal (140-mm diameter) shape simulating the average pendant breast, at 80 kVp. Image quality was evaluated in terms of contrast, noise, CNR, contrast-to-noise ratio per unit of dose (CNRD), and spatial resolution as width of line spread function for high contrast details. Results: Reconstructed images with the asymmetric detector technique deviate less than 1% from reconstruction with a conventional symmetric detector (detector view) and indicate a reduction of the cupping artifact in CT slices. The maximum scatter-to-primary ratio at the center of the phantom decreases by about 50% for both small and large diameter phantoms (e.g., from 0.75 in detector view to 0.40 in extended view geometry at the central axis of the 140-mm diameter PMMA phantom). Less cupping produces an increase of the CT number accuracy and an improved image detail contrast, but the associated increase of noise observed may

  6. A study of emittance growth in the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswamy Gounder et al.

    2001-07-20

    We investigate processes contributing to emittance growth in the Fermilab Recycler Ring. In addition to beam-gas multiple scattering, we also examine other external factors such as Main Injector ramping affecting the emittance growth.

  7. To study the emittance dilution in Superconducting Linear Accelerator Design for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Kirti; Solyak, Nikolay; Tenenbaum, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Recently the particle physics community has chosen a single technology for the new accelerator, opening the way for the world community to unite and concentrate resources on the design of an International Linear collider (ILC) using superconducting technology. One of the key operational issues in the design of the ILC will be the preservation of the small beam emittances during passage through the main linear accelerator (linac). Sources of emittance dilution include incoherent misalignments of the quadrupole magnets and rf-structure misalignments. In this work, the study of emittance dilution for the 500-GeV center of mass energy main linac of the Superconducting Linear Accelerator design, based on adaptation of the TESLA TDR design is performed using LIAR simulation program. Based on the tolerances of the present design, effect of two important Beam-Based steering algorithms, Flat Steering and Dispersion Free Steering, are compared with respect to the emittance dilution in the main linac. We also investigated the effect of various misalignments on the emittance dilution for these two steering algorithms.

  8. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  9. Emittance studies of the SNS external-antenna H- ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N; Santana, Manuel; Long, Cary D

    2010-01-01

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at SNS. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H- beam produced with the external-antenna RF-driven ion source and transported through the 2-lens electrostatic LEBT are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  10. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  11. Analyzing the propagation behavior of scintillation index and bit error rate of a partially coherent flat-topped laser beam in oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Golmohammady, Shole; Mashal, Ahmad; Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, a semianalytical expression for describing on-axis scintillation index of a partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) laser beam of weak to moderate oceanic turbulence is derived; consequently, by using the log-normal intensity probability density function, the bit error rate (BER) is evaluated. The effects of source factors (such as wavelength, order of flatness, and beam width) and turbulent ocean parameters (such as Kolmogorov microscale, relative strengths of temperature and salinity fluctuations, rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, and rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid) on propagation behavior of scintillation index, and, hence, on BER, are studied in detail. Results indicate that, in comparison with a Gaussian beam, a PCFT laser beam with a higher order of flatness is found to have lower scintillations. In addition, the scintillation index and BER are most affected when salinity fluctuations in the ocean dominate temperature fluctuations.

  12. Analyzing the propagation behavior of scintillation index and bit error rate of a partially coherent flat-topped laser beam in oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Golmohammady, Shole; Mashal, Ahmad; Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, a semianalytical expression for describing on-axis scintillation index of a partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) laser beam of weak to moderate oceanic turbulence is derived; consequently, by using the log-normal intensity probability density function, the bit error rate (BER) is evaluated. The effects of source factors (such as wavelength, order of flatness, and beam width) and turbulent ocean parameters (such as Kolmogorov microscale, relative strengths of temperature and salinity fluctuations, rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, and rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid) on propagation behavior of scintillation index, and, hence, on BER, are studied in detail. Results indicate that, in comparison with a Gaussian beam, a PCFT laser beam with a higher order of flatness is found to have lower scintillations. In addition, the scintillation index and BER are most affected when salinity fluctuations in the ocean dominate temperature fluctuations. PMID:26560913

  13. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ{sub Q}), electronic noise (σ{sub E}), and view aliasing (σ{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}), dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} <∼200, above which noise increased with N{sub proj} due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f {sup β}—and a general model of individual noise components (σ{sub Q}, σ{sub E}, and σ{sub view}) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N{sub proj}, D{sub tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis

  14. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  15. Metamaterial selective emitters for photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Dante F.; Pfeister, Nicole A.; Shemelya, Corey M.; Vandervelde, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    This work demonstrates metamaterial (MM) selective thermal emitters for potential use with energy harvesting photodiodes, such as thermophotovoltaic cells. Preliminary structures have been designed, simulated, and fabricated using CST Microwave Studio and microfabrication techniques including electron beam evaporation, atomic layer deposition, and electron beam lithography, respectively. Samples were tested to determine the effect of top layer metal thickness on the absorption of these devices. Preliminary simulation and testing was also performed to design a device for operation at 500°C.

  16. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  17. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W. Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  18. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    PubMed Central

    Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  19. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  20. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  1. Nonlinear Statistical Reconstruction for Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT with Blur and Correlated Noise Models

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications. PMID:27110051

  2. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  3. Improvement of spread-out Bragg peak flatness for a carbon-ion beam by the use of a ridge filter with a ripple filter.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yousuke; Takada, Yoshihisa; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Nihei, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yojiro; Nagafuchi, Kosuke; Kawai, Ryuichi; Tanabe, Masaki; Mizutani, Shohei; Himukai, Takeshi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2012-03-21

    We have developed a novel design method of ridge filters for carbon-ion therapy using a broad-beam delivery system to improve the flatness of a biologically effective dose in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). So far, the flatness of the SOBP is limited to about ±5% for carbon beams since the weight control of component Bragg curves composing the SOBP is difficult. This difficulty arises from using a large number of ridge-bar steps (e.g. about 100 for a SOBP width of 60 mm) required to form the SOBP for the pristine Bragg curve with an extremely sharp distal falloff. Instead of using a single ridge filter, we introduce a ripple filter to broaden the Bragg peak so that the number of ridge-bar steps can be reduced to about 30 for SOBP with of 60 mm for the ridge filter designed for the broadened Bragg peak. Thus we can manufacture the ridge filter more accurately and then attain a better flatness of the SOBP due to well-controlled weights of the component Bragg curves. We placed the ripple filter on the same frame of the ridge filter and arranged the direction of the ripple-filter-bar array perpendicular to that of the ridge-filter-bar array. We applied this method to a 290 MeV u(-1) carbon-ion beam in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba and verified the effectiveness by measurements.

  4. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  5. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  6. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  7. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  8. Delivery of large molecular protein using flat and short microneedles prepared using focused ion beam (FIB) as a skin ablation tool.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karmen; West, Geoff; Das, Diganta Bhusan

    2015-08-01

    Many studies have been reported in the literature on the effects of various geometries and lengths of microneedles (MNs) on transdermal drug delivery using a variety of drug molecules. In particular, sharp-tipped MNs have been used to disrupt the top layer of the skin, namely, stratum corneum (SC). It has also been shown that short- and flat-tipped MNs can pierce the SC and they have the potential to increase drug permeability. However, there is little work that explores MNs as a skin ablative tool with a view to increasing skin permeability. To address this point, well-defined small patterns (size of individual pattern 10-20 μm) on the tip of flat MN (tip radius of individual MN ∼250 μm) were created and their effects evaluated on the permeability of bovine serum albumin (BSA), which is chosen as a model drug of high molecular weight. The patterns on the tip of flat MN act as rough surfaces (e.g. like sand paper) which when applied on the surface of the skin ablate the SC layer. Focused ion beam (FIB) has been used as the fabrication technique for the MNs. The permeability data are then compared with the other data for flat- and sharp-tipped MN. The permeability data from passive diffusion experiments are used as the reference case. The exact number of MNs or patterns in the flat and patterned MN patches is not considered as important as they have not been designed to pierce the skin. However, this is an important consideration in the case of sharp MNs as they pierce and create cavities in the skin. It is found that the delivery of BSA with the fabricated flat and patterned MNs gave similar but somewhat lower drug permeation profile in comparison to the sharp MNs. Passive diffusion showed no permeation, as would be expected due to the large size of the chosen molecule.

  9. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  10. Development of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei generated by proton irradiation of targets containing {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei in preparation of clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a new calculation algorithm that is satisfactory in terms of the requirements for both accuracy and calculation time for a simulation of imaging of the proton-irradiated volume in a patient body in clinical proton therapy. Methods: The activity pencil beam algorithm (APB algorithm), which is a new technique to apply the pencil beam algorithm generally used for proton dose calculations in proton therapy to the calculation of activity distributions, was developed as a calculation algorithm of the activity distributions formed by positron emitter nuclei generated from target nuclear fragment reactions. In the APB algorithm, activity distributions are calculated using an activity pencil beam kernel. In addition, the activity pencil beam kernel is constructed using measured activity distributions in the depth direction and calculations in the lateral direction. {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei were determined as the major target nuclei that constitute a human body that are of relevance for calculation of activity distributions. In this study, ''virtual positron emitter nuclei'' was defined as the integral yield of various positron emitter nuclei generated from each target nucleus by target nuclear fragment reactions with irradiated proton beam. Compounds, namely, polyethylene, water (including some gelatin) and calcium oxide, which contain plenty of the target nuclei, were irradiated using a proton beam. In addition, depth activity distributions of virtual positron emitter nuclei generated in each compound from target nuclear fragment reactions were measured using a beam ON-LINE PET system mounted a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp). The measured activity distributions depend on depth or, in other words, energy. The irradiated proton beam energies were 138, 179, and 223 MeV, and measurement time was about 5 h until the measured activity reached the background level. Furthermore, the activity pencil beam data

  11. Emittance Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N.; Berry, M.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-06-28

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC showed trapping of plasma electrons. These trapped electrons appeared on an energy spectrometer with smaller transverse size than the beam driving the wake. A connection is made between transverse size and emittance; due to the spectrometer's resolution, this connection allows for placing an upper limit on the trapped electron emittance. The upper limit for the lowest normalized emittance measured in the experiment is 1 mm {center_dot} mrad.

  12. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  13. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  14. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Don; Acosta, John; Cremaldi, Lucien; Hart, Terry; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Wu, Wanwei; Neuffer, David

    2015-05-07

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low β region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 μs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87%.

  15. Impact of flat panel-imager veiling glare on scatter-estimation accuracy and image quality of a commercial on-board cone-beam CT imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this study is to measure the low frequency drop (LFD) of the modulation transfer function (MTF), associated with the long tails of the detector point spread function (PSF) of an on-board flat panel imager and study its impact on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and scatter measurement accuracy. Methods: Two different experimental methods were used to characterize LFD and its associated PSF of a Varian OBI flat-panel detector system: the edge response function (ERF) method and the disk transfer function (DTF) method. PSF was estimated by fitting parametric models to these measurements for four values of the applied voltage (kVp). The resultant PSF was used to demonstrate the effect of LFD on image contrast and CT number accuracy in CBCT images reconstructed from synthetic datasets, as well as, accuracy of scatter measurements with the beam-stop method. Results: The MTFs derived from the measured ERF data revealed LFDs varying from 8% (at 60 kVp) to 10.5% (at 120 kVp), while the intensity of the long PSF tails was found to increase with increasing kVp. The veiling glare line spread functions derived from the ERF and DTF methods were in excellent agreement. Uncorrected veiling glare reduced contrast and the image intensity in CBCT reconstruction, near the phantom periphery (by 67 Hounsfield units in a 20 cm-in-diameter water phantom) and (to a smaller degree) near inhomogeneities. Use of the bow-tie filter mitigated these effects. Veiling glare also resulted in about 10%-15% overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio when measured with the beam-stop or beam-stop array method. Conclusions: The long tails of the detector PSF were found to have a modest dependence of beam spectrum, which is reflected on the MTF curve LFD. Our findings show that uncorrected veiling glare can affect quantitative accuracy and contrast in CBCT imaging, based on flat panel imager. In addition, it results in overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio, measured

  16. A flat-cathode thermionic injector for the PHERMEX Radiographic Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kauppila, T.; Builta, L.; Burns, M.; Gregory, W.; Honaberger, D.; Watson, S.; Hughes, T.

    1993-06-01

    The PHERMEX (Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays) standing-wave linear accelerator is a high-current electron beam generator used for flash-radiography. An improved electron gun has been designed employing a flat-thermionic cathode to replace the existing Pierce-geometry gun. The flat cathode yields increased current with the same applied voltage and cathode area as the Pierce gun. The ISIS code simulations indicate a beam current of 1.5 kA at 600 kV. The new geometry also reduces the probability for high voltage breakdown in the A-K gap. A reentrant magnet captures the expanding electron beam and a bucking coil nulls cathode-tinge field. A third coil is used to optimize the extraction field profile and reduce the effect of nonlinear space charge on the beam emittance. Time-resolved measurements of beam current and voltage have been made. In addition, a streak camera was used to measure beam emittance and spatial profile. Comparisons of measurements with simulations are presented.

  17. A flat-cathode thermionic injector for the PHERMEX Radiographic Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kauppila, T.; Builta, L.; Burns, M.; Gregory, W.; Honaberger, D.; Watson, S. ); Hughes, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The PHERMEX (Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays) standing-wave linear accelerator is a high-current electron beam generator used for flash-radiography. An improved electron gun has been designed employing a flat-thermionic cathode to replace the existing Pierce-geometry gun. The flat cathode yields increased current with the same applied voltage and cathode area as the Pierce gun. The ISIS code simulations indicate a beam current of 1.5 kA at 600 kV. The new geometry also reduces the probability for high voltage breakdown in the A-K gap. A reentrant magnet captures the expanding electron beam and a bucking coil nulls cathode-tinge field. A third coil is used to optimize the extraction field profile and reduce the effect of nonlinear space charge on the beam emittance. Time-resolved measurements of beam current and voltage have been made. In addition, a streak camera was used to measure beam emittance and spatial profile. Comparisons of measurements with simulations are presented.

  18. Flat-field grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray and EUV measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Trabert, E; Chen, H; Lepson, J K; Gu, M F; Schmidt, M

    2004-03-27

    A R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Angstrom up to 50 Angstrom. The instrument uses a grating with variable line spacing (about 2400 l/mm) for a flat field of view. Spectra are recorded with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The new instrument greatly improves upon the resolution achieved with existing grating spectrometers and complements crystal spectrometers at the shorter wavelengths both in terms of wavelength coverage and polarization independent reflectivity response.

  19. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  20. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  1. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  2. Ablation depth control with 40 nm resolution on ITO thin films using a square, flat top beam shaped femtosecond NIR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon-Young; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Choi, Won-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the ablation depth control with a resolution of 40 nm on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film using a square beam shaped femtosecond (190 fs) laser (λp=1030 nm). A slit is used to make the square, flat top beam shaped from the Gaussian spatial profile of the femtosecond laser. An ablation depth of 40 nm was obtained using the single pulse irradiation at a peak intensity of 2.8 TW/cm2. The morphologies of the ablated area were characterized using an optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Ablations with square and rectangular types with various sizes were demonstrated on ITO thin film using slits with varying x-y axes. The stereo structure of the ablation with the depth resolution of approximately 40 nm was also fabricated successfully using the irradiation of single pulses with different shaped sizes of femtosecond laser.

  3. Beam emittance forming line of the CW race-track microtron of the institute of nuclear physics of Moscow State University (INP MSU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, A. S.; Gevorkyan, V. G.; Gorbatov, Yu. I.; Gribov, I. V.; Ibadov, A. Kh.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Korneenkov, V. A.; Lazutin, E. V.; Makulbekov, E. A.; Piskarev, I. M.; Platov, K. Yu.; Savitsky, A. B.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Sorvin, V. M.; Tiunov, A. V.; Ushkanov, V. A.; Zinoviev, S. V.

    1989-06-01

    The transverse and longitudinal emittance forming line (EFL) of the race-track microtron of INP MSU is described. The work presents the principles of operation, parameters of EFL elements, description of rf power supply system and automated control system. The method of EFL tuning and experimental results are discussed.

  4. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  5. Emittance Theory for Cylindrical Fiber Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    A fibrous rare earth selective emitter is approximated as an infinitely long, cylinder. The spectral emittance, e(sub x), is obtained L- by solving the radiative transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions and uniform temperature. For optical depth, K(sub R), where alpha(sub lambda), is the extinction coefficient and R is the cylinder radius, greater than 1 the spectral emittance depths, K(sub R) alpha(sub lambda)R, is nearly at its maximum value. There is an optimum cylinder radius, R(sub opt) for maximum emitter efficiency, n(sub E). Values for R(sub opt) are strongly dependent on the number of emission bands of the material. The optimum radius decreases slowly with increasing emitter temperature, while the maximum efficiency and useful radiated power increase rapidly with increasing, temperature.

  6. Emittance and lifetime measurement with damping wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Cheng, W. X.; Guo, W.; Ilinsky, P.; Li, Y.; Podobedov, B.; Willeke, F.

    2016-03-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new third-generation storage ring light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The storage ring design calls for small horizontal emittance (<1 nm-rad) and diffraction-limited vertical emittance at 12 keV (8 pm-rad). Achieving low value of the beam size will enable novel user experiments with nm-range spatial and meV-energy resolution. The high-brightness NSLS-II lattice has been realized by implementing 30-cell double bend achromatic cells producing the horizontal emittance of 2 nm rad and then halving it further by using several Damping Wigglers (DWs). This paper is focused on characterization of the DW effects in the storage ring performance, namely, on reduction of the beam emittance, and corresponding changes in the energy spread and beam lifetime. The relevant beam parameters have been measured by the X-ray pinhole camera, beam position monitors, beam filling pattern monitor, and current transformers. In this paper, we compare the measured results of the beam performance with analytic estimates for the complement of the 3 DWs installed at the NSLS-II.

  7. Low-Energy Emittance Studies with the new Allison Emittance Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Blokland, Willem; Gorlov, Timofey V; Han, Baoxi; Long, Cary D; Pennisi, Terry R; Assadi, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The new SNS Allison emittance scanner measures emittances of 65 kV ion beams over a range of +/- 116 mrad. Its versatile control system allows for time-dependent emittance measurements using an external trigger to synchronize with pulsed ion beam systems. After an adjustable initial delay, the system acquires an array of equally-delayed beam current measurements, each averaged over a certain time span, where all three time parameters are user selectable. The zero offset of the beam current measurements is determined by averaging a fraction of 1 ms shortly before the start of the ion beam pulse. This paper discusses the optimization of the angular range. In addition it presents the first results and reports an unresolved artefact. Data are presented on the time evolution of emittance ellipses during 0.8 ms long H- beam pulses emerging from the SNS test LEBT, which is important for loss considerations in the SNS accelerator. Additional data explore the emittance growth observed with increasing beam current and/or increasing RF-power.

  8. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Pennisi, T. R.; Murray, S. N.; Santana, M.; Long, C. D.

    2010-02-15

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H{sup -} beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  9. On the Production of Flat Electron Bunches for Laser Wake Field Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kando, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S.V.; Tajima, T.; Chao, A.; Pitthan, R.; Schuler, K.-P.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Nemoto, K.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo

    2006-06-27

    We suggest a novel method for injection of electrons into the acceleration phase of particle accelerators, producing low emittance beams appropriate even for the demanding high energy Linear Collider specifications. In this paper we work out the injection into the acceleration phase of the wake field in a plasma behind a high intensity laser pulse, taking advantage of the laser polarization and focusing. With the aid of catastrophe theory we categorize the injection dynamics. The scheme uses the structurally stable regime of transverse wake wave breaking, when electron trajectory self-intersection leads to the formation of a flat electron bunch. As shown in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of a laser pulse in a line-focus with an underdense plasma, the electrons, injected via the transverse wake wave breaking and accelerated by the wake wave, perform betatron oscillations with different amplitudes and frequencies along the two transverse coordinates. The polarization and focusing geometry lead to a way to produce relativistic electron bunches with asymmetric emittance (flat beam). An approach for generating flat laser accelerated ion beams is briefly discussed.

  10. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M. A.; Zocca, F.; Jones, R. M.; Pasini, M.; Posocco, P. A.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34±0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36±0.04 π ns keV/ u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48±0.2 and 1.55±0.12 π ns keV/ u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rigorously simulated and validated. A silicon detector, in its development phase, was also exploited to measure the longitudinal beam properties. The measured longitudinal emittance is compatible with the acceptance of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac upgrade.

  11. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  12. Emittance growth from space-charge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1991-01-01

    Space-charge-induced emittance growth has become a topic of much recent interest for designing the low-velocity sections of high- intensity, high-brightness accelerators and beam-transport channels. In this paper we review the properties of the space-charge force, and discuss the concepts of matching, space-charge and emittance-dominated beams, and equilibrium beams and their characteristics. This is followed by a survey of some of the work over the past 25 years to identify the mechanisms of this emittance growth in both ion and electron accelerators. We summarize the overall results in terms of four distinct mechanisms whose characteristics we describe. Finally, we show numerical simulation results for the evolution of initial rms-mismatched laminar beams. The examples show that for space-charge dominated beams, the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a highly choatic filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. In the examples we have studied the halo contains only a few percent of the particles, but contributes about half of the emittance growth. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Emittance and proton fraction measurement in High current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Gharat, S.; Rajawat, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    The beam characterization studies in terms of emittance and proton fraction have been carried out in the high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source developed for Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA). The beam emittance was measured using two slit emittance measurement units (EMU). The emittance was measured at three locations (1) after beam extraction at ion source end, (2) after focusing the beam using solenoid magnet and (3) after focusing and separating H+ using solenoid magnet and analyzing magnet. The beam emittance measured in all three cases was found to be less than 0.2π mm-mrad (rms-normalized). The proton fraction in the beam measured using analyzing magnet was found to be more than 90%. The variations of beam emittance and proton fraction have been studied as a function of microwave power and neutral gas pressure.

  14. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  15. Soft-tissue contrast resolution within the head of human cadaver by means of flat-detector-based cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias; Schaefer, Dirk; Conrads, Norbert; Noordhoek, Niels; de Jong, Kees; Aach, Til; Rose, Georg

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, soft tissue contrast visibility in neural applications is investigated for volume imaging based on flat X-ray detector cone-beam CT. Experiments have been performed on a high precision bench-top system with rotating object table and fixed X-ray tube-detector arrangement. Several scans of a post mortem human head specimen have been performed under various conditions. Hereby two different flat X-ray detectors with 366 x 298mm2 (Trixell Pixium 4700) and 176 x 176mm2 (Trixell Pixium 4800) active area have been employed. During a single rotation up to 720 projections have been acquired. For reconstruction of the 3D images a Feldkamp algorithm has been employed. Reconstructed images of the head of human cadaver demonstrate that added soft tissue contrast down to 10 HU is detectable for X-ray dose comparable to CT. However, the limited size of the smaller detector led to truncation artifacts, which were partly compensated by extrapolation of the projections outside the field of view. To reduce cupping artifacts resulting from scattered radiation and to improve visibility of low contrast details, a novel homogenization procedure based on segmentation and polynomial fitting has been developed and applied on the reconstructed voxel data. Even for narrow HU-Windows, limitations due to scatter induced cupping artifacts are no longer noticeable after applying the homogenization procedure.

  16. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.E.-; Church, M.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2010-08-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchanger to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at A0 photoinjector.

  17. Flat Focusing Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y. C.; Kicas, S.; Trull, J.; Peckus, M.; Cojocaru, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Drazdys, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  18. Theoretical study of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H; Davidson, R C; Chung, M; Barnard, J J; Wang, T F

    2011-04-14

    The effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions is investigated using the generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. Recently, the concept and technique of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling have been proposed for applications in the Linac Coherent Light Source and other free-electron lasers to reduce the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Such techniques can also be applied to the driver beams for the heavy ion fusion and beam-driven high energy density physics, where the transverse emittance budget is typically tighter than the longitudinal emittance. The proposed methods consist of one or several coupling components which completely swap the emittances of one of the transverse directions and the longitudinal direction at the exit of the coupling components. The complete emittance exchange is realized in one pass through the coupling components. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions. A weak coupling component is introduced at every focusing lattice, and we would like to determine if such a lattice can realize the function of emittance exchange.

  19. ETAII 6 MEV PEPPERPOT EMITTANCE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2004-10-18

    We measured the beam emittance at the ETAII accelerator using a pepper-pot diagnostic at nominal parameters of 6 MeV and 2000 Amperes. During the coarse of these experiments, a ''new tune'' was introduced which significantly improved the beam quality. The source of a background pedestal was investigated and eliminated. The measured ''new tune'' emittance is {var_epsilon}= 8.05 {plus_minus} 0. 53 cm - mr or a normalized emittance of {var_epsilon}{sub n} = 943 {plus_minus} 63 mm - mr In 1990 the ETAII programmatic emphasis was on free electron lasers and the paramount parameter was whole beam brightness. The published brightness for ETAII after its first major rebuild was J = 1 - 3 x 10{sup 8} A/(m - rad){sup 2} at a current and energy of 1000-1400 Amperes and 2.5 MeV. The average normalized emittance derived from table 2 of that report is 864 mm-mr corresponding to a real emittance of 14.8 cm-mr.

  20. The influence of antiscatter grids on soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography with flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Moseley, D.J.; Bakhtiar, B.; Richard, S.; Jaffray, D.A.

    2004-12-01

    The influence of antiscatter x-ray grids on image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is evaluated through broad experimental investigation for various anatomical sites (head and body), scatter conditions (scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) ranging from {approx}10% to 150%), patient dose, and spatial resolution in three-dimensional reconstructions. Studies involved linear grids in combination with a flat-panel imager on a system for kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging and guidance of radiation therapy. Grids were found to be effective in reducing x-ray scatter 'cupping' artifacts, with heavier grids providing increased image uniformity. The system was highly robust against ring artifacts that might arise in CT reconstructions as a result of gridline shadows in the projection data. The influence of grids on soft-tissue detectability was evaluated quantitatively in terms of absolute contrast, voxel noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in cone-beam CT reconstructions of 16 cm 'head' and 32 cm 'body' cylindrical phantoms. Imaging performance was investigated qualitatively in observer preference tests based on patient images (pelvis, abdomen, and head-and-neck sites) acquired with and without antiscatter grids. The results suggest that although grids reduce scatter artifacts and improve subject contrast, there is little strong motivation for the use of grids in cone-beam CT in terms of CNR and overall image quality under most circumstances. The results highlight the tradeoffs in contrast and noise imparted by grids, showing improved image quality with grids only under specific conditions of high x-ray scatter (SPR>100%), high imaging dose (D{sub center}>2 cGy), and low spatial resolution (voxel size {>=}1 mm)

  1. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  2. Study of instabilities and emittance growth in periodic focusing systems for intense beams. Progress report, Technical report No. PP 81-198

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.

    1981-05-01

    Initial problems with secondary electrons and diagnostics were solved. Beam expansion in free space and focusing by one and two solenoid lenses were studied in the experiment. Of particular interest are the special effects (beam explosion, images) caused by electrons scattered at the anode mesh.

  3. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  4. Analyzing the propagation behavior of coherence and polarization degrees of a phase-locked partially coherent radial flat-topped array laser beam in underwater turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh; Yousefi, Masoud

    2016-08-10

    In this research, based on an analytical expression for cross-spectral density (CSD) matrix elements, coherence and polarization properties of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) radial array laser beams propagating through weak oceanic turbulence are analyzed. Spectral degrees of coherence and polarization are analytically calculated using CSD matrix elements. Also, the effective width of spatial degree of coherence (EWSDC) is calculated numerically. The simulation is done by considering the effects of source parameters (such as radius of the array setup's circle, effective width of the spectral degree of coherence, and wavelength) and turbulent ocean factors (such as the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations, Kolmogorov micro-scale, and rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature) in detail. Results indicate that any change in the amount of turbulence factors that increase the turbulence power reduces the EWSDC significantly and causes the reduction in the degree of polarization, and occurs at shorter propagation distances but with smaller magnitudes. In addition, being valid for all conditions, the degradation rate of the EWSDC of Gaussian array beams are more in comparison with the PCFT ones. The simulation and calculation results are shown by graphs.

  5. Analyzing the propagation behavior of coherence and polarization degrees of a phase-locked partially coherent radial flat-topped array laser beam in underwater turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh; Yousefi, Masoud

    2016-08-10

    In this research, based on an analytical expression for cross-spectral density (CSD) matrix elements, coherence and polarization properties of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) radial array laser beams propagating through weak oceanic turbulence are analyzed. Spectral degrees of coherence and polarization are analytically calculated using CSD matrix elements. Also, the effective width of spatial degree of coherence (EWSDC) is calculated numerically. The simulation is done by considering the effects of source parameters (such as radius of the array setup's circle, effective width of the spectral degree of coherence, and wavelength) and turbulent ocean factors (such as the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations, Kolmogorov micro-scale, and rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature) in detail. Results indicate that any change in the amount of turbulence factors that increase the turbulence power reduces the EWSDC significantly and causes the reduction in the degree of polarization, and occurs at shorter propagation distances but with smaller magnitudes. In addition, being valid for all conditions, the degradation rate of the EWSDC of Gaussian array beams are more in comparison with the PCFT ones. The simulation and calculation results are shown by graphs. PMID:27534473

  6. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  7. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  8. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  9. Understanding the Impact of Field-Emitter Characteristics on Electron Beam Focusing in the VAPoR Time-of-Fight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southard, Adrian E.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Costen, Nicholas P.; Hidrobo, Gregory B.; Glavin, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of field emission of electrons from an electron gun are used to determine the angular distribution of the emitted electron beam and the percentage of charge transmitted through the grid. The simulations are a first step towards understanding the spherical aberration present after focusing the electron beam. The effect of offset of the cathode with respect to the grid and the separation between cathode and grid on the angular distributions of emitted electrons and transmission of the grid are explored.

  10. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  11. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  12. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer). Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used. Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  13. Model-based iterative reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with focal spot blur, detector blur, and correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Steven, II; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2016-01-01

    While model-based reconstruction methods have been successfully applied to flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) systems, typical implementations ignore both spatial correlations in the projection data as well as system blurs due to the detector and focal spot in the x-ray source. In this work, we develop a forward model for flat-panel-based systems that includes blur and noise correlation associated with finite focal spot size and an indirect detector (e.g. scintillator). This forward model is used to develop a staged reconstruction framework where projection data are deconvolved and log-transformed, followed by a generalized least-squares reconstruction that utilizes a non-diagonal statistical weighting to account for the correlation that arises from the acquisition and data processing chain. We investigate the performance of this novel reconstruction approach in both simulated data and in CBCT test-bench data. In comparison to traditional filtered backprojection and model-based methods that ignore noise correlation, the proposed approach yields a superior noise-resolution tradeoff. For example, for a system with 0.34 mm FWHM scintillator blur and 0.70 FWHM focal spot blur, using the correlated noise model instead of an uncorrelated noise model increased resolution by 42% (with variance matched at 6.9  ×  10-8 mm-2). While this advantage holds across a wide range of systems with differing blur characteristics, the improvements are greatest for systems where source blur is larger than detector blur.

  14. Ballasted and electrically steerable carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. T.; Li, C.; Qu, K.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B.; Pribat, D.; Milne, W. I.

    2012-09-01

    Here we present our on-going efforts toward the development of stable ballasted carbon nanotube-based field emitters employing hydrothermally synthesized zinc oxide nanowires and thin film silicon-on-insulator substrates. The semiconducting channel in each controllably limits the emission current thereby preventing detrimental burn-out of individual emitters that occurs due to unavoidable statistical variability in emitter characteristics, particularly in their length. Fabrication details and emitter characterization are discussed in addition to their field emission performance. The development of a beam steerable triode electron emitter formed from hexagonal carbon nanotube arrays with central focusing nanotube electrodes, is also described. Numerical ab-initio simulations are presented to account for the empirical emission characteristics. Our engineered ballasted emitters have shown some of the lowest reported lifetime variations (< 0.7%) with on-times of < 1 ms, making them ideally-suited for next-generation displays, environmental lighting and portable x-rays sources.

  15. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  16. Scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT: propagation of signal, contrast, and noise into reconstructed volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Hohmann, Steffen; Bertram, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for the systematic assessment of the impact of scattered radiation in .at-detector based cone-beam CT. While it is well known that scattered radiation causes three di.erent types of artifacts in reconstructed images (inhomogeneity artifacts such as cupping and streaks, degradation of contrast, and enhancement of noise), investigations in the literature quantify the impact of scatter mostly only in terms of inhomogeneity artifacts, giving little insight, e.g., into the visibility of low contrast lesions. Therefore, for this study a novel framework has been developed that in addition to normal reconstruction of the CT (HU) number allows for reconstruction of voxelized expectation values of three additional important characteristics of image quality: signal degradation, contrast reduction, and noise variances. The new framework has been applied to projection data obtained with voxelized Monte-Carlo simulations of clinical CT data sets of high spatial resolution. Using these data, the impact of scattered radiation was thoroughly studied for realistic and clinically relevant patient geometries of the head, thorax, and pelvis region. By means of spatially resolved reconstructions of contrast and noise propagation, the image quality of a scenario with using standard antiscatter grids could be evaluated with great detail. Results show the spatially resolved contrast degradation and the spatially resolved expected standard deviation of the noise at any position in the reconstructed object. The new framework represents a general tool for analyzing image quality in reconstructed images.

  17. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  18. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOEpatents

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  19. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  20. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  1. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  2. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  3. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  4. Patient-specific scatter correction for flat-panel detector-based cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Brunner, Stephen; Niu, Kai; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-02-01

    A patient-specific scatter correction algorithm is proposed to mitigate scatter artefacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The approach belongs to the category of convolution-based methods in which a scatter potential function is convolved with a convolution kernel to estimate the scatter profile. A key step in this method is to determine the free parameters introduced in both scatter potential and convolution kernel using a so-called calibration process, which is to seek for the optimal parameters such that the models for both scatter potential and convolution kernel is able to optimally fit the previously known coarse estimates of scatter profiles of the image object. Both direct measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been proposed by other investigators to achieve the aforementioned rough estimates. In the present paper, a novel method has been proposed and validated to generate the needed coarse scatter profile for parameter calibration in the convolution method. The method is based upon an image segmentation of the scatter contaminated CBCT image volume, followed by a reprojection of the segmented image volume using a given x-ray spectrum. The reprojected data is subtracted from the scatter contaminated projection data to generate a coarse estimate of the needed scatter profile used in parameter calibration. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using numerical simulations and experimental CBCT data acquired on a clinical CBCT imaging system. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artefacts and recover the correct CT number. Numerical simulation results show the method is patient specific, can accurately estimate the scatter, and is robust with respect to segmentation procedure. For experimental and in vivo human data, the results show the CT number can be successfully recovered and anatomical structure visibility can be significantly improved.

  5. Electron beam requirements for a three-dimensional Smith-Purcell backward-wave oscillator for intense terahertz radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.-J.; Kumar, V.; Accelerator Systems Division; Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Tech.

    2007-08-01

    A Smith-Purcell device can operate as a backward-wave oscillator for intense, narrow-bandwidth, continuous wave radiation at terahertz wavelengths. We determine the requirements on electron beam current and emittance for the system to oscillate based on a three-dimensional extension of our previous two-dimensional analysis. It is found that specially designed electron beams are required with a current that exceeds a certain threshold value and a flat transverse profile that allows the beam to travel very close to the grating surface. Two methods for producing electron beams with the required characteristics are discussed.

  6. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  7. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-03-15

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  8. Evaluation for Basic Image Qualities Dependence on the Position in XYZ Directions and Acquisition Parameters of the Cone Beam CT for Angiography System with Flat Panel Detector.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Norisato; Mitsui, Kota; Oda, Shinichiro

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the position in XYZ directions and acquisition parameters on the basic image qualities of for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an angiography system with flat panel detector. The resolution property (modulation transfer function: MTF) and the noise property (Wiener spectrum: WS) of CBCT images in X-Y plane were measured with different acquisition parameters (scan matrix number and projection number) and the effect of the position in XYZ directions. The MTFs with 1024×1024 matrix were higher than those of 512×512 matrix and decreased in the peripheral areas due to the reduction of projection number. The highest and the lowest MTFs were measured at the X-ray tube side and on the detector side of the position in X-Y plane, respectively. The WS-doubled projection number showed about 50% lesser noise level. There were differences in the Wiener spectra (WS) at the position in XYZ directions. We conclude that the resolution and the noise property of CBCT image in X-Y plane showed dependences on the position in XYZ directions and acquisition parameters of the CBCT. PMID:27546079

  9. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  10. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  11. Adiabatic warm-fluid equilibrium theory of thermal charged-particle beams in alternating-gradient focusing fields

    SciTech Connect

    Samokhvalova, Ksenia R.; Chen Chiping; Zhou Jing

    2009-04-15

    An adiabatic warm-fluid equilibrium theory for a thermal charged-particle beam in an alternating-gradient focusing field is presented. Warm-fluid equilibrium equations are solved in the paraxial approximation. The theory predicts that the four-dimensional rms thermal emittance of the beam is conserved, but the two-dimensional rms thermal emittances are not constant. The rms beam envelope equations and the self-consistent Poisson equation, governing the beam density and potential distributions, are derived. Although the presented rms beam envelope equations have the same form as the previously known rms beam envelope equations, the evolution of the rms emittances in the present theory is given by analytical expressions. The density does not have the simplest elliptical symmetry, but the constant-density contours are ellipses, and the aspect ratio of the elliptical constant-density contours decreases as the density decreases along the transverse displacement from the beam axis. For high-intensity beams, the beam density profile is flat in the center of the beam and falls off rapidly within a few Debye lengths, and the rate at which the density falls is approximately isotropic in the transverse directions.

  12. Tuning the Magnetic Transport of an Induction LINAC using Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Paul, A C; Wargo, P E; Zentler, J M

    2006-08-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Flash X-Ray (FXR) machine is a linear induction accelerator used to produce a nominal 18 MeV, 3 kA, 65 ns pulse width electron beam for hydrodynamic radiographs. A common figure of merit for this type of radiographic machine is the x-ray dose divided by the spot area on the bremsstrahlung converter where a higher FOM is desired. Several characteristics of the beam affect the minimum attainable x-ray spot size. The most significant are emittance (chaotic transverse energy), chromatic aberration (energy variation), and beam motion (transverse instabilities and corkscrew motion). FXR is in the midst of a multi-year optimization project to reduce the spot size. This paper describes the effort to reduce beam emittance by adjusting the fields of the transport solenoids and position of the cathode. If the magnetic transport is not correct, the beam will be mismatched and undergo envelope oscillations increasing the emittance. We measure the divergence and radius of the beam in a drift section after the accelerator by imaging the optical transition radiation (OTR) and beam envelope on a foil. These measurements are used to determine an emittance. Relative changes in the emittance can be quickly estimated from the foil measurements allowing for an efficient, real-time study. Once an optimized transport field is determined, the final focus can be adjusted and the new x-ray spot measured. A description of the diagnostics and analysis is presented.

  13. INTRA - BEAM SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; CONNOLLY,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; ZENO,K.

    2002-06-02

    RHIC in gold operation shows significant intra-beam scattering due to the high charge state of the stored ions. Intra-beam scattering leads to longitudinal and transverse emittance growth. The longitudinal emittance growth causes debunching in operation; the transverse emittance growth contributes to the reduction of the beam and luminosity lifetimes. The longitudinal and transverse beam growth was measured. Beam growth measurement are compared with computations.

  14. Applications of an Energy Transfer Model to Three Problems in Planetary Regoliths: The Solid-State Greenhouse, Thermal Beaming, and Emittance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Several problems of interest in planetary infrared remote sensing are investigated using a new radiative-conductive model of energy transfer in regoliths: the solid-state greenhouse effect, thermal beaming, and reststrahlen spectra. The results of the analysis are as follows: (1) The solid-state greenhouse effect is self-limiting to a rise of a few tens of degrees in bodies of the outer solar system. (2) Non-Lambertian directional emissivity can account for only about 20% of the observed thermal beaming factor. The remainder must have another cause, presumably surface roughness effects. (3) The maximum in a reststrahlen emissivity spectrum does not occur exactly at the Christiansen wavelength where, by definition, the real part of the refractive index equals one, but rather at the first transition minimum in reflectance associated with the transition from particle scattering being dominated by volume scattering to that dominated by strong surface scattering. The transparency feature is at the second transition minimum and does not require the presence of a second band at longer wavelength for its occurance. Subsurface temperature gradients have only a small effect on emissivity bands.

  15. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  16. Emittance Characterization of a Hot-Cavity Laser Ion Source at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Baktash, Cyrus; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Krause, Herbert F; Schultz, David Robert; Stracener, Daniel W; Vane, C Randy; Geppert, C.; Gottwald, T.; Kessler, T.; Wies, K.; Wendt, K.

    2009-01-01

    The first investigation of the transverse emittance of a hot-cavity laser ion source based on all-solid-state Ti:Sapphire lasers is presented. The emittances of 63Cu ion beams generated by three-photon resonant ionization are measured and compared with that of the 69Ga and 39K ion beams resulting from surface ionization in the same ion source. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is adapted for noise reduction and emittance analysis. Typical values of the rms and 90% fractional emittances of the Cu ion beams at 20 keV energy are found to be about 2 -mm-mrad and 8 -mm-mrad, respectively, for the ion currents of 2 to 40 nA investigated. The emittances of the laser-produced Cu ion beams are smaller than those of the surface-ionized Ga and K ion beams.

  17. Emittance conservation by tailored focusing profiles in a plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornmair, I.; Floettmann, K.; Maier, A. R.

    2015-04-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators, providing high electric field gradients, are promising candidates to drive next-generation compact light sources and high-energy applications. However, conservation of beam emittance, a prerequisite for future applications, is very challenging, as the accelerated beam has to be matched to the plasma's strong focusing forces. Here we derive with simulations ideal laser and plasma density profiles to match an electron beam in and out of a plasma stage, thus relaxing required beta functions for injection and minimizing divergence and emittance growth after the plasma.

  18. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  19. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August; Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  20. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Bhat; John P. Marriner

    2003-06-10

    The Recycler Ring (RR) is a new 8Gev antiproton storage ring at Fermilab. Presently, this machine is being commissioned using protons from the Booster. It uses barrier buckets for stacking, un-stacking and storing the beam. At any given time, the RR is capable of storing proton or antiproton beams in multiple segments azimuthally. These segments of the beam may have widely differing longitudinal emittance and beam intensities and bunch lengths. It is highly essential to be able to measure the longitudinal emittance and keep track of the longitudinal dynamics at various stages of the operation of the RR. In this paper, the authors discuss a few methods of longitudinal emittance measurements in barrier buckets and discuss their merits and demerits

  1. Laser Assisted Emittance Transfer for Storage Ring Lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2011-06-01

    In modern storage rings the transverse emittance of electron beams can be comparable to that from state-of-art photoinjectors, but the intrinsic low peak current and large energy spread pre-cludes the possibility of realizing short-wavelength high-gain free electron lasers (FELs) in storage rings. In this note I propose a technique to significantly increase beam peak current without greatly increasing beam energy spread, which is achieved by transferring part of the longitudinal emittance to transverse plane. It is shown that by properly repartitioning the emittance in 6-D phase space, the beam from a large storage ring may be used to drive a single-pass high-gain FEL in soft x-ray wavelength range.

  2. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  3. Emittance measurement at the NSLS x-ray ring

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek, J.; Stefan, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A pinhole camera for imaging x-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The pinhole camera detector is a 0.5 mm thick YAG phosphor screen viewed by a video camera. Both the theoretical pinhole diffraction pattern and the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the phosphor and camera have been deconvolved from the measured profile in order to derive the true transverse profile of the electron beam. This profile was then fit to a 2-dimensional Gaussian. The electron beam emittance as a function of the phase space acceptance of the pinhole camera has been derived, so the horizontal and vertical electron emittances can be deduced from the major and minor sigmas of the fit Gaussian. In the X-Ray Ring, the vertical emittance is kept small to maximize the synchrotron radiation brightness. The ratio of the measured vertical to horizontal emittance is 0.001.

  4. Thermophotovoltaic emitter development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Many refractory oxide ceramics in fibrous form are efficient converters of the heat of combustion into radiant energy. Rare earth oxide ceramics, which are refractory and stable in flames, exhibit selective emission in the near IR where semiconductor photoconverters are efficient in converting radiant energy directly into electrical power. Ytterbia emitters and silicon photoconverters, in particular, constitute the basis for a high performance thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system. Ceramic fiber fabrication techniques are described that yield mechanically durable emitters in classical mantle geometries and in a novel planar form. This work has been supported by the Basic Research Group of the Gas Research Institute, Chicago, Illinois.

  5. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  6. Investigation of spatial resolution and temporal performance of SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) with integrated electrostatic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.; Rowlands, John A.; Kenmotsu, Hidenori; Nishimoto, Norihito; Nishino, Takeshi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Zhao, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We have previously proposed SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout), a novel detector concept with potentially superior spatial resolution and low-dose performance compared with existing flat-panel imagers. The detector comprises a scintillator that is optically coupled to an amorphous selenium photoconductor operated with avalanche gain, known as high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). High resolution electron beam readout is achieved using a field emitter array (FEA). This combination of avalanche gain, allowing for very low-dose imaging, and electron emitter readout, providing high spatial resolution, offers potentially superior image quality compared with existing flat-panel imagers, with specific applications to fluoroscopy and breast imaging. Through the present collaboration, a prototype HARP sensor with integrated electrostatic focusing and nano- Spindt FEA readout technology has been fabricated. The integrated electron-optic focusing approach is more suitable for fabricating large-area detectors. We investigate the dependence of spatial resolution on sensor structure and operating conditions, and compare the performance of electrostatic focusing with previous technologies. Our results show a clear dependence of spatial resolution on electrostatic focusing potential, with performance approaching that of the previous design with external mesh-electrode. Further, temporal performance (lag) of the detector is evaluated and the results show that the integrated electrostatic focusing design exhibits comparable or better performance compared with the mesh-electrode design. This study represents the first technical evaluation and characterization of the SAPHIRE concept with integrated electrostatic focusing.

  7. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  8. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shul'zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-01

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB6 washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  9. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; Kuroda, S.; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  10. Measurement of Transverse Emittance in the Fermilab Booster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, William Sproull

    A new beam profile monitor has been built and installed in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron. It nondestructively measures the beam's vertical density distribution on a fast turn-by-turn basis. This enables one to measure the beam's transverse emittance and to observe emittance growth as it occurs. For high intensities (>2 times 10^{12 } protons), the normalized 95% emittance was observed to grow from 6pi mm-mrad at injection to 16pi mm-mrad at extraction. The initial (<5 msec) emittance growth and beam losses are shown to be caused by the space charge tune shift onto integer and 1/2 integer resonance lines. The growth near injection accounts for approximately 40% of the observed emittance increase throughout the acceleration cycle. The remaining 60% is due to two factors: slow linear growth due to betatron-motion driven by noise in the rf system; and faster growth after the transition energy that is caused by coupling of the longitudinal beam motion into the transverse planes.

  11. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  12. Flat minima.

    PubMed

    Hochreiter, S; Schmidhuber, J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for finding low-complexity neural networks with high generalization capability. The algorithm searches for a "flat" minimum of the error function. A flat minimum is a large connected region in weight space where the error remains approximately constant. An MDL-based, Bayesian argument suggests that flat minima correspond to "simple" networks and low expected overfitting. The argument is based on a Gibbs algorithm variant and a novel way of splitting generalization error into underfitting and overfitting error. Unlike many previous approaches, ours does not require gaussian assumptions and does not depend on a "good" weight prior. Instead we have a prior over input-output functions, thus taking into account net architecture and training set. Although our algorithm requires the computation of second-order derivatives, it has backpropagation's order of complexity. Automatically, it effectively prunes units, weights, and input lines. Various experiments with feedforward and recurrent nets are described. In an application to stock market prediction, flat minimum search outperforms conventional backprop, weight decay, and "optimal brain surgeon/optimal brain damage".

  13. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  14. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  15. Charlie Flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows a region of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars, dubbed 'Charlie Flats.' This region is a rich science target for Opportunity because it contains a diverse assortment of small grains, pebbles and spherules, as well as both dark and light soil deposits. The area seen here measures approximately 0.6 meters (2 feet) across. The smallest grains visible in this image are only a few millimeters in size. The approximate true color image was acquired on Sol 20 of Opportunity's mission with panoramic camera filters red, green and blue. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view Charlie Flats Spectra The chart above shows examples of spectra, or light wave patterns, extracted from the region of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop dubbed 'Charlie Flats,' a rich science target for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The spectra were extracted from the similarly colored regions in the image on the left, taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The green circle identifies a bright, dust-like soil deposit. The red circle identifies a dark soil region. The yellow identifies a small, angular rock chip with a strong near-infrared band. The pink identifies a sphere-shaped pebble with a different strong near-infrared band. The cyan circle shows a dark, grayish pebble.

  16. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  17. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  18. An ultracold low emittance electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Harvey, M.; Murray, A. J.; Bellan, L.; Bertsche, W.; Appleby, R. B.; Mete, O.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-06-01

    Ultracold atom-based electron sources have recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional photo-injectors or thermionic electron guns widely used in modern particle accelerators. The advantages of ultracold atom-based electron sources lie in the fact that the electrons extracted from the plasma (created from near threshold photo-ionization of ultracold atoms) have a very low temperature, i.e. down to tens of Kelvin. Extraction of these electrons has the potential for producing very low emittance electron bunches. These features are crucial for the next generation of particle accelerators, including free electron lasers, plasma-based accelerators and future linear colliders. The source also has many potential direct applications, including ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and electron microscopy, due to its intrinsically high coherence. In this paper, the basic mechanism of ultracold electron beam production is discussed and our new research facility for an ultracold, low emittance electron source is introduced. This source is based on a novel alternating current Magneto-Optical Trap (the AC-MOT). Detailed simulations for a proposed extraction system have shown that for a 1 pC bunch charge, a beam emittance of 0.35 mm mrad is obtainable, with a bunch length of 3 mm and energy spread 1%.

  19. Collisions of round beams at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring in preparation for Moebius operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Elizabeth Marie

    1998-05-01

    Colliding round, rather than flat, beams promises to more than double the luminosity of electron-positron colliders. In simulations, round beams have been capable of producing large tune shifts, much greater than produced by flat beams, with acceptable beam blowup. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate experimentally the promise of round beams (made round by the coupling resonance) and to prepare for the installation of a Mobius insert (a group of skew quadrupoles that exchange horizontal and vertical motion on every turn) at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. During the collision experiments, three interrelated measures of colliding beam performance, the emittance blowup, the beam-beam tune shift parameter, and the coherent π mode tune shift, were measured as functions of beam current and tune, and the luminosity was also measured at the highest beam currents. The results of these measurements confirm that round beams are capable of producing very large tune shifts and justify continued development of the Mobius scheme.

  20. 4D Emittance Measurements Using Multiple Wire and Waist Scan Methods in the ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rimbault, C.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Alabau, M.; Kuroda, S.; Scarfe, A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Emittance measurements performed in the diagnostic section of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) extraction line since 1998 led to vertical emittances three times larger than the expected ones, with a strong dependence on intensity. An experimental program is pursued to investigate potential sources of emittance growth and find possible remedies. This requires efficient and reliable emittance measurement techniques. In the past, several phase-space reconstruction methods developed at SLAC and KEK have been used to estimate the vertical emittance, based on multiple location beam size measurements and dedicated quadrupole scans. These methods have been shown to be very sensitive to measurement errors and other fluctuations in the beam conditions. In this context new emittance measurements have been performed revisiting these methods and newly developed ones with a systematic approach to compare and characterise their performance in the ATF extraction line.

  1. Emittance Preservation in the International Linear Collider Ring to Main Linac Transfer Line

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Latina, A.; Smith, J.C.; Kubo, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-06-27

    The very small vertical beam emittance in the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be degraded by dispersion, xy coupling, transverse wakefields, and time-varying transverse fields introduced by elements with misalignments, strength errors, xy rotation errors, or yz rotation errors in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) transfer line. We present a plan for emittance preservation in this beamline which uses local, quasi-local, and global correction schemes. Results of simulations of the emittance preservation algorithm are also presented and discussed.

  2. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  3. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  4. Field emitter arrays for plasma and microwave source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.

    1999-05-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) stand to strongly impact device performance when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and/or high pulse repetition frequencies are an issue. FEAs are capable of instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, and low voltage operation characteristics. Advanced microwave power tubes, and in particular, inductive output amplifiers, are by far the most technically challenging use to date. Other important uses include, e.g., electron sources for micropropulsion systems-Hall thrusters-and tethers for satellites, and (the most widely pursued application) field emission displays. The characteristics of field emitters that make them attractive to such applications shall be surveyed. A thorough analytical model of a field emitter array, beginning with a review of the nature of field emission and continuing with an analytical model of a single emitter and the operation of an array of emitters, shall be presented. In particular, attention shall be directed towards those features of FEAs that render them attractive as cold cathode candidates for electron beam generation. Tip characteristics, such as emission distribution, and array operation, such as space charge effects, will be analyzed in the context of the model. Finally, restricting attention to microwave applications, the performance of a tapered-helix inductive output amplifier to highlight the advantages of high frequency emission gating of the electron beam in a power tube shall be investigated.

  5. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  6. Sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface for ion beam erosion of Si with simultaneous co-deposition of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Brötzmann, M.; Hofsäss, H.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate pattern formation on Si by sputter erosion under simultaneous co-deposition of Fe atoms, both at off-normal incidence, as function of the Fe surface coverage. The patterns obtained for 5 keV Xe ion irradiation at 30° incidence angle are analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of the local steady state Fe content of the Fe-Si surface layer allows a quantitative correlation between pattern type and Fe coverage. With increasing Fe coverage the patterns change, starting from a flat surface at low coverage (< 2×1015 Fe/cm2) over dot patterns (2-8×1015 Fe/cm2), ripples patterns (8-17×1015 Fe/cm2), pill bug structures (1.8×1016 Fe/cm2) and a rather flat surface with randomly distributed weak pits at high Fe coverage (>1.8×1016 Fe/cm2). Our results confirm the observations by Macko et al. for 2 keV Kr ion irradiation of Si with Fe co-deposition. In particular, we also find a sharp transition from pronounced ripple patterns with large amplitude (rms roughness ˜ 18 nm) to a rather flat surface (rms roughness ˜ 0.5 nm). Within this transition regime, we also observe the formation of pill bug structures, i.e. individual small hillocks with a rippled structure on an otherwise rather flat surface. The transition occurs within a very narrow regime of the steady state Fe surface coverage between 1.7 and 1.8×1016 Fe/cm2, where the composition of the mixed Fe-Si surface layer of about 10 nm thickness reaches the stoichiometry of FeSi2. Phase separation towards amorphous iron silicide is assumed as the major contribution for the pattern formation at lower Fe coverage and the sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface.

  7. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  8. Summary report on transverse emittance preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Vos, L.

    1997-12-01

    During the past years, significant progress has been made in understanding the beam transverse emittance blow-up and its preservation. However, one often finds him-/herself ignorant when he/she tries to explain what was observed in an existing machine or to predict what will happen in a machine under design. There are a number of such examples given in this report. Some of them are even fundamental. These are the challenges. But they are also the directions leading to new achievements. The workshop gladly acknowledged them and promised to work on them.

  9. Low-dose 2.5 MV cone-beam computed tomography with thick CsI flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace; Moussot, Christopher; Morf, Daniel; Seppi, Edward; Amols, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Most of the treatment units, both new and old models, are equipped with a megavoltage portal imager but its use for volumetric imaging is limited. This is mainly due to the poor image quality produced by the high-energy treatment beam (> 6MV). A linac at our center is equipped with a prototype 2.5 MV imaging beam. This study evaluates the feasibility of low-dose megavoltage cone-beam imaging with the 2.5MV beam and a thick cesium iodide detector, which is a high-efficiency imager. Basic imaging properties such as spatial resolution and modulation transfer function were assessed for the 2.5 MV prototype imaging system. For image quality and imaging dose, a series of megavoltage cone-beam scans were acquired for the head, thorax, and pelvis of an anthropomorphic phantom and were compared to kilovoltage cone-beam and 6X megavoltage cone-beam images. To demonstrate the advantage of MV imaging, a phantom with metallic inserts was scanned and the image quality was compared to CT and kilovoltage cone-beam scans. With a lower energy beam and higher detector efficiency, the 2.5 MV imaging system generally yields better image quality than does the 6 MV imaging system with the conventional MV imager. In particular, with the anthropomorphic phantom studies, the contrast to noise of bone to tissue is generally improved in the 2.5 MV images compared to 6 MV. With an image quality sufficient for bony alignment, the imaging dose for 2.5 MV cone-beam images is 2.4-3.4 MU compared to 26 MU in 6 MV cone-beam scans for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions of the phantom. Unlike kilovoltage cone-beam, the 2.5 MV imaging system does not suffer from high-Z image artifacts. This can be very useful for treatment planning in cases where high-Z prostheses are present. PMID:27455493

  10. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Shimada, K; Yasuda, Y; Saito, T; Tamura, H; Kamakura, K

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  11. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  12. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  13. A Study of Emittance Measurement at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, G.A.; Agapov, I.V.; Carter, J.; Deacon, L.; Angal-Kalinin, D.A.K.; Jenner, L.J.; Ross, M.C.; Seryi, A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    The measurement of the International Linear Collider (ILC) emittance in the ILC beam delivery system (BDS) is simulated. Estimates of statistical and machine-related errors are discussed and the implications for related diagnostics R&D are inferred. A simulation of the extraction of the laser-wire Compton signal is also presented.

  14. Sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface for ion beam erosion of Si with simultaneous co-deposition of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, K.; Broetzmann, M.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-15

    We investigate pattern formation on Si by sputter erosion under simultaneous co-deposition of Fe atoms, both at off-normal incidence, as function of the Fe surface coverage. The patterns obtained for 5 keV Xe ion irradiation at 30 Degree-Sign incidence angle are analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of the local steady state Fe content of the Fe-Si surface layer allows a quantitative correlation between pattern type and Fe coverage. With increasing Fe coverage the patterns change, starting from a flat surface at low coverage (< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Fe/cm{sup 2}) over dot patterns (2-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Fe/cm{sup 2}), ripples patterns (8-17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Fe/cm{sup 2}), pill bug structures (1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Fe/cm{sup 2}) and a rather flat surface with randomly distributed weak pits at high Fe coverage (>1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Fe/cm{sup 2}). Our results confirm the observations by Macko et al. for 2 keV Kr ion irradiation of Si with Fe co-deposition. In particular, we also find a sharp transition from pronounced ripple patterns with large amplitude (rms roughness {approx} 18 nm) to a rather flat surface (rms roughness {approx} 0.5 nm). Within this transition regime, we also observe the formation of pill bug structures, i.e. individual small hillocks with a rippled structure on an otherwise rather flat surface. The transition occurs within a very narrow regime of the steady state Fe surface coverage between 1.7 and 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Fe/cm{sup 2}, where the composition of the mixed Fe-Si surface layer of about 10 nm thickness reaches the stoichiometry of FeSi{sub 2}. Phase separation towards amorphous iron silicide is assumed as the major contribution for the pattern formation at lower Fe coverage and the sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface.

  15. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  16. Emittance measurements in Grumman 1 MeV beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Debiak, T.; Gammel, G.; Melnychuk, S.

    1992-12-01

    The emittance of a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} beam has been measured with an Allison type electrostatic analyser at two positions separated by 85 cm along the Grumman 1 MeV beamline LEBT at low currents (about 4 mA, no Cs{sub 2}O additive in the source) and at higher currents (10-15 mA, with Cs{sub 2}O additive in the source). No emittance growth was observed between the two positions, but, at the higher current level, the emittance was about 60% higher than at the low current level ({Sigma}{sub n},rms = .0045 {pi} cm-mrad vs. 0070 {pi} cm-mrad). Argon was then introduced up to a partial pressure of 4x10{sup {minus}5} torr, and the emittance decreased back to a range corresponding to that found at the lower currents. However, beam noise was observed at the downstream position, and there is evidence for a small amount of emittance growth (<20%) between the two positions.

  17. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  18. Emission Testing Results of Thermally Stable, Metamaterial, Selective-Emitters for Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Katherine; Naka, Norihito; Pfiester, Nicole; Licht, Abigail; Vandervelde, Tom

    2015-03-01

    In thermophotovoltaics, the energy from a heated emitter is converted to electricity by a photovoltaic diode. A selective emitter can be used to emit a narrow band of wavelengths tailored to the bandgap of the photovoltaic diode. This spectral shaping improves the conversion efficiency of the diode and reduces undesirable diode heating. In our research, we study selective emitters based on metamaterials composed of repeating nanoscale structures. The emission characteristics of these materials vary based on the compositional structure, allowing the emitted spectrum to be tunable. Simulations were performed with CST Microwave Studio to design emitters with peak wavelengths ranging from 1-10 microns. The structures were then fabricated using physical vapor deposition and electron beam lithography on a sapphire substrate. Emitter materials studied include gold, platinum, and iridium. Here we report on the emission spectra of the selective emitters and the post-heating structural integrity.

  19. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  20. IMPROVEMENTS IN EMITTANCE WAKE FIELD OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2003-05-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time monitoring of the beam sizes. We show that the different tuning strategy provided significantly improved emittances at the interaction point of the SLC.

  1. MICE Step I: first measurement of emittance with particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Vittorio

    2012-03-01

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intending to demonstrate the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam is measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a sci-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in Li-H absorbers and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a second muon identification system measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010-11 run the beam and most detectors have been fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of a beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors has been performed. The analysis of these data should be completed by the time of the Conference. The next steps of more precise measurements, of emittance and emittance reduction (cooling), that will follow in 2012 and later, will also be outlined.

  2. MICE Step 1: First measurements of emittance using particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adey, David; MICE Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intended to demonstrate the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam is measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a fibre tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in LH2 absorbers and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a second muon identification system measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010 run the beam and most detectors have been fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of a beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors has been performed. The next steps of more precise measurements, of emittance and emittance reduction (cooling), that will follow in 2011 and later, will also be outlined.

  3. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  4. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  5. Coherent Hot-Electron Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Nobuya; Furuya, Kazuhito

    2001-01-01

    The structure and principle of an electron emitter ejecting electron waves with ultimate value of product of wavefront spread and current density in a solid-state condition is proposed. By introducing an additional electrode, the gate, to a double-barrier resonant-tunneling emitter, an electron flux with a single wavelength, a wide wavefront spread and high current density can be achieved. We justify the principle by electrostatic theory. This emitter might also be used for various types of solid-state spectroscopy.

  6. Measurement of ultra low transverse emittance at REGAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump-probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required which can be identified with a small beam emittance. A standard magnet scan is used for the emittance measurement which is in case of a low charged bunch most sensitive to the beam size determination (RMS or 2nd central moment of a distribution). Therefore the diagnostic and a routine to calculate proper central moments of an arbitrary distribution will be introduced and discussed.

  7. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Mark; Alexander, James; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  8. High brightness symmetric emittance rf photoinjector preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Ostiguy, J.F.; Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    A preliminary design for a high bunch charge (8 nC), low emittance (< 20 mm-mr) radiofrequency electron photoinjector matched to the requirements of the Tesla Test Facility is presented. A 1.5 cell iris coupled {pi}mode structure with high average accelerating gradient is chosen for its high shunt impedance, simplicity, and ability to accommodate an externally mounted solenoid for simultaneous beam divergence control and emittance compensation. Beam optics are optimized for an overall injector consisting of the electron gun followed by one linac capture section, a dipole chicane for magnetic bunch compression to achieve a bunch length corresponding to {sigma}{sub z} = 1 mm. Electrical and beam dynamical aspects of the photoinjector design are presented. A description of the proposed experimental program is included.

  9. New method of verificating optical flat flatness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Xueyuan; Han, Sen; Zhu, Jianrong; Guo, Zhenglai; Fu, Yuegang

    2014-11-01

    Optical flat is commonly used in optical testing instruments, flatness is the most important parameter of forming errors. As measurement criteria, optical flat flatness (OFF) index needs to have good precision. Current measurement in China is heavily dependent on the artificial visual interpretation, through discrete points to characterize the flatness. The efficiency and accuracy of this method can not meet the demand of industrial development. In order to improve the testing efficiency and accuracy of measurement, it is necessary to develop an optical flat verification system, which can obtain all surface information rapidly and efficiently, at the same time, in accordance with current national metrological verification procedures. This paper reviews current optical flat verification method and solves the problems existing in previous test, by using new method and its supporting software. Final results show that the new system can improve verification efficiency and accuracy, by comparing with JJG 28-2000 metrological verification procedures method.

  10. Low Emittance Tuning Studies for SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, Simone; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Donald, Martin; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    SuperB[1] is an international project for an asymmetric 2 rings collider at the B mesons cm energy to be built in the Rome area in Italy. The two rings will have very small beam sizes at the Interaction Point and very small emittances, similar to the Linear Collider Damping Rings ones. In particular, the ultra low vertical emittances, 7 pm in the LER and 4 pm in the HER, need a careful study of the misalignment errors effects on the machine performances. Studies on the closed orbit, vertical dispersion and coupling corrections have been carried out in order to specify the maximum allowed errors and to provide a procedure for emittance tuning. A new tool which combines MADX and Matlab routines has been developed, allowing for both corrections and tuning. Results of these studies are presented.

  11. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon; Hoffstaetter, Georg H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the coupler region with

  12. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  13. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  14. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  15. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  16. Effects of Beam Filling Pattern on Beam Ion Instability and Beam Loading In PEP-X

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2009-06-02

    A proposed high-brightness synchrotron light source (PEP-X) is under design at SLAC. The 4.5-GeV PEP-X storage ring has four theoretical minimum emittance (TME) cells to achieve the very low emittance and two double-bend achromat (DBA) cells to provide spaces for IDs. Damping wigglers will be installed in zero-dispersion straights to reduce the emittance below 0.1 nm. Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue due to its ultra small emittance. Third harmonic cavity can be used to lengthen the bunch in order to improve the beam's life time. Bunch-train filling pattern is proposed to mitigate both the fast ion instability and beam loading effect. This paper investigates the fast ion instability and beam loading for different beam filling patterns.

  17. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by

  18. New apparatus increases ion beam power density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, L. V.; Sandborn, V. A.

    1964-01-01

    To increase ion engine or rocket power, an ion source and emitter, an ion beam focusing electrode, and an ion accelerator are incorporated into the system. In operation the space charge surrounding the ion emitter decreases, the ion beam density accelerates, and engine power increases.

  19. X-ray flat-panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam volume CT (CBVCT) under a circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    2001-06-01

    The potential of cone beam volume CT (CBVCT) to improve the data acquisition efficiency for volume tomographic imaging is well recognized. A novel x-ray FPI based CBVCT prototype and its preliminary performance evaluation are presented in this paper. To meet the data sufficiency condition, the CBVCT prototype employs a circle-plus-two-arc orbit accomplished by a tiltable circular gantry. A cone beam filtered back-projection (CB-FBP) algorithm is derived for this data acquisition orbit, which employs a window function in the Radon domain to exclude the redundancy between the Radon information obtained from the circular cone beam (CB) data and that from the arc CB data. The number of projection images along the circular sub-orbit and each arc sub-orbit is 512 and 43, respectively. The reconstruction exactness of the prototype x-ray FPI based CBVCT system is evaluated using a disc phantom in which seven acrylic discs are stacked at fixed intervals. Images reconstructed with this algorithm show that both the contrast and geometric distortion existing in the disc phantom images reconstructed by the Feldkamp algorithm are substantially reduced. Meanwhile, the imaging performance of the prototype, such as modulation transfer function (MTF) and low contrast resolution, are quantitatively evaluated in detail through corresponding phantom studies. Furthermore, the capability of the prototype to reconstruct an ROI within a longitudinally unbounded object is verified. The results obtained from this preliminary performance evaluation encourage an expectation of medical applications of the x-ray FPI based CBVCT under the circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition, particularly the application in image-guided interventional procedures and radiotherapy where the movement of a patient table is to be avoided.

  20. Counterstreaming beams and flat-top electron distributions observed with Langmuir, Whistler, and compressional Alfvén waves in earth's magnetic tail.

    PubMed

    Teste, Alexandra; Parks, George K

    2009-02-20

    Relevant new clues to wave-particle interactions have been obtained in Earth's plasma sheet (PS). The plasma measurements made on Cluster spacecraft show that broadband (approximately 2-6 kHz) electrostatic emissions, in the PS boundary layer, are associated with cold counterstreaming electrons flowing at 5-12x10(3) km s(-1) through hot Maxwellian plasma. In the current sheet (CS), electromagnetic whistler mode waves (approximately 10-80 Hz) and compressional Alfvén waves (<2 Hz) are detected with flat-topped electron distributions whose cutoff speeds are approximately 15-17x10(3) km s(-1). These waves are damped in the central CS where |B|

  1. Beam dynamics in SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.

    1997-07-01

    Beam dynamics issues affect many different aspects of the SLC performance. This paper concentrates on the multi-particle beam dynamics in the linac and the associated limitations that are imposed on the overall SLC performance. The beam behavior in the presence of strong wakefields has been studied in order to optimize the performance and to predict the expected emittances in high performance linacs. Emittance measurements and simulations are presented for the SLAC linac and are compared in detail. As the overall SLC performance depends on the accelerator stability, the tuning stability is discussed. Measurements are shown and the consequences for the performance of the SLC are discussed.

  2. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  3. Electron cooling of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    Electron cooling of electron (and positron) sources may be important for future linear collider applications. In order to cool electrons with electrons, an intermediary positron beam must be employed, since it is impossible to merge two beams of identical particles into the cooling straight. By adjusting the beta functions of the electron and positron lattices appropriately, the final emittance of the stored electron beam can be made less than the emittance of the cooling electron beam. This paper will discuss accelerator physics issues relating to an electron-cooled electron beam source.

  4. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Harada, H.; Hayashi, N.; Horino, K.; Hotchi, H.; Kinsho, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Tani, N.; Togashi, T.; Ueno, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Irie, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) as well as to the main ring (MR) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100πmmmrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150πmmmrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the present principle.

  5. The flat antenna - Now a reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel R.

    1989-09-01

    A practical, high-performance, low-cost, consumer-oriented flat antenna is described. Advantages of the flat antenna include a thin profile which is less obtrusive than a parabolic dish, features less expensive shipping and installation costs due to its light weight, has the ability to squint the beam, and has improved aperture control for sidelobe suppression. R&D focuses on development of monolithic microwave integrated circuts which will be embedded into the array, thus adding the potential features of amenability to integrated electronics (which will improve noise performance and avoid the necessity of appending an external low-noise converter), and electronic steerability to the list of flat antenna advantages. The basic construction of the flat panel and the intended market for the first flat antennas and the subsequent effect on product design are discussed. Initial market results in Japan, and planned development of European and American markets are discussed.

  6. Status of the Trasco Intense Proton Source and emittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Chines, F.; Presti, M.; Andò, L.; Guo, X. H.; Gobin, R.; Ferdinand, R.

    2004-05-01

    The Trasco Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) was installed at INFN-LNS in May 2000 and has been fully operational since the Fall of 2000; now the source fulfills all the requirements of the TRASCO (Trasmutazione Scorie) project. The proton beam intensity easily exceeds 40 mA at the operating voltage of 80 kV. A set of emittance measurements was carried out for different source conditions and confirmed the simulations performed with the AXCEL code: in all the cases the rms normalized emittance is well lower than the value required for the injection into the RFQ (0.2 π mm mrad); the results will be shown and discussed. Finally a beam reliability of 99.8% has been found during a long run test lasting over 142 h.

  7. Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sen, Tanaji; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2010-05-01

    In order to avoid the effects of long-range beam-beam interactions which produce beam blow-up and deteriorate beam life time, a compensation scheme with current carrying wires has been proposed. Two long-range beam-beam compensators were installed in RHIC rings in 2006. The effects of the compensators have been experimentally investigated. An indication was observed that the compensators are beneficial to beam life time in measurements performed in RHIC during 2009. In this paper, we report the effects of wire compensator on beam loss and emittance for proton-proton beams at collision energy.

  8. Computational challenges for beam-beam simulation for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-10-01

    In this article we will review the computational challenges in the beam-beam simulation for the polarized proton run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The difficulties in our multi-particle and million turn tracking to calculate the proton beam lifetime and proton beam emittance growth due to head-on beam-beam interaction and head-on beam-beam compensation are presented and discussed. Solutions to obtain meaningful physics results from these trackings are proposed and tested. In the end we will present the progress in the benchmarking of the RHIC operational proton beam lifetime.

  9. Fine-tuning to minimize emittances of J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Asano, H.; Oguri, H.

    2016-02-01

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) cesiated RF-driven H- ion source has been successfully operated for about one year. By the world's brightest level beam, the J-PARC design beam power of 1 MW was successfully demonstrated. In order to minimize the transverse emittances, the rod-filter-field (RFF) was optimized by changing the triple-gap-lengths of each of pairing five piece rod-filter-magnets. The larger emittance degradation seems to be caused by impurity-gases than the RFF. The smaller beam-hole-diameter of the extraction electrode caused the more than expected improvements on not only the emittances but also the peak beam intensity.

  10. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  11. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  12. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1989-07-01

    A support is discussed which was provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  13. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a support provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  14. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1989-07-06

    This document discusses a support provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  15. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-10-16

    A support is presented for use in a thermionic converted to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a large metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  16. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  17. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  18. Reduction of Thermal Emittance by using P-polarized Laser at Oblique Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,D.; Park, S.; Park, J.; Parc, Y.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    High charge low emittance electron beam is crucial for the 4th generation light source. Conventionally the beam is generated by photoinjector with laser illuminating the cathode at nearly normal incidence. In this paper attention was called to the use of laser at oblique incidence, which we believe, may be more beneficial. It is found that when the laser illuminates the cathode at oblique incidence, the quantum efficiency (QE) and thermal emittance show strong dependence on incidence angle and polarization state. By using p-polarized laser at oblique incidence, surface photoemission is initiated by the presence of the normal electric field which results in a higher QE and lower thermal emittance. With this technique, the increase in QE by almost 5 times and the reduction of thermal emittance by 40% should be quite expectable for a Copper photo-cathode with atomically smooth surface.

  19. Optimization of the Dynamic Aperture for SPEAR3 Low-Emittance Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lanfa; Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Borland, Michael; /Argonne

    2012-05-30

    A low emittance upgrade is planned for SPEAR3. As the first phase, the emittance is reduced from 10nm to 7nm without additional magnets. A further upgrade with even lower emittance will require a damping wiggler. There is a smaller dynamic aperture for the lower emittance optics due to a stronger nonlinearity. Elegant based Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) is used to maximize the dynamic aperture. Both the dynamic aperture and beam lifetime are optimized simultaneously. Various configurations of the sextupole magnets have been studied in order to find the best configuration. The betatron tune also can be optimized to minimize resonance effects. The optimized dynamic aperture increases more than 15% from the nominal case and the lifetime increases from 14 hours to 17 hours. It is important that the increase of the dynamic aperture is mainly in the beam injection direction. Therefore the injection efficiency will benefit from this improvement.

  20. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  1. Status Report of the Frankfurt H--Test LEBT Including a Non-destructive Emittance Measurement Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, C.; Jakob, A.; Meusel, O.; Schäfer, J.; Klomp, A.; Santić, F.; Pozimski, J.; Klein, H.; Ratzinger, U.

    2002-11-01

    For high power proton accelerators like SNS, ESS or the planned neutrino factory (CERN), negative ions are preferred because they offer charge exchange injection into the accumulation rings (non Liouvillian stacking). The low energy beam emittance is a key parameter in order to avoid emittance growth and particle losses in the high-energy sections. Conventional destructive emittance measurement methods like slit-harp systems are restricted for high power ion beams by the interaction of the ion beam with e.g. slit or harp. Therefore a non-destructive emittance measurement has several technical and physical advantages. To study the transport of high perveance beams of negative ions, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section is under construction. The study of non destructive emittance measurement devices is one major subject of the test bench. For negative ions -especially H--ions-photodetachment can be applied for a non-destructive emittance measurement instrument (PD-EMI). The paper will present the status of that emittance diagnostic and of the test bench.

  2. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  3. Study of ultra-low emittance design for Spear3 using longitudinal gradient dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.

    2015-09-24

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  4. Pepper-pot based emittance measurements of the AWA photoinjector.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Gao, F.; Konecny, D.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Rihaoui, M.; Piot, Ph.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2008-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) RF photocathode gun is a 1.5 cell, L-band, RF photocathode gun operating at 77 MV/m, with emittance compensating solenoids, a magnesium photocathode, and generates an 8 MeV, 1 nC - 100 nC beam. In this paper, we report on a parametric set of measurements to characterize the transverse trace space of the 1 nC electron beam directly out of the gun. We emphasize details of the experimental setup, image analysis, and end with a comparison of the measurements to PARMELA simulations.

  5. Emittance of investment casting molds

    SciTech Connect

    Havstad, M.A.

    1994-07-15

    This document describes measurements of the directional spectral emittance of four ceramic mold materials. The work was performed with the samples at {approximately} 900{degree}C in a vacuum vessel pumped to {approximately}3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}Torr. Results conform to expectations derived from prior work done with similar samples.

  6. Accurate estimation of the RMS emittance from single current amplifier data

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R.F.; Keller, R.; Letchford, A.P.; Thomae, R.W.; Thomason, J.W.G.

    2002-05-31

    This paper presents the SCUBEEx rms emittance analysis, a self-consistent, unbiased elliptical exclusion method, which combines traditional data-reduction methods with statistical methods to obtain accurate estimates for the rms emittance. Rather than considering individual data, the method tracks the average current density outside a well-selected, variable boundary to separate the measured beam halo from the background. The average outside current density is assumed to be part of a uniform background and not part of the particle beam. Therefore the average outside current is subtracted from the data before evaluating the rms emittance within the boundary. As the boundary area is increased, the average outside current and the inside rms emittance form plateaus when all data containing part of the particle beam are inside the boundary. These plateaus mark the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary and provide unbiased estimates for the average background and the rms emittance. Small, trendless variations within the plateaus allow for determining the uncertainties of the estimates caused by variations of the measured background outside the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary. The robustness of the method is established with complementary variations of the exclusion boundary. This paper presents a detailed comparison between traditional data reduction methods and SCUBEEx by analyzing two complementary sets of emittance data obtained with a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an ISIS H{sup -} ion source.

  7. A Resonant Cavity Approach to Non-Invasive, Pulse-to-Pulse EmittanceMeasurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Nantista, C.D.; Miller, R.H.; Weidemann, A.W.; /FARTECH, San Diego /SLAC

    2010-06-15

    We present a resonant cavity approach for non-invasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of non-circular multi-bunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to Q{sub L{lambda}}/{pi}, where Q{sub L{lambda}} is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode {lambda}, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad-cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM{sub 220} for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45{sup o} with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system determine the beam emittance, i.e. the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms-beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms-beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of ten microns. A prototype quad-cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor.

  8. MAMA NUV Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2013-10-01

    This program is aimed at obtaining NUV-MAMA flat-field observations for the construction of pixel-to-pixel flats {p-flats} with a SNR of 100 per binned pixel. The flats are obtained with the DEUTERIUM-lamp and the MR grisms G230M. The actual choice of central wavelength and slit combination depends on the observed count level within each exposure.Note that STIS NUV-MAMA flats are taken every other cycles{i.e. during odd number cycles} in order to not drain the DEUTERIUMlamp lifetime.

  9. MAMA NUV Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena

    2011-10-01

    This program is aimed at obtaining NUV-MAMA flat-field observations for the construction of pixel-to-pixel flats {p-flats} with a SNR of 100 per binned pixel. The flats are obtained with the DEUTERIUM-lamp and the MR grisms G230M. The actual choice of central wavelength and slit combination depends on the observed count level within each exposure.Note that STIS NUV-MAMA flats are taken every other cycles{i.e. during odd number cycles} in order to not drain the DEUTERIUMlamp lifetime.

  10. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  11. Longitudinal emittance: An introduction to the concept and survey of measurement techniques including design of a wall current monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1990-03-01

    The properties of charged particle beams associated with the distribution of the particles in energy and in time can be grouped together under the category of longitudinal emittance. This article is intended to provide an intuitive introduction to the concepts longitudinal emittance; to provide an incomplete survey of methods used to measure this emittance and the related properties of bunch length and momentum spread; and to describe the detailed design of a 6 Ghz bandwidth resistive wall current monitor useful for measuring bunch shapes of moderate to high intensity beams. Overall, the article is intended to be broad in scope, in most cases deferring details to cited original papers. 37 refs., 21 figs.

  12. Noninvasive emittance and energy spread monitor using optical synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorito, R.; Shkvarunets, A.; Castronovo, D.; Cornacchia, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Kishek, R.; Tschalaer, C.; Veronese, M.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a design for a minimally perturbing diagnostic minichicane, which utilizes optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) generated from magnetic bends in the chicane, to measure the rms horizontal and vertical beam sizes, divergences, emittances, Twiss parameters and energy spread of a relativistic electron beam. The beam is externally focused to a waist at the first bend and the OSR generated there can be used to measure the rms beam size. Subsequent pairs of bends produce far field OSR interferences (OSRI) whose visibility depends on the beam energy spread and the angular divergence. Under proper conditions, one of these two effects will dominate the OSRI visibility from a particular pair of bends and can be used to diagnose the dominant effect. The properties of different configuration of bends in the chicane have been analyzed to provide an optimum diagnostic design for a given set of beam parameters to: (1) provide a sufficient number of OSR interferences to allow a measurement of the fringe visibility; (2) minimize the effect of coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge forces on the particles motion; and (3) minimize the effect of compression on the bunch length as the beam passes through the chicane. A design for the chicane has been produced for application to the FERMI free electron laser facility and by extension to similar high brightness linear accelerators. Such a diagnostic promises to greatly improve control of the electron beam optics with a noninvasive measurement of beam parameters and allow on-line optics matching and feedback.

  13. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  14. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  15. Benchmarking of measurement and simulation of transverse rms-emittance growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groening, L.; Barth, W.; Bayer, W.; Clemente, G.; Dahl, L.; Forck, P.; Gerhard, P.; Hofmann, I.; Riehl, G.; Yaramyshev, S.; Jeon, D.; Uriot, D.

    2008-09-01

    Transverse emittance growth along the Alvarez drift tube linac (DTL) section is a major concern with respect to the preservation of beam quality of high current beams at the GSI UNILAC. In order to define measures to reduce this growth, appropriate tools to simulate the beam dynamics are indispensable. This paper is about the benchmarking of three beam dynamics simulation codes, i.e. DYNAMION, PARMILA, and PARTRAN against systematic measurements of beam emittances for different transverse phase advances along the DTL. Special emphasis is put on the modeling of the initial distribution for the simulations. The concept of rms equivalence is expanded from full intensity to fractions of less than 100% of the beam. The experimental setup, data reduction, preparation of the simulations, and the evaluation of the simulations are described. In the experiments and in the simulations, a minimum of the rms-emittance growth was observed at zero current phase advances of about 60°. In general, good agreement was found between simulations and experiment for the mean values of horizontal and vertical emittances at the DTL exit.

  16. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  17. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  18. MAMA FUV Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena

    2012-10-01

    This program aims at obtaining FUV-MAMA flat-field observations to create a new p-flats with a SNR of 100 per {low resolution} pixel. The flats are obtained with the Krypton-lamp and the MR grating G140M, similarly to the cycle 17 and 18 programs. However the exact instrument setup {slit width and central wavelength} might change depending on the desired count level {which will be close to the internally allowed global rate limit}.

  19. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  20. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  1. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F. -J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  2. Optimal dipole-field profiles for emittance reduction in storage rings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Wang, Y.; Peng, Y. )

    2011-03-21

    In recent years nonuniform dipoles with bending-radius variation have been studied for reducing storage ring emittance. According to a new minimum-emittance theory, the effects of an arbitrary dipole can be characterized with two parameters determined by the dipole. To have a better idea of the potentials of nonuniform dipoles, here we numerically explore the possible values of these two parameters and associated bending profiles for optimal emittance reduction. Such optimization results provide a useful reference for lattice designs involving nonuniform bending. Simple bending-radius profiles (a short segment of constant radius with linear ramps on the sides) were found to be close to the optimal. Basic beam and lattice properties such as emittance, energy spread, and phase advances are presented based on the optimal dipole solutions.

  3. Spatial uniformity of the current emitted by an array of passively fed electrospray porous emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Krejci, D.; Lozano, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquid ion sources (ILIS) have a broad range of applications ranging from focused ion beams (FIB) to spacecraft propulsion. For space thrusters, having a beam of ions of high velocity and low energy spread results in high specific impulse (a measure of the efficiency of propellant consumption) and high power efficiency. For FIB applications, these traits benefit focusing and resolution respectively. Since typical current levels emitted by individual ILIS range from tens of nA to a few μA, both applications often require using arrays of emitters in order to increase the total beam current; i.e. the thrust level in the case of a thruster or the throughput in ion milling applications. So far, most studies of emitter arrays have dealt with experimental measurements of global, spatially-averaged, properties and theoretical analyses generally assume that all emitters operate in a similar manner, so that scaling of the current is linear with the number of emitters. In this work we use a current probe to explore the uniformity properties of the current emitted by an array of porous emitters. We present measurements of the current density of both the array and individual tips, and analyze the reason and implications of the experimental observations.

  4. Acceleration of electrons generated during ionization of a gas by a nearly flat profile laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    2009-09-15

    A scheme of acceleration of electrons generated during ionization of krypton by nearly flat radial and nearly flat temporal laser pulse profiles has been suggested. The energy spectrum of the electrons suggests that energy of the electrons is higher for a nearly flat temporal profile than that for a nearly flat radial profile. The suppression of scattering of the electrons is better for a nearly flat radial profile than that for a nearly flat temporal profile. The energy of the electrons increases, scattering decreases, and beam quality improves with an increase in flatness of radial and temporal profiles.

  5. Flat Pack Toy Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the concept of flat pack toys. Flat pack toys are designed using a template on a single sheet of letter-sized card stock paper. Before being cut out and built into a three-dimensional toy, they are scanned into the computer and uploaded to a website. With the template accessible from the website, anyone with…

  6. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  7. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chuyu; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-10-04

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  8. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  9. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  10. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Pande, R.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch.

  11. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  12. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  13. Development of a compact high current low emittance RF ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    A 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma based RF ion source is developed for production of high brightness focused ion beams of heavy gaseous elements for high speed milling and light ions for high speed imaging. In order to obtain ion beams with low emittance, no magnetic field of any kind is used in the ion source. However, to achieve the high plasma density, the plasma chamber volume is reduced to couple RF power as high as 8-12 W/cm3 to the plasma. Measurements show that the normalized rms emittance of 0.6 mA Ar1+ beam to be as low as 0.0075 mm-mrad while it is 0.004 mm-mrad for 1.2 mA of ion beam from hydrogen plasma. With a simple parallel plate extraction system with an aperture of 2 mm diameter, 80 mA/cm2 of ion beam from hydrogen plasma could be extracted at 3.5 kV extraction potential and 300 W of RF power. The ion source has been operated with other heavy gases and results show that more than 1 mA of xenon and krypton ion beam could easily be extracted at 5 kV extraction potential and 200 W of RF power. In this article, the capability of the ion source to produce high current, low emittance heavy as well as light ion beams is presented.

  14. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  15. FLATs: Warming Up - continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this proposal is to monitor the flat fields during the interval between the end of science observations and the exhaustion of cryogen and subsequent warming of the dewar to > 100K. These flats will provide a monitor for particulate comtamination {GROT} and detector lateral position {from the coronagraphic spot and FDA vignetting}. They will provide some measure of relative {flat field} and absolute QE variation as a function of temperature. When stars are visible they might provide a limited degree of focus determination.

  16. FLATs: Warming Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this proposal is to monitor the flat fields during the interval between the end of science observations and the exhaustion of cryogen and subsequent warming of the dewar to > 100K. These flats will provide a monitor for particulate comtamination {GROT} and detector lateral position {from the coronagraphic spot and FDA vignetting}. They will provide some measure of relative {flat field} and absolute QE variation as a function of temperature. When stars are visible they might provide a limited degree of focus determination.

  17. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  18. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  19. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  1. Rotating system for four-dimensional transverse rms-emittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Maier, M.; Du, X. N.; Gerhard, P.; Groening, L.; Mickat, S.; Vormann, H.

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms parameters is essential for applications that involve lattice elements that couple the two transverse degrees of freedom (planes). Of special interest is the elimination of interplane correlations to reduce the projected emittances. A dedicated rotating system for emittance measurements (ROSE) has been proposed, developed, and successfully commissioned to fully determine the four-dimensional beam matrix. This device has been used at the high charge injector (HLI) at GSI in a beam line which is composed of a skew quadrupole triplet, a normal quadrupole doublet, and ROSE. Mathematical algorithms, measurements, and the analysis of errors and the decoupling capability for ion beams of 83Kr 13+ at 1.4 MeV /u are reported in this paper.

  2. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  3. Thermophotovoltaic Generators Using Selective Metallic Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Samaras, John E.; Avery, James E.; Ewell, Richard

    1995-01-01

    In the literature to date on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generators, two types of infrared emitter's have been emphasized : gray body emitters and rare earth oxide selective emitters. The gray body emitter is defined as an emitter with a spectral emissivity independent of wavelength whereas the rare earth oxide selective emitter is idealized as a delta function emitter with a high emissivity at a select wavelength and a near zero emissivity at all other wavelengths. Silicon carbide is an example of a gray body emitter and ER-YAG is an example of a selective emitter. The Welsbach mantle in a common lantern is another example of an oxide selective emitter. Herein, we describe an alternative type of selective emitter, a selective metallic emitter. These metallic emitters are characterized by a spectral emissivity curve wherein the emissivity monotonically increases with shorter infrared wavelengths as is shown. The metal of curve "A", tungsten, typifies this class of selective metallic emitter's. In a thermophotovoltaic generator, a photovoltaic cell typically converts infrared radiation to electricity out to some cut-off wavelength. For example, Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) TPV cells respond out to 1.7 microns. The problem with gray body emitters is that they emit at all wavelengths. Therefore, a large fraction of the energy emitted will be outside of the response band of the TPV cell. The argument for the selective emitter is that, ideally, all the emitted energy can be in the cells response band. Unfortunately, rare earth oxide emitters are not ideal. In order to suppress the emissivity toward zero away from the select wavelength, the use of thin fiber's is necessary. This leads to a fragile emitter typical of a lantern mantle. Even given a thin ER-YAG emitter, the measured emissivity at the select wavelength of 1.5 microns has been reported to be 0.6 while the off wavelength background emissivity falls to only 0.2 at 5 microns. This gives a selectivity ratio of only 3

  4. Positioning with stationary emitters in a two-dimensional space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-11-15

    The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems in a two-dimensional space-time have been introduced in a previous work [Phys. Rev. D 73, 084017 (2006)] where geodesic positioning systems, constituted by two geodesic emitters, have been considered in a flat space-time. Here, we want to show in what precise senses positioning systems allow to make relativistic gravimetry. For this purpose, we consider stationary positioning systems, constituted by two uniformly accelerated emitters separated by a constant distance, in two different situations: absence of gravitational field (Minkowski plane) and presence of a gravitational mass (Schwarzschild plane). The physical coordinate system constituted by the electromagnetic signals broadcasting the proper time of the emitters are the so called emission coordinates, and we show that, in such emission coordinates, the trajectories of the emitters in both situations, the absence and presence of a gravitational field, are identical. The interesting point is that, in spite of this fact, particular additional information on the system or on the user allows us not only to distinguish both space-times, but also to complete the dynamical description of emitters and user and even to measure the mass of the gravitational field. The precise information under which these dynamical and gravimetric results may be obtained is carefully pointed out.

  5. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  6. Propagation of electron and positron beams in long, dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric; Blue, Brent; Clayton, Chris; Decker, Franz-Joseph; Hogan, Mark; Hunag, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Katsouleas, Tom; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren; O'Connell, Caollionn; Siemann, Robert; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2008-04-01

    Electron beams with density larger than the plasma density can propagate through plasmas without significant emittance growth. The electron beam expels the plasma electrons from the bunch volume and propagate in a pure, uniform ion column. In contrast, positron beams attract plasma electrons that flow through the positron bunch. As a result the plasma focusing force is nonlinear, a charge halo forms around the bunch, and the bunch emittance grows. After some distance into the plasma, the bunch emittance reaches an approximately constant value, and the beam and the plasma focusing force reach a steady state. Experimental results obtained with electron and positron bunches, as well as numerical simulation results will be presented.

  7. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  8. ACCELERATORS: Emittance coupling driven by space charge in the CSNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Jun; Fu, Shi-Nian; Peng, Jun

    2009-09-01

    In the conventional design of RF linacs, the bunched beams are not in thermal equilibrium. The space charge forces couple the particle motions between the transverse and the longitudinal directions. Furthermore it will cause the equipartitioning process which leads to emittance growth and halo formation. In the design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac, three cases are investigated using the Hofmann stability charts. In this paper, we present the equipartitioning beam study of the CSNS Alvarez DTL linac.

  9. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  10. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  11. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  12. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  13. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  14. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  15. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  16. Rare earth boride electron emitter materials fabrication and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Davis, P. R.; Gesley, M. A.

    1982-03-01

    Techniques were developed for routine preparation of single crystal rods of LaB6, CeB6 and PrB6 by arc float zone refining. Single crystal, oriented samples were prepared from these rods and mounted as cathodes for testing. Several mounting systems were used, and flat, pointed cone and truncated cone thermionic cathodes were studied. Pointed field emitters of LaB6(100) were also investigated. Variation of thermionic emitted current density and thermal stability of materials were studied as functions of rare earth element, bulk stoichiometry and crystal orientation. Life tests were performed on several different LaB6(100) cathodes. One such cathode operated for over 3000 hours at approximately 10 A/sq cm emitted current density with no serious physical degradation. Surface properties of the materials were investigated by various surface analysis techniques.

  17. Flat bunch creation and acceleration: a possible path for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Increasing the collider luminosity by replacing bunches having Gaussian line-charge distribution with flat bunches, but with same beam-beam tune shift at collision, has been studied widely in recent years. But, creation of 'stable' flat bunches (and their acceleration) using a multiple harmonic RF system has not been fully explored. Here, we review our experience with long flat bunches in the barrier RF buckets at Fermilab.We presentsome preliminary results from beam dynamics simulations and recent beam studies in the LHC injectors to create stable flat bunches using double harmonic RF systems. The results deduced from these studies will be used to model the necessary scheme for luminosity upgrade in the LHC. We have also described a viable (and economical) way for creation and acceleration of flat bunches in the LHC. The flat bunch scheme may have many advantages over the LHC baseline scenario, particularly because of the reduced momentum spread of the bunch for increased intensities.

  18. `Pipetron` beam dynamics with noise

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.D.

    1996-10-01

    Extra-large hadron collider, ``Pipetron``, at 100 TeV energy is currently under consideration. In this article we study the Pipetron transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics under influence of external noises. The major effects are growths of transverse and longitudinal emittances of the beam caused by noisy forces which vary over the revolution period or synchrotron oscillation period, respectively; and closed orbit distortions induced by slow drift of magnet positions. Based on analytical consideration of these phenomena, we estimate tolerable levels of these noises and compare them with available experimental data. Although it is concluded that transverse and, probably, longitudinal feedback systems are necessary for the emittance`s preservation, and sophisticated beam-based orbit correction methods should be used at the Pipetron, we observe no unreasonable requirements which present and impenetrable barrier to the project.

  19. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Haga, A; Sugita, S; Kita, S; Tanaka, S-I; Okuyama, F; Kobayashi, N

    2007-01-01

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10beam extracted from the CNFs was estimated to be D<50 microm in diameter. Superior performance was realized by using CNFs with larger fiber radii (100-500 nm) grown sparsely on the metal tips, which were installed in a holder at the short length L=0.5 mm.

  20. FLASH X-RAY (FXR) LINEAR INDUCTION ACCELERATOR (LIA) OPTIMIZATION Upgrade of the OTR Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Wargo, P E

    2006-12-01

    Knowing the electron beam parameters at the exit of an accelerator is critical for several reasons. Foremost is to optimize the application of the beam, which is flash radiography in the case of the FXR accelerator. The beam parameters not only determine the theoretical dose, x-ray spectrum, and radiograph resolution (spot size), they are required to calculate the final transport magnetic fields that focus the beam on the bremsstrahlung converter to achieve the theoretical limits. Equally important is the comparison of beam parameters to the design specifications. This comparison indicates the ''health'' of the accelerator, warning the operator when systems are deteriorating or failing. For an accelerator of the size and complexity of FXR, a large suite of diagnostics is normally employed to measure and/or infer beam parameters. These diagnostics are distributed throughout the accelerator and can require a large number of ''shots'' (measurements) to calculate a specific beam parameter. The OTR Emittance Diagnostic, however, has the potential to measure all but one of the beam parameters simultaneous at a specific location. Using measurements from a scan of a few shots, this final parameter can also be determined. Since first deployment, the OTR Emittance Diagnostic has been limited to measuring only one of the seven desired parameters, the beam's divergence. This report describes recent upgrades to the diagnostic that permit full realization of its potential.

  1. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  2. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  3. Plasmons in doped finite carbon nanotubes and their interactions with fast electrons and quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Sandra; Cox, Joel D.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2016-08-01

    We study the potential of highly doped finite carbon nanotubes to serve as plasmonic elements that mediate the interaction between quantum emitters. Similar to graphene, nanotubes support intense plasmons that can be modulated by varying their level of electrical doping. These excitations exhibit large interaction with light and electron beams, as revealed upon examination of the corresponding light extinction cross-section and electron energy-loss spectra. We show that quantum emitters experience record-high Purcell factors, while they undergo strong mutual interaction mediated by their coupling to the tube plasmons. Our results show the potential of doped finite nanotubes as tunable plasmonic materials for quantum optics applications.

  4. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  5. The emittances and brightnesses of high-intensity negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; McConnell, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The emittances of high-intensity ion beams extracted from cesium sputter negative ion sources equipped with cylindrical and ellipsoidal solid tungsten and spiral-wound tantalum (General Ionex Corporation, Model 860), and cesium surface ionizers have been measured for several ion species, including /sup 12/C/sup -/, /sup 28/Si/sup -/, /sup 58/Ni/sup -/, and /sup 197/Au/sup -/. While certain sets of data from the ellipsoidal and cylindrical geometry ionizer sources suggest a moderate growth in emittance with increasing negative ion beam intensity I over the range of intensities investigated (5 less than or equal to 1 less than or equal to 60 ..mu..A) of perhaps 20%, not all data exhibit this dependence, especially those from the Model 860 source. As well, no evidence of an emittance dependence on ion mass of a monotonic nature was found. The emittances of ion beams at the 80% intensity level from the Model 860 source are found to be higher on the average by factors of 1.8 and 1.7, respectively, than those from sources equipped with ellipsoidal and cylindrical geometry cesium surface ionizers.

  6. Flat Top & rocky terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at lower right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. Flat Top has been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  7. Experimental and simulation studies of beam-beam compensation with Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2007-06-01

    Initially the Tevatron Electron Lenses (TELs) were intended for compensation of the beam-beam effect on the antiproton beam [1]. Owing to recent increase in the number of antiprotons and reduction in their emittance, it is the proton beam now that suffers most from the beam-beam effect [2]. We present results of beam studies, compare them with the results of computer simulations using LIFETRAC code and discuss possibilities of further improvements of the Beam-Beam Compensation efficiency in the Tevatron.

  8. Multi-particle weak-strong simulation of RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo,Y.; Abreu, N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    To compensate the large tune spread generated by the beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton (pp) run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy round Gaussian electron beam or electron lens is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. Using a weakstrong beam-beam interaction model, we carry out multiparticle simulations to investigate the effects of head-on beam-beam compensation on the proton beam's lifetime and emittance growth. The simplectic 6-D element-by-element tracking code SixTrack is adopted and modified for this study. The code benchmarking and preliminary simulation results are presented.

  9. Holograms of Flat Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Grumiller, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The holographic principle has a concrete realization in the Anti-de Sitter/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence. If this principle is a true fact about quantum gravity then it must also hold beyond AdS/CFT. In this paper, we address specifically holographic field theory duals of gravitational theories in asymptotically flat spacetimes. We present some evidence of our recent conjecture that three-dimensional (3d) conformal Chern-Simons gravity (CSG) with flat space boundary conditions is dual to an extremal CFT.

  10. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-09-15

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  11. Noninterceptive transverse emittance measurements using BPM for Chinese ADS R&D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Chi; He, Yuan; Dou, Weiping; Tao, Yue; Chen, Wei-long; Jia, Huan; Liu, Shu-hui; Wang, Wang-sheng; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhang, X. L.

    2016-04-01

    The noninterceptive four-dimensional transverse emittance measurements are essential for commissioning the high power continue-wave (CW) proton linacs as well as their operations. The conventional emittance measuring devices such as slits and wire scanners are not well suited under these conditions due to sure beam damages. Therefore, the method of using noninterceptive Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is developed and demonstrated on Injector Scheme II at the Chinese Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (China-ADS) proofing facility inside Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) [1]. The results of measurements are in good agreements with wire scanners and slits at low duty-factor pulsed (LDFP) beam. In this paper, the detailed experiment designs, data analysis and result benchmarking are presented.

  12. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Thomas; Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio; Bravin, Enrico; Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O.; Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H- beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H- beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H0/e- pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H0 particles are separated from the unstripped H- ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H- beam, the transverse emittance of the H- beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  13. Anomalous beam diffusion near beam-beam synchrobetatron resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Tanaji

    2012-10-01

    The diffusion process near low order synchrobetatron resonances driven by beam-beam interactions at a crossing angle is investigated. Macroscopic observables such as beam emittance, lifetime, and beam profiles are calculated. These are followed with detailed studies of microscopic quantities such as the evolution of the variance at several transverse amplitudes and single particle probability distribution functions. We present evidence to show that the observed diffusion is anomalous and the dynamics follows a non-Markovian continuous time random walk process. We derive a modified master equation to replace the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation in action-angle space and a fractional diffusion equation to describe the density evolution for this class of processes.

  14. Is flat fair?

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic pricing holds out the promise of shifting peak demand as well as reducing overall demand. But it also raises thorny issues of fairness. All practical pricing systems involve tradeoffs between equity and efficiency. I examine the circumstances under which equity ought to be allowed to trump efficiency and whether or not this constitutes a defense of flat pricing. (author)

  15. Flat conductor cable applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the numerous applications of flat conductor cable (FCC) systems are briefly described. Both government and commercial uses were considered, with applications designated as either aerospace, military, or commercial. The number and variety of ways in which FCC is being applied and considered for future designs are illustrated.

  16. Multilayer flat electrical cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    Flat electrical cable is lightweight, flexible over wide temperature range, withstands continuous exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation, and can carry high currents with minimum of temperature rise. Its magnetic cleanliness is equal to or better than twisted pair of wires, and it can be terminated in conventional electrical connector.

  17. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  18. Design study of a low-emittance lattice with a five-bend achromat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Lin; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-04-01

    The multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice, which can provide a small horizontal emittance in the subnanometer range, shows promise for future storage-ring-based light-source facilities. We present the linear and the nonlinear properties of an optical design and the results of its optimization. The MBA lattice is designed as a five-bend achromat, and an emittance of 0.270 nm rad is achieved. The energy and the circumference of the designed ring are 3 GeV and 499.3 m, respectively. We investigated an injection system with a single-pulsed sextupole magnet in the storage ring. We describe the space allocation in the injection section and the particle dynamics of the injected beam. The investigation shows that our design exhibits a very low emittance and a sufficient dynamic aperture, and provides a suitable injection scheme for a 3-GeV light source.

  19. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-01

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J ˜5×109 A/m2, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E =10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately Dx=0.5 μm.

  20. Emittance improvement efforts on the 15-20 mA dc H{sup -} multicusp source

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Xianlu; Zhang Tianjue; Zheng Xia; Zhang Suping; Zou Jian; Lin Jun

    2010-02-15

    A 15 mA beam from the 15-20 mA dc H{sup -} multicusp source has been obtained at China Institute of Atomic Energy. In order to improve the emittance of extracted beam from this new multicusp source, some measures have been taken, i.e., increasing the length of the ion source body, improving the vacuum in the extraction area, injecting cesium vapor into the ion source, etc. The hardware, including the lengthened source body, the improved back cover and cesium heating system, and the extraction vacuum box, will be described. Initial results for these efforts aimed at emittance improvement will also be given in the paper.