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Sample records for emittance flat beams

  1. The preservation of low emittance flat beams

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1993-04-01

    Many future linear collider designs require beams with very small transverse emittances and large emittance ratios {epsilon}{sub x} {much_gt} {epsilon}{sub y}. In this paper, we will discuss issues associated with the preservation of these small emittances during the acceleration of the beams. The primary sources of transverse emittance dilution in a high energy linear accelerator are the transverse wakefields, the dispersive errors, RF deflections, and betatron coupling. We will discuss the estimation of these effects and the calculation of tolerances that will limit the emittance dilution with a high degree of confidence. Since the six-dimensional emittance is conserved and only the projected emittances are increased, these dilutions can be corrected if the beam has not filamented (phase mixed). We discuss methods of correcting the dilutions and easing the tolerances with beam-based alignment and steering techniques, and non-local trajectory bumps. Finally, we discuss another important source of luminosity degradation, namely, pulse-to-pulse jitter.

  2. Emittance Compensation in a Flat Beam RF Photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S.; Colby, E.; Serafini, L.

    1997-05-01

    The beam dynamics of a flat beam rf photoinjector, which is intended to produce asymmetric emittances for linear collider applications, are analyzed, by both analytical and computational methods. The analytical model is a generalization of the recently developed theory of emittance compensation in round beams(L.Serafini, and J.B. Rosenzweig, submitted to Physical Review E.), in which a new mode of laminar flow beam dynamics, the invariant envelope, is found to give the ideal conditions for emittance minimization. Three-dimensional rf and beam dynamics simulations are used to iluminate the analytical results. abstract.

  3. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Piot, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ~37 MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25 μm (emittance ratio is ~400), 0.13 μm, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41 μm, 0.20 μm, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2-nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  4. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  5. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  6. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  7. Flat beams in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Barklow, T.; Burke, D.

    1993-05-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to operate with round beams; horizontal and vertical emittance made equal in the damping rings. The main motivation was to facilitate the optical matching through beam lines with strong coupling elements like the solenoid spin rotator magnets and the SLC arcs. Tests in 1992 showed that ``flat`` beams with a vertical to horizontal emittance ratio of around 1/10 can be successfully delivered to the end of the linac. Techniques developed to measure and control the coupling of the SLC arcs allow these beams to be transported to the Interaction Point (IP). Before flat beams could be used for collisions with polarized electrons, a new method of rotating the electron spin orientation with vertical arc orbit bumps had to be developed. Early in the 1993 run, the SLC was switched to ``flat`` beam operation. Within a short time the peak luminosity of the previous running cycle was reached and then surpassed. The average daily luminosity is now a factor of about two higher than the best achieved last year. In the following we present an overview of the problems encountered and their solutions for different parts of the SLC.

  8. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  9. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  10. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  11. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-e

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  12. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  13. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  15. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  16. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  17. Investigation of emittance growth in the White Horse beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lee, H.; Lemons, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium and stability of the neutral gas transport section of the White Horse beam accelerator is studied. It is found that the beam should be unstable from the two-stream instability and from beam-excited ion-acoustic waves, with the latter being a possible source of emittance growth in the beam. 11 references, 16 figures, 1 table.

  18. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  19. Effects on flat-beam generation from space-charge force and beamline errors

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E.; Kim, K.-J.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The transformation of a round, angular-momentum-dominated electron beam produced in a photoinjector into a flat beam using a transformer composed of three skew-quadrupoles [1] has been developed theoretically [2, 3] and experimentally [4]. In this paper, we present numerical and analytical studies of space-charge forces, and evaluate the corresponding limits on the ratio of vertical-to-horizontal emittances. We also investigate the sensitivities of flat-beam emittances on the quadrupole misalignments in each of the six degrees of freedom.

  20. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  2. Emittance compensation studies of photoinjector beams with angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven

    2003-05-19

    Beam dynamics studies on the FNPL photo injector that seek to optimize the transport of intense electron beams with large values of canonical angular momentum have been performed. These studies investigate the effect of solenoid emittance compensation on beams that evolve under the combined influence of intense space charge forces and large angular momentum. We present details of experimental measurements and supporting simulations of beam envelope evolution.

  3. Uncorrelated Energy Spread and Longitudinal Emittance of a Photoinjector Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Stupakov, G.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    Longitudinal phase space properties of a photoinjector beam are important in many areas of high-brightness beam applications such as bunch compression, transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange, and high-gain free-electron lasers. In this paper, we discuss both the rf and the space charge contributions to the uncorrelated energy spread of the beam generated from a laser-driven rf gun. We compare analytical expressions for the uncorrelated energy spread and the longitudinal emittance with numerical simulations and recent experimental results.

  4. Limits to Electron Beam Emittance from Stochastic Coulomb Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Wan, Weishi

    2008-08-22

    Dense electron beams can now be generated on an ultrafast timescale using laser driven photo-cathodes and these are used for a range of applications from ultrafast electron defraction to free electron lasers. Here we determine a lower bound to the emittance of an electron beam limited by fundamental stochastic Coulomb interactions.

  5. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  6. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Connolly, R; Liu, C.; Summers, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  7. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  8. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD10), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the inplane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43% and 0.75% respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10% changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2% level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, dmax, is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD10, and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant. PMID:26634604

  9. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  10. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  11. Electron beam emittance monitor for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Kauffmann, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Taratin, A.

    1993-05-01

    A nondestructive beam profile monitor for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is presented using as a probe a low-energy electron beam interacting with the proton bunch charge. Results using a full Monte Carlo simulation code look promising for the transverse and longitudinal beam profile measurements.

  12. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  13. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  14. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  15. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Kim, K. J.; Sun, Y. E.; Piot, P.; Rihaoui, M.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNAL

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  16. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Power, J. G.; Piot, P.; Sun, Y.-E.

    2009-01-22

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  17. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.J.; Piot, Philippe; Power, John Gorham; Sun, Y.E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  18. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Asova, G.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Groß, M.; Hakobyan, L.; Isaev, I.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jachmann, L.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Köhler, W.; Mahgoub, M.; Malyutin, D.; Nozdrin, M.; Oppelt, A.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Rimjaem, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Vashchenko, G.; Weidinger, S.; Wenndorff, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Lederer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Templin, I.; Will, I.; Paramonov, V.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ). Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008-2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010-2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  19. Intra-beam scattering studies for low emittance at BAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sai-Ke; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Xu, Gang; Jiao, Yi

    2015-06-01

    The target parameters of modern ultra-low emittance storage ring light sources are entering into a regime where intra-beam scattering (IBS) becomes important and, in the case of the Beijing Advanced Photon Source (BAPS), which is being designed at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), even a limitation for achieving the desired emittances in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for X-ray wavelengths (≈10 pm). Due to the low emittance, the IBS effect will be very strong. Accurate calculations are needed to check if the design goal (ɛh+ɛv = 20 pm) can be reached. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation studies of the IBS effect on a BAPS temporary design lattice.

  20. BEAM EMITTANCE DIAGNOSTIC FOR THE DARHT SECOND AXIS INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R. R.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Rose, E. A.; Custer, D. M.; Ridlon, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Low beam emittance is key to achieving the required spot size at the output focus of the DARHT Second Axis. The nominal electron beam parameters at the output of the injector are 2 kA, 4.6 MeV, 2-microsecond pulse width and an rms radius less than 1 cm. Emittance is measured by bringing the beam to a focus in which the emittance is a dominant influence in determining the spot size. The spot size is measured from Cerenkov or optical transition radiation (OTR) generated from a target intercepted by the beam. The current density in the focused DARHT beam would melt this target in less than 1/2 microsec. To prevent this we have designed a DC magnetic transport system that defocuses the beam on the emittance target to prevent overheating, and uses a 125-ns half period pulsed solenoid to selectively focus the beam for short times during the beam pulse. During the development of the fast-focusing portion of this diagnostic it has been determined that the focusing pulse must rapidly sweep through the focus at the target to an over-focused condition to avoid target damage due to overheating. The fast focus produces {approx}1 kilogauss field over an effective length of {approx}50 cm to bring the beam to a focus on the target. The fast focus field is generated with a 12-turn coil located inside the beam-transport vacuum chamber with the entire fast coil structure within the bore of a D.C. magnet. The pulsed coil diameter of {approx}15 cm is dictated by the return current path at the nominal vacuum wall. Since the drive system is to use 40 kV to 50 kV technology and much of the inductance is in the drive and feed circuit, the coil design has three 120 degree segments. The coil, driver and feed system design, as well as beam envelope calculations and target heating calculations are presented below. Operation of the OTR imaging system will be discussed in separate publication (Ref. 1).

  1. Ion beam emittance from an ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, P. Lang, R.; Mäder, J.; Maimone, F.; Schlei, B. R.; Tinschert, K.; Biri, S.; Rácz, R.

    2016-02-15

    Simulation of ion beam extraction from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is a fully 3 dimensional problem, even if the extraction geometry has cylindrical symmetry. Because of the strong magnetic flux density, not only the electrons are magnetized but also the Larmor radius of ions is much smaller than the geometrical dimension of the plasma chamber (Ø 64 × 179 mm). If we assume that the influence of collisions is small on the path of particles, we can do particle tracking through the plasma if the initial coordinates of particles are known. We generated starting coordinates of plasma ions by simulation of the plasma electrons, accelerated stochastically by the 14.5 GHz radio frequency power fed to the plasma. With that we were able to investigate the influence of different electron energies on the extracted beam. Using these assumptions, we can reproduce the experimental results obtained 10 years ago, where we monitored the beam profile with the help of viewing targets. Additionally, methods have been developed to investigate arbitrary 2D cuts of the 6D phase space. To this date, we are able to discuss full 4D information. Currently, we extend our analysis tool towards 5D and 6D, respectively.

  2. Emittance compensation with dynamically optimized photoelectron beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; England, R. J.; Dunning, M.; Anderson, S. G.; Ferrario, Massimo

    2006-02-01

    Much of the theory and experimentation concerning creation of a high-brightness electron beam from a photocathode, and then applying emittance compensation techniques, assumes that one must strive for a uniform density electron beam, having a cylindrical shape. On the other hand, this shape has large nonlinearities in the space-charge field profiles near the beam's longitudinal extrema. These nonlinearities are known to produce both transverse and longitudinal emittance growth. On the other hand, it has recently been shown by Luiten that by illuminating the cathode with an ultra-short laser pulse of appropriate transverse profile, a uniform density, ellipsoidally shaped bunch is dynamically formed, which then has linear space-charge fields in all dimensions inside of the bunch. We study here this process, and its marriage to the standard emittance compensation scenario that is implemented in most recent photoinjectors. It is seen that the two processes are compatible, with simulations indicating a very high brightness beam can be obtained. The robustness of this scheme to systematic errors is examined. Prospects for experimental tests of this scheme are discussed.

  3. Partially coherent flat-topped beam and its propagation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Di; Cai, Yangjian; Lin, Qiang

    2004-08-20

    A partially coherent beam with flat-topped profile is proposed. The cross-spectral density of this beam can be expressed as a finite series of the cross-spectral density of partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model beams with different parameters. Analytical propagation formulas for partially coherent flat-topped beams are derived through aligned and misaligned optical systems. The propagation property of partially coherent flat-topped beams in free space is illustrated numerically. The fractional Fourier transform of partially coherent fiat-topped beams is also studied. Our method provides a convenient way to describe partially coherent flat-topped beams and treat their propagation and transformation.

  4. Science and applications of low-emittance electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    van Bibber, K

    2000-08-20

    The capability of making very low-emittance electron beams of temporally short, high charge bunches has opened up exciting new possibilities in basic and applied science. Two notable applications are high energy electron-positron linear colliders for particle physics, and fourth-generation light sources consisting of linac-driven Free-Electron Lasers (FEL), both of which represent significant programmatic potential for the Laboratory in the future. The technologies contributing to low-emittance electron beams and their applications, namely precision fabrication, ultra-short pulse lasers, and RF photocathode injectors, are all areas of Lab expertise, and the work carried out under this LDRD project further expanded our core-competency in advanced concept accelerators. Furthermore, high energy accelerators have become a cornerstone of the SBSS program, as illustrated by the recent development of proton radiography as a prime technology candidate for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), which enhanced the significance of this project all the more. This was a one-year project to both advance the technology of, and participate in the science enabled by very low-emittance electron beams. The work centered around the two themes above, namely electron-positron linear colliders, and the new fourth-generation light sources. This work built upon previous LDRD investments, and was intended to emphasize accelerator physics experiments.

  5. Tunneling-enabled spectrally selective thermal emitter based on flat metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu; Luk, Ting S.; Tan, Yixuan; Ji, Dengxin; Zhou, Ming; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu

    2015-03-11

    Infrared thermal emission from metals has important energy applications in thermophotovoltaics, radiative cooling, and lighting. The emissivity of flat metal films is close to zero because the screening effect prevents metals' fluctuating currents from emitting to the far field. As a result, metal films are often used as reflecting mirrors instead of thermal emitters. Recently, nanostructured metals, such as metamaterials, have emerged as an interesting way to enhance and to spectrally control thermal emission based on plasmonic resonant effects. However, they require sophisticated lithography. Here, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a completely different mechanism to achieve spectrally selective metallic emitters based on atunneling effect. Furthermore, this effect allows a simple flat metal film to achieve a near-unity emissivity with controlled spectral selectivity for efficient heat-to-light energy conversion.

  6. Tunneling-enabled spectrally selective thermal emitter based on flat metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu; Tan, Yixuan; Zhou, Ming; Yu, Zongfu; Luk, Ting Shan; Ji, Dengxin; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-03-09

    Infrared thermal emission from metals has important energy applications in thermophotovoltaics, radiative cooling, and lighting. Unfortunately, the emissivity of flat metal films is close to zero because the screening effect prevents metals' fluctuating currents from emitting to the far field. As a result, metal films are often used as reflecting mirrors instead of thermal emitters. Recently, nanostructured metals, such as metamaterials, have emerged as an interesting way to enhance and to spectrally control thermal emission based on plasmonic resonant effects. However, they require sophisticated lithography. Here, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a completely different mechanism to achieve spectrally selective metallic emitters based on a tunneling effect. This effect allows a simple flat metal film to achieve a near-unity emissivity with controlled spectral selectivity for efficient heat-to-light energy conversion.

  7. Simulations of beam emittance growth from the collectiverelaxation of space-charge nonuniformities

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Grote, David P.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-05-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. For unbunched beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in linear focusing channels, Debye screening of self-field interactions tends to make the transverse density profile flat. An injected particle distribution with a large systematic charge nonuniformity will generally be far from an equilibrium of the focusing channel and the initial condition will launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and experience nonlinear interactions which result in an effective relaxation to a more thermal-equilibrium-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This relaxation transfers self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). Here they employ two-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the effects of initial transverse space-charge nonuniformities on the equality of beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in a continuous focusing channel. Results are compared to theoretical bounds of emittance growth developed in previous studies. Consistent with earlier theory, it is found that a high degree of initial distribution nonuniformity can be tolerated with only modest emittance growth and that beam control can be maintained. The simulations also provide information on the rate of relaxation and characteristic levels of fluctuations in the relaxed states. This research suggests that a surprising degree of initial space-charge nonuniformity can be tolerated in practical intense beam experiments.

  8. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10-9-10-6 ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a 12C5+ beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  9. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, H. Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S.

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  10. Emittance growth of an nonequilibrium intense electron beam in a transport channel with discrete focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    The author analyzes the emittance growth mechanisms for a continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. The emittance grows from the effect of nonlinear forces arising from (1) current density nonuniformities, (2) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (3) axial variations in the radial vector potential, (4) an axial velocity shear along the beam, and (5) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The emittance growth is studied analytically and numerically for the cases of balanced flow, tight focusing, and slight beam scalloping, and is additionally studied numerically for an existing 6-MeV induction linear accelerator. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are established. Some emittance growth will always occur, both from current density nonuniformities that arise along the transport and from beam radius changes along the transport.

  11. Procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, I. Yu

    2016-09-01

    The procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam generated by RF gun and reconstruction of its longitudinal phase portrait is proposed. Measuring system consists of vertical deflecting RF cavity, horizontal bending dipole and screen. The beam spot on the screen is used to reconstruct the longitudinal phase portrait. In the proposed procedure an electromagnetic field of the vertical deflecting RF cavity can be approximated by the TM110 mode of pillbox cavity. This approximation allows analytically solve the motion equations of the electron motion in the vertical deflecting RF cavity. The report contains description of the vertical deflecting RF cavity and the dipole, the formulae underlying the procedure and the results of numerical simulation.

  12. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  13. A multiwire secondary emission profile monitor for small emittance beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chehab, R.; Bonnard, J.; Humbert, G.; Leblond, B.; Saury, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    A secondary emission monitor using two multiwire grids separated by a positively biased collector has been constructed and tested with a 1 GeV electron beam at the Orsay Linac. The monitor installed just before the electron-positron converter has 8 gold-plated-tungsten wires of 0.1 mm diameter equally spaced 0.2 mm apart in each plane. Each wire is connected with an integrator using a low-bias current operational amplifier. The wire planes and the collector are moved into the beam by a stepping motor : that allows beam-position verification. We measured narrow profiles for 1 Amp peak current pulses of 30 nanoseconds width. Profiles are displayed on a scope and allow emittance determination by the three gradient method. Such a monitor is very useful to control the electron beam position and dimensions on the converter, because the positron source dimensions are rather bigger than those of the incident beam and the geometrical acceptance of the positron Linac is limited.

  14. Beam structure and transverse emittance studies of high-energy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Schneider, J. D.

    1991-05-01

    A visual diagnostic technique was developed to monitor and study ion beam structure shape and size along a transport line. In this technique, a commercially available fluorescent screen is utilized in conjunction with a video camera. This visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for on-line viewing. Digitized information is stored for further off-line processing (e.g., extraction of beam profiles). An optional wire grid placed upstream of the fluor screen adds the capability of transverse emittance (or angular spread) measurement to this technique. This diagnostic allows real time observation of the beam response to parameter changes (e.g., evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position).

  15. Space-charged-induced emittance growth in the transport of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Carlsten, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    The emittance induced by space charge in a drifting beam of finite length has been investigated, and a scaling law has been obtained from simple considerations of the different rates of expansion of different portions of the beam. The scaling law predicts the initial rate of emittance growth, before the beam shape has distorted significantly, and thus represents an upper bound on the rate of emittance increase. This scaling law has been substantiated by particle-in-cell simulation and the dependence on geometric factors evaluated for specific choices of the beam profile. For long, axially nonuniform beams, the geometric factors have been evaluated explicitly for Gaussian profiles, and other shapes.

  16. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  17. Transverse-to-longitudinal Emittance-exchange with an Energy Chirped Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, J.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.-E; Maxwell, T.; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Emittance exchange has been proposed to increase the performance of free electron lasers by tailoring the phase space of an electron beam. The principle of emittance exchange - where the transverse phase space of the electron beam is exchanged with the longitudinal phase space - has been demonstrated recently at the A0 photoinjector. The experiment used a low charge bunch (250 pC) with no energy chirp. Theory predicts an improvement in the emittance exchange scheme when the incoming beam has an energy chirp imparted on it. The energy chirp helps to overcome the thick lens effect of the deflecting mode cavity and other second order effects that might lead to an incomplete emittance exchange at higher charges. In this work, we report experimental and simulation results from operating the emittance exchange beam line using an energy chirped beam with higher charge (500 pC) at different RF-chirp settings.

  18. Instantaneous electron beam emittance measurement system based on the optical transition radiation principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Yang, Guo-Jun; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun; Li, Jin

    2014-01-01

    One kind of instantaneous electron beam emittance measurement system based on the optical transition radiation principle and double imaging optical method has been set up. It is mainly adopted in the test for the intense electron-beam produced by a linear induction accelerator. The system features two characteristics. The first one concerns the system synchronization signal triggered by the following edge of the main output waveform from a Blumlein switch. The synchronous precision of about 1 ns between the electron beam and the image capture time can be reached in this way so that the electron beam emittance at the desired time point can be obtained. The other advantage of the system is the ability to obtain the beam spot and beam divergence in one measurement so that the calculated result is the true beam emittance at that time, which can explain the electron beam condition. It provides to be a powerful beam diagnostic method for a 2.5 kA, 18.5 MeV, 90 ns (FWHM) electron beam pulse produced by Dragon I. The ability of the instantaneous measurement is about 3 ns and it can measure the beam emittance at any time point during one beam pulse. A series of beam emittances have been obtained for Dragon I. The typical beam spot is 9.0 mm (FWHM) in diameter and the corresponding beam divergence is about 10.5 mrad.

  19. Measurements of Intra-Beam Scattering at Low Emittance in the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; De Santis, S.; Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Wu, Y.; Bane, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, T.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The beam emittance at the interaction point of linear colliders is expected to be strongly influenced by the emittance of the beams extracted from the damping rings. Intra-beam scattering (IBS) potentially limits the minimum emittance of low-energy storage rings, and this effect strongly influences the choice of energy of damping rings [1]. Theoretical analysis suggests that the NLC damping rings will experience modest emittance growth at 1.98 GeV, however there is little experimental data of IBS effects for very low-emittance machines in the energy regime of interest. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a third-generation synchrotron light source operating with high-intensity, low-emittance beams at energies of approximately 1-2 GeV, and with emittance coupling capability of 1% or less. We present measurements of the beam growth in three dimensions as a function of current, for normalized natural horizontal emittance of approximately 1-10 mm-mrad at energies of 0.7-1.5 GeV, values comparable to the parameters in an NLC damping ring. Using a dedicated diagnostic beamline with an x-ray scintillator imaging system, measurements of the transverse beamsize are made, and bunch length measurements are made using an optical streak camera. Emittance growth as a function of bunch current is determined, and compared with preliminary calculation estimates.

  20. SU-E-T-635: Quantitative Study On Beam Flatness Variation with Beam Energy Change

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Eldib, A; Ma, C; Lin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam flatness check has been proposed for beam energy check for photon beams with flattering filters. In this work, beam flatness change with beam energy was investigated quantitatively using the Monte Carlo method and its significance was compared with depth dose curve change. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations for a linear accelerator with flattering filter were performed with different initial electron energies for photon beams of 6MV and 10MV. Dose calculations in a water phantom were then perform with the phase space files obtained from the simulations. The beam flatness was calculated based on the dose profile at 10 cm depth for all the beams with different initial electron energies. The percentage depth dose (PDD) curves were also analyzed. The dose at 10cm depth (D10) and the ratio of the dose at 10cm and 20cm depth (D10/D20) and their change with the beam energy were calculated and compared with the beam flatness variation. Results: It was found that the beam flatness variation with beam energy change was more significant than the change of D10 and the ratio between D10 and D20 for both 6MV and 10MV beams. Half MeV difference on the initial electron beam energy brought in at least 20% variation on the beam flatness but only half percent change on the ratio of D10 and D20. The change of D10 or D20 alone is even less significant. Conclusion: The beam energy impact on PDD is less significant than that on the beam flatness. If the PDD is used for checking the beam energy, uncertainties of the measurement could possibly disguise its change. Beam flatness changes more significantly with beam energy and therefore it can be used for monitoring the energy change for photon beams with flattering filters. However, other factors which may affect the beam flatness should be watched as well.

  1. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  2. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Bohler, D.; Ding, Y.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Ratner, D.; Vetter, S.

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  3. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  4. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  5. Filters for stochastic cooling of longitudinal beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Konecny, R.; Simpson, J.; Wright, A.J.

    1983-03-01

    The shorted stub filter (SSF) has been used extensively to provide the electronics gain shaping for stochastic cooling of longitudinal beam emittance. The repetitive notch of this filter results from the cancellation of the incident signal by the reflected signal at frequencies where the cable electrical length equals an integer number of half wavelengths. Variations in notch depth of the SSF have been approximately compensated by a rather complicated system. Dispersion of the notch frequency resulting from variation of the phase velocity can also be approximately corrected using tuned imperfections in the shorted cable. Dispersion due to imperfections in the coaxial cable can be quite significant and can only be compensated for by costly construction techniques. This paper describes another type of notch filter. Although this filter has been mentioned previously, this analysis demonstrates the advantages of this filter in providing small notch dispersion and other properties necessary for stochastic cooling systems. Because this filter uses only forward signals, it is quite insensitive to imperfections in cables and components, and can therefore be constructed from commercially available components.

  6. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Colwyn Bartnik, Adam Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-02

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9–9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  7. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  8. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  9. III-nitride ultraviolet emitters produced by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban

    In this dissertation, the growth of III-Nitride based ultraviolet (UV) emitters by molecular beam epitaxy has been addressed. These devices can find applications in optical data storage, solid-state lighting, and in biological detection. A significant part of the research involved materials development, as there are several major scientific and technological hurdles that must be overcome in order to produce commercially viable devices. For emission in the wavelength region 330 nm to 350 nm, the devices were designed as electrically-injected light emitting diodes (LEDs). Each layer of this structure was individually optimized to improve the materials properties. To overcome the difficulties in p-type doping, a new growth regime has been explored which led to films with hole concentrations of up to 2 x 10 18/cm3. Multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown along polar and non-polar directions to understand the effects of the presence of built-in polarization fields. It was found that these detrimental effects are minimized for ultra thin wells. Use of an Indium flux as a surfactant was found to substantially improve the luminescence properties of bulk Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) alloys and MQWs. UV-LEDs grown under these optimized conditions show an optical power output of 0.75 mW at 340 nm and 4.5 mW at 350nm. For emission in the wavelength region below 270 nm, due to the difficulty of doping AlGaN alloys with high Aluminum Nitride (AlN) mole fraction, edge or vertical emitting electron beam-pumped laser structures have been developed. Since it is difficult to cleave III-Nitrides deposited onto C-plane sapphire, edge emitting laser structures using a Graded-Index Separate Confinement Heterostructure (GRINSCH) based geometry have been deposited onto A-plane sapphire using a novel AlN buffer layer. An AlGaN bulk film or a set of AlN/AlGaN MQWs is used as the active region. For use in these devices, the growth of high Al content AlGaN was optimized to reduce the deep

  10. The HEB at flat top: Arranging for the HEB to collider beam transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    The flat top for the High Energy Booster (HEB) is planned to last for only 6.5 seconds, yet during this time the beam must be made to: (1) have the correct central momentum; (2) have the correct bunch-to-bunch spacing; (3) have the correct central phase; and (4) have the correct momentum spread and longitudinal length. All of these attributes must match what the Collider expects or unwanted emittance growth will occur. This paper outlines the techniques necessary to achieve a proper HEB-to-Collider beam transfer within the 6.5 s time constraint. A novel means for cogging is proposed and evaluated. The hardware necessary to implement the beam manipulation and to achieve the four goals is specified, and tolerances on the hardware are evaluated.

  11. Experimental generation of longitudinally-modulated electron beams using an emittance exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.; Maxwell, T.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; /FERMILAB

    2010-08-01

    We report our experimental demonstration of longitudinal phase space modulation using a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange technique. The experiment is carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermi National Accelerator Lab. A vertical multi-slit plate is inserted into the beamline prior to the emittance exchange, thus introducing beam horizontal profile modulation. After the emittance exchange, the longitudinal phase space coordinates (energy and time structures) of the beam are modulated accordingly. This is a clear demonstration of the transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange. In this paper, we present our experimental results on the measurement of energy profile as well as numerical simulations of the experiment.

  12. Development of a pepper pot emittance probe and its application for ECR ion beam studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Vinogradov, N.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2009-07-21

    A pepper pot-scintillator screen system has been developed and used to measure the emittance of DC ion beams extracted from a high-intensity permanent magnet ECR ion source. The system includes a fast beam shutter with a minimum dwell time of 18 ms to reduce the degradation of the CsI(Tl) scintillator by DC ion beam irradiation and a CCD camera with a variable shutter speed in the range of 1 {micro}s-65 s. On-line emittance measurements are performed by an application code developed on a LabVIEW platform. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to measure the emittance of DC ion beams with current densities down to about 100 nA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance of all ion species extracted from the ECR ion source and post-accelerated to an energy of 75-90 keV/charge have been measured downstream of the LEBT. As the mass-to-charge ratio of ion species increases, the normalized RMS emittances in both transverse phase planes decrease from 0.5-1.0 {pi} mm mrad for light ions to 0.05-0.09 {pi} mm mrad for highly charged {sup 209}Bi ions. The dependence of the emittance on ion's mass-to-charge ratio follows very well the dependence expected from beam rotation induced by decreasing ECR axial magnetic field. The measured emittance values cannot be explained by only ion beam rotation for all ion species and the contribution to emittance of ion temperature in plasma, non-linear electric fields and non-linear space charge is comparable or even higher than the contribution of ion beam rotation.

  13. Emittance measurements of space-charge-dominated electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Namkung, W.; Chojnacki, E.P.

    1985-06-01

    A diagnostic technique of the beam emittance is developed for electron beams with diverging envelopes under strong space-charge forces. Radial profiles of current density, local temperature, and divergence angle are measured by the slit-pinhole method for axisymmetric beams. The partical distribution function in transverse phase space is then constructed and the rms emittance is obtained by numerical integrations. A 5-kV, 200-mA, and 3-microsec electron beam is used in the comparison between theory and experiment on this diagnostic method.

  14. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  15. Relation between field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1985-01-01

    An equation is presented for continuous beams with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing, which expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  17. Coupling Correction and Beam Dynamics at Ultralow Vertical Emittance in the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, Christoph; Robin, D.; Wolski, A.; Portmann, G.; Safranek, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    For synchrotron light sources and for damping rings of linear colliders it is important to be able to minimize the vertical emittance and to correct the spurious vertical dispersion. This allows one to maximize the brightness and/or the luminosity. A commonly used tool to measure the skew error distribution is the analysis of orbit response matrices using codes like LOCO. Using the new Matlab version of LOCO and 18 newly installed power supplies for individual skew quadrupoles at the ALS the emittance ratio could be reduced below 0.1% at 1.9 GeV yielding a vertical emittance of about 5 pm. At those very low emittances, additional effects like intra beam scattering become more important, potentially limiting the minimum emittance for machine like the damping rings of linear colliders.

  18. Development of maskless electron-beam lithography using nc-Si electron-emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Ikegami, N.; Yoshida, T.; Miyaguchi, H.; Muroyama, M.; Nishino, H.; Yoshida, S.; Sugata, M.; Cakir, S.; Ohyi, H.; Koshida, N.; Esashi, M.

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrated our prototyped Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) electron emitter which is a nc-Si (nanocrystalline silicon) ballistic electron emitter array integrated with an active-matrix driving LSI for high-speed Massively Parallel Electron Beam Direct Writing (MPEBDW) system. The MPEBDW system consists of the multi-column, and each column provides multi-beam. Each column consists of emitter array, a MEMS condenser lens array, an MEMS anode array, a stigmator, three-stage deflectors to align and to scan the multi beams, and a reduction lens as an objective lens. The emitter array generates 100x100 electron beams with binary patterns. The pattern exposed on a target is stored in one of the duplicate memories in the active matrix LSI. After the emission, each electron beam is condensed into narrow beam in parallel to the axis of electron optics of the system with the condenser lens array. The electrons of the beams are accelerated and pass through the anode array. The stigmator and deflectors make fine adjustments to the position of the beams. The reduction lens in the final stage focuses all parallel beams on the surface of the target wafer. The lens reduces the electron image to 1%-10% in size. Electron source in this system is nc-Si ballistic surface electron emitter. The characteristics of the emitter of 1:1 projection of e-beam have been demonstrated in our previous work. We developed a Crestec Surface Electron emission Lithography (CSEL) for mass production of semiconductor devices. CSEL system is 1:1 electron projection lithography using surface electron emitter. In first report, we confirmed that a test bench of CSEL resolved below 30 nm pattern over 0.2 um square area. Practical resolution of the system is limited by the chromatic aberration. We also demonstrated the CSEL system exposed deep sub-micron pattern over full-field for practical use. As an interim report of our development of MPEBDW system, we evaluated characteristics of the

  19. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  20. INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING SCALING FOR VERY LARGE HADRON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; PARZEN,G.

    2001-06-18

    For Very Large Hadron Colliders (VLHC), flat hadron beams [2] with their vertical emittance much smaller than their horizontal emittance are proposed to maximize the design luminosity. Emittance growth caused by intra-beam scattering (IBS) is a concern on the realization of such flat-beam conditions. Based on existing IBS formalism on beams of Gaussian distribution, we analytically derive [6] the IBS growth rate and determine the IBS limit on the aspect ratio for a flat beam.

  1. Design of a Standing-Wave Multi-Cavity Beam-Monitor for Simultaneous Beam Position and Emittance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Miller, R.; Nantista, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-22

    A high precision emittance measurement requires precise beam position at the measurement location. At present there is no existing technique, commercial or otherwise, for non-destructive pulse-to-pulse simultaneous beam position and emittance measurement. FARTECH, Inc. is currently developing a high precision cavity-based beam monitor for simultaneous beam position and emittance measurements pulse-to-pulse, without beam interception and without moving parts. The design and analysis of a multi-cavity standing wave structure for a pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement system in which the quadrupole and the dipole standing wave modes resonate at harmonics of the beam operating frequency is presented. Considering the Next Linear Collider beams, an optimized 9-cavity standing wave system is designed for simultaneous high precision beam position and emittance measurements. It operates with the {pi}-quadrupole mode resonating at 16th harmonic of the NLC bunch frequency, and the 3 {pi}/4 dipole mode at 12th harmonic (8.568 GHz). The 9-cavity system design indicates that the two dipoles resonate almost at the same frequency 8.583 GHz and the quadrupole at 11.427 GHz according to the scattering parameter calculations. The design can be trivially scaled so that the dipole frequency is at 8.568 GHz, and the quadrupole frequency can then be tuned during fabrication to achieve the desired 11.424 GHz. The output powers from these modes are estimated for the NLC beams. An estimated rms-beam size resolution is sub micro-meters and beam positions in sub nano-meters.

  2. Accurate model of electron beam profiles with emittance effects for pierce guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Dongyang; Li, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of electron beam profile is one of the key objectives of electron optics, and the basis for design of the practical electron gun. In this paper, an improved model describing electron beam in Pierce gun with both space charge effects and emittance effects is proposed. The theory developed by Cutler and Hines is still applied for the accelerating region of the Pierce gun, while the motion equations of the electron beams in the anode aperture and drift tunnel are improved by modifying electron optics theory with emittance. As a result, a more universal and accurate formula of the focal length of the lens for the electron beam with both effects is derived for the anode aperture with finite dimension, and a modified universal spread curve considering beam emittance is introduced in drift tunnel region. Based on these improved motion equations of the electron beam, beam profiles with space charge effects and emittance effects can be theoretically predicted, which are subsequently approved to agree well with the experimentally measured ones. The developed model here is helpful to design more applicable Pierce guns at high frequencies.

  3. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  4. Specialty flat-top beam delivery fibers with controlled beam parameter product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollivet, C.; Farley, K.; Conroy, M.; Abramczyk, J.; Belke, S.; Becker, F.; Tankala, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam delivery fibers have been used widely for transporting the optical beams from the laser to the subject of irradiation in a variety of markets including industrial, medical and defense applications. Standard beam delivery fibers range from 50 to 1500 μm core diameter and are used to guide CW or pulsed laser light, generated by solid state, fiber or diode lasers. Here, we introduce a novel fiber technology capable of simultaneously controlling the beam profile and the angular divergence of single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) beams using a single-optical fiber. Results of beam transformation from a SM to a MM beam with flat-top intensity profile are presented in the case of a controlled BPP at 3.8 mm*mrad. The scaling capabilities of this flat-top fiber design to achieve a range of BPP values while ensuring a flat-top beam profile are discussed. In addition, we demonstrate, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the homogenizer capabilities of this novel technology, able to transform random MM beams into uniform flat-top beam profiles with very limited impact on the beam brightness. This study is concluded with a discussion on the scalability of this fiber technology to fit from 50 up to 1500 μm core fibers and its potential for a broader range of applications.

  5. Low Emittance, High Brilliance Relativistic Electron Beams from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Raj, G.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-11-19

    Progress in laser wakefield accelerators indicates their suitability as a driver of compact free-electron lasers (FELs). High brightness is defined by the normalized transverse emittance, which should be less than 1{pi} mm mrad for an x-ray FEL. We report high-resolution measurements of the emittance of 125 MeV, monoenergetic beams from a wakefield accelerator. An emittance as low as 1.1{+-}0.1{pi} mm mrad is measured using a pepper-pot mask. This sets an upper limit on the emittance, which is comparable with conventional linear accelerators. A peak transverse brightness of 5x10{sup 15} A m{sup -1} rad{sup -1} makes it suitable for compact XUV FELs.

  6. Reduction of Beam Emittance of Pep-X Using Quadruple Bend Achromat Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is studying an option of building a high brightness synchrotron light source machine, PEP-X, in the existing PEP-II tunnel [1, 2]. By replacing 6 arcs of FODO cells of PEPII High Energy Ring (HER) with two arcs of DBA and four arcs of TME and installation of 89.3 m long damping wiggler an ultra low beam emittance of 0.14 nm-rad (including intra-beam scattering) at 4.5 GeV is achieved. In this paper we study the possibility to further reduce the beam emittance by releasing the constraint of the dispersion free in the DBA straight. The QBA (Quadruple Bend Achromat) cell is used to replace the DBA. The ratio of outer and inner bending angle is optimized. The dispersion function in the non-dispersion straight is controlled to compromise with lower emittance and beam size at the dispersion straight. An undulator of period length 23 mm, maximum magnetic field of 1.053 T, and total periods of 150 is used to put in the 30 straights to simulate the effects of these IDs on the beam emittance and energy spread. The brightness including all the ID effects is calculated and compared to the original PEP-X design.

  7. Emittance reconstruction from measured beam sizes in ATF2 and perspectives for ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faus-Golfe, A.; Navarro, J.; Fuster Martinez, N.; Resta Lopez, J.; Giner Navarro, J.

    2016-05-01

    The projected emittance (2D) and the intrinsic emittance (4D) reconstruction method by using the beam size measurements at different locations is analyzed in order to study analytically the conditions of solvability of the systems of equations involved in this process. Some conditions are deduced and discussed, and general guidelines about the locations of the measurement stations have been obtained to avoid unphysical results. The special case of the multi-Optical Transition Radiation system (m-OTR), made of four measurement stations, in the Extraction Line (EXT) of Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) has been simulated in much detail and compared with measurements. Finally a feasibility study of a multi-station system for fast transverse beam size measurement, emittance reconstruction and coupling correction in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) of International Linear Collider (ILC) Diagnostic sections of the RTML has been discussed in detail.

  8. COMPENSATION FOR BUNCH EMITTANCE IN A MAGNETIZATION AND SPACE CHARGE DOMINATED BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    In order to obtain sufficient cooling rates for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) electron cooling, a bunched beam with high bunch charge, high repetition frequency and high energy is required and it is necessary to use a ''magnetized'' beam, i.e., an electron beam with non-negligible angular momentum. Applying a longitudinal solenoid field on the cathode can generate such a beam, which rotates around its longitudinal axis in a field-free region. This paper suggests how a magnetized beam can be accelerated and transported from a RF photocathode electron gun to the cooling section without significantly increasing its emittance. The evolution of longitudinal slices of the beam under a combination of space charge and magnetization is investigated, using paraxial envelope equations and numerical simulations. We find that we must modify the traditional method of compensating for emittance as used for normal non-magnetized beam with space charge to account for magnetization. The results of computer simulations of successful compensation are presented. Alternately, we show an electron bunch density distribution for which all slices propagate uniformly and which does not require emittance compensation.

  9. Demonstration of a laserwire emittance scanner for hydrogen ion beams at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, T.; Kruchinin, K. O.; Bosco, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Roncarolo, F.; Boorman, G.; Raich, U.; Bravin, E.; Pozimski, J. K.; Letchford, A.; Gabor, C.

    2015-12-01

    A noninvasive, compact laserwire system has been developed to measure the transverse emittance of an H- beam and has been demonstrated at the new LINAC4 injector for the LHC at CERN. Light from a low power, pulsed laser source is conveyed via fiber to collide with the H- beam, a fraction of which is neutralized and then intercepted by a downstream diamond detector. Scanning the focused laser across the H- beam and measuring the distribution of the photo-neutralized particles enables the transverse emittance to be reconstructed. The vertical phase-space distribution of a 3 MeV beam during LINAC4 commissioning has been measured by the laserwire and verified with a conventional slit and grid method.

  10. Photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, David U.; Clendenin, James E.; Kirby, Robert E.

    2004-06-01

    A photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electric beam. The accelerator includes a tube having an inner wall, the inner tube wall being coated by a getter material. A portable, or demountable, cathode plug is mounted within said tube, the surface of said cathode having a semiconductor material formed thereon.

  11. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  12. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  13. Analysis of transverse RMS emittance growth of a beam induced by spherical and chromatic aberration in a solenoidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Radhakanta; Nayak, Biswaranjan; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    In a medium energy beam transport line transverse rms emittance growth associated with spherical aberration is analysed. An analytical expression is derived for beam optics in a solenoid field considering terms up to the third order in the radial displacement. Two important phenomena: effect of spherical aberrations in axial-symmetric focusing lens and influence of nonlinear space charge forces on beam emittance growth are discussed for different beam distributions. In the second part nonlinear effect associated with chromatic aberration that describes the growth of emittance and distortion of phase space area is discussed.

  14. High-Precision Resonant Cavity Beam Position, Emittance And Third-Moment Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Barov, N.; Kim, J.S.; Weidemann, A.W.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-14

    Linear colliders and FEL facilities need fast, nondestructive beam position and profile monitors to facilitate machine tune-up, and for use with feedback control. FAR-TECH, Inc., in collaboration with SLAC, is developing a resonant cavity diagnostic to simultaneously measure the dipole, quadrupole and sextupole moments of the beam distribution. Measurements of dipole and quadrupole moments at multiple locations yield information about beam orbit and emittance. The sextupole moment can reveal information about beam asymmetry which is useful in diagnosing beam tail deflections caused by short-range dipole wakefields. In addition to the resonance enhancement of a single-cell cavity, use of a multi-cell standing-wave structure further enhances signal strength and improves the resolution of the device. An estimated resolution is better than 1 {micro}m in rms beam size and better than 1 nm in beam position.

  15. Intra-beam Scattering and Minimum Achievable Emittance in the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-08-13

    Intra-beam scattering (IBS) potentially limits the minimum emittance of low-energy storage rings, and this effect strongly influences the choice of energy of damping rings for linear colliders. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is the third-generation synchrotron light source operating in high-intensity, low-emittance beams at energies up to 2 GeV. It can operate with an emittance coupling of below 1%. We present measurements of the beam growth in three dimensions as a function of current, for normalized natural horizontal emittances approximately 1-10 mm-mrad at energies of 0.7-1.5 GeV, values comparable to the parameters in an NLC damping ring [1]. Using a dedicated diagnostic beamline with an x-ray scintillator imaging system, measurements of the transverse beamsize are made, simultaneously with bunch length measurements using an optical streak camera. The bunch volume growth as a function of bunch current is compared with theoretical estimates, for a parameter space of IBS, where very little experimental data exists so far.

  16. Emittance and Energy Measurements of Low-Energy Electron Beam Using Optical Transition Radiation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Iijima, Hokuto; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Imai, Takayuki; Ueda, Toru; Watanabe, Takahiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2005-03-01

    Emittance and energy of an electron beam in the range of 8 to 22 MeV were measured via optical transition radiation (OTR) techniques. The beam divergence effect on observations of the far-field OTR image at low energies was studied by means of numerical analysis. The numerical analysis indicates that if the beam divergence is under 1.5 mrad, a simultaneous single-shot measurement of emittance and energy is possible. The results of the single-shot experiment agree with independent measurements conducted using the quadrupole scan method and an electron spectrometer. The experiments were performed with an S-band linac at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo (UTNL).

  17. Multiwire secondary-emission monitor and the emittance measurement of the AGS beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Chiang, I.H.; Smith, G.A.; Soukas, A.

    1983-01-01

    For CBA injection the transverse emittances and the Twiss parameters of the AGS beam have to be well defined to minimize the phase space dilution in CBA. Althoug there exists a profile monitor device at U165, there are three reasons why construction of multiwire profile monitor system at three locations from U500 to U168 is required: (1) the dispersion function is not zero at U165 which makes it harder to interpret the measurement; (2) the original single wire device takes five minutes to traverse the whole beam; (3) a three station multiwire system can provide the profile information at all locations in one pulse which makes on-line analysis possible. In summary, a set of three stations of Multiwire Secondary Emission Monitor (MSEM) has been built and installed in the fast external beam line for the measurement of beam profiles. Each unit consists of two planes each with 30 nickel wires having a diameter of 5 mils. The signal is linear within the range of 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 13/ incident protons on the wire and the resolution of the signal is well within a few percent. A least-square fitting routine has been used to extract the emittance and phase space parameters of the beam. The emittances obtained at various intensities will help us to understand the AGS acceleration process and to choose the optimal injection scheme for CBA.

  18. System for transporting an electron beam to the atmosphere for a gun with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the results of simulation of the gas flow in a gun with a plasma emitter and in the system for extracting the electron beam to the atmosphere, constructed on the basis of standard gasdynamic windows (GDWs). The design of the gun and GDWs is described. Calculations are performed for a pressure of about 10-3 Torr in the electron beam generation range. It is shown that the pressure drop to the atmospheric pressure in the system of electron beam extraction to the atmosphere can be ensured by two GDW stages evacuated by pumps with optimal performance.

  19. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  20. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; ...

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  1. Simulation study on the emittance compensation of off-axis emitted beam in RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Mitchell, Chad; Jia, Qi-Ka; Papadopoulos, Christos; Sannibale, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    To make full use of the photocathode material and improve its quantum efficiency lifetime, it can be necessary to operate the laser away from the cathode center in photoinjectors. In RF guns, the off-axis emitted beam will see a time-dependent RF effect, which would generate a significant growth in transverse emittance. It has been demonstrated that such an emittance growth can be almost completely compensated by orienting the beam on a proper orbit in the downstream RF cavities along the injector [1]. In this paper we analyze in detail the simulation techniques used in reference [1] and the issues associated with them. The optimization of photoinjector systems involving off-axis beams is a challenging problem. To solve this problem, one needs advanced simulation tools including both genetic algorithms and an efficient algorithm for 3D space charge. In this paper, we report on simulation studies where the two codes ASTRA and IMPACT-T are used jointly to overcome these challenges, in order to optimize a system designed to compensate for the emittance growth in a beam emitted off axis. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11375199), and Chinese Scholarship Council

  2. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  3. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-04-19

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  4. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  5. Emittance Measurements of Space Charge Dominated Electron Beam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-AI8 693 EMITTANE KASUREMNIS OF SPACE CHARG DOMINATED I/S ELECIRON BEAI) NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS CENTER SILVER SPRING N, NASUNG El AL. 01 JUN 65 NSW...UNIT NUMBERS 10901 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, Maryland 20903-5000 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE 1 June 1985 13. NUMBER...by a plate with a pinhole of radius rp which travels on the -axis, This system is commonly 8 NSWC TR 85-244 designed as L > a (beam radius) >> d > rp

  6. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between transverse phase space (x,x') and longitudinal phase space (z,{delta}), where x is the transverse position, x' is the transverse divergence, and z and {delta} are relative longitudinal position and energy deviation with respect to the reference particle. Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e., mapping x to z, x' to {delta}, z to x, and {delta} to x', are suggested. Schemes to mitigate and completely compensate for the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are studied. Some applications of the phase space exchange for advanced beam manipulation and diagnostics are discussed.

  7. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  8. Processing digital images and calculation of beam emittance (pepper-pot method for the Krion source)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, V. S.; Donets, E. E.; Nyukhalova, E. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Sedykh, S. N.; Tuzikov, A. V.; Philippov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Programs for the pre-processing of photographs of beam images on the mask based on Wolfram Mathematica and Origin software are described. Angles of rotation around the axis and in the vertical plane are taken into account in the generation of the file with image coordinates. Results of the emittance calculation by the Pep_emit program written in Visual Basic using the generated file in the test mode are presented.

  9. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  10. Low-emittance monoenergetic electron and ion beams from ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Roth, M; Allen, M M; Johnson, J; Hatchett, S P; Le Sage, G P; Wilks, S C

    2000-03-03

    Recent experiments at the LLNL Petawatt Laser have demonstrated the generation of intense, high energy beams of electrons and ions from the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with solid targets. Focused laser intensities as high as 6 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} are achieved, at which point the quiver energies of the target electrons extend to {approx}10 MeV. In this new, fully relativistic regime of laser-plasma interactions, nuclear processes become important and nuclear techniques are required to diagnose the high-energy particle production. In recent experiments we have observed electrons accelerated to 100 MeV, up to 60 MeV brehmsstrahlung generation, photo-nuclear fission and positron-electron pair creation. We also have observed monoenergetic jets of electrons having sufficiently small emittance to be interesting as a laser-accelerated beam, if the production mechanism could be understood and controlled. The huge flux of multi-MeV ponderomotively accelerated electrons produced in the laser-solid interaction is also observed to accelerate contaminant ions from the rear surface of the solid target up to 50 MeV. We describe spectroscopic measurements which reveal intense monoenergetic beam features in the proton energy spectrum. The total spectrum contains >10{sup 13} protons, while the monoenergetic beam pulses contain {approx}1 nC of protons, and exhibits a longitudinal and transverse emittance smaller than conventional RF proton accelerator beams.

  11. Stable two-plane focusing for emittance-dominated sheet-beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Earley, L. M.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Russell, S. J.; Potter, J. M.; Ferguson, P.; Humphries, S.

    2005-06-01

    Two-plane focusing of sheet electron beams will be an essential technology for an emerging class of high-power, 100 to 300 GHz rf sources [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 85 (2005), ITPSBD, 0093-3813, 10.1109/TPS.2004.841172]. In these devices, the beam has a unique asymmetry in which the transport is emittance dominated in the sheet’s thin dimension and space-charge dominated in the sheet’s wide dimension. Previous work has studied the stability of the transport of beams in the emittance-dominated regime for both wiggler and periodic permanent magnet (PPM) configurations with single-plane focusing, and has found that bigger envelope scalloping occurs for equilibrium transport, as compared to space-charge dominated beams [Carlsten et al., this issue, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 062001 (2005), PRABFM, 1098-4402]. In this paper, we describe the differences in transport stability when two-plane focusing is included. Two-plane wiggler focusing degrades the transport stability slightly, whereas two-plane PPM focusing greatly compromises the transport. On the other hand, single-plane PPM focusing can be augmented with external quadrupole fields to provide weak focusing in the sheet’s wide dimension, which has stability comparable to two-plane wiggler transport.

  12. Vacuum electron acceleration and bunch compression by a flat-top laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Wang, P X; Ho, Y K; Kong, Q; Gu, Y; Wang, S J

    2007-09-01

    The field intensity distribution and phase velocity characteristics of a flat-top laser beam are analyzed and discussed. The dynamics of electron acceleration in this kind of beam are investigated using three-dimensional test particle simulations. Compared with the standard (i.e., TEM(00) mode) Gaussian beam, a flat-top laser beam has a stronger longitudinal electric field and a larger diffraction angle. These characteristics make it easier for electrons to be trapped and accelerated by the beam. With a flat-top shape, the laser beam is also applicable to the acceleration of low energy electron and bunch compression.

  13. Precision Control of the Electron Longitudinal Bunch Shape Using an Emittance-Exchange Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, G.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Power, J. G.; Doran, D. S.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Liu, W.; Whiteford, C.; Gao, Q.; Kim, K.-J.; Zholents, A.; Sun, Y.-E.; Jing, C.; Piot, P.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the experimental generation of relativistic electron bunches with a tunable longitudinal bunch shape. A longitudinal bunch-shaping (LBS) beam line, consisting of a transverse mask followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) beam line, is used to tailor the longitudinal bunch shape (or current profile) of the electron bunch. The mask shapes the bunch's horizontal profile, and the EEX beam line converts it to a corresponding longitudinal profile. The Argonne wakefield accelerator rf photoinjector delivers electron bunches into a LBS beam line to generate a variety of longitudinal bunch shapes. The quality of the longitudinal bunch shape is limited by various perturbations in the exchange process. We develop a simple method, based on the incident slope of the bunch, to significantly suppress the perturbations.

  14. BEAM LIFETIME AND EMITTANCE GROWTH MEASUREMENTS OF GOLD BEAMS IN RHIC AT STORAGE.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; DREES,A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CONNOLLY,R.; FLILLER,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    During stores of gold beams, longitudinal and transverse beam sizes were recorded. Longitudinal profiles were obtained with a wall current monitor. Transverse profiles were reconstructed from gold-gold collision rates at various relative transverse beam positions. The total beam lifetime was measured with a beam current transformer, the bunched beam lifetime with the wall current monitor. Diffusion rates in the beam halo were determined from the change in the loss rate when a scraper is retracted. The measurements are used to determine the lifetime limiting effects. Beam growth measurements are compared with computations of beam-growth times from intra-beam scattering.

  15. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  16. Minimization of three-dimensional beam emittance growth in rare-isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, B. H.; Yoon, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a research to minimize the three-dimensional (3D) emittance growth (EG) in the RAON accelerator, a heavy ion accelerator currently being developed in Korea to produce various rare isotopes. The emittance minimization is performed using the multi-objective genetic algorithm and the simplex method. We use them to analyze the driver linac for the in-flight fragmentation separator of the RAON facility and show that redesign of the 90-degree bending section of the RAON accelerator together with adjustment of optics in the upstream and downstream superconducting linacs can limit the 3D EG to 20 % in the entire region of the driver linac. Effects of various magnet and rf accelerating cavity errors on the beam-EG are also discussed.

  17. An Ultra-Bright Pulsed Electron Beam With Low Longitudinal Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, M.; Commins, E.D.; Denes, P.; Hussain, Z.; Lebedev, G.V.; Lidia, S.M.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Vogel, R.A.; Wan, W.; Heifets, S.A.; /SLAC

    2006-02-10

    Most existing electron sources extract electrons from conductors. Since the actual temperature inside the conductor is much less than the Fermi temperature of the conduction electrons, the electron degeneracy {delta}{sub f} is close to 1, the maximum allowed by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, during extraction several factors conspire together to reduce {delta}{sub f} many orders of magnitude, limiting the achieved values to {approx} 10{sup -5}. A new concept is described for building a novel electron source designed to produce a pulsed beam with {delta}{sub f} {approx} 2 10{sup -3} and longitudinal emittance four orders of magnitude smaller than currently achieved values. This high brightness, low longitudinal emittance regime enables a wide range of novel applications that utilize angstrom-scale spatial resolution and eV-scale energy resolution. The current state of a proof-of-principle experiment conducted at LBNL is also described.

  18. An Ultra-Bright Pulsed Electron Beam with Low LongitudinalEmittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Denes, P.; Heifets, Samuel; Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, Gennnadi V.; Lidia, Steven M.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Vogel, Robert; Wan, Weishi

    2005-05-01

    Most existing electron sources extract electrons from conductors. Since the actual temperature inside the conductor is much less than the Fermi temperature of the conduction electrons, the electron degeneracy ({delta}{sub f}) is close to 1, the maximum allowed by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, during extraction several factors conspire together to reduce {delta}{sub f} many orders of magnitude, limiting the achieved values to approx 10{sup -5}. A new concept is described for building a novel electron source designed to produce a pulsed beam with {delta}{sub f} approx 2 10{sup -3} and longitudinal emittance four orders of magnitude smaller than currently achieved values. This high brightness, low longitudinal emittance regime enables a wide range of novel applications that utilize angstrom-scale spatial resolution and eV-scale energy resolution. The current state of a proof-of-principle experiment conducted at LBNL is also described.

  19. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Fartoukh, Stephane; Valishev, Alexander; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical $\\beta^{\\ast}$values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  20. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  1. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  2. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  3. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  4. Measurements and simulations of ultralow emittance and ultrashort electron beams in the linac coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Ding, Y; Brachmann, A; Decker, F-J; Dowell, D; Emma, P; Frisch, J; Gilevich, S; Hays, G; Hering, Ph; Huang, Z; Iverson, R; Loos, H; Miahnahri, A; Nuhn, H-D; Ratner, D; Turner, J; Welch, J; White, W; Wu, J

    2009-06-26

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser project presently in a commissioning phase at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We report here on very low-emittance measurements made at low bunch charge, and a few femtosecond bunch length produced by the LCLS bunch compressors. Start-to-end simulations associated with these beam parameters show the possibilities of generating hundreds of GW at 1.5 A x-ray wavelength and nearly a single longitudinally coherent spike at 1.5 nm with 2-fs duration.

  5. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  6. Beam propagation factor of partially coherent flat-topped beams in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dan, Youquan; Zhang, Bin

    2008-09-29

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) has been used to study the beam propagation factor (M(2)-factor) for partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) beams with circular symmetry in a turbulent atmosphere. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of the WDF, an expression for the WDF of PCFT beams in turbulence has been given. By use of the second-order moments of the WDF, the analytical formulas for the root-mean-square (rms) spatial width, the rms angular width, and the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence have been derived, which can be applied to cases of different spatial power spectra of the refractive index fluctuations. The rms angular width and the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence have been discussed with numerical examples. It can be shown that the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence depends on the beam order, degree of global coherence of the source, waist width, wavelength, spatial power spectrum of the refractive index fluctuations, and propagation distance.

  7. Flat beam spot sizes measurement in the SLC-final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.

    1995-06-01

    With the switch to flat beam operation in the SLC during the 1993 run, it has become necessary to develop an algorithm that is capable of measuring the beam spot sizes at the Final Focus Interaction Point (IP). This algorithm uses the correct beam-beam deflection formula for the more general flat-beam case, since the round beam approximation is no longer valid. The application of this formula to the IP spot size measurements in the SLC Final Focus is the subject of this paper.

  8. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  9. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  10. Random source generating far field with elliptical flat-topped beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongtao; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-07-01

    Circular and rectangular multi-Gaussian Schell-model (MGSM) sources which generate far fields with circular and rectangular flat-topped beam profiles were introduced just recently (Sahin and Korotkova 2012 Opt. Lett. 37 2970; Korotkova 2014 Opt. Lett. 39 64). In this paper, a random source named an elliptical MGSM source is introduced. An analytical expression for the propagation factor of an elliptical MGSM beam is derived. Furthermore, an analytical propagation formula for an elliptical MGSM beam passing through a stigmatic ABCD optical system is derived, and its propagation properties in free space are studied. It is interesting to find that an elliptical MGSM source generates a far field with an elliptical flat-topped beam profile, being qualitatively different from that of circular and rectangular MGSM sources. The ellipticity and the flatness of the elliptical flat-topped beam profile in the far field are determined by the initial coherence widths and the beam index, respectively.

  11. The primary test of measuremental system for the actual emittance of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Fu; Tai-bin Du; Xin Chen

    1995-12-31

    Recent, a new measuremental system has been established basically in Tsinghua University PRA. This system is able to measure the lower emittance of the electron beams from the RF accelerators for the FEL. It consists of a scanning magnetic field, a slit, a fluorescent screen, and a TV camera, an image processing system, a CAD 386 computer. Using it an actual phase diagram is obtained for 4-10 Mev electron beams, The principle and structure of the facility were reported in the Proceeding of the 15th FEL Conference. This paper describes the performance of the main components and the results of first measurement for the electron gun and 4Mev standing wave LINAC, Some new suggests are related too.

  12. Image quality of flat-panel cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Georg; Wiegert, Jens; Schaefer, Dirk; Fiedler, Klaus; Conrads, Norbert; Timmer, Jan; Rasche, Volker; Noordhoek, Niels; Klotz, Erhard; Koppe, Reiner

    2003-06-01

    We present results on 3D image quality in terms of spatial resolution (MTF) and low contrast detectability, obtained on a flat dynamic X-ray detector (FD) based cone-beam CT (CB-CT) setup. Experiments have been performed on a high precision bench-top system with rotating object table, fixed X-ray tube and 176 x 176 mm2 active detector area (Trixell Pixium 4800). Several objects, including CT performance-, MTF- and pelvis phantoms, have been scanned under various conditions, including a high dose setup in order to explore the 3D performance limits. Under these optimal conditions, the system is capable of resolving less than 1% (~10 HU) contrast in a water background. Within a pelvis phantom, even inserts of muscle and fat equivalent are clearly distinguishable. This also holds for fast acquisitions of up to 40 fps. Focusing on the spatial resolution, we obtain an almost isotropic three-dimensional resolution of up to 30 lp/cm at 10% modulation.

  13. Growth of Atomically Flat DBCO Films Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, Aaron E.; Oh, Seongshik; Davidson, Bruce A.; O'Donnell, Jim; Eckstein, James N.

    2000-03-01

    We have grown atomically flat a-axis dysprosium barium copper oxide (DBCO) films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a pure ozone source. Such films can be used, for example, to exploit the inherent anisotropy of DBCO in spin injection devices using ferromagnetic polarized electron sources or all-superconducting Josephson junctions. The a-axis films are grown on a strontium titanate (STO) substrate using a low temperature DBCO template to achieve a-axis orientation. During growth, we use reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) to observe the emergence of one-third order streaks in the diffraction pattern and a reduction in the surface roughness as we increase the growth temperature. Subsequent x-ray diffraction shows complete a-axis normal orientation with pseudomorphic growth (in-plane lattice constants identical to the substrate) and a slightly larger out of plane lattice constant than bulk crystals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows an RMS roughness of 4 Å over several millimeters of the film surface, sufficient to construct tunnel junction devices.

  14. H/sup -/ beam emittance measurements for the penning and the asymmetric, grooved magnetron surface-plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    Beam-intensity and emittance measurements show that the H/sup -/ beam from our Penning surface-plasma source (SPS) has twice the intensity and ten times the brightness of the H/sup -/ beam from an asymmetric, grooved magnetron SPS. We deduce H/sup -/ ion temperatures of 5 eV for the Penning SPS and 22 eV for the asymmetric, grooved magnetron.

  15. Low-emittance electron-beam generation with laser pulse shaping in photocathode radio-frequency gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Sakai, F.; Yanagida, T.; Yorozu, M.; Okada, Y.; Takasago, K.; Endo, A.; Yada, A.; Washio, M.

    2002-08-01

    A technique of laser-pulse shaping was developed for low-emittance electron-beam generation in a photocathode radio-frequency (rf) gun. The emittance growth due to space charge and rf effects in the rf gun was experimentally investigated with square and gaussian temporal pulse shapes. It was found that the square pulse shaping was a useful tool for both the reduction of nonlinear space-charge force and the correction of linear space charge. The normalized transverse rms emittance at 1 nC was obtained to be 1.20 pimm-mrad for the square pulse shape with pulse length of 9 ps full width at half maximum. The emittance was measured as a function of the electron bunch charge and the laser-pulse length.

  16. Design of a standing-wave multicell radio frequency cavity beam monitor for simultaneous position and emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Miller, Roger; Nantista, Christopher

    2005-07-15

    High precision, nondisruptive emittance measurement through second moment monitoring requires precise beam position at the measurement location. We present the design and analysis of a multicavity standing wave structure for a pulse-to-pulse beam position-emittance measurement system in which the quadrupole and the dipole standing wave modes resonate at harmonics of a presumed beam bunch train frequency. As an application for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) beams, an optimized nine-cavity standing-wave structure is designed for simultaneous high precision beam position and emittance measurement. It operates with the {pi}-phase advance quadrupole mode resonating at the 16th harmonic (11.424 GHz) of the NLC bunch frequency and the 3{pi}/4-phase advance dipole mode at the 12th harmonic (8.568 GHz). The output powers from these modes are estimated for the NLC beams. Measurement resolution is estimated to be on the micron scale for rms beam size and on the nanometer scale for beam position.

  17. Transverse-to-Longitudinal Emittance Exchange to Improve Performance of High-Gain Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2006-09-21

    The ability to generate small transverse emittance is perhaps the main limiting factor for the performance of high-gain x-rays free-electron lasers (FELs). Noting that beams from an rf photocathode gun can have energy spread much smaller than required for efficient FEL interaction, we present a method to produce normalized transverse emittance at or below about 0.1 {micro}m, which will lead to a significantly shorter length undulator as well as a lower electron beam energy for an x-ray FEL project. The beam manipulation consists of producing an unequal partition of the initially equal emittances into two dissimilar emittances by a flat beam technique and exchanging the larger transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. We study various issues involved in the manipulation. In particular, a new emittance exchange optics we found enables an exact emittance exchange necessary for this scheme.

  18. Characterization of the heavily doped emitter and junction regions of silicon solar cells using an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1986-01-01

    Heavily doped emitter and junction regions of silicon solar cells are investigated by means of the electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) technique. Although the experimental EBIC data are collected under three-dimensional conditions, it is analytically demonstrated with two numerical examples that the solutions obtained with one-dimensional numerical modeling are adequate. EBIC data for bare and oxide-covered emitter surfaces are compared with theory. The improvement in collection efficiency when an emitter surface is covered with a 100-A SiO2 film varies with beam energy; for a cell with a junction depth of 0.35 microns, the improvement is about 54 percent at 2 keV.

  19. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    DOEpatents

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  20. Emittance improvement of the electron cyclotron resonance high intensity light ion source proton beam by gas injection in the low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Gobin, R.; Lagniel, J. M.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Pottin, B.; Sherman, J.

    2000-03-01

    SILHI is the ECR high intensity light ion source studied in France at C.E.A. Saclay. This is the source for the injector of the high intensity proton injector prototype developed by a CNRS-IN2P3 collaboration. 80 mA at 95 keV beams with a rms normalized r-r' emittance lower than 0.3 π mm mrad and a proton fraction better than 85% are currently produced. Recently, it has been found that the injection in the low energy beam transport of a buffer gas had a strong effect on the emittance measured 1 m downstream of the focusing solenoid. By adding several gases (H2, N2, Ar, Kr), improvements as great as a factor of 3 have been observed. The emittance has been measured by means of an r-r' emittance measurement unit equipped with a sampling hole and a wire profile monitor, both moving across the beam. Simultaneously, the space charge compensation factor is measured using a four-grid analyzer unit. In this article all results of these experiments are presented and discussed. A first explanation of the emittance reduction phenomenon and possible consequences on the injector operation is given.

  1. BER of flat-topped Gaussian beam in slant path turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fang; Han, Yanyan; Han, Xiang-e.; Yang, Rui-ke

    2013-08-01

    Based on the theory of optical wave propagation in the slant path and the ITU-R turbulence structure constant model which is dependent on altitude, the on-axis scintillation index of the flat-topped Gaussian beam at the receiver plane in slant path turbulence was given by using Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence power spectrum model. The influences of the link altitudes, atmospheric refractive index structure constant C0 at the ground,the source size and the beam order on scintillation index of the flat-topped Gaussian beam are discussed in detail. The result shows that the scintillation index increased first and then decreased with the increase of the beam order. The advantage of a flat-topped Gaussian beam over a single Gaussian beam is restricted to small source sizes, which is consistent with the case of the horizontal path. To find the average bit error rate under weak slant path turbulence, the log-normal distribution model of the intensity fluctuation was used. The influence of beam order and source size on BER was discussed. The result indicates that the smaller sized flat-topped Gaussian beam will bring average bit error rate advantage over the same size Gaussian beam. Our results correctly reduce to the result of the horizontal path with atmospheric structure constant fixed.

  2. Effective source size, radial, angular and energy spread of therapeutic 11C positron emitter beams produced by 12C fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, Marta; Brahme, Anders

    2014-02-01

    The use of positron emitter light ion beams in combination with PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and PET-CT (Computed Tomography) imaging could significantly improve treatment verification and dose delivery imaging during radiation therapy. The present study is dedicated to the analysis of the beam quality in terms of the effective source size, as well as radial, angular and energy spread of the 11C ion beam produced by projectile fragmentation of a primary point monodirectional and monoenergetic 12C ion beam in a dedicated range shifter of different materials. This study was performed combining analytical methods describing the transport of particles in matter and the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT+. A high brilliance and production yield of 11C fragments with a small effective source size and emittance is best achieved with a decelerator made of two media: a first liquid hydrogen section of about 20 cm followed by a hydrogen rich section of variable length. The calculated intensity of the produced 11C ion beam ranges from about 5% to 8% of the primary 12C beam intensity depending on the exit energy and the acceptance of the beam transport system. The angular spread is lower than 1 degree for all the materials studied, but the brilliance of the beam is the highest with the proposed mixed decelerator.

  3. Generation of terahertz hollow beams by a photonic quasi-crystal flat lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Liu, Exian; Wang, Ziming; Cai, Weicheng; Liu, Hongfei; Wang, Shuo; Liang, Taiyuan; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    We have designed a decagonal photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) flat lens, which turns an incident terahertz (THz) plane wave into a hollow beam easily and flexibly. The features of the THz hollow beam can be controlled by varying the parameters of a point defect in the center of the lens, i.e., the PQC flat lens can be used as a flexible tool for THz optical captivity or optical tweezer. The results showing that an airy disk, whose mean beam width is similar to the incident wavelength and power-in-the-bucket (PIB) is more than 96%, can be generated in the far field.

  4. Flat-top beam for laser-stimulated pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Ryan; Nadeau, Valerie; Dickinson, Mark

    2005-04-01

    One of the main problems during laser stimulation in human pain research is the risk of tissue damage caused by excessive heating of the skin. This risk has been reduced by using a laser beam with a flattop (or superGaussian) intensity profile, instead of the conventional Gaussian beam. A finite difference approximation to the heat conduction equation has been applied to model the temperature distribution in skin as a result of irradiation by flattop and Gaussian profile CO2 laser beams. The model predicts that a 15 mm diameter, 15 W, 100 ms CO2 laser pulse with an order 6 superGaussian profile produces a maximum temperature 6 oC less than a Gaussian beam with the same energy density. A superGaussian profile was created by passing a Gaussian beam through a pair of zinc selenide aspheric lenses which refract the more intense central region of the beam towards the less intense periphery. The profiles of the lenses were determined by geometrical optics. In human pain trials the superGaussian beam required more power than the Gaussian beam to reach sensory and pain thresholds.

  5. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Dendooven, P; Buitenhuis, H J T; Diblen, F; Heeres, P N; Biegun, A K; Fiedler, F; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E R; Brandenburg, S

    2015-12-07

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, providing the largest number of counts, the least biological washout and the fastest feedback. In this implementation, all nuclides, independent of their half-life, will contribute. As a first step towards assessing the relevance of short-lived nuclides (half-life shorter than that of (10)C, T1/2  =  19 s) for in vivo dose delivery verification using beam-on PET, we measured their production in the stopping of 55 MeV protons in water, carbon, phosphorus and calcium The most copiously produced short-lived nuclides and their production rates relative to the relevant long-lived nuclides are: (12)N (T1/2  =  11 ms) on carbon (9% of (11)C), (29)P (T1/2  =  4.1 s) on phosphorus (20% of (30)P) and (38m)K (T1/2  =  0.92 s) on calcium (113% of (38g)K). No short-lived nuclides are produced on oxygen. The number of decays integrated from the start of an irradiation as a function of time during the irradiation of PMMA and 4 tissue materials has been determined. For (carbon-rich) adipose tissue, (12)N dominates up to 70 s. On bone tissue, (12)N dominates over (15)O during the first 8-15 s (depending on carbon-to-oxygen ratio). The short-lived nuclides created on phosphorus and calcium provide 2.5 times more beam-on PET counts than the long-lived ones produced on these elements during a 70 s irradiation. From the estimated number of (12)N PET counts, we conclude that, for any tissue, (12)N PET imaging potentially provides equal to superior proton range information compared to prompt gamma imaging with an optimized knife-edge slit camera. The practical implementation of (12)N PET imaging is discussed.

  6. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Heeres, P. N.; Biegun, A. K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M.-J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, providing the largest number of counts, the least biological washout and the fastest feedback. In this implementation, all nuclides, independent of their half-life, will contribute. As a first step towards assessing the relevance of short-lived nuclides (half-life shorter than that of 10C, T1/2  =  19 s) for in vivo dose delivery verification using beam-on PET, we measured their production in the stopping of 55 MeV protons in water, carbon, phosphorus and calcium The most copiously produced short-lived nuclides and their production rates relative to the relevant long-lived nuclides are: 12N (T1/2  =  11 ms) on carbon (9% of 11C), 29P (T1/2  =  4.1 s) on phosphorus (20% of 30P) and 38mK (T1/2  =  0.92 s) on calcium (113% of 38gK). No short-lived nuclides are produced on oxygen. The number of decays integrated from the start of an irradiation as a function of time during the irradiation of PMMA and 4 tissue materials has been determined. For (carbon-rich) adipose tissue, 12N dominates up to 70 s. On bone tissue, 12N dominates over 15O during the first 8-15 s (depending on carbon-to-oxygen ratio). The short-lived nuclides created on phosphorus and calcium provide 2.5 times more beam-on PET counts than the long-lived ones produced on these elements during a 70 s irradiation. From the estimated number of 12N PET counts, we conclude that, for any tissue, 12N PET imaging potentially provides equal to superior proton range information compared to prompt gamma imaging with an optimized knife-edge slit camera. The practical implementation of 12N PET imaging is discussed.

  7. Turbulence-induced degradation properties of partially coherent flat-topped beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavinejad, M.; Ghafary, B.

    2008-05-01

    Propagation of partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) beams in a turbulent atmosphere is investigated and analytical formula for the average intensity is derived. Detailed analysis of PCFT beams through atmospheric turbulence with various correlation length indicated that PCFT beams with smaller correlation length are less affected by atmospheric turbulence. Analytical formula for beam width and power in bucket (PIB) of PCFT propagated through turbulence media are derived. The investigation showed that the beam width and PIB of PCFT with higher correlation length are more affected by turbulence.

  8. A high-resolution multi-slit phase space measurement technique for low-emittance beams

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Piot, P.

    2012-12-21

    Precise measurement of transverse phase space of a high-brightness electron beamis of fundamental importance in modern accelerators and free-electron lasers. Often, the transverse phase space of a high-brightness, space-charge-dominated electron beam is measured using a multi-slit method. In this method, a transverse mask (slit/pepperpot) samples the beaminto a set of beamlets, which are then analyzed on to a screen downstream. The resolution in this method is limited by the type of screen used which is typically around 20 {mu}m for a high-sensitivity Yttrium Aluminum Garnet screen. Accurate measurement of sub-micron transverse emittance using this method would require a long drift space between the multi-slit mask and observation screen. In this paper, we explore a variation of the technique that incorporates quadrupole magnets between the multi-slit mask and the screen. It is shown that this arrangement can improve the resolution of the transverse-phase-space measurement with in a short footprint.

  9. Second-order intensity-moment characteristics for broadband partially coherent flat-topped beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haidan; Zhao, Daomu

    2010-01-18

    Based on the intensity moments and Wigner distribution function, the second-order moments for broadband partially coherent flat-topped (BPCFT) beams in atmospheric turbulence are studied. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is larger than that in free space. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is larger than that of broadband fully coherent flat-topped (BFCFT) beams in atmospheric turbulence. The broader the bandwidth is, the larger the beam width of BPCFT beams becomes. Similar conclusion can be obtained by analyzing the divergence angle and beam propagation factor of BPCFT beams. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is less affected by the broad spectral bandwidth than that in free space. The beam width of BFCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is less affected by the broad spectral bandwidth than that of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence.

  10. Quadrupole lens-free multiple-profile diagnostics for emittance measurement of laser wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krůs, M.; Laštovička, T.; Levato, T.

    2016-02-01

    A quadrupole lens-free diagnostic is a simple single shot method which can be used to measure the electron beam transverse emittance. LANEX screens are used as profile monitors due to the high yield of visible photons which can be easily detected by standard camera sensors. This type of minimally destructive diagnostics is particularly suitable for electron beams accelerated by the laser wakefield mechanism where the basic parameters of such beams fluctuate shot-to-shot mainly during the beam optimizing process. It allows to simultaneously measure the beam divergence, position, profile, pointing, and charge. The numerical study of the diagnostics performance and applicability range is presented and its limits are discussed. The influence of the LANEX screen multiple Coulomb scattering is studied by means of GEANT4; the unfolding procedure for multiple scattering contribution is presented.

  11. Trace-space reconstruction of low-emittance electron beams through betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Anania, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Giulietti, D.; Marocchino, A.; Petrarca, M.; Shpakov, V.; Zigler, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new methodology able to model and reconstruct the transverse trace space of low-emittance electron beams accelerated in the bubble regime of laser-plasma interaction is presented. The single-shot measurement of both the electron energy spectrum and the betatron radiation spectrum is shown to allow a complete measurement of the transverse emittance, including the correlation term. A novel technique to directly measure the betatron oscillation amplitude distribution is described and tested at the SPARC-LAB test facility through the interaction of the ultrashort ultraintense Ti:Sa laser FLAME with a He gas-jet target. Via the exposed technique the beam transverse profile is also retrieved. From the study of the electron transverse dynamics inside the plasma bubble, the nonlinear correlation between the betatron amplitude and the divergence, i.e. the angle with respect the acceleration axis, is found. The angular distribution of the electron beam inside the bubble is retrieved. The knowledge of the trace-space density allows a more accurate measurement of the transverse emittance with respect to previous paradigms.

  12. Investigations of a flat-panel detector for quality assurance measurements in ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Bernadette; Telsemeyer, Julia; Huber, Lucas; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-01-07

    Increased accuracy in radiation delivery to a patient provided by scanning particle beams leads to high demands on quality assurance (QA). To meet the requirements, an extensive quality assurance programme has been implemented at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Currently, high-resolution radiographic films are used for beam spot position measurements and homogeneity measurements for scanned fields. However, given that using this film type is time and equipment demanding, considerations have been made to replace the radiographic films in QA by another appropriate device. In this study, the suitability of the flat-panel detector RID 256 L based on amorphous silicon was investigated as an alternative method. The currently used radiographic films were taken as a reference. Investigations were carried out for proton and carbon ion beams. The detectors were irradiated simultaneously to allow for a direct comparison. The beam parameters (e.g. energy, focus, position) currently used in the daily QA procedures were applied. Evaluation of the measurements was performed using newly implemented automatic routines. The results for the flat-panel detector were compared to the standard radiographic films. Additionally, a field with intentionally decreased homogeneity was applied to test the detector's sensitivities toward possible incorrect scan parameters. For the beam position analyses, the flat-panel detector results showed good agreement with radiographic films. For both detector types, deviations between measured and planned spot distances were found to be below 1% (1 mm). In homogeneously irradiated fields, the flat-panel detector showed a better dose response homogeneity than the currently used radiographic film. Furthermore, the flat-panel detector is sensitive to field irregularities. The flat-panel detector was found to be an adequate replacement for the radiographic film in QA measurements. In addition, it saves time and equipment because no post

  13. Flat-Lens Focusing of Electron Beams in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yang; Cao, Xiyuan; Guo, Ran; Zhang, Yanyan; Che, Zhiyuan; Yannick, Fouodji T.; Zhang, Weiping; Du, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Coupling electron beams carrying information into electronic units is fundamental in microelectronics. This requires precision manipulation of electron beams through a coupler with a good focusing ability. In graphene, the focusing of wide electron beams has been successfully demonstrated by a circular p-n junction. However, it is not favorable for information coupling since the focal length is so small that the focal spot locates inside the circular gated region, rather than in the background region. Here, we demonstrate that an array of gate-defined quantum dots, which has gradually changing lattice spacing in the direction transverse to propagation, can focus electrons outside itself, providing a possibility to make a coupler in graphene. The focusing effect can be understood as due to the gradient change of effective refractive indices, which are defined by the local energy band in a periodic potential. The strong focusing can be achieved by suitably choosing the lattice gradient and the layer number in the incident direction, offering an effective solution to precision manipulation of electron beams with wide electron energy range and high angular tolerance. PMID:27628099

  14. Transverse emittance-preserving arc compressor for high-brightness electron beam-based light sources and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-03-01

    Bunch length magnetic compression is used in high-brightness linacs driving free-electron lasers (FELs) and particle colliders to increase the peak current of the injected beam. To date, it is performed in dedicated insertions made of few degrees bending magnets and the compression factor is limited by the degradation of the beam transverse emittance owing to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We reformulate the known concept of CSR-driven optics balance for the general case of varying bunch length and demonstrate, through analytical and numerical results, that a 500 pC charge beam can be time-compressed in a periodic 180 deg arc at 2.4 GeV beam energy and lower, by a factor of up to 45, reaching peak currents of up to 2 kA and with a normalized emittance growth at the 0.1 μ \\text{m} rad level. The proposed solution offers new schemes of beam longitudinal gymnastics; an application to an energy recovery linac driving FEL is discussed.

  15. Design and construction of a prototype of a flat top beam interferometer and initial tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agresti, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; DeSalvo, R.; Forest, D.; Lagrange, B.; Mackowski, J. M.; Michel, C.; Montorio, J. L.; Morgado, N.; Pinard, L.; Remillieux, A.; Simoni, B.; Tarallo, M.; Willems, P.

    2006-03-01

    A non-Gaussian, flat-top laser beam profile, also called Mesa Beam Profile, supported by non spherical mirrors known as Mexican Hat (MH) mirrors, has been proposed as a way to depress the mirror thermal noise and thus improve the sensitivity of future interferometric Gravitational Wave detectors, including Advanced LIGO [1]. Non-Gaussian beam configurations have never been tested before [2] hence the main motivation of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of this new concept. A 7m rigid suspended Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity which can support a scaled version of a Mesa beam applicable to the LIGO interferometers has been developed. The FP cavity prototype is being designed to prove the feasibility of actual MH mirror profiles, determine whether a MH mirror cavity is capable of transforming an incoming Gaussian beam into a flat top beam profile, study the effects of unavoidable mirror imperfections on the resulting beam profile and gauge the difficulties associated with locking and maintaining the alignment of such an optical cavity. We present the design of the experimental apparatus and simulations comparing Gaussian and Mesa beams performed both with ideal and current (measured) mirror profiles. An overview of the technique used to manufacture this kind of mirror and initial results showing Mesa beam properties are presented.

  16. Theory and simulation of emittance, space charge and electron pressure effects on focusing of neutralized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Jones, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the final focus mode characterized by warm comoving electrons and vacuum propagation. In particular, we extend a previous envelope equation analysis of ion focusing in this mode to include the effects of ion emittance as well as ion space charge and initial electron temperature. Our major result is a simple equation relating initial R/sub o/ and final R/sub f/ beam radii to ion emittance epsilon and perveance K and electron Debye length lambda/sub D/ which is supported by one dimensional, electrostatic, particle-in-cell simulations of radial ion focusing. Finally, we use this equation to find the allowed temperature of neutralizing electrons for typical Heavy Ion Fusion reactor and High Temperature Experiment scenarios.

  17. Theory and simulation of emittance, space charge and electron pressure effects on focusig of neutralized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Jones, M.E.

    1986-01-21

    We investigate the final focus mode characterized by warm comoving electrons and vacuum propagation. In particular, we extend a previous envelope equation analysis of ion focusing in this mode to include the effects of ion emittance as well as ion space charge and initial electron temperature. Our major result is a simple equation relating initial R/sub o/ and final R/sub f/ beam radii to ion emittance epsilon and perveance K and electron Debye lengthe lambda/sub D/ which is supported by one dimensional, electrostatic, particle-in-cell simulations of radial ion focusing. Finally, we use this equation to find the allowed temperature of neutralizing electrons for typical Heavy Ion Fusion reactor and High Temperature Experiment scenarios.

  18. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H- ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H- ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H- ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  19. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  20. Minimization of transverse beam-emittance growth in the 90-degree bending section of the RAON rare-isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, B. H.; Yoon, M.

    2016-11-01

    The major contribution of the transverse beam emittance growth (EG) in a RAON heavy-ion accelerator comes from the bending section, which consists of a charge-stripping section, a matching section, and a charge-selection section in sequence. In this paper, we describe our research to minimize the two-dimensional EG in the 90-degree bending section of the RAON currently being developed in Korea. The EG minimization was achieved with the help of multi-objective genetic algorithms and the simplex method. We utilized those algorithms to analyze the 90-degree bending section in a driver linac for the in-flight fragmentation system. Horizontal and vertical EGs were limited to below 10 % in the bending section by adjustment of the transverse beam optics upstream from the charge-stripping section, redesign of the charge-selection section, and optimization of the vertical beam optics at the entrance of a charge-selection section.

  1. Double Emittance Exchanger as a Bunch Compressor for the MaRIE XFEL electron beam line at 1GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai; Carlsten, Bruce Eric

    2016-09-22

    We demonstrate an alternative realization of a bunch compressor (specifically the second bunch compressor for the MaRIE XFEL beamline, 1GeV electron energy) using a double emittance exchanger (EEX) and a telescope in the transverse phase space.We compare our results with a traditional bunch compressor realized via chicane, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) and Space Charge (SC) effects. In particular, we use the Elegant code for tracking particles through the beam line and analyze the eigen-emittances evolution to separate the influence of the CSR/SC effects from the nonlinear dynamics effects. We optimize the scheme parameters to reach a desirable compression factor and minimize the emittance growth. We observe dominant CSR-effects in our scheme resulting in critical emittance growth and introduce alternative version of an emittance exchanger with a reduced number of bending magnets to minimize the impact of CSR effects.

  2. Development of a MEMS electrostatic condenser lens array for nc-Si surface electron emitters of the Massive Parallel Electron Beam Direct-Write system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Ikegami, N.; Yoshida, T.; Miyaguchi, H.; Muroyama, M.; Yoshida, S.; Totsu, K.; Koshida, N.; Esashi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Developments of a Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) electrostatic Condenser Lens Array (CLA) for a Massively Parallel Electron Beam Direct Write (MPEBDW) lithography system are described. The CLA converges parallel electron beams for fine patterning. The structure of the CLA was designed on a basis of analysis by a finite element method (FEM) simulation. The lens was fabricated with precise machining and assembled with a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) electron emitter array as an electron source of MPEBDW. The nc-Si electron emitter has the advantage that a vertical-emitted surface electron beam can be obtained without any extractor electrodes. FEM simulation of electron optics characteristics showed that the size of the electron beam emitted from the electron emitter was reduced to 15% by a radial direction, and the divergence angle is reduced to 1/18.

  3. Perturbation-minimized triangular bunch for high-transformer ratio using a double dogleg emittance exchange beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, G.; Cho, M. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Namkung, W.; Power, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    The longitudinal shape, i.e., the current profile, of an electron bunch determines the transformer ratio in a collinear wakefield accelerator and thus methods are sought to control the longitudinal bunch shape. The emittance exchange (EEX) appears to be promising for creating a precisely controlled longitudinal bunch shapes. The longitudinal shape is perturbed by two sources: higher-order terms in the beam line optics and collective effects and these perturbations can lead to a significant drop of the transformer ratio. In this paper, we analytically and numerically investigate the perturbation to an ideal triangular longitudinal bunch shape and propose methods to minimize it.

  4. Measurements and Simulations of Ultra-Low Emittance and Ultra-Short Electron Beams in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2009-02-03

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently in a commissioning phase at SLAC. We report here on very low emittance measurements made at low bunch charge, and a few femtosecond bunch length produced by the LCLS bunch compressors. Start-to-end simulations associated with these beam parameters show the possibilities of generating hundreds of GW at 1.5 {angstrom} x-ray wavelength and nearly a single longitudinally spike at 1.5 nm with 2-fs duration.

  5. Surface flatness measurement of quasi-parallel plates employing three-beam interference with strong reference beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Zofia; Patorski, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    A big challenge for standard interferogram analysis methods such as Temporal Phase Shifting or Fourier Transform is a parasitic set of fringes which might occur in the analyzed fringe pattern intensity distribution. It is encountered, for example, when transparent glass plates with quasi-parallel surfaces are tested in Fizeau or Twyman-Green interferometers. Besides the beams reflected from the plate front surface and the interferometer reference the beam reflected from the plate rear surface also plays important role; its amplitude is comparable with the amplitude of other beams. In result we face three families of fringes of high contrast which cannot be easily separated. Earlier we proposed a competitive solution for flatness measurements which relies on eliminating one of those fringe sets from the three-beam interferogram and separating two remaining ones with the use of 2D Continuous Wavelet Transform. In this work we cover the case when the intensity of the reference beam is significantly higher than the intensities of two object beams. The main advantage of differentiating beam intensities is the change in contrast of individual fringe families. Processing of such three-beam interferograms is modified but also takes advantage of 2D CWT. We show how to implement this method in Twyman-Green and Fizeau setups and compare this processing path and measurement procedures with previously proposed solutions.

  6. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  7. SAPHIRE: A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector With Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    array of TFTs, simi- lar to that in existing AMFPI. The proposed detector is named SHARP-AMFPI scintillator-HARP active matrix flat-panel imager...the wavelength of the incident photon. It was found by Pai and Enck that the ESe and dependence of photogeneration in a-Se follow the Onsager ...mechanism.25 Onsager theory states that every absorbed photon creates a pair of thermalized carriers bound by their Coulombic attrac- tion. The initial

  8. Propagation of flat-topped multi-Gaussian beams through a double-lens system with apertures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanqi; Zhu, Baoqiang; Liu, Daizhong; Lin, Zunqi

    2009-07-20

    A general model for different apertures and flat-topped laser beams based on the multi-Gaussian function is developed. The general analytical expression for the propagation of a flat-topped beam through a general double-lens system with apertures is derived using the above model. Then, the propagation characteristics of the flat-topped beam through a spatial filter are investigated by using a simplified analytical expression. Based on the Fluence beam contrast and the Fill factor, the influences of a pinhole size on the propagation of the flat-topped multi-Gaussian beam (FMGB) through the spatial filter are illustrated. An analytical expression for the propagation of the FMGB through the spatial filter with a misaligned pinhole is presented, and the influences of the pinhole offset are evaluated.

  9. Exact cone beam reconstruction formulae for functions and their gradients for spherical and flat detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2016-11-01

    We derive unified inversion formulae for the cone beam transform similar to the Radon transform. Reinterpreting Grangeat’s formula we find a relation between the Radon transform of the gradient of the searched-for function and a quantity computable from cone beam data. This gives a uniqueness result for the cone beam transform of compactly supported functions under much weaker assumptions than the Tuy-Kirillov condition. Furthermore this relation leads to an exact formula for the direct calculation of derivatives of the density distribution; but here, similar to the classical Radon transform, complete Radon data are needed, hence the Tuy-Kirillov condition has to be imposed. Numerical experiments reported in Hahn B N et al (2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 125601) indicate that these calculations are less corrupted by beam-hardening noise. Finally, we present flat detector versions for these results, which are mathematically less attractive but important for applications.

  10. Ugrades of beam diagnostics in support of emittance-exchange experiments at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Johnson, A.S.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.-E.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using electron beam phase space manipulations to support a free-electron laser accelerator design optimization has motivated our research. An ongoing program demonstrating the exchange of transverse horizontal and longitudinal emittances at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector has benefited recently from the upgrade of several of the key diagnostics stations. Accurate measurements of these properties upstream and downstream of the exchanger beamline are needed. Improvements in the screen resolution term and reduced impact of the optical system's depth-of-focus by using YAG:Ce single crystals normal to the beam direction will be described. The requirement to measure small energy spreads (<10 keV) in the spectrometer and the exchange process which resulted in bunch lengths less than 500 fs led to other diagnostics performance adjustments and upgrades as well. A longitudinal to transverse exchange example is also reported.

  11. Demonstration of Current Profile Shaping using Double Dog-Leg Emittance Exchange Beam Line at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Gwanghui; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Kim, Kwang-Je; Liu, Wanming; Namkung, Won; Piot, Philippe; Power, John; Sun, Yin-E; Whiteford, Charles; Wisniewski, Eric; Zholents, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Emittance exchange (EEX) based longitudinal current profile shaping is the one of the promising current profile shaping technique. This method can generate high quality arbitrary current profiles under the ideal conditions. The double dog-leg EEX beam line was recently installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) to explore the shaping capability and confirm the quality of this method. To demonstrate the arbitrary current profile generation, several different transverse masks are applied to generate different final current profiles. The phase space slopes and the charge of incoming beam are varied to observe and suppress the aberrations on the ideal profile. We present current profile shaping results, aberrations on the shaped profile, and its suppression.

  12. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  13. Gaussian versus flat-top spatial beam profiles for optical stimulation of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the CN surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5-ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. The threshold for ONS was approximately 0.14 J/cm2, corresponding to a temperature increase of 6-8°C at the CN surface after a stimulation time of 15 s. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of CN's during prostate

  14. Propagation properties of radial partially coherent flat-topped array beams in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Xiangyin

    2010-11-01

    With the help of the tensor method, the analytical expression for the cross-spectral density of the radial partially coherent flat-topped array (RPCFTA) beams propagating in a turbulent atmosphere is derived, where the correlated superposition and uncorrelated superposition are considered. The average intensity, the spatial coherence properties and power in bucket (PIB) of these kinds of beams are investigated in detail. It is shown by numerical results and analysis that the average intensity and the spatial coherence of the correlated or uncorrelated RPCFTA beams will change on propagation and this change is dependent upon the correlation of the source's beamlets and atmospheric turbulence. In addition, the comparisons of the average intensity and the spatial coherence between the correlated and the uncorrelated RPCFTA beams propagating both in turbulent atmosphere and in free space are also given, and some interesting results are obtained. The laser power of focus ability of the single PCFT beam is worse than that of the correlated RPCFTA beam and but better than that of the uncorrelated RPCFTA beam when propagation distance in turbulent atmosphere is far-field plane.

  15. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  16. Radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array in non-Kolmogorov medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huilong; Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Chen, Dong; He, Wei; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2016-08-22

    The analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density, the average intensity and the complex degree of spatial coherence of a radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array propagating through non-Kolmogorov medium are obtained by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The evolution behaviors of a radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array propagating through non-Kolmogorov medium are studied in detail. It is shown that the evolution behaviors of average intensity depend on beam parameters including the spatial correlation length, the radius of the beam array, as well as the propagation distance. A radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array with high coherence evolves more rapidly than that with low coherence.

  17. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  18. Heterostructures with CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots for single photon emitters grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Belyaev, K. G.; Rakhlin, M. V.; Toropov, A. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of heterostructures with CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) with relatively low surface density, which could be used as single-photon emitters. The QDs were formed on the surface of a 3.1- to 4.5-monolayer-thick two-dimensional strained CdTe layer by depositing amorphous Te layer and its fast thermal desorption. Subsequent thermal annealing of the surface with QDs in the absence of external Te flux led to strong broadening and short-wavelength shift of the QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. Measurement of the micro-PL spectra of individual CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots in fabricated mesastructures with a diameter of 200—1000 nm allowed estimation of the QD surface density as 1010 cm-2.

  19. Wakefields of a Beam near a Single Plate in a Flat Dechirper

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

    2016-11-29

    At linac-based, X-ray free electron lasers (FELs), there is interest in streaking the beam by inducing the transverse wakes in a flat dechirper, by passing the beam near to one of its two jaws. For LCLS-II - as has already been done for LCLS-I - this way of using the dechirper will e.g. facilitate two-color and fresh slice schemes of running the FEL. With the beam a distance from the near wall of say b ~ 0.25 mm and from the far wall by ≳ 5 mm, the second wall will no longer affect the results. The physics will be quite different from the two plate case: with two plates the impedance has a resonance spike whose frequency depends on the plate separation 2a; in the single plate case this parameter no longer exists. Formulas for the longitudinal, dipole, and quadrupole wakes for a beam off-axis between two dechirper plates, valid for the range of bunch lengths of interest in an X-ray FEL, are given in reference 3. By taking the proper limit, we can obtain the corresponding wakes for a beam close to one dechirper plate and far from the other. This is the task we perform in this note.

  20. Large amplitude nonlinear response of flat aluminum, and carbon fiber plastic beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Howard F.; Shroyer, Cynthia A.

    1994-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of a continuing study to improve the understanding of nonlinear dynamic behavior of aerospace structures subjected to high levels of excitation. Tests were continued with a clamped-clamped (C-C) aluminum beam. A summary of the results is presented. Tests were conducted with a C-C carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) beam and a pinned-pinned (P-P) aluminum beam. A summary of these results is also presented. Flat plate tests began with an aluminum plate. The shapes of the total, axial, and bending strain power spectral densities for the C-C aluminum and the CFRP beams were quite similar. Both showed a small frequency increase and slight peak broadening as the levels of excitation increased. The nonlinear displacement shapes for the two cases were also quite similar. Further analysis is needed for the P-P aluminum beam case. Finally, a method of estimating the RMS stress for the multimodal response of a panel is presented.

  1. Stability of an emittance-dominated sheet-electron beam in planar wiggler and periodic permanent magnet structures with natural focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Earley, L. M.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Russell, S. J.; Potter, J. M.; Ferguson, P.; Humphries, S.

    2005-06-01

    A sheet-beam traveling-wave amplifier has been proposed as a high-power generator of rf from 95 to 300 GHz, using a microfabricated rf slow-wave structure [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 85 (2005), ITPSBD, 0093-3813, 10.1109/TPS.2004.841172], for emerging radar and communications applications. The planar geometry of microfabrication technologies matches well with the nearly planar geometry of a sheet beam, and the greater allowable beam current leads to high-peak power, high-average power, and wide bandwidths. Simulations of nominal designs using a vane-loaded waveguide as the slow-wave structure have indicated gains in excess of 1 dB/mm, with extraction efficiencies greater than 20% at 95 GHz with a 120-kV, 20-A electron beam. We have identified stable sheet-beam formation and transport as the key enabling technology for this type of device. In this paper, we describe sheet-beam transport, for both wiggler and periodic permanent magnet (PPM) magnetic field configurations, with natural (or single-plane) focusing. For emittance-dominated transport, the transverse equation of motion reduces to a Mathieu equation, and to a modified Mathieu equation for a space-charge dominated beam. The space-charge dominated beam has less beam envelope ripple than an emittance-dominated beam, but they have similar stability thresholds (defined by where the beam ripple continues to grow without bound along the transport line), consistent with the threshold predicted by the Mathieu equation. Design limits are derived for an emittance-dominated beam based on the Mathieu stability threshold. The increased beam envelope ripple for emittance-dominated transport may impact these design limits, for some transport requirements. The stability of transport in a wiggler field is additionally compromised by the beam’s increased transverse motion. Stable sheet-beam transport with natural focusing is shown to be achievable for a 120-kV, 20-A, elliptical beam with a cross section of

  2. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  3. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  4. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-07

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  5. Nonintrusive Emittance Measurement of 1GeV H- Beam with a Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Long, Cary D; Menshov, Alexander A; Pogge, James R; Webster, Anthony W; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2012-01-01

    A laser wire based transverse phase space measurement system has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The system allows a nonintrusive measurement of 1GeV hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the high energy beam transport (HEBT). This paper describes the design, installation, and measurement performance of the system. Major technical challenges in the implementation and commissioning of the nonintrusive phase space diagnostics at high brightness particle accelerator facilities are discussed.

  6. Momentum Flux Determination Using the Multi-beam Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolls, M. J.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, Diego; Heinselman, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an estimator for the vertical flux of horizontal momentum with arbitrary beam pointing, applicable to the case of arbitrary but fixed beam pointing with systems such as the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). This method uses information from all available beams to resolve the variances of the wind field in addition to the vertical flux of both meridional and zonal momentum, targeted for high-frequency wave motions. The estimator utilises the full covariance of the distributed measurements, which provides a significant reduction in errors over the direct extension of previously developed techniques and allows for the calculation of an error covariance matrix of the estimated quantities. We find that for the PFISR experiment, we can construct an unbiased and robust estimator of the momentum flux if sufficient and proper beam orientations are chosen, which can in the future be optimized for the expected frequency distribution of momentum-containing scales. However, there is a potential trade-off between biases and standard errors introduced with the new approach, which must be taken into account when assessing the momentum fluxes. We apply the estimator to PFISR measurements on 23 April 2008 and 21 December 2007, from 60-85 km altitude, and show expected results as compared to mean winds and in relation to the measured vertical velocity variances.

  7. Technique using axicons for generating flat-top laser-beam profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Woodfin, G.L.; Stahl, D.; Carpenter, J.P.; Kyrala, G.

    1983-01-01

    In certain fusion experiments using CO/sub 2/ lasers, like Helios, it is desired to produce a focal spot several times larger than the nominal focal spot, with a flat beam profile. The typical focal spot in Helios is roughly 70 ..mu..m and just defocussing the beam produces beam breakup, with several hot spots with roughly the original diameter, and a gaussian distribution. A number of schemes were tried to achieve a large spot with desired characteristics. These are described in the article. Axicons were found to produce spots with desired characteristics. Axicons are lenses or mirrors having a cone-shaped surface. The various schemes are described, as well as an experiment in Helios which confirmed that axicons produced the spots with desirable characteristics. Helios is an 8-beam CO/sub 2/ laser which produces 10 kJ at power in excess of 20 TW. It is currently being used for Laser Fusion studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  9. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  10. Novel beam delivery fibers for delivering flat-top beams with controlled BPP for high power CW and pulsed laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollivet, C.; Farley, K.; Conroy, M.; Abramczyk, J.; Belke, S.; Becker, F.; Tankala, K.

    2016-03-01

    Single-mode (SM) kW-class fiber lasers are the tools of choice for material processing applications such as sheet metal cutting and welding. However, application requirements include a flat-top intensity profile and specific beam parameter product (BPP). Here, Nufern introduces a novel specialty fiber technology capable of converting a SM laser beam into a flat-top beam suited for these applications. The performances are demonstrated using a specialty fiber with 100 μm pure silica core, 0.22 NA surrounded by a 120 μm fluorine-doped layer and a 360 μm pure silica cladding, which was designed to match the conventional beam delivery fibers. A SM fiber laser operating at a wavelength of 1.07 μm and terminated with a large-mode area (LMA) fiber with 20 μm core and 0.06 NA was directly coupled in the core of the flat-top specialty fiber using conventional splicing technique. The output beam profile and BPP were characterized first with a low-power source and confirmed using a 2 kW laser and we report a beam transformation from a SM beam into a flat-top intensity profile beam with a 3.8 mm*mrad BPP. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful beam transformation from SM to MM flat-top with controlled BPP in a single fiber integrated in a multi-kW all-fiber system architecture.

  11. Production of clinically useful positron emitter beams during carbon ion deceleration.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, M; Brahme, A

    2011-03-21

    In external beam radiation therapy, radioactive beams offer the best clinical solution to simultaneously treat and in vivo monitor the dose delivery and tumor response using PET or PET-CT imaging. However, difficulties mainly linked to the low production efficiency have so far limited their use. This study is devoted to the analysis of the production of high energy (11)C fragments, preferably by projectile fragmentation of a stable monodirectional and monoenergetic primary (12)C beam in different absorbing materials (decelerators) in order to identify the optimal elemental composition. The study was performed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT07. The track length and fluence of generated secondary particles were scored in a uniform absorber of 300 cm length and 10 cm radius, divided into slices of 1 cm thickness. The (11)C fluence build-up and mean energy variation with increasing decelerator depth are presented. Furthermore, the fluence of the secondary (11)C beam was studied as a function of its mean energy and the corresponding remaining range in water. It is shown that the maximum (11)C fluence build-up is high in compounds where the fraction by weight of hydrogen is high, being the highest in liquid hydrogen. Furthermore, a cost effective alternative solution to the single medium initially envisaged is presented: a two-media decelerator that comprises a first liquid hydrogen section followed by a second decelerating section made of a hydrogen-rich material, such as polyethylene (C(2)H(4)). The purpose of the first section is to achieve a fast initial (11)C fluence build-up, while the second section is primarily designed to modulate the mean energy of the generated (11)C beam in order to reach the tumor depth. Finally, it was demonstrated that, if the intensity of the primary (12)C beam can be increased by an order of magnitude, a sufficient intensity of the secondary (11)C beam is achieved for therapy and subsequent therapeutic PET imaging sessions. Such an

  12. Production of clinically useful positron emitter beams during carbon ion deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, M.; Brahme, A.

    2011-03-01

    In external beam radiation therapy, radioactive beams offer the best clinical solution to simultaneously treat and in vivo monitor the dose delivery and tumor response using PET or PET-CT imaging. However, difficulties mainly linked to the low production efficiency have so far limited their use. This study is devoted to the analysis of the production of high energy 11C fragments, preferably by projectile fragmentation of a stable monodirectional and monoenergetic primary 12C beam in different absorbing materials (decelerators) in order to identify the optimal elemental composition. The study was performed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT07. The track length and fluence of generated secondary particles were scored in a uniform absorber of 300 cm length and 10 cm radius, divided into slices of 1 cm thickness. The 11C fluence build-up and mean energy variation with increasing decelerator depth are presented. Furthermore, the fluence of the secondary 11C beam was studied as a function of its mean energy and the corresponding remaining range in water. It is shown that the maximum 11C fluence build-up is high in compounds where the fraction by weight of hydrogen is high, being the highest in liquid hydrogen. Furthermore, a cost effective alternative solution to the single medium initially envisaged is presented: a two-media decelerator that comprises a first liquid hydrogen section followed by a second decelerating section made of a hydrogen-rich material, such as polyethylene (C2H4). The purpose of the first section is to achieve a fast initial 11C fluence build-up, while the second section is primarily designed to modulate the mean energy of the generated 11C beam in order to reach the tumor depth. Finally, it was demonstrated that, if the intensity of the primary 12C beam can be increased by an order of magnitude, a sufficient intensity of the secondary 11C beam is achieved for therapy and subsequent therapeutic PET imaging sessions. Such an increase in the

  13. Experimental and theoretical studies of laser cooling and emittance control of neutral beams. Final report, 1 November 1981-31 January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, J.F.; McFarlane, R.A.; Palmer, A.J.; Steel, D.G.; Turley, R.S.

    1987-01-31

    Experimental and theoretical studies are made of issues relevant to laser cooling and emittance control of neutral beams. Experimental accomplishments include development of a technique for state specific velocity selection in atomic beams, observation of the optical Kapitza Dirac Effect, construction of sodium and atomic hydrogen beam facilities, and initial development of a tunable, transform-limited, vacuum-ultraviolet source. Theoretical accomplishments include development of a theory of pi pulse cooling, a theory of two-photon ionization in atomic hydrogen resonant with the Lyman-alpha transition, and an incorporation of the effects of intense fields in the theory of the Optical Kapitza Dirac Effect.

  14. Comparing flat top and Gaussian focal beam shapes when micromachining steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest

    2011-10-01

    Laser micromachining, drilling and marking is extensively used within the aerospace, automotive and firearms industries. The unique properties of lasers make them ideal tools for micromachining a wide diversity of materials, including steel alloys [1]. We describe the results of micromachining of low carbon steel and stainless steel alloys, using a high powered diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser operating at a wavelength of 355nm. The laser was configured with beam conditioning optics to produce either a flat top beam or a Gaussian output which was then sent through a galvanometer scanner and telecentric lens beam delivery system. This paper outlines the interrelationship of process variables when micromachining fine features in steel and stainless steel alloys. Process variables measured included the optimum laser focus plane, energy density, galvanometer scan rate, and pulse overlap and focal spot diameter. Optimum process performance was evaluated based on a dimensional comparison of the micromachined features from each test coupon, including uniformity and surface roughness of the micromachined surface and the minimization of surface irregularities (stalagmite type slag / debris / corn row patterns) and taper angle of the micromachined feature side walls.

  15. Mixing intensity modulated electron and photon beams: combining a steep dose fall-off at depth with sharp and depth-independent penumbras and flat beam profiles.

    PubMed

    Korevaar, E W; Heijmen, B J; Woudstra, E; Huizenga, H; Brahme, A

    1999-09-01

    For application in radiotherapy, intensity modulated high-energy electron and photon beams were mixed to create dose distributions that feature: (a) a steep dose fall-off at larger depths, similar to pure electron beams, (b) flat beam profiles and sharp and depth-independent beam penumbras, as in photon beams, and (c) a selectable skin dose that is lower than for pure electron beams. To determine the required electron and photon beam fluence profiles, an inverse treatment planning algorithm was used. Mixed beams were realized at a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden), and evaluated by the dose distributions measured in a water phantom. The multileaf collimator of the MM50 was used in a static mode to shape overlapping electron beam segments, and the dynamic multileaf collimation mode was used to realize the intensity modulated photon beam profiles. Examples of mixed beams were generated at electron energies of up to 40 MeV. The intensity modulated electron beam component consists of two overlapping concentric fields with optimized field sizes, yielding broad, fairly depth-independent overall beam penumbras. The matched intensity modulated photon beam component has high fluence peaks at the field edges to sharpen this penumbra. The combination of the electron and the photon beams yields dose distributions with the characteristics (a)-(c) mentioned above.

  16. Measurement of Electron Beam Emittance Using Optical Transition Radiation and Development of a Diffuse Screen Electron Beam Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Zerodur ,irror, 2" relfects light. 1OZ20BD.1; 20th wave zerodur mirror , 1" reflects light. LS-35; 3’ x 5’ optical breadboard; for mounting components...profile measurements using the diffuse screen were compared with measurements using a front surface mirror and a fluorescent screen. The 20 DISTRIBUTION...Beam current and profile measurements using the diffuse screen were compared with measurements using a front surface mirror and a fluorescent screen

  17. Scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT: analysis of voxelized patient simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a systematic assessment of scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT. The analysis is based on simulated scatter projections of voxelized CT images of different body regions allowing to accurately quantify scattered radiation of realistic and clinically relevant patient geometries. Using analytically computed primary projection data of high spatial resolution in combination with Monte-Carlo simulated scattered radiation, practically noise-free reference data sets are computed with and without inclusion of scatter. The impact of scatter is studied both in the projection data and in the reconstructed volume for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions. Currently available anti-scatter grid geometries do not sufficiently compensate scatter induced cupping and streak artifacts, requiring additional software-based scatter correction. The required accuracy of scatter compensation approaches increases with increasing patient size.

  18. Multi-emitter laser multiplexer using a two-mirror beam shaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Joshua M.; Brennan, John; Bhatia, Vikram

    2014-12-01

    A system was designed and built to spatially multiplex four broad area laser diodes (BALD) and condense the light into a multi-mode fiber with a core diameter of 105 um and an NA of 0.15. The lasers were efficiently combined with an étendue aspect ratio scaler (EARS) optic. The EARS works under the principle of a two mirror beam shaper. We were able to successfully couple more than 87% of the optical energy into the fiber. The design of the optical system and the results of several built systems are discussed.

  19. Flat-panel detector-based cone beam volume CT breast imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary evaluation of large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages over film-screen and CCD-based imagers: compactness, high resolution, high frame rate, large dynamic range, small image lag (<1%), and excellent linearity (~1%). A real time large-area flat panel detector (FPD) Varian PaxScan 2520 was evaluated for cone-beam volume breast imaging (CBVCTBI) in terms of dynamic range, linearity, image lag, and spatial as well as low contrast resolution. In addition, specially made breast phantoms were imaged with our prototyped CBVCTBI system to provide real outcomes to evaluate the detector under full imaging system conditions including the x-ray source, gantry geometry, x-ray technique selection, data acquisition system and reconstruction algorithms. We have concentrated on the low kVp range (30 to 80 kVp) in the context of the breast-imaging task. For ~288 images/scan the exposure required was ~2.5mR/projection. This is equivalent to that of a conventional mammography screening exam. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCTBI system can achieve sufficient high- and low-contrast resolution for diagnostic CBVCT breast imaging with a clinically acceptable exposure level. The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for CBVCTBI.

  20. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  1. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  2. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  3. Analyzing the average intensity distribution and beam width evolution of phase-locked partially coherent radial flat-topped array laser beams in oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, M.; Kashani, F. D.; Mashal, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this research, an analytical expression for cross-spectral density matrix elements (and consequently, average intensity) of partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) radial array laser beams in weak oceanic turbulence are derived based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the previously developed knowledge of the propagation of a partially coherent beam in atmosphere. Mean-squared beam width is calculated analytically using average intensity formula. The simulation is done by considering the effects of source parameters (such as the radius of the array setup’s circle and effective width of spectral degree of coherence) and turbulent ocean factors (such as the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and relative strength of temperature-salinity fluctuations, Kolmogorov micro-scale, and the rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature) in detail. It is found that when salinity fluctuations in the ocean dominate temperature fluctuations, the average intensity of the PCFT array beam becomes more broad and the array beam profile conversion process to a single wider Gaussian beam profile will occur at a faster rate. For the same turbulent conditions and the same initial beam width, the divergence of a flat-topped array beam is less than the Gaussian array beam. The simulation and calculation results are shown by graphs.

  4. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  5. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  6. Emittance compensation in split photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floettmann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The compensation of correlated emittance contributions is of primary importance to optimize the performance of high brightness photoinjectors. While only extended numerical simulations can capture the complex beam dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in sufficient detail to optimize a specific injector layout, simplified models are required to gain a deeper understanding of the involved dynamics, to guide the optimization procedure, and to interpret experimental results. In this paper, a slice envelope model for the emittance compensation process in a split photoinjector is presented. The emittance term is included in the analytical solution of the beam envelope in a drift, which is essential to take the emittance contribution due to a beam size mismatch into account. The appearance of two emittance minima in the drift is explained, and the matching into the booster cavity is discussed. A comparison with simulation results points out effects which are not treated in the envelope model, such as overfocusing and field nonlinearities.

  7. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Bulanov, Stepan; Chen, Min; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Vay, J.; Yu, Lule; Leemans, Wim

    2015-05-21

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2O3 laser for ionization injection.

  8. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  9. Evaluation of flat panel detector cone beam CT breast imaging with different sizes of breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Lu, Xianghua; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yong; Schiffhauer, Linda; Cullinan, Jeanne

    2005-04-01

    The sensitivity to detect small breast cancers and the specificity of conventional mammography (CM) remain limited owing to an overlap in the appearances of lesions and surrounding structure. We propose to address the limitations accompanying CM using flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT breast imaging (CBCTBI). The purpose of the study is to determine optimal x-ray operation ranges for different sizes of normal breasts and corresponding glandular dose levels. The current CBCT prototype consists of a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage CT gantry, an x-ray tube, a Varian PaxScan 4030CB FPD, a CT table and a PC. Two uncompressed breast phantoms, with the diameters of 10.8 and 13.8 cm, consist of three inserts: a layer of silicone jell simulating a background structure, a lucite plate on which five simulated carcinomas are mounted, and a plate on which six calcifications are attached. With a single scan, 300 projections were acquired for all phantom scans. The optimal x-ray techniques for different phantom sizes were determined. The total mean glandular doses for different size phantoms were measured using a CT pencil ionization chamber. With the optimal x-ray techniques that result in the maximal dose efficiency for the different tissue thickness, the image quality with two different phantoms was evaluated. The results demonstrate that the CBCTBI can detect a few millimeter-size simulated carcinoma and ~ 0.2 mm calcification with clinically acceptable mean glandular doses for different size breasts.

  10. Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT for dynamic imaging: system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cai, Weixing; Yang, Dong; Lu, Xianghua

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize a newly built flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT (CBCT) prototype for dynamic imaging. A CBCT prototype has been designed and constructed by completely modifying a GE HiSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT gantry, incorporating a newly acquired large size real-time FPD (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), a new x-ray generator and a dual focal spot angiography x-ray tube that allows the full coverage of the detector. During data acquisition, the x-ray tube and the FPD can be rotated on the gantry over Nx360 degrees due to integrated slip ring technology with the rotation speed of one second/revolution. With a single scan time of up to 40 seconds , multiple sets of reconstructions can be performed for dynamic studies. The upgrade of this system has been completed. The prototype was used for a series of preliminary phantom studies: different sizes of breast phantoms, a Humanoid chest phantom and scatter correction studies. The results of the phantom studies demonstrate that good image quality can be achieved with this newly built prototype.

  11. Performance of cone-beam CT using a flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsusita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Fukuda, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    An active matrix flat-panel imager (FPI) is a good candidate for the 2-dimensional detector of cone beam CT (CBCT), because it has a wider dynamic range and less geometrical distortion than video-fluoroscopic system so far employed. However the performance of FPI-based CBCT has not been sufficiently examined yet. The aim of this work is to examine the performance of CBCT using a FPI with several phantoms. An X-ray tube, a phantom and a FPI were aligned on an experimental table. The FPI was PaxScan2520 provided by Varian Medical Systems. It has an active area of approximately 180x240mm and the pixel size is 127 micrometer. CsI is used as a scintillator. The phantom was rotated with 1-degree steps while 360 projection frames (1408x1888 active pixels each frame) were collected. 2x2 pixels were combined into a single pixel to reduce noise. 512x512x512 voxels were reconstructed with the Feldkamp method. The comparison was made between reconstructed images with or without scatter rejecting grid. The uniformity and linearity of reconstruction value was drastically improved with the grid. Scatter rejection using a thin-vane collimator was also examined, and it showed more effective than the grid.

  12. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  13. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  14. Photocathode rf gun emittance measurements using variable-length laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerge, John F.; Hernandez, Mike; Hogan, Mark J.; Reis, David A.; Winick, Herman

    1999-07-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) was created to develop an appropriate injector for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS design requires the injector to produce a beam with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter pulse with no greater than 1 (pi) mm-mrad normalized rms emittance. The first photoinjector under study at the GTF is a 1.6 cell S-band symmetrized gun with an emittance compensation solenoid. Emittance measurements, reported here, were made as function of the transverse laser pulse shape and the Gaussian longitudinal laser pulse length. The lowest achieved emittance to data with 1 nC of charge is 5.6 (pi) mm-mrad and was obtained with both a Gaussian longitudinal and transverse pulse shape with 5 ps FWHM and 2.4 mm FWHM respectively. The measurement is in agreement with a PARMELA simulation using measured beam parameters. There are indications that the accelerator settings used in the results presented here were not optimal. Simulations indicate that a normalized emittance meeting the LCLS requirement can be obtained using appropriately shaped transverse and temporal laser/electron beam pulses. Work has begun on producing temporal flat top laser pulses which combined with transverse clipping of the laser is expected to lower the emittance to approximately 1 (pi) mm-mrad for 1 nC beams with optimal accelerator settings.

  15. Theoretical modeling of the divergence of a flat-topped beam from a two-stage beam shaper into a conical intensity profile after propagation in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighatzadeh, A.; Saadat, Sh.

    2014-02-01

    In this article, a two-stage beam shaping device based on a plastic fiber-bundle prism duct coupled waveguide is theoretically and experimentally described. ZEMAX software is used to simulate and investigate the divergence phenomenon on the beam shape outputted and the radiance profiles in both position and angle space. The effect of prism's geometrical structure on the beam divergence is also investigated and the optimum geometric conditions are reported. According to the theoretical results, due to an asymmetrical divergence effect the beam's cross section is increased with distance by a variable aspect ratio. The results also show that propagation in free space transformed a square beam with a flat-top intensity distribution into a rectangular beam with a conical intensity distribution. For experimental study, an imaging technique is applied to investigate the beam's output images and intensity profiles. A source light is used to illuminate the optical beam shaping elements of the reported design. Digital photographs of the beam's output for different axial distances are taken by a camera and the image data is converted into a response curve for comparison with the simulated image profiles. The obtained experimental results are strongly in agreement with the theoretical ones.

  16. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatomo, T. Kase, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Nakagawa, T.; Tzoganis, V.

    2016-02-15

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO{sub 2} (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF{sub 2}, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy {sup 12}C{sup 4+}, {sup 16}O{sup 4+}, and {sup 40}Ar{sup 11+} ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  17. Laser beam scanning system for irradiation in an external quadrangular form for soldering of quad flat package IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hitoshi; Homma, Tetsuya

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new soldering process and a system for a quad flat package IC (QFP-IC). The incident line-formed laser beam converted by this system can realize an external quadrangular form line for the non-contact regional heating, to provide thin and light weight electronic packages as required. The laser beam pumped by an yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser oscillator is split into four beams. Using a galvano motor, which can scan the reflection mirror with high frequencies, the laser beam can change the heating line. The soldering time for QFP-IC of 100 pins with the 0.65 mm pitch was 6 s. As the regional heating just only junctions, the temperature in the resin package was lower than 141 °C after solder fusion. From the experimental result, it is confirmed that this method is less damage to a resin package than a conventional whole heating method.

  18. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razin, S.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  19. Flat panel detector-based cone-beam volume CT angiography imaging: system evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ning, R; Chen, B; Yu, R; Conover, D; Tang, X; Ning, Y

    2000-09-01

    Preliminary evaluation of recently developed large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages: compactness, absence of geometric distortion and veiling glare with the benefits of high resolution, high detective quantum efficiency (DQE), high frame rate and high dynamic range, small image lag (< 1%), and excellent linearity (approximately 1%). The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for cone-beam volume computed tomography (CT) angiography (CBVCTA) imaging. The purpose of this study is to characterize a prototype FPD-based imaging system for CBVCTA applications. A prototype FPD-based CBVCTA imaging system has been designed and constructed around a modified GE 8800 CT scanner. This system is evaluated for a CBVCTA imaging task in the head and neck using four phantoms and a frozen rat. The system is first characterized in terms of linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then, the optimal selection of kVps for CBVCTA is determined and the effect of image lag and scatter on the image quality of the CBVCTA system is evaluated. Next, low-contrast resolution and high-contrast spatial resolution are measured. Finally, the example reconstruction images of a frozen rat are presented. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCT can achieve 2.75-lp/mm spatial resolution at 0% modulation transfer function (MTF) and provide more than enough low-contrast resolution for intravenous CBVCTA imaging in the head and neck with clinically acceptable entrance exposure level. The results also suggest that to use an FPD for large cone-angle applications, such as body angiography, further investigations are required.

  20. 1.5% root-mean-square flat-intensity laser beam formed using a binary-amplitude spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Kohn, Rudolph N; Becker, Michael F; Heinzen, Daniel J

    2009-04-01

    We demonstrate a digital micromirror device (DMD)-based optical system that converts a spatially noisy quasi-Gaussian to an eighth-order super-Lorentzian flat-top beam. We use an error-diffusion algorithm to design the binary pattern for the Texas Instruments DLP device. Following the DMD, a telescope with a pinhole low-pass filters the beam and scales it to the desired sized image. Experimental measurements show a 1% root-mean-square (RMS) flatness over a diameter of 0.28 mm in the center of the flat-top beam and better than 1.5% RMS flatness over its entire 1.43 mm diameter. The power conversion efficiency is 37%. We develop an alignment technique to ensure that the DMD pattern is correctly positioned on the incident beam. An interferometric measurement of the DMD surface flatness shows that phase uniformity is maintained in the output beam. Our approach is highly flexible and is able to produce not only flat-top beams with different parameters, but also any slowly varying target beam shape. It can be used to generate the homogeneous optical lattice required for Bose-Einstein condensate cold atom experiments.

  1. Cone-beam CT breast imaging with a flat panel detector: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Tu, Shu-Ju; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Kappadath, S. C.

    2005-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a flat panel based cone-beam computer tomography (CT) system for 3-D breast imaging with computer simulation and imaging experiments. In our simulation study, 3-D phantoms were analytically modeled to simulate a breast loosely compressed into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients were estimated to represent various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications to generate realistic image signal and contrast. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the two-views mammography comparable dose level on the central axis of the phantom (also the rotation axis), x-ray kVp/filtration, transmittance through the phantom, detected quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to estimate the phantom noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis. This estimated noise level was then used with the random number generator to produce and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulated detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian-like kernel is designed to suppress the noise fluctuation that inherently originates from projection images so that the reconstructed image detectability of low contrast masses phantom can be improved. Image reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. With 600 mrads mean glandular dose (MGD) at the phantom center, soft tissue masses as small as 1 mm in diameter can be detected in a 10 cm diameter 50% glandular 50% adipose or fatter breast tissue, and 2 mm or larger

  2. Non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement by using laser beam and laser distance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Fan, Bo; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2015-07-01

    Large-scale separated surface is very common in modern manufacturing industry. The measurement of the flatness of such surfaces is one of the most important procedures when evaluating the manufacturing quality. Usually, the measurement needs to be accomplished in an in-situ and non-contact way. Although there are many conventional approaches such as autocollimator, capacitance displacement sensor and even CMM, they can not meet the needs from the separated surfaces measurement either because of their contact-nature or inapplicable to separated surfaces. A non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement device utilizing laser beam and laser distance sensor (LDS) is proposed. The laser beam is rotated to form an optical reference plane. The LDS is used to measure the distance between the surface and the sensor accurately. A Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) is mounted with the LDS firmly to determine the distance between the LDS and the reference plane and then the distance between the surface and the reference plane can be obtained by subtracting the two distances. The device can be easily mounted on a machine-tool spindle and is moved to measure all the separated surfaces. Then all the data collected are used to evaluate the flatness of these separated surfaces. The accuracy analysis, the corresponding flatness evaluation algorithm, the prototype construction and experiments are also discussed. The proposed approach and device feature as high accuracy, in-situ usage and the higher degree of automatic measurement, and can be used in the areas that call for non-contact and separated surfaces measurement.

  3. The effects of external beam irradiation on the growth of flat bones in children: Modeling a dose-volume effect

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J. . E-mail: mathew.krasin@stjude.org; Xiong Xiaoping; Wu Shengjie; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To model the effects of external beam irradiation on the developing flat bones of pediatric patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for tumors involving the musculoskeletal system. Methods and Materials: Patients with image-guided RT plans including areas adjacent to facial or pelvic flat bones underwent retrospective contouring of nontumor involved flat bones ipsilateral and contralateral to the treatment side. Radiation dose-volume information and bone volume data (initial and the most recent follow-up) were analyzed in 15 paired flat bones from 10 patients (ages 1.0-17.0 years). The models to predict bone growth after completion of RT (v {sub post}) were based on initial bone volume (v {sub pre}), the patient's age, time to follow-up (t), and the dose-volume parameter (v{sub Int35+} ). Results: We developed a dose effects model as follows: Log (v{sub post} / v{sub pre} ) = {beta}{sub time}t + {beta}{sub agegroup}t + {beta}{sub dose}t v{sub Int35} . The dose-volume parameter v{sub Int35} predicted significantly for alterations in growth in younger patients, but not for older patients. The predictability of the fitted model for relative change in bone growth improved in the younger age group with the addition of the dose-volume term v{sub Int35} (correlation coefficient of r = 0.5510 to r = 0.6760 with the addition v{sub Int35} ). Conclusions: Our model accurately predicted flat bone growth and is notable for the inclusion of radiation dose-volume information, which is now available in the image-guided RT era. Further refinement of this model in a prospective patient population is underway.

  4. Empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) for the precorrection of beam hardening and scatter for flat panel CT

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, Rainer; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Scatter and beam hardening are prominent artifacts in x-ray CT. Currently, there is no precorrection method that inherently accounts for tube voltage modulation and shaped prefiltration. Methods: A method for self-calibration based on binary tomography of homogeneous objects, which was proposed by B. Li et al. [''A novel beam hardening correction method for computed tomography,'' in Proceedings of the IEEE/ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering CME 2007, pp. 891-895, 23-27 May 2007], has been generalized in order to use this information to preprocess scans of other, nonbinary objects, e.g., to reduce artifacts in medical CT applications. Further on, the method was extended to handle scatter besides beam hardening and to allow for detector pixel-specific and ray-specific precorrections. This implies that the empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) technique is sensitive to spectral effects as they are induced by the heel effect, by shaped prefiltration, or by scanners with tube voltage modulation. The presented method models the beam hardening correction by using a rational function, while the scatter component is modeled using the pep model of B. Ohnesorge et al. [''Efficient object scatter correction algorithm for third and fourth generation CT scanners,'' Eur. Radiol. 9(3), 563-569 (1999)]. A smoothness constraint is applied to the parameter space to regularize the underdetermined system of nonlinear equations. The parameters determined are then used to precorrect CT scans. Results: EBTC was evaluated using simulated data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner with tube voltage modulation and bow-tie prefiltration and using real data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner. In simulation studies, where the ground truth is known, the authors' correction model proved to be highly accurate and was able to reduce beam hardening by 97% and scatter by about 75%. Reconstructions of measured data showed significantly less artifacts than

  5. An ESS system for ECRIS Emittance Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Sun, L.T.; He, W.; Ma, L.; Zhang, Z.M.; Zhao, H.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhang, X.Z.; Guo, X.H.; Ma, B.H.; Li, J.; Wang, H.; Li, J.Y.; Li, X.X.; Feng, Y.C.; Lu, W.

    2005-03-15

    An emittance scanner named Electric-Sweep Scanner had been designed and fabricated in IMP. And it has been set up on the LECR3 beam line for the ion beam quality study. With some development, the ESS system has become a relatively dependable and reliable emittance scanner. Its experiment error is about 10 percent. We have done a lot of experiments of emittance measurement on LECR3 ion source, and have researched the relations between ion beam emittance and the major parameters of ECR ion source. The reliability and accuracy test results are presented in this paper. And the performance analysis is also discussed.

  6. Transverse emittance measurements from a photocathode RF gun with variable laser pulse length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, D. A.; Hernandez, M.; Schmerge, J. F.; Winick, H.; Hogan, M. J.

    1999-06-01

    The gun test facility (GTF) at SSRL was started in 1996 to develop an appropriate injector for the proposed linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS design requires the injector to produce a beam with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter pulse with no greater than 1π mm mrad normalized rms emittance. The photoinjector at the GTF is 1.6 cell S-band symmetrized gun and emittance compensation solenoid. Emittance measurements, reported here, were made as function of laser pulse width using Gaussian longitudinal pulses. The lowest achieved emittance to date with 1 nC of charge is 5.6π mm mrad and was obtained with a pulse width of 5 ps (FWHM) and is in agreement with simulation. There are indications that the accelerator settings for these results may not have been optimal. Simulations also indicate that a normalized emittance meeting the LCLS requirement can be obtained using appropriately shaped transverse and temporal laser/electron beam pulses. Work has begun on producing temporal flat top laser pulses which combined with transverse clipping of the laser is expected to lower the emittance to approximately 1π mm mrad for 1 nC with optimal accelerator settings.

  7. Direct determination of nuclear polarization produced by beam-foil interaction for the short-lived. beta. emitter /sup 12/B

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, Y.; Deutch, B.I.

    1983-07-18

    Nuclear polarization P of the short-lived ..beta.. emitter /sup 12/B was produced by the beam-foil interaction and directly determined via asymmetric ..beta.. decay. For a single tilted foil, at boron energy E/sub B/ = 1.0 MeV, Vertical BarPVertical Bar = 1.82(14)%. This was enhanced to Vertical BarPVertical Bar = 4.69(46)% by stacking four tilted foils. The dependence of P vs E/sub B/ was observed for a single tilted foil in the range of E/sub B/ = 0.6 to 1.3 MeV. The sign of P followed that of the tilt angle and was consistent with predictions from electron-density-gradient models.

  8. Dependence of the Light Emission Characteristics on the Ne Gas Pressure in an Electron-beam-pumped Light Source Using a Field Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Kazufumi; Neo, Yoichiro; Okada, Morihiro; Kume, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ikedo, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi; Hashiguchi, Gen; Mimura, Hidenori

    The dependence of the light intensity on the gas pressure was investigated in an electron-beam-pumped-light source using a graphite nanoneedle field emitter, a Si electron-transparent film and a Ne gas. A spot-like light emission and a background light emission are observed in at a Ne gas pressure less than 0.4 atm, while the back ground light emission disappears and the light emission becomes a completely spot with increasing the gas pressure. These experimental results are explained by the Monte-Calro simulation of electron trajectories inside the gas cell. On the other hand, the light intensity almost saturates at a gas pressure of 0.4 atm and dose not increase with increasing the gas pressure. The Monte-Calro simulation suggests that the saturation of the light intensity is due to the increase of the excited Ne atoms losing their energy without light emission.

  9. Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  10. Selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  11. Microcalcification detection using cone-beam CT mammography with a flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Vedula, Aruna A; Glick, Stephen J

    2004-06-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate microcalcification detectability using CT mammography with a flat-panel imager. To achieve this, a computer simulation was developed to model an amorphous-silicon, CsI based flat-panel imager system using a linear cascaded model. The breast was modelled as a hemi-ellipsoid shape with composition of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. Microcalcifications were modelled as small spheres having a composition of calcium carbonate. The results show that with a mean glandular dose equivalent to that typically used in two-view screening mammography, CT mammography with a flat-panel detector is capable of providing images where most microcalcifications are detectable. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was conducted by five physicist observers viewing simulated CT mammography reconstructions. The results suggest that the microcalcification with its diameter equal to or greater than 0.175 mm can be detected with an average area under the ROC curve (AUC) greater than 0.95 using 0.1 or 0.2 mm pixelized detectors. The results also indicate that the optimal pixel size of the detector is around 0.2 mm for microcalcification detection, based on the trade-off between detectability of microcalcifications and the time required for data acquisition and reconstruction.

  12. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  13. An equation-based nonlinear model for non-flat MEMS fixed-fixed beams with non-vertical anchoring supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Juan; Garg, Anurag; Kovacs, Andrew; Bajaj, Anil K.; Peroulis, Dimitrios

    2015-05-01

    Anchor supports in MEMS beams are often far from the ideally assumed built-in or step-up conditions. Practical fabrication processes often result in non-vertical anchoring supports (referred to as inclined supports in the following text) which significantly influence the post-release performance of the beam. This paper brings attention to the presence of the inclined supports in surface micromachined fixed-fixed beams and models the mechanical and electromechanical effects of inclined supports for the first time. Specifically, we calculate and validate the effects of residual stress and loading on the post-release beam behavior including their nonlinear large-displacement characteristics. In addition the model accounts for non-flat beam profiles caused by residual stress and/or a non-flat sacrificial layer profile. Inclined supports are modeled as cantilever beams connected to a horizontal beam. The Euler-Bernoulli equations for all beams are simultaneously solved to calculate the axial stress of the horizontal beam and the axial, translational, and rotational compliance of the supports. Nonlinear effects due to stretching and residual stress are also included. The calculated beam displacements agree with FEM models to within 1.1% in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Furthermore, experimentally-obtained displacements of six fabricated beams with inclined supports agree to within 5.2% with the presented model.

  14. Emittance measurements for optimum operation of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The transverse emittances of the source were measured with various conditions to find out the optimum operation conditions minimizing the horizontal and vertical rms normalized emittances. The transverse emittances were most effectively reduced by operating the source with the plasma electrode temperature lower than 70°C. The optimum value of the cesium (Cs) density around the beam hole of the plasma electrode seems to be proportional to the plasma electrode temperature. The fine control of the Cs density is indispensable, since the emittances seem to increase proportionally to the excessiveness of the Cs density. Furthermore, the source should be operated with the Cs density beyond a threshold value, since the plasma meniscus shape and the ellipse parameters of the transverse emittances seem to be changed step-function-likely on the threshold Cs value.

  15. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  16. Efficient upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Burkett, Allan; Blackwell, Ashley; Taylor, Keylantra; Walker, Vernell; Sarkisov, Sergey; Koplitz, Brent

    2014-09-01

    We report on fabrication and investigation of optical and morphological properties of highly efficient (a quantum yield of 1%) upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the new technique of double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE). Polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) host was evaporated on a silicon substrate using a 1064-nm pulsed laser beam using a target made of frozen (to the temperature of liquid nitrogen) solution of PMMA in chlorobenzene. Concurrently, the second 532-nm pulsed beam from the same laser was used to impregnate the polymer host with the inorganic nanoparticulate made of the rare earth upconversion compounds NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+, NaYF4: Yb3+, Ho3+, and NaYF4: Yb3+, Tm3+. The compounds were initially synthesized using the wet process, baked, and compressed in solid pellet targets. The proposed DB-MAPLE method has the advantage of making highly homogeneous nanocomposite films with precise control of the doping rate due to the optimized overlapping of the plumes produced by the ablation of the organic and inorganic target with the infrared and visible laser beams respectively. X-ray diffraction, electron and atomic force microscopy, and optical fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that the inorganic nanoparticulate preserved its crystalline structure and upconversion properties (strong emission in green, red, and blue bands upon illumination with 980-nm laser diode) after being transferred from the target in the polymer nanocomposite film. The produced films can be used in applications varying from the efficiency enhancement of the photovoltaic cells, optical sensors and biomarkers to anti-counterfeit labels.

  17. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Ken; Baba, Rika

    2006-12-15

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

  18. mARC Treatment of Hypopharynx Carcinoma with Flat and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Energies – A Planning Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Katharina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently implemented mARC-rotation-technique is capable to deliver high dose rate bursts. For the case of hypopharynx cancer plans we evaluate whether the mARC can achieve an advantage in treatment time in comparison to IMRT. These plans consider two arcs with flat and flattening filter free (FFF) beam energies. Materials and Methods For 8 hypopharynx-cancer patients step-and-shoot-IMRT and mARC plans were created retrospectively using flat and FFF beam energy. The comparison of the plan scenarios considered measures of quality for PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk. All plans were irradiated on an anthromorphic phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure scattered dose and treatment times. Results A visual comparison of the dose distribution did not show a marked preference for either technique or energy. The statistical evaluation yielded significant differences in favor of the mARC technique and the FFF energy. Scattered dose could be decreased markedly by the use of the mARC technique. Treatment times could be reduced up to 3 minutes with the use of mARC in comparison to IMRT. The high dose rate energy results in another time advantage of about 1 minute. Conclusions All four plan scenarios yielded equally good quality plans. A combination of the mARC technique with FFF 7 MV high dose rate resulted in a decrease of treatment times from about 9 minutes to 5–6 minutes in comparison to 6 MV IMRT. PMID:27741272

  19. Small animal imaging using a flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Yong; Lu, Xianghua; Wood, Ronald W.; Reeder, Jay E.; Johnson, Aimee M.

    2005-04-01

    Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT (FPD-CBCT) imaging system prototypes have been constructed based on modified clinical CT scanners (a modified GE 8800 CT system and a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) spiral CT system) each with a Varian PaxScan 2520 imager. The functions of the electromechanical and radiographic subsystems of the CT system were controlled through specially made hardware, software and data acquisition modules to perform animal cone beam CT studies. Small animal (mouse) imaging studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of an optimized CBCT imaging system to have the capability to perform longitudinal studies to monitor the progression of cancerous tumors or the efficacy of treatments. Radiographic parameters were optimized for fast (~10 second) scans of live mice to produce good reconstructed image quality with dose levels low enough to avoid any detectable radiation treatment to the animals. Specifically, organs in the pelvic region were clearly imaged and contrast studies showed the feasibility to visualize small vasculature and space-filling bladder tumors. In addition, prostate and mammary tumors were monitored in volume growth studies.

  20. Coherence preservation and beam flatness of a single-bounce multilayer monochromator (beamline ID19—ESRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Weitkamp, T.; Zanette, I.; Morawe, Ch.; Vivo Rommeveaux, A.; Tafforeau, P.; Cloetens, P.; Ziegler, E.; Rack, T.; Cecilia, A.; Vagovič, P.; Harmann, E.; Dietsch, R.; Riesemeier, H.

    2011-09-01

    Larger spectral bandwidth and higher photon flux density are the major advantages of multilayer monochromators over crystal-based devices. Especially for synchrotron-based hard X-ray microimaging applications the increased photon flux density is important in order to achieve high contrast and resolution in space and/or time. However, the modifications on the beam profile induced by reflection on a multilayer are a drawback which can seriously harm the performance of such a monochromator. A recent study [A. Rack, T. Weitkamp, M. Riotte, D. Grigoriev, T. Rack, L. Helfen, T. Baumbach, R. Dietsch, T. Holz, M. Krämer, F. Siewert, M. Meduňa, P. Cloetens, E. Ziegler, J. Synchrotron Radiat. 17 (2010) 496-510] has shown that the modifications in terms of beam flatness and coherence preservation can be influenced via the material composition of the multilayer coating. The present article extends this knowledge by studying further material compositions used on a daily basis for hard X-ray monochromatization at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

  1. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  2. Double emittance exchanger as a bunch compressor for the MaRIE XFEL electron beam line at 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Yampolsky, Nikolai A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate an alternative realization of a bunch compressor (specifically, the second bunch compressor for the MaRIE XFEL beamline, 1GeV electron energy) using a double emittance exchanger (EEX) and a telescope in the transverse phase space. We compare our results with a traditional bunch compressor realized via a chicane, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) and Space Charge (SC) effects. In particular, we use the Elegant code for tracking particles through the beamline, and analyze the evolution of the eigen-emittances to separate the influence of the CSR/SC effects from the nonlinear dynamics effects. We optimize the scheme parameters to reach a desirable compression factor and minimize the emittance growth. We observe dominant CSR effects in our scheme, resulting in critical emittance growth, and introduce an alternative version of an emittance exchanger with a reduced number of bending magnets to minimize the impact of CSR effects.

  3. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  4. The exact solution of shear-lag problems in flat panels and box beams assumed rigid in the transverse direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Francis B

    1943-01-01

    A mathematical procedure is herein developed for obtaining exact solutions of shear-lag problems in flat panels and box beams: the method is based on the assumption that the amount of stretching of the sheets in the direction perpendicular to the direction of essential normal stresses is negligible. Explicit solutions, including the treatment of cut-outs, are given for several cases and numerical results are presented in graphic and tabular form. The general theory is presented in a from which further solutions can be readily obtained. The extension of the theory to cover certain cases of non-uniform cross section is indicated. Although the solutions are obtained in terms of infinite series, the present developments differ from those previously given in that, in practical cases, the series usually converge so rapidly that sufficient accuracy is afforded by a small number of terms. Comparisons are made in several cases between the present results and the corresponding solutions obtained by approximate procedures devised by Reissner and by Kuhn and Chiarito.

  5. Aging of imaging properties of a CMOS flat-panel detector for dental cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; Han, J. C.; Yun, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the long-term stability of imaging properties of a flat-panel detector in conditions used for dental x-ray imaging. The detector consists of a CsI:Tl layer and CMOS photodiode pixel arrays. Aging simulations were carried out using an 80-kVp x-ray beam at an air-kerma rate of approximately 5 mGy s-1 at the entrance surface of the detector with a total air kerma of up to 0.6 kGy. Dark and flood-field images were periodically obtained during irradiation, and the mean signal and noise levels were evaluated for each image. We also evaluated the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The aging simulation showed a decrease in both the signal and noise of the gain-offset-corrected images, but there was negligible change in the signal-to-noise performance as a function of the accumulated dose. The gain-offset correction for analyzing images resulted in negligible changes in MTF, NPS, and DQE results over the total dose. Continuous x-ray exposure to a detector can cause degradation in the physical performance factors such the detector sensitivity, but linear analysis of the gain-offset-corrected images can assure integrity of the imaging properties of a detector during its lifetime.

  6. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  7. Analyzing the propagation behavior of scintillation index and bit error rate of a partially coherent flat-topped laser beam in oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Golmohammady, Shole; Mashal, Ahmad; Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, a semianalytical expression for describing on-axis scintillation index of a partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) laser beam of weak to moderate oceanic turbulence is derived; consequently, by using the log-normal intensity probability density function, the bit error rate (BER) is evaluated. The effects of source factors (such as wavelength, order of flatness, and beam width) and turbulent ocean parameters (such as Kolmogorov microscale, relative strengths of temperature and salinity fluctuations, rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, and rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid) on propagation behavior of scintillation index, and, hence, on BER, are studied in detail. Results indicate that, in comparison with a Gaussian beam, a PCFT laser beam with a higher order of flatness is found to have lower scintillations. In addition, the scintillation index and BER are most affected when salinity fluctuations in the ocean dominate temperature fluctuations.

  8. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2011-10-07

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  9. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  10. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  11. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  12. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ{sub Q}), electronic noise (σ{sub E}), and view aliasing (σ{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}), dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} <∼200, above which noise increased with N{sub proj} due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f {sup β}—and a general model of individual noise components (σ{sub Q}, σ{sub E}, and σ{sub view}) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N{sub proj}, D{sub tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis

  13. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  14. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  15. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  16. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W. Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  17. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  18. Nonlinear Statistical Reconstruction for Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT with Blur and Correlated Noise Models

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications. PMID:27110051

  19. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  20. Development of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei generated by proton irradiation of targets containing {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei in preparation of clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a new calculation algorithm that is satisfactory in terms of the requirements for both accuracy and calculation time for a simulation of imaging of the proton-irradiated volume in a patient body in clinical proton therapy. Methods: The activity pencil beam algorithm (APB algorithm), which is a new technique to apply the pencil beam algorithm generally used for proton dose calculations in proton therapy to the calculation of activity distributions, was developed as a calculation algorithm of the activity distributions formed by positron emitter nuclei generated from target nuclear fragment reactions. In the APB algorithm, activity distributions are calculated using an activity pencil beam kernel. In addition, the activity pencil beam kernel is constructed using measured activity distributions in the depth direction and calculations in the lateral direction. {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei were determined as the major target nuclei that constitute a human body that are of relevance for calculation of activity distributions. In this study, ''virtual positron emitter nuclei'' was defined as the integral yield of various positron emitter nuclei generated from each target nucleus by target nuclear fragment reactions with irradiated proton beam. Compounds, namely, polyethylene, water (including some gelatin) and calcium oxide, which contain plenty of the target nuclei, were irradiated using a proton beam. In addition, depth activity distributions of virtual positron emitter nuclei generated in each compound from target nuclear fragment reactions were measured using a beam ON-LINE PET system mounted a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp). The measured activity distributions depend on depth or, in other words, energy. The irradiated proton beam energies were 138, 179, and 223 MeV, and measurement time was about 5 h until the measured activity reached the background level. Furthermore, the activity pencil beam data

  1. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  2. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  3. Emittance growth due to dipole ripple and sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-05-01

    Ripple in the power supplies for storage ring magnets can have adverse effects on the circulating beams: orbit distortion and emittance growth from dipole ripple, tune modulation and dynamic aperture reduction from quadrupole ripple, etc. In this paper, we study the effects of ripple in the horizontal bending field of the SSC in the presence of nonlinearity, in particular, the growth in beam emittance.

  4. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Don; Acosta, John; Cremaldi, Lucien; Hart, Terry; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Wu, Wanwei; Neuffer, David

    2015-05-07

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low β region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 μs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87%.

  5. Flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography with a circle-plus-two-arcs data acquisition orbit: preliminary phantom study.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ruola; Tang, Xiangyang; Conover, David; Yu, Rongfeng

    2003-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been investigated in the past two decades due to its potential advantages over a fan beam CT. These advantages include (a) great improvement in data acquisition efficiency, spatial resolution, and spatial resolution uniformity, (b) substantially better utilization of x-ray photons generated by the x-ray tube compared to a fan beam CT, and (c) significant advancement in clinical three-dimensional (3D) CT applications. However, most studies of CBCT in the past are focused on cone beam data acquisition theories and reconstruction algorithms. The recent development of x-ray flat panel detectors (FPD) has made CBCT imaging feasible and practical. This paper reports a newly built flat panel detector-based CBCT prototype scanner and presents the results of the preliminary evaluation of the prototype through a phantom study. The prototype consisted of an x-ray tube, a flat panel detector, a GE 8800 CT gantry, a patient table and a computer system. The prototype was constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT gantry such that both a single-circle cone beam acquisition orbit and a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit can be achieved. With a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit, a complete set of cone beam projection data can be obtained, consisting of a set of circle projections and a set of arc projections. Using the prototype scanner, the set of circle projections were acquired by rotating the x-ray tube and the FPD together on the gantry, and the set of arc projections were obtained by tilting the gantry while the x-ray tube and detector were at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions, respectively. A filtered backprojection exact cone beam reconstruction algorithm based on a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit was used for cone beam reconstruction from both the circle and arc projections. The system was first characterized in terms of the linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then the uniformity, spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were assessed using

  6. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  7. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  8. A compact time reversal emitter-receiver based on a leaky random cavity

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Trung-Dung; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal acoustics (TRA) has gained widespread applications for communication and measurements. In general, a scattering medium in combination with multiple transducers is needed to achieve a sufficiently large acoustical aperture. In this paper, we report an implementation for a cost-effective and compact time reversal emitter-receiver driven by a single piezoelectric element. It is based on a leaky cavity with random 3-dimensional printed surfaces. The random surfaces greatly increase the spatio-temporal focusing quality as compared to flat surfaces and allow the focus of an acoustic beam to be steered over an angle of 41°. We also demonstrate its potential use as a scanner by embedding a receiver to detect an object from its backscatter without moving the TRA emitter. PMID:27811957

  9. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  10. Beam emittance forming line of the CW race-track microtron of the institute of nuclear physics of Moscow State University (INP MSU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, A. S.; Gevorkyan, V. G.; Gorbatov, Yu. I.; Gribov, I. V.; Ibadov, A. Kh.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Korneenkov, V. A.; Lazutin, E. V.; Makulbekov, E. A.; Piskarev, I. M.; Platov, K. Yu.; Savitsky, A. B.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Sorvin, V. M.; Tiunov, A. V.; Ushkanov, V. A.; Zinoviev, S. V.

    1989-06-01

    The transverse and longitudinal emittance forming line (EFL) of the race-track microtron of INP MSU is described. The work presents the principles of operation, parameters of EFL elements, description of rf power supply system and automated control system. The method of EFL tuning and experimental results are discussed.

  11. Field Emitter Arrays for Plasma and Microwave Source Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kevin L.

    1998-11-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are attractive cathode candidates for many applications, e.g., electron microguns(C. Constancias, D. Herve, R. Accomo, and E. Molva, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. B13, 611, 1995.), miniaturized TWTs(H. Imura, S. Tsuida, M. Takahasi, A. Okamoto, H. Makishima, and S. Miyano, Tech. Dig. of the IEEE-IEDM (Dec. 7-11, Washington, DC) p721.), radiation sources, instrumentation , sensors, mass spectrometers, and electric propulsion (Hall thrusters (C. M. Marrese and Alec D. Gallimore, Tech. Dig. of Int'l. Conf. on Plasma Science, (Raleigh, NC, June 4-5, 1998), 1D05.)) due to their instant ON/OFF capability, high brightness and current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, low voltage operation, and so on. Two applications are significant: in the most widely pursued, FEAs may enable significant reductions in physical dimensions, weight, and power consumption of flat panel displays (FPDs)(A. Ghis, R. Meyer, P. Rambaud, F. Levy, and T. Leroux, IEEE-Trans. Elect. Dev. 36, 2320 (1991)), whereas the most challenging application, advanced RF tubes(M. A. Kodis, K. L. Jensen, E. G. Zaidman, B. Goplen, D. N. Smithe, IEEE-Trans. on Plas. Sci. 24, 970 (1996).), may benefit from the current densities and high pulse repetition frequencies field emitters are capable of. FEAs (a coplanar gate less than one micron from a microfabricated conical emitter for field enhancement), provide high current density for low gate voltages, are relatively temperature insensitive, and are capable of emission modulation at 10 GHz. High currents due to quantum mechanical tunneling are made possible by narrowing the field emission barrier to nanometer widths. Greater performance and robustness may be enabled through rugged low work function coatings. We shall describe the process of field emission by quantum mechanical tunneling, provide an overview of the applications and their demands on field emitters, and present a model of FEAs used to characterize their performance

  12. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F; Pennisi, T R; Murray, S N; Santana, M; Long, C D

    2010-02-01

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H(-) beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  13. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-12-23

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  14. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R.J. Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence. PMID:28008918

  15. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  16. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  17. Emittance control in Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Chiu, C.; Breitling, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we summarize our recent effort and results in theoretical study of the emittance issues of multistaged Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in TeV energy range. In such an energy regime the luminosity and therefore the emittance requirements become very stringent and tantamount to the success or failure of such an accelerator. The system of such a machine is very sensitive to jitters due to misalignment between the beam and the wakefield. In particular, the effect of jitters in the presence of a strong focusing wakefield and initial longitudinal phase space spread of the beam leads to severe transverse emittance degradation of the beam. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration in a superunit setup, the "horn" model based on exactly synchronous acceleration achieved through plasma density variation and lastly an algorithm based on minimization of the final beam emittance to actively control the stage displacement of such an accelerator.

  18. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  19. Preparation and characterization of zirconium carbide field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, W.A.; Hinrichs, C.H. ); Davis, P.R. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors' report on experiments to determine the feasibility of using the refractory transition metal carbide ZrC as a stable field-emission cathode. Applications of such cathodes could include radiation-immune microcircuitry, flat-panel displays, e-beam lithography, and other uses where the need is for very high-density, small spot size electron sources. The primary emphasis of this paper is the preparation and analysis of methods needed to obtain stable electron emission from a cold field-emission cathode. CrC single-crystal specimens were prepared by arc floating zone refinement from sintered stock, yielding an average bulk stoichiometry of C/Zr = 0.913. Due to its brittle nature and the high temperatures required for cleaning of this carbide, new mounting methods were developed and are described. Emitter etching procedures are reported for ZrC, as well as {ital in situ} tip sharpening techniques of neon-ion bombardment and temperatures required for thermal cleaning. A temperature of 1500{degrees}C is required to remove adsorbates including oxygen. A clean ZrC field-emission pattern is shown. Ordering of work functions of various crystal planes is reported through field-emission microscopy and comparisons made with thermionic projection microscopy. Effective thermionic work functions are presented for clean surfaces to further support the ordering obtained. The ability of ZrC field emitters to operate at pressures far above those commonly found for field-emission cathodes is demonstrated.

  20. On the Production of Flat Electron Bunches for Laser Wake Field Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kando, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S.V.; Tajima, T.; Chao, A.; Pitthan, R.; Schuler, K.-P.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Nemoto, K.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo

    2006-06-27

    We suggest a novel method for injection of electrons into the acceleration phase of particle accelerators, producing low emittance beams appropriate even for the demanding high energy Linear Collider specifications. In this paper we work out the injection into the acceleration phase of the wake field in a plasma behind a high intensity laser pulse, taking advantage of the laser polarization and focusing. With the aid of catastrophe theory we categorize the injection dynamics. The scheme uses the structurally stable regime of transverse wake wave breaking, when electron trajectory self-intersection leads to the formation of a flat electron bunch. As shown in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of a laser pulse in a line-focus with an underdense plasma, the electrons, injected via the transverse wake wave breaking and accelerated by the wake wave, perform betatron oscillations with different amplitudes and frequencies along the two transverse coordinates. The polarization and focusing geometry lead to a way to produce relativistic electron bunches with asymmetric emittance (flat beam). An approach for generating flat laser accelerated ion beams is briefly discussed.

  1. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  2. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.E.-; Church, M.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2010-08-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchanger to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at A0 photoinjector.

  3. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction from Cone-Beam Projections for Flat and Curved Detectors: Reconstruction Method Development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui

    This dissertation is principally concerned with improving the performance of a prototype image-intensifier -based cone-beam volume computed tomography system by removing or partially removing two of its restricting factors, namely, the inaccuracy of current cone-beam reconstruction algorithm and the image distortion associated with the curved detecting surface of the image intensifier. To improve the accuracy of cone-beam reconstruction, first, the currently most accurate and computationally efficient cone-beam reconstruction method, the Feldkamp algorithm, is investigated by studying the relation of an original unknown function with its Feldkamp estimate. From this study, a partial knowledge on the unknown function can be derived in the Fourier domain from its Feldkamp estimate. Then, based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm, a modified iterative algorithm efficiently incorporating the Fourier knowledge as well as the a priori spatial knowledge on the unknown function is devised and tested to improve the cone-beam reconstruction accuracy by postprocessing the Feldkamp estimate. Two methods are developed to remove the distortion associated with the curved surface of image intensifier. A calibrating method based on a rubber-sheet remapping is designed and implemented. As an alternative, the curvature can be considered in the reconstruction algorithm. As an initial effort along this direction, a generalized convolution -backprojection reconstruction algorithm for fan-beam and any circular detector arrays is derived and studied.

  4. Theoretical study of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H; Davidson, R C; Chung, M; Barnard, J J; Wang, T F

    2011-04-14

    The effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions is investigated using the generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. Recently, the concept and technique of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling have been proposed for applications in the Linac Coherent Light Source and other free-electron lasers to reduce the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Such techniques can also be applied to the driver beams for the heavy ion fusion and beam-driven high energy density physics, where the transverse emittance budget is typically tighter than the longitudinal emittance. The proposed methods consist of one or several coupling components which completely swap the emittances of one of the transverse directions and the longitudinal direction at the exit of the coupling components. The complete emittance exchange is realized in one pass through the coupling components. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions. A weak coupling component is introduced at every focusing lattice, and we would like to determine if such a lattice can realize the function of emittance exchange.

  5. Creating flat-top X-ray beams by applying surface profiles of alternating curvature to deformable piezo bimorph mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, John P.; Alcock, Simon G.; Kashyap, Yogesh; Nistea, Ioana; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    Beam shaping is becoming increasingly important for synchrotron X-ray applications. Although routine for visible light lasers, this is challenging for X-rays due to the limited source coherence and extreme optical tolerances required for the shaping mirrors. In deliberate defocusing, even surface errors <5 nm r.m.s. introduce damagingly large striations into the reflected beam. To counteract such problems, surface modifications with alternating concave and convex curvature on equal segments were polished onto the surface of non-active mirrors of fixed curvature. Such optics are useful for providing a fixed size of X-ray beam, but do not provide the adaptability required by many experiments. In contrast, deformable piezo bimorph mirrors permit a continuous range of X-ray beam sizes and shapes. A new theory is developed for applying non-periodic modifications of alternating curvature to optical surfaces. The position and length of the segments may be freely chosen. For the first time, surface modifications of alternating curvature are applied to bimorph mirrors to generate non-Gaussian X-ray beam profiles of specified width. The new theory’s freedom is exploited to choose the segments to match the polishing errors of medium wavelength (>10 mm) and the piezos’ influence on the mirror’s figure. Five- and seven-segment modifications of alternating curvature are calculated and verified by visible light and X-ray metrology. The latter yields beam profiles with less striation than those made by defocusing. Remaining beam striations are explained by applying geometrical optics to the deviations from the ideal surface modifications of alternating curvature. PMID:27787239

  6. Creating flat-top X-ray beams by applying surface profiles of alternating curvature to deformable piezo bimorph mirrors.

    PubMed

    Sutter, John P; Alcock, Simon G; Kashyap, Yogesh; Nistea, Ioana; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-11-01

    Beam shaping is becoming increasingly important for synchrotron X-ray applications. Although routine for visible light lasers, this is challenging for X-rays due to the limited source coherence and extreme optical tolerances required for the shaping mirrors. In deliberate defocusing, even surface errors <5 nm r.m.s. introduce damagingly large striations into the reflected beam. To counteract such problems, surface modifications with alternating concave and convex curvature on equal segments were polished onto the surface of non-active mirrors of fixed curvature. Such optics are useful for providing a fixed size of X-ray beam, but do not provide the adaptability required by many experiments. In contrast, deformable piezo bimorph mirrors permit a continuous range of X-ray beam sizes and shapes. A new theory is developed for applying non-periodic modifications of alternating curvature to optical surfaces. The position and length of the segments may be freely chosen. For the first time, surface modifications of alternating curvature are applied to bimorph mirrors to generate non-Gaussian X-ray beam profiles of specified width. The new theory's freedom is exploited to choose the segments to match the polishing errors of medium wavelength (>10 mm) and the piezos' influence on the mirror's figure. Five- and seven-segment modifications of alternating curvature are calculated and verified by visible light and X-ray metrology. The latter yields beam profiles with less striation than those made by defocusing. Remaining beam striations are explained by applying geometrical optics to the deviations from the ideal surface modifications of alternating curvature.

  7. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  8. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  9. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  10. Study of instabilities and emittance growth in periodic focusing systems for intense beams. Progress report, Technical report No. PP 81-198

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.

    1981-05-01

    Initial problems with secondary electrons and diagnostics were solved. Beam expansion in free space and focusing by one and two solenoid lenses were studied in the experiment. Of particular interest are the special effects (beam explosion, images) caused by electrons scattered at the anode mesh.

  11. Experiment and Simulations with Nearly Equal Horizontal and Vertical Focusing Functions: Single and Colliding Beam Results from the Cornell Electron Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, Peter Paul

    1995-01-01

    For colliding beam particle accelerators, the dynamics of the beam beam interaction are one limit on the luminosity or event rate. Simulations of the beam beam interaction have suggested that round beams (equal horizontal and vertical emittances and beta ^{*}) could produce saturated tune shifts of about 0.100, much larger than those predicted for flat beams (horizontal emittance and beta ^{*} much larger than the vertical). This experiment was designed to test round beams and had a single interaction point at the North Interaction Region or NIP, with nearly zero horizontal dispersion and about 25 cm beta^{*} 's. In early 1990 we used about 140 hours of machine time. Beginning with flat beams (horizontal emittance much larger than the vertical emittance), we achieved saturated vertical tune shift parameters of about 0.045, very high for CESR at the time, but much smaller than the 0.080 predicted by the simulations for this case. During this flat beam work, we realized we had several experimental problems and halted the experiment without attempting the round beam work. Our separation scheme for the South Interaction Region or SIP produced different horizontal emittances and damping times for the electrons and positrons and so we reduced the separation in the SIP until we were concerned about the near miss beam crossing there. Also later analysis of orbit measurements showed small, but important, horizontal separations at the NIP. We've used a beam beam simulation to understand the effects that each of these problems has on the beam beam dynamics. Also using both an analytic formalism for the effects of resonances on single particles and several diagnostics to look at the simulation results for single particles, we've developed some understanding of why the simulations give the results they do and which resonances are important. We believe "dirt" effects, rather than fundamental limitations, set our experimental tune shift limit and that the nearly equal beta

  12. Tangent map analysis of the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Tepikian, S.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the tangent map of the beam-beam interaction and found no evidence of beam-beam instability for /epsilon/ = 0.04. Tracking study with tune modulation shows however large emittance growth due to the sum resonances. The emittance growth is due to the multiple crossing of the sum resonances. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  14. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  15. Understanding the Impact of Field-Emitter Characteristics on Electron Beam Focusing in the VAPoR Time-of-Fight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southard, Adrian E.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Costen, Nicholas P.; Hidrobo, Gregory B.; Glavin, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of field emission of electrons from an electron gun are used to determine the angular distribution of the emitted electron beam and the percentage of charge transmitted through the grid. The simulations are a first step towards understanding the spherical aberration present after focusing the electron beam. The effect of offset of the cathode with respect to the grid and the separation between cathode and grid on the angular distributions of emitted electrons and transmission of the grid are explored.

  16. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  17. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOEpatents

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  18. Flat Focusing Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y. C.; Kicas, S.; Trull, J.; Peckus, M.; Cojocaru, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Drazdys, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  19. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  20. Analyzing the propagation behavior of coherence and polarization degrees of a phase-locked partially coherent radial flat-topped array laser beam in underwater turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh; Yousefi, Masoud

    2016-08-10

    In this research, based on an analytical expression for cross-spectral density (CSD) matrix elements, coherence and polarization properties of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) radial array laser beams propagating through weak oceanic turbulence are analyzed. Spectral degrees of coherence and polarization are analytically calculated using CSD matrix elements. Also, the effective width of spatial degree of coherence (EWSDC) is calculated numerically. The simulation is done by considering the effects of source parameters (such as radius of the array setup's circle, effective width of the spectral degree of coherence, and wavelength) and turbulent ocean factors (such as the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations, Kolmogorov micro-scale, and rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature) in detail. Results indicate that any change in the amount of turbulence factors that increase the turbulence power reduces the EWSDC significantly and causes the reduction in the degree of polarization, and occurs at shorter propagation distances but with smaller magnitudes. In addition, being valid for all conditions, the degradation rate of the EWSDC of Gaussian array beams are more in comparison with the PCFT ones. The simulation and calculation results are shown by graphs.

  1. Longitudinal emittance growth due to nonlinear space charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Yu, Simon S.; Barnard, John J.; Seidl, Peter A.

    2012-03-01

    Emittance posts limits on the key requirements of final pulse length and spot size on target in heavy ion fusion drivers. In this paper, we show studies on the effect of nonlinear space charge on longitudinal emittance growth in the drift compression section. We perform simulations, using the 3D PIC code WARP, for a high current beam under conditions of bends and longitudinal compression. The linear growth rate for longitudinal emittance turns out to depend only on the peak line charge density, and is independent of pulse length, velocity tilt, and/or the pipe and beam size. This surprisingly simple result is confirmed by simulations and analytic calculations.

  2. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  3. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  4. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  5. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  6. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  7. Model-based iterative reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with focal spot blur, detector blur, and correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Steven, II; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2016-01-01

    While model-based reconstruction methods have been successfully applied to flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) systems, typical implementations ignore both spatial correlations in the projection data as well as system blurs due to the detector and focal spot in the x-ray source. In this work, we develop a forward model for flat-panel-based systems that includes blur and noise correlation associated with finite focal spot size and an indirect detector (e.g. scintillator). This forward model is used to develop a staged reconstruction framework where projection data are deconvolved and log-transformed, followed by a generalized least-squares reconstruction that utilizes a non-diagonal statistical weighting to account for the correlation that arises from the acquisition and data processing chain. We investigate the performance of this novel reconstruction approach in both simulated data and in CBCT test-bench data. In comparison to traditional filtered backprojection and model-based methods that ignore noise correlation, the proposed approach yields a superior noise-resolution tradeoff. For example, for a system with 0.34 mm FWHM scintillator blur and 0.70 FWHM focal spot blur, using the correlated noise model instead of an uncorrelated noise model increased resolution by 42% (with variance matched at 6.9  ×  10-8 mm-2). While this advantage holds across a wide range of systems with differing blur characteristics, the improvements are greatest for systems where source blur is larger than detector blur.

  8. Cone beam volume CT image artifacts caused by defective cells in x-ray flat panel imagers and the artifact removal using a wavelet-analysis-based algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tang, X; Ning, R; Yu, R; Conover, D

    2001-05-01

    The application of x-ray flat panel imagers (FPIs) in cone beam volume CT (CBVCT) has attracted increasing attention. However, due to a deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, defective cells unavoidably exist in x-ray FPIs. These defective cells cause their corresponding image pixels in a projection image to behave abnormally in signal gray level, and result in severe streak and ring artifacts in a CBVCT image reconstructed from the projection images. Since a three-dimensional (3-D) back-projection is involved in CBVCT, the formation of the streak and ring artifacts is different from that in the two-dimensional (2-D) fan beam CT. In this paper, a geometric analysis of the abnormality propagation in the 3D back-projection is presented, and the morphology of the streak and ring artifacts caused by the abnormality propagation is investigated through both computer simulation and phantom studies. In order to calibrate those artifacts, a 2D wavelet-analysis-based statistical approach to correct the abnormal pixels is proposed. The approach consists of three steps: (1) the location-invariant defective cells in an x-ray FPI are recognized by applying 2-D wavelet analysis on flat-field images, and a comprehensive defective cell template is acquired; (2) based upon the template, the abnormal signal gray level of the projection image pixels corresponding to the location-invariant defective cells is replaced with the interpolation of that of their normal neighbor pixels; (3) that corresponding to the isolated location-variant defective cells are corrected using a narrow-windowed median filter. The CBVCT images of a CT low-contrast phantom are employed to evaluate this proposed approach, showing that the streak and ring artifacts can be reliably eliminated. The novelty and merit of the approach are the incorporation of the wavelet analysis whose intrinsic multi-resolution analysis and localizability make the recognition algorithm robust under variable x

  9. Scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT: propagation of signal, contrast, and noise into reconstructed volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Hohmann, Steffen; Bertram, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for the systematic assessment of the impact of scattered radiation in .at-detector based cone-beam CT. While it is well known that scattered radiation causes three di.erent types of artifacts in reconstructed images (inhomogeneity artifacts such as cupping and streaks, degradation of contrast, and enhancement of noise), investigations in the literature quantify the impact of scatter mostly only in terms of inhomogeneity artifacts, giving little insight, e.g., into the visibility of low contrast lesions. Therefore, for this study a novel framework has been developed that in addition to normal reconstruction of the CT (HU) number allows for reconstruction of voxelized expectation values of three additional important characteristics of image quality: signal degradation, contrast reduction, and noise variances. The new framework has been applied to projection data obtained with voxelized Monte-Carlo simulations of clinical CT data sets of high spatial resolution. Using these data, the impact of scattered radiation was thoroughly studied for realistic and clinically relevant patient geometries of the head, thorax, and pelvis region. By means of spatially resolved reconstructions of contrast and noise propagation, the image quality of a scenario with using standard antiscatter grids could be evaluated with great detail. Results show the spatially resolved contrast degradation and the spatially resolved expected standard deviation of the noise at any position in the reconstructed object. The new framework represents a general tool for analyzing image quality in reconstructed images.

  10. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  11. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  12. INTRA - BEAM SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; CONNOLLY,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; ZENO,K.

    2002-06-02

    RHIC in gold operation shows significant intra-beam scattering due to the high charge state of the stored ions. Intra-beam scattering leads to longitudinal and transverse emittance growth. The longitudinal emittance growth causes debunching in operation; the transverse emittance growth contributes to the reduction of the beam and luminosity lifetimes. The longitudinal and transverse beam growth was measured. Beam growth measurement are compared with computations.

  13. Cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise transfer characteristics of flat-panel cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Tward, Daniel J; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2008-12-01

    The physical factors that govern 2D and 3D imaging performance may be understood from quantitative analysis of the spatial-frequency-dependent signal and noise transfer characteristics [e.g., modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ)] along with a task-based assessment of performance (e.g., detectability index). This paper advances a theoretical framework based on cascaded systems analysis for calculation of such metrics in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The model considers the 2D projection NPS propagated through a series of reconstruction stages to yield the 3D NPS and allows quantitative investigation of tradeoffs in image quality associated with acquisition and reconstruction techniques. While the mathematical process of 3D image reconstruction is deterministic, it is shown that the process is irreversible, the associated reconstruction parameters significantly affect the 3D DQE and NEQ, and system optimization should consider the full 3D imaging chain. Factors considered in the cascade include: system geometry; number of projection views; logarithmic scaling; ramp, apodization, and interpolation filters; 3D back-projection; and 3D sampling (noise aliasing). The model is validated in comparison to experiment across a broad range of dose, reconstruction filters, and voxel sizes, and the effects of 3D noise correlation on detectability are explored. The work presents a model for the 3D NPS, DQE, and NEQ of CBCT that reduces to conventional descriptions of axial CT as a special case and provides a fairly general framework that can be applied to the design and optimization of CBCT systems for various applications.

  14. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  15. Modeling Shift-Variant X-Ray Focal Spot Blur for High-Resolution Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Steven; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been applied clinically in a number of high-resolution applications. Increasing geometric magnification can potentially improve resolution, but also increases blur due to an extended x-ray focal-spot. We present a shift-variant focal-spot blur model and incorporate it into a model-based iterative-reconstruction algorithm. We apply this algorithm to simulation and CBCT test-bench data. In a trabecular bone simulation study, we find traditional reconstruction approaches without a blur model exhibit shift-variant resolution properties that depend greatly on the acquisition protocol (e.g. short vs. full scans) and the anode angles of the rays used to reconstruct a particular region. For physical CBCT experiments focal spot blur was characterized and a spatial resolution phantom was scanned and reconstructed. In both experiments image quality using the shift-variant model was significantly improved over approaches that modeled no blur or only a shift-invariant blur, suggesting a potential means to overcome traditional CBCT spatial resolution and system design limitations. PMID:28361129

  16. Applications of an Energy Transfer Model to Three Problems in Planetary Regoliths: The Solid-State Greenhouse, Thermal Beaming, and Emittance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Several problems of interest in planetary infrared remote sensing are investigated using a new radiative-conductive model of energy transfer in regoliths: the solid-state greenhouse effect, thermal beaming, and reststrahlen spectra. The results of the analysis are as follows: (1) The solid-state greenhouse effect is self-limiting to a rise of a few tens of degrees in bodies of the outer solar system. (2) Non-Lambertian directional emissivity can account for only about 20% of the observed thermal beaming factor. The remainder must have another cause, presumably surface roughness effects. (3) The maximum in a reststrahlen emissivity spectrum does not occur exactly at the Christiansen wavelength where, by definition, the real part of the refractive index equals one, but rather at the first transition minimum in reflectance associated with the transition from particle scattering being dominated by volume scattering to that dominated by strong surface scattering. The transparency feature is at the second transition minimum and does not require the presence of a second band at longer wavelength for its occurance. Subsurface temperature gradients have only a small effect on emissivity bands.

  17. SU-E-T-493: Influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 Megavolts Energy On Rapid Arc Radiotherapy Planning for Cervix Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Girigesh, Y; Kumar, L; Raman, K; Mishra, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 MV energy on RA planning for Ca. Cervix. Methods: CT data sets of eleven patients reported with carcinoma cervix were used for RA planning for 10MV -FFB and 10MV-FFFB. RA plans were generated using two full arcs.All RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4Gy in 28 fractions for PTV and ALARA for OAR’s. All plans were analysed for PTV Coverage, conformity Index, homogeneity index, dose to OAR’s, integral dose to normal tissue and total monitor units were studied. Results: DVH was used to evaluate RA plans for both 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB photon beam. Planning results show a comparable PTV coverage for both energies. Results shows volume of PTV receiving prescription dose were 95.10+ 0.09% and 95.09 +0.11%, and volume of PTV receiving a dose of 107% is 0.45+0.96% and 5.25+8.9%, homogeneity index (HI) were 1.051+0.007 and 1.066+0.008, Conformity Index(CI) were 1.003+0.019 and 1.012+0.013, Mean Integral dose were 2.65+0.34 and 2.60+0.33(*10−5Gy.cm3) for 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB respectively. 10MV-FB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in mean doses to bladder, rectum, bowel and mean total number of MU’s and also shows remarkable decrease in mean total no. of MU’s by 43.7% in comparison to 10MV-FFFB. There is statistically significant (p<0.05) difference found in CI and HI for 10MV-FB in comparison to 10MV -FFF beam. 10MV-FFFB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) for mean NTID and delivers 1.65 % less NTID in comparison to 10 MV- FB. Conclusion: 10MV-FB is superior to 10MV-FFFB for rapid arc planning in case of Cervix carcinomas, it offers better target coverage and OAR’s sparing, comparable mean Integral dose to normal tissues and 10 MV- FB also produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distribution in comparison to 10MV-FFFB.

  18. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August; Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  19. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  20. Summary of the Working Group 4: Future accelerator concepts including gamma-gamma, beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    The working group WG4 was aiming to focus its attention on various topics related to the future and novel accelerator concepts of colliders, new beam manipulation and focusing techniques, novel FEL schemes. The group planned in particular to consider new concepts of plasma (and other such method) based colliders; novel concepts of colliders including Higgs factories based on advanced linacs (and recirculating linacs), gamma-gamma collider, etc.; novel schemes of beam focusing including local chromaticity correction; beam control and manipulation schemes; emittance exchange, micro-bunch train, beam shaping (ramped beams, special distributions), flat beam transformations; novel FEL schemes, such as transversely tapered undulator, RF, optical and plasma based undulators. As many of these topics (e.g. novel concepts of plasma based colliders, the methods to create micro-bunch train and ramped beam distributions) could be of joint interest with WG1, the sought ways to arrange joint working group sessions for discussion of these topics.

  1. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  2. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  3. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  4. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  5. Experimental Results of a Single Emittance Compensation Solenoidal Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 300 pC electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ɛ_n,rms = 0.7 π mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane Bz <= 10 gauss for a peak magnetic field of B_z,max = 3 KG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces a initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance ɛ_mag,n,rms scales as 0.01 π mm mrad per gauss at the cathode. Which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that show spot size and emittance as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory and simulations.

  6. P13, the EMBL macromolecular crystallography beamline at the low-emittance PETRA III ring for high- and low-energy phasing with variable beam focusing

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Michele; Bourenkov, Gleb; Pompidor, Guillaume; Karpics, Ivars; Kallio, Johanna; Bento, Isabel; Roessle, Manfred; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography P13 beamline is part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Integrated Facility for Structural Biology at PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) and has been in user operation since mid-2013. P13 is tunable across the energy range from 4 to 17.5 keV to support crystallographic data acquisition exploiting a wide range of elemental absorption edges for experimental phase determination. An adaptive Kirk­patrick–Baez focusing system provides an X-ray beam with a high photon flux and tunable focus size to adapt to diverse experimental situations. Data collections at energies as low as 4 keV (λ = 3.1 Å) are possible due to a beamline design minimizing background and maximizing photon flux particularly at low energy (up to 1011 photons s−1 at 4 keV), a custom calibration of the PILATUS 6M-F detector for use at low energies, and the availability of a helium path. At high energies, the high photon flux (5.4 × 1011 photons s−1 at 17.5 keV) combined with a large area detector mounted on a 2θ arm allows data collection to sub-atomic resolution (0.55 Å). A peak flux of about 8.0 × 1012 photons s−1 is reached at 11 keV. Automated sample mounting is available by means of the robotic sample changer ‘MARVIN’ with a dewar capacity of 160 samples. In close proximity to the beamline, laboratories have been set up for sample preparation and characterization; a laboratory specifically equipped for on-site heavy atom derivatization with a library of more than 150 compounds is available to beamline users. PMID:28009574

  7. Investigation of spatial resolution and temporal performance of SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) with integrated electrostatic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.; Rowlands, John A.; Kenmotsu, Hidenori; Nishimoto, Norihito; Nishino, Takeshi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Zhao, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We have previously proposed SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout), a novel detector concept with potentially superior spatial resolution and low-dose performance compared with existing flat-panel imagers. The detector comprises a scintillator that is optically coupled to an amorphous selenium photoconductor operated with avalanche gain, known as high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). High resolution electron beam readout is achieved using a field emitter array (FEA). This combination of avalanche gain, allowing for very low-dose imaging, and electron emitter readout, providing high spatial resolution, offers potentially superior image quality compared with existing flat-panel imagers, with specific applications to fluoroscopy and breast imaging. Through the present collaboration, a prototype HARP sensor with integrated electrostatic focusing and nano- Spindt FEA readout technology has been fabricated. The integrated electron-optic focusing approach is more suitable for fabricating large-area detectors. We investigate the dependence of spatial resolution on sensor structure and operating conditions, and compare the performance of electrostatic focusing with previous technologies. Our results show a clear dependence of spatial resolution on electrostatic focusing potential, with performance approaching that of the previous design with external mesh-electrode. Further, temporal performance (lag) of the detector is evaluated and the results show that the integrated electrostatic focusing design exhibits comparable or better performance compared with the mesh-electrode design. This study represents the first technical evaluation and characterization of the SAPHIRE concept with integrated electrostatic focusing.

  8. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  9. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  10. Simulation Studies On The Vertical Emittance Growth At The Existing ATF Extraction Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Amann, J.; Seletskiy, S.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.M.; Woodley, M.D.

    2008-06-27

    Significant beam intensity-dependence of the vertical emittance growth was experimentally observed at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK extraction beamline. This paper presents the simulations of possible vertical emittance growth sources, particularly in the extraction channel, where the magnets are shared by both the ATF extraction beamline and its damping ring. The vertical emittance growth is observed in the simulations by changing the beam orbit in the extraction channel, even with all optics corrections. The possible reasons for the experimentally observed dependence of the vertical emittance growth on the beam intensity are also discussed. An experiment to measure the emittance versus beam orbit at the existing ATF extraction beamline is on-going led by the European colleagues.

  11. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  12. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza,E; Houck, T L; S M, Lidia; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-07-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5"-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 {pi}-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  13. Envelope and multi-slit emittance measurements at Fermilab A0 photoinjector and comparison with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Carneiro, J.-P.; Fliller, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Recently we have measured the envelope and the transverse emittance of an 0.85 nC electron beam at the Fermilab A0-Photoinjector facility. The transverse emittance measurement was performed using the multi-slit method. The data have been taken with an unstacked 2.8 ps laser pulse. In this paper we report on these beam measurements and compare the results with the predictions from beam dynamics codes ASTRA and GPT using 3D space charge routines.

  14. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  15. Intrinsic emittance reduction of copper cathodes by laser wavelength tuning in an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divall, Marta Csatari; Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Vicario, Carlo; Trisorio, Alexandre; Schietinger, Thomas; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-03-01

    With the improvement of acceleration techniques, the intrinsic emittance of the cathode has a strong impact on the final brightness of a free electron laser. The systematic studies presented in this paper demonstrate for the first time in a radiofrequency photocathode gun a reduction of the intrinsic emittance when tuning the laser photon energies close to the effective work function of copper. The intrinsic emittance was determined by measuring the core slice emittance as a function of the laser beam size at laser wavelengths between 260 and 275 nm. The results are consistent with the measured effective work function of the cathode. Slice emittance values normalized to the laser beam size reached values down to 500 nm /mm , close to that expected from theory. A 20% reduction of the intrinsic emittance was observed over the spectral range of the laser.

  16. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  17. Development of a PYTHON-based emittance calculator at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. T.

    Beam emittance is an important characteristic describing charged particle beams. In linear accelerators (linac), it is critical to characterize the beam phase space parameters and, in particular, to precisely measure transverse beam emittance. The quadrupole scan (quad-scan) is a well-established technique used to characterize transverse beam parameters in four-dimensional phase space, including beam emittance. A computational algorithm with PYTHON scripts has been developed to estimate beam parameters, in particular beam emittance, using the quad-scan technique in the electron linac at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. This script has been implemented in conjunction with an automated quad-scan tool (also written in PYTHON) and has decreased the time it takes to perform a single quad-scan from an hour to a few minutes. From the experimental data, the emittance calculator quickly delivers several results including: geometrical and normalized transverse emittance, Courant-Snyder parameters, and plots of the beam size versus quadrupole field strength, among others. This paper will discuss the details of the techniques used, the results from several quad-scans preformed at FAST during the electron injector commissioning, and the PYTHON code used to obtain the results.

  18. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  19. Low Emittance Growth in a LEBT with Un-Neutralized Section

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Carneiro, Jean-Paul; Shemyakin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In a Low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), the emittance growth due to the beam's own space charge is typically suppressed by way of neutralization from either electrons or ions, which originate from ionization of the background gas. In cases where the beam is chopped, the neutralization pattern changes throughout the beginning of the pulse, causing the Twiss parameters to differ significantly from their steady state values, which, in turn, may result in beam losses downstream. For a modest beam perveance, there is an alternative solution, in which the beam is kept un-neutralized in the portion of the LEBT that contains the chopper. The emittance can be nearly preserved if the transition to the un-neutralized section occurs where the beam exhibits low transverse tails. This report discusses the experimental realization of such a scheme at Fermilab's PXIE, where low beam emittance dilution was demonstrated

  20. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  1. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Antici, P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m) generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  2. Localization of Narrowband Single Photon Emitters in Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Kerem; Sandstrom, Russell; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-03-23

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bioimaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work, we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  3. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  4. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  5. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  6. Is transverse feedback necessary for the SSC emittance preservation? (Vibration noise analysis and feedback parameters optimization)

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper considers the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site ground motion measurements as well as data from accelerators worldwide about noises that worsen beam performance. Unacceptably fast emittance growth due to these noises is predicted for the SSC. A transverse feedback system was found to be the only satisfactory alternative to prevent emittance decay. Optimization of the primary feedback parameters was done.

  7. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  8. Low-dose 2.5 MV cone-beam computed tomography with thick CsI flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace; Moussot, Christopher; Morf, Daniel; Seppi, Edward; Amols, Howard

    2016-07-08

    Most of the treatment units, both new and old models, are equipped with a megavoltage portal imager but its use for volumetric imaging is limited. This is mainly due to the poor image quality produced by the high-energy treatment beam (> 6MV). A linac at our center is equipped with a prototype 2.5 MV imaging beam. This study evaluates the feasibility of low-dose megavoltage cone-beam imaging with the 2.5MV beam and a thick cesium iodide detector, which is a high-efficiency imager. Basic imaging properties such as spatial resolution and modulation transfer function were assessed for the 2.5 MV prototype imaging system. For image quality and imaging dose, a series of megavoltage cone-beam scans were acquired for the head, thorax, and pelvis of an anthropomorphic phantom and were compared to kilovoltage cone-beam and 6X megavoltage cone-beam images. To demonstrate the advantage of MV imaging, a phantom with metallic inserts was scanned and the image quality was compared to CT and kilovoltage cone-beam scans. With a lower energy beam and higher detector efficiency, the 2.5 MV imaging system generally yields better image quality than does the 6 MV imaging system with the conventional MV imager. In particular, with the anthropomorphic phantom studies, the contrast to noise of bone to tissue is generally improved in the 2.5 MV images compared to 6 MV. With an image quality sufficient for bony alignment, the imaging dose for 2.5 MV cone-beam images is 2.4-3.4 MU compared to 26 MU in 6 MV cone-beam scans for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions of the phantom. Unlike kilovoltage cone-beam, the 2.5 MV imaging system does not suffer from high-Z image artifacts. This can be very useful for treatment planning in cases where high-Z prostheses are present.

  9. Charlie Flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows a region of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars, dubbed 'Charlie Flats.' This region is a rich science target for Opportunity because it contains a diverse assortment of small grains, pebbles and spherules, as well as both dark and light soil deposits. The area seen here measures approximately 0.6 meters (2 feet) across. The smallest grains visible in this image are only a few millimeters in size. The approximate true color image was acquired on Sol 20 of Opportunity's mission with panoramic camera filters red, green and blue. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view Charlie Flats Spectra The chart above shows examples of spectra, or light wave patterns, extracted from the region of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop dubbed 'Charlie Flats,' a rich science target for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The spectra were extracted from the similarly colored regions in the image on the left, taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The green circle identifies a bright, dust-like soil deposit. The red circle identifies a dark soil region. The yellow identifies a small, angular rock chip with a strong near-infrared band. The pink identifies a sphere-shaped pebble with a different strong near-infrared band. The cyan circle shows a dark, grayish pebble.

  10. Summary report on transverse emittance preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Vos, L.

    1997-12-01

    During the past years, significant progress has been made in understanding the beam transverse emittance blow-up and its preservation. However, one often finds him-/herself ignorant when he/she tries to explain what was observed in an existing machine or to predict what will happen in a machine under design. There are a number of such examples given in this report. Some of them are even fundamental. These are the challenges. But they are also the directions leading to new achievements. The workshop gladly acknowledged them and promised to work on them.

  11. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-15

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  12. Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

    2011-09-01

    A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

  13. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  14. Experimental Studies on Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at an Emittance Exchange Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to experimentally investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy chirped beam.

  15. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  16. Sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface for ion beam erosion of Si with simultaneous co-deposition of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Brötzmann, M.; Hofsäss, H.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate pattern formation on Si by sputter erosion under simultaneous co-deposition of Fe atoms, both at off-normal incidence, as function of the Fe surface coverage. The patterns obtained for 5 keV Xe ion irradiation at 30° incidence angle are analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of the local steady state Fe content of the Fe-Si surface layer allows a quantitative correlation between pattern type and Fe coverage. With increasing Fe coverage the patterns change, starting from a flat surface at low coverage (< 2×1015 Fe/cm2) over dot patterns (2-8×1015 Fe/cm2), ripples patterns (8-17×1015 Fe/cm2), pill bug structures (1.8×1016 Fe/cm2) and a rather flat surface with randomly distributed weak pits at high Fe coverage (>1.8×1016 Fe/cm2). Our results confirm the observations by Macko et al. for 2 keV Kr ion irradiation of Si with Fe co-deposition. In particular, we also find a sharp transition from pronounced ripple patterns with large amplitude (rms roughness ˜ 18 nm) to a rather flat surface (rms roughness ˜ 0.5 nm). Within this transition regime, we also observe the formation of pill bug structures, i.e. individual small hillocks with a rippled structure on an otherwise rather flat surface. The transition occurs within a very narrow regime of the steady state Fe surface coverage between 1.7 and 1.8×1016 Fe/cm2, where the composition of the mixed Fe-Si surface layer of about 10 nm thickness reaches the stoichiometry of FeSi2. Phase separation towards amorphous iron silicide is assumed as the major contribution for the pattern formation at lower Fe coverage and the sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface.

  17. Beam-beam tuneshift during the TEVATRON squeeze

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.

    1988-11-01

    We calculate the beam-beam tuneshift during the squeeze of the beam in the Tevatron from injection to mini-beta. We find that for the beam emittances typically used, there is little variation of the tuneshift, in either plane, during the squeeze. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  19. Real-time modeling of transverse emittance growth due to ground motion

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.D.; Parkhomchuk, V.V. |

    1993-09-01

    Ground motion noise at frequencies around 1 kHz causes growth of transverse emittance of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) collider beams. The effect was quantitatively investigated using real-time signals from seismometers installed at the tunnel depth and on the surface. The SSC beam was modeled as an ensemble of oscillators with a spread of betatron frequencies. The effect of transverse feedback on emittance growth was investigated.

  20. Ultra-high Temperature Emittance Measurements for Space and Missile Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; Crandall, David

    2009-01-01

    Advanced modeling and design efforts for many aerospace components require high temperature emittance data. Applications requiring emittance data include propulsion systems, radiators, aeroshells, heatshields/thermal protection systems, and leading edge surfaces. The objective of this work is to provide emittance data at ultra-high temperatures. MSFC has a new instrument for the measurement of emittance at ultra-high temperatures, the Ultra-High Temperature Emissometer System (Ultra-HITEMS). AZ Technology Inc. developed the instrument, designed to provide emittance measurements over the temperature range 700-3500K. The Ultra-HITEMS instrument measures the emittance of samples, heated by lasers, in vacuum, using a blackbody source and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer. Detectors in a Nicolet 6700 FT-IR spectrometer measure emittance over the spectral range of 0.4-25 microns. Emitted energy from the specimen and output from a Mikron M390S blackbody source at the same temperature with matched collection geometry are measured. Integrating emittance over the spectral range yields the total emittance. The ratio provides a direct measure of total hemispherical emittance. Samples are heated using lasers. Optical pyrometry provides temperature data. Optical filters prevent interference from the heating lasers. Data for Inconel 718 show excellent agreement with results from literature and ASTM 835. Measurements taken from levitated spherical specimens provide total hemispherical emittance data; measurements taken from flat specimens mounted in the chamber provide near-normal emittance data. Data from selected characterization studies will be presented. The Ultra-HITEMS technique could advance space and missile technologies by advancing the knowledge base and the technology readiness level for ultra-high temperature materials.

  1. Highly directional thermal emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  2. Towards graphane field emitters

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shuyi; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M.; Kang, Moon H.; Parmee, Richard J.; Zhang, Xiaobing; Milne, William I.; Wang, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm–1), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm–2 (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm–2 (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function. PMID:28066543

  3. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  4. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  5. Studies of emittance of multiply charged ions extracted from high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source, PKDELIS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Lakshmy, P. S.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2010-02-15

    For the high current injector project at Inter University Accelerator Centre, a high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, PKDELIS, would provide the high charge state ions. The emittance of the ECR ion source is an important parameter to design further beam transport system and to match the acceptances of the downstream radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac accelerators of the high current injector. The emittance of the analyzed beam of PKDELIS ECR source has been measured utilizing the three beam size technique. A slit and two beam profile monitors positioned at fixed distances from each other were used to measure the beam size. The digitized beam profiles have been analyzed to determine the emittance of various multiply charged ions. The variation of emittance with gas mixing, ultrahigh frequency power, and extraction energy are discussed in this presentation.

  6. Sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface for ion beam erosion of Si with simultaneous co-deposition of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, K.; Broetzmann, M.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-15

    We investigate pattern formation on Si by sputter erosion under simultaneous co-deposition of Fe atoms, both at off-normal incidence, as function of the Fe surface coverage. The patterns obtained for 5 keV Xe ion irradiation at 30 Degree-Sign incidence angle are analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of the local steady state Fe content of the Fe-Si surface layer allows a quantitative correlation between pattern type and Fe coverage. With increasing Fe coverage the patterns change, starting from a flat surface at low coverage (< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Fe/cm{sup 2}) over dot patterns (2-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Fe/cm{sup 2}), ripples patterns (8-17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Fe/cm{sup 2}), pill bug structures (1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Fe/cm{sup 2}) and a rather flat surface with randomly distributed weak pits at high Fe coverage (>1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Fe/cm{sup 2}). Our results confirm the observations by Macko et al. for 2 keV Kr ion irradiation of Si with Fe co-deposition. In particular, we also find a sharp transition from pronounced ripple patterns with large amplitude (rms roughness {approx} 18 nm) to a rather flat surface (rms roughness {approx} 0.5 nm). Within this transition regime, we also observe the formation of pill bug structures, i.e. individual small hillocks with a rippled structure on an otherwise rather flat surface. The transition occurs within a very narrow regime of the steady state Fe surface coverage between 1.7 and 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Fe/cm{sup 2}, where the composition of the mixed Fe-Si surface layer of about 10 nm thickness reaches the stoichiometry of FeSi{sub 2}. Phase separation towards amorphous iron silicide is assumed as the major contribution for the pattern formation at lower Fe coverage and the sharp transition from ripple patterns to a flat surface.

  7. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Mark; Alexander, James; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  8. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. P.; Billing, M. G.; Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Eggert, N.; Forster, M.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D. L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Kreinick, D. L.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J. A.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D. P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Schwartz, R.; Shanks, J. P.; Sikora, J.; Harkay, K. C.; Antoniou, F.; Calatroni, S.; Gasior, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pfingstner, J.; Rumolo, G.; Schmickler, H.; Taborelli, M.; Holtzapple, R.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R. M; Flanagan, J. W.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D. V.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Schachter, L.

    2010-05-23

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  9. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  10. Low Emittance Tuning Studies for SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, Simone; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Donald, Martin; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    SuperB[1] is an international project for an asymmetric 2 rings collider at the B mesons cm energy to be built in the Rome area in Italy. The two rings will have very small beam sizes at the Interaction Point and very small emittances, similar to the Linear Collider Damping Rings ones. In particular, the ultra low vertical emittances, 7 pm in the LER and 4 pm in the HER, need a careful study of the misalignment errors effects on the machine performances. Studies on the closed orbit, vertical dispersion and coupling corrections have been carried out in order to specify the maximum allowed errors and to provide a procedure for emittance tuning. A new tool which combines MADX and Matlab routines has been developed, allowing for both corrections and tuning. Results of these studies are presented.

  11. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  12. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  13. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  14. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-07-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 microm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 microm x 50 microm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 microm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  15. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  16. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by

  17. Single shot transverse emittance measurement from OTR screens in a drift transport section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Delerue, N.; Bartolini, R.

    2011-07-01

    Single shot transverse emittance measurement is essential to assess the beam quality and performance of new generation light sources such as linac based X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) or laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LPWA). To this end, we have developed a single shot transverse emittance measurement using at least 3 screens inserted in the beam at the same time, measuring the beam size at different positions in a drift space in one single shot. In this paper, we firstly present the theoretical aspects to perform the measurement. We secondly show experimental results obtained at Diamond for a 3 GeV electron beam in the transfer line from the Booster to the Storage Ring, using this thin OTR screens method. Finally, we discuss the results showing the strength of the measurement in comparison with more standard and established emittance measurement, like the quadrupole scan method.

  18. Matching optics for Gaussian beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, William D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A system of matching optics for Gaussian beams is described. The matching optics system is positioned between a light beam emitter (such as a laser) and the input optics of a second optics system whereby the output from the light beam emitter is converted into an optimum input for the succeeding parts of the second optical system. The matching optics arrangement includes the combination of a light beam emitter, such as a laser with a movable afocal lens pair (telescope) and a single movable lens placed in the laser's output beam. The single movable lens serves as an input to the telescope. If desired, a second lens, which may be fixed, is positioned in the beam before the adjustable lens to serve as an input processor to the movable lens. The system provides the ability to choose waist diameter and position independently and achieve the desired values with two simple adjustments not requiring iteration.

  19. Reduction of Thermal Emittance by using P-polarized Laser at Oblique Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,D.; Park, S.; Park, J.; Parc, Y.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    High charge low emittance electron beam is crucial for the 4th generation light source. Conventionally the beam is generated by photoinjector with laser illuminating the cathode at nearly normal incidence. In this paper attention was called to the use of laser at oblique incidence, which we believe, may be more beneficial. It is found that when the laser illuminates the cathode at oblique incidence, the quantum efficiency (QE) and thermal emittance show strong dependence on incidence angle and polarization state. By using p-polarized laser at oblique incidence, surface photoemission is initiated by the presence of the normal electric field which results in a higher QE and lower thermal emittance. With this technique, the increase in QE by almost 5 times and the reduction of thermal emittance by 40% should be quite expectable for a Copper photo-cathode with atomically smooth surface.

  20. Optimization of the Dynamic Aperture for SPEAR3 Low-Emittance Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lanfa; Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Borland, Michael; /Argonne

    2012-05-30

    A low emittance upgrade is planned for SPEAR3. As the first phase, the emittance is reduced from 10nm to 7nm without additional magnets. A further upgrade with even lower emittance will require a damping wiggler. There is a smaller dynamic aperture for the lower emittance optics due to a stronger nonlinearity. Elegant based Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) is used to maximize the dynamic aperture. Both the dynamic aperture and beam lifetime are optimized simultaneously. Various configurations of the sextupole magnets have been studied in order to find the best configuration. The betatron tune also can be optimized to minimize resonance effects. The optimized dynamic aperture increases more than 15% from the nominal case and the lifetime increases from 14 hours to 17 hours. It is important that the increase of the dynamic aperture is mainly in the beam injection direction. Therefore the injection efficiency will benefit from this improvement.

  1. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  2. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  3. Investigation into the influence of x-ray scatter on the imaging performance of an x-ray flat-panel imager-based cone-beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    2001-06-01

    The advent of the x-ray flat panel imager (FPI) is making the study of cone beam volume CT (CBVCT) more competitive. Motivated by recent encouraging developments in CBVCT, this paper investigates the influence of x-ray scatter on the imaging performance of an x-ray FPI based CBVCT prototype. The prototype employs a circle-plus-two-arc orbit to meet the data sufficiency condition, and can reconstruct a region of interest within a longitudinally unbounded object using a cone beam filtered back-projection algorithm derived for the data acquisition orbit. First, the humanoid phantom is used to investigate the temporal variation of both scatter intensity and scatter to primary ratio (SPR) in the projection images acquired for CB reconstruction. Second, a 160 mm cylindrical water phantom consisting of four 16 mm rods made up of Acrylic, Polyethelene, Polycarborate and Polystrene respectively is utilized to evaluate the variation of interference caused by x-ray scatter (cupping effect) and signal to noise ratio vs. SPR in projection images. Third, a disc phantom consisting of seven acrylic discs stacked at even intervals is employed to evaluate the influence of x-ray scatter on reconstruction accuracy and the improvement of CBVCT image quality with recourse to an anti-scatter grid. Finally, the alleviation of the cupping effect in the presence of a beam-shaping (bow-tie) attenuator is assessed . The quantitative investigation shows that the influence of x-ray scatter on the SNR and CT number accuracy is a crucial problem to be addressed for the application of x-ray CBVCT.

  4. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  5. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  6. Study of ultra-low emittance design for Spear3 using longitudinal gradient dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.

    2015-09-24

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  7. A possible approach to reduce the emittance of HLS- II storage ring using a Robinson wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Yi; Liu, Gong-Fa; Xu, Wei; Li, Wei-Min; Li, Yong-Jun

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present some preliminary studies on using a Robinson wiggler to reduce the horizontal beam emittance in the Hefei Light Source II (HLS- II) storage ring. A proof-of-principle lattice demonstrates that it is possible to reduce its emittance by 50% with a 2-meter long wiggler. This encouraging result suggests a feasible option to significantly improve the machine performance at a relatively low cost.

  8. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  9. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  10. Accurate estimation of the RMS emittance from single current amplifier data

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R.F.; Keller, R.; Letchford, A.P.; Thomae, R.W.; Thomason, J.W.G.

    2002-05-31

    This paper presents the SCUBEEx rms emittance analysis, a self-consistent, unbiased elliptical exclusion method, which combines traditional data-reduction methods with statistical methods to obtain accurate estimates for the rms emittance. Rather than considering individual data, the method tracks the average current density outside a well-selected, variable boundary to separate the measured beam halo from the background. The average outside current density is assumed to be part of a uniform background and not part of the particle beam. Therefore the average outside current is subtracted from the data before evaluating the rms emittance within the boundary. As the boundary area is increased, the average outside current and the inside rms emittance form plateaus when all data containing part of the particle beam are inside the boundary. These plateaus mark the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary and provide unbiased estimates for the average background and the rms emittance. Small, trendless variations within the plateaus allow for determining the uncertainties of the estimates caused by variations of the measured background outside the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary. The robustness of the method is established with complementary variations of the exclusion boundary. This paper presents a detailed comparison between traditional data reduction methods and SCUBEEx by analyzing two complementary sets of emittance data obtained with a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an ISIS H{sup -} ion source.

  11. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  12. A Resonant Cavity Approach to Non-Invasive, Pulse-to-Pulse EmittanceMeasurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Nantista, C.D.; Miller, R.H.; Weidemann, A.W.; /FARTECH, San Diego /SLAC

    2010-06-15

    We present a resonant cavity approach for non-invasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of non-circular multi-bunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to Q{sub L{lambda}}/{pi}, where Q{sub L{lambda}} is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode {lambda}, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad-cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM{sub 220} for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45{sup o} with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system determine the beam emittance, i.e. the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms-beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms-beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of ten microns. A prototype quad-cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor.

  13. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  14. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  15. Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange: Downsizing the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    A technique is proposed to generate electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance through laser assisted transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM10 mode is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the emittance exchange. It is shown that with the proposed technique one can significantly downsize an x-ray free electron laser (FEL), which may greatly extend the availability of these light sources. A hard x-ray FEL operating at 1.5 {angstrom} with a saturation length within 30 meters using a 3.8 GeV electron beam is shown to be practically feasible.

  16. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-01-01

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  17. A long pulse high-power diode based on a microelectronic emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, B.; Clark, C.; Walko, R.; Fleming, J.

    1995-11-01

    Microelectronic cathode emitter technology being developed at Sandia for supplying continuous low current for flat panel displays appears to be a promising technology for providing high currents when operated in a pulsed, higher voltage mode. If currents in excess of one amp per square centimeter could be produced for tens of microseconds at several kilohertz repetition rate, important applications in such as large volume food or waste sterilization in situ detection, and high power microwave production could be achieved. A testbed was built to perform the experiments. The desired current densities have been demonstrated using small emitter arrays.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as field emitter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing; Song, Yuelin; Wang, Na; Chen, Huihui; Chen, Haihua; Wu, Jianghong; Sun, Yangang; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as a promising material of electron field emitters. They exhibit extraordinary field emission properties because of their high electrical conductivity, high aspect ratio "needle like" shape for optimum geometrical field enhancement, and remarkable thermal stability. In this Review, we emphasize the estimation and influencing factors of CNTs' emission properties, and discuss in detail the emission properties of macroscopic CNT cathodes, especially fabricated by transplant methods, and describe recent progress on understanding of CNT field emitters and analyze issues related to applications of CNT based cold cathodes in field emission display (FED). We foresee that CNT-FED will take an important place in display technologies in the near future.

  19. The effects of gas mixing and plasma electrode position on the emittance of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2004-05-01

    Gas mixing is a commonly used method to improve the intensities and the charge state distribution of ion beams extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). At the same time, the emittance of the ion beam should be as small as possible. In this work we have studied the effect of the gas mixing method on the ion beam quality by measuring the emittance and brightness of different ion beams using helium, oxygen, and argon with several gas feeding ratios. All measurements were performed with the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. At the second stage of the experiments the emittance and the ion beam brightness were studied as a function of the plasma electrode position. The extraction system constructed for this experiment can be moved online.

  20. Micromachined mold-type double-gated metal field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongjae; Kang, Seokho; Chun, Kukjin

    1997-12-01

    Electron field emitters with double gates were fabricated using micromachining technology and the effect of the electric potential of the focusing gate (or second gate) was experimentally evaluated. The molybdenum field emission tip was made by filling a cusplike mold formed when a conformal film was deposited on the hole-trench that had been patterned on stacked metals and dielectric layers. The hole-trench was patterned by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Each field emitter has a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img1 diameter extraction gate (or first gate) and a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img2 diameter focusing gate (or second gate). To make a path for the emitted electrons, silicon bulk was etched anisotropically in KOH and EDP (ethylene-diamine pyrocatechol) solution successively. The I - V characteristics and anode current change due to the focusing gate potential were measured.

  1. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  2. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F. -J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  4. Emittance characterization of thermal control paints, coatings and surfaces using a calorimetric technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal control surfaces are used in every spacecraft thermal management system to dissipate heat through radiant heat transfer. This paper describes the thermal performance of several thermal control paints, coatings, and surfaces, as characterized by a calorimetric vacuum emissometer. The emissometer is designed to measure the functional emittance of a surface based on heat transfer from an underlying substrate to the surface and from the surface or near surface to a surrounding cold wall. Emittance measurements were made between 200 and 350 K. Polished aluminum, used here as a standard, was found to have a total hemispherical emittance of 0.06, as expected. A velvet black paint, also used here as a standard, was found to have an emittance of 0.94 at room temperature. Other surfaces of interest included a polyurethane-based black paint designated Z-306, a highly polished 316L stainless steel, and an atomic oxygen beam-textured carbon-carbon composite.

  5. Emittance characterization of thermal control paints, coatings and surfaces using a calorimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1994-12-01

    Thermal control surfaces are used in every spacecraft thermal management system to dissipate heat through radiant heat transfer. This paper describes the thermal performance of several thermal control paints, coatings, and surfaces, as characterized by a calorimetric vacuum emissometer. The emissometer is designed to measure the functional emittance of a surface based on heat transfer from an underlying substrate to the surface and from the surface or near surface to a surrounding cold wall. Emittance measurements were made between 200 and 350 K. Polished aluminum, used here as a standard, was found to have a total hemispherical emittance of 0.06, as expected. A velvet black paint, also used here as a standard, was found to have an emittance of 0.94 at room temperature. Other surfaces of interest included a polyurethane-based black paint designated Z-306, a highly polished 316L stainless steel, and an atomic oxygen beam-textured carbon-carbon composite.

  6. Spatial uniformity of the current emitted by an array of passively fed electrospray porous emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Krejci, D.; Lozano, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquid ion sources (ILIS) have a broad range of applications ranging from focused ion beams (FIB) to spacecraft propulsion. For space thrusters, having a beam of ions of high velocity and low energy spread results in high specific impulse (a measure of the efficiency of propellant consumption) and high power efficiency. For FIB applications, these traits benefit focusing and resolution respectively. Since typical current levels emitted by individual ILIS range from tens of nA to a few μA, both applications often require using arrays of emitters in order to increase the total beam current; i.e. the thrust level in the case of a thruster or the throughput in ion milling applications. So far, most studies of emitter arrays have dealt with experimental measurements of global, spatially-averaged, properties and theoretical analyses generally assume that all emitters operate in a similar manner, so that scaling of the current is linear with the number of emitters. In this work we use a current probe to explore the uniformity properties of the current emitted by an array of porous emitters. We present measurements of the current density of both the array and individual tips, and analyze the reason and implications of the experimental observations.

  7. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  8. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  9. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  10. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  11. Investigating higher order modes effects on thermionic RF gun transverse emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2017-02-01

    As the excitation of higher order modes in high gradient accelerating cavities of the RF gun negatively influences electron beam quality, in the present work a theory is obtained based on generalizing Panofsky-Wenzel theorem to study the effect of transverse magnetic modes on transverse emittance growth of the RF gun. Based on this theory, the impact of higher order modes on transverse momentum is investigated. Based on analysis and simulation results, it is shown that different RF modes result in divergence or convergence effects on beam transverse dynamics. The presence of dipole and quadrupole modes can enhance the transverse emittance by 320 % and 450 % , respectively. The compound effect of the presence of two higher order modes results in 470 % transverse emittance growth.

  12. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chuyu; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-10-04

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  13. The introduction of trajectory oscillations to reduce emittance growth in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Decker, F.J. ); Hsu, I. . Inst. of Nuclear Science)

    1992-08-01

    Emittance growth of accelerated beams in the 50 GeV linear accelerator of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) arises from the effects of transverse wakefields and momentum dispersion. These effects are caused by small misalignments of the beam position monitors, lattice quadrupoles, and accelerating structure and by the energy spectrum of the beam which changes along the accelerator. The introduction of strategically placed trajectory oscillations over finite lengths of the linac has been used to generate beam errors which cancel the emittance accumulation from these small unknown, random alignment errors. Induced oscillations early in the linac cancel effects which filament along the accelerator affecting mostly the beam core. Induced oscillations located at the center of the accelerator or beyond cancel wakefield and dispersion errors which do not completely filament but cause the beams to have, in addition, an apparent betatron mismatch and transverse tails. The required induced oscillations of a few hundred microns are reasonably stable over a period of several weeks. Of course, the optimum induced oscillations depend upon the beam charge. Emittance reductions of 30 to 50% have been obtained.

  14. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  15. Fine-tuning to minimize emittances of J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Asano, H.; Oguri, H.

    2016-02-15

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source has been successfully operated for about one year. By the world’s brightest level beam, the J-PARC design beam power of 1 MW was successfully demonstrated. In order to minimize the transverse emittances, the rod-filter-field (RFF) was optimized by changing the triple-gap-lengths of each of pairing five piece rod-filter-magnets. The larger emittance degradation seems to be caused by impurity-gases than the RFF. The smaller beam-hole-diameter of the extraction electrode caused the more than expected improvements on not only the emittances but also the peak beam intensity.

  16. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  17. Monolithic semiconductor light emitter and amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Nils W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A semiconductor light emitter comprising a substrate of a semiconductor material having a pair of opposed surfaces and a body of semiconductor material on one of the surfaces. The body includes a pair of clad layers of opposite conductivity types having an intermediate quantum well region therebetween. The clad layers are of a semiconductor material which forms a heterojunction with the material of the quantum well region. The clad layers and the quantum well region form a waveguide which extends along the body. A plurality of gain sections are formed in the body spaced along and optically coupled by the waveguide. Each of the gain sections is adapted to generate light therein when a voltage is placed thereacross. One of the gain section has gratings at each end thereof which are adapted to reflect light back into the one gain section and thereby create a beam of light. The grating between the one gain section and an adjacent gain section is adapted to allow some of the light generated in the one gain section to pass therethrough along the waveguide to the next gain section. Each of the other gain sections have gratings adjacent an end opposite the first gain sections. The periods of the grating are such that no self-oscillation of the light in the waveguide occurs so that each of the other gain sections serve as single pass amplifiers. The gratings also direct the amplified light from the other gain sections out of the body.

  18. Chemical regeneration of emitter surface increases thermionic diode life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breiteieser, R.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical regeneration of sublimated emitter electrode increases the operating efficiency and life of thermionic diodes. A gas which forms chemical compounds with the sublimated emitter material is introduced into the space between the emitter and the collector. The compounds migrate to the emitter where they decompose and redeposit the emitter material.

  19. Laser reflections from relatively flat specular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1989-05-01

    A major element in laser range control procedures has been the control of stray reflections from glass reflectors which may be near the laser target. These hazardous reflections have been thought to extend as far as the direct beam for near grazing angles of incidence. Modern military laser rangefinders and designators can be hazardous to the unaided eye to distances of 10 km or even greater. For this reason, many square kilometers of laser range area have been necessary to conduct laser tests when flat specular reflectors may be present on targets. Fortunately, sophisticated pointing systems have been developed with these laser systems to ensure that the direct beam is confined to the immediate target area. In most cases, flat specular reflectors also have been eliminated from the immediate target area. In some instances, however, specular reflectors still exist near or on laser targets. For these special cases, a more definitive mathematical treatment of hazardous laser reflections is desired. The divergence of a laser beam which has been reflected from a flat specular surface is dependent on the size of the reflector, the divergence of the laser creating the reflection, and the curvature of the reflecting surface. It can be shown mathematically that the curvature of even an optical flat, a reference surface used to compare the flatness of other surfaces, will produce a significant additional beam spread, thereby reducing the hazards of reflected beams. The natural curvature of plate glass or window glass is much greater, reducing the hazards even further. The extent of the hazards for reflections of various types of lasers and reflecting surfaces is discussed.

  20. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  1. Towards a Small Emittance Design of the JLEIC Electron Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fanglei; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Hutton, Andrew M.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Pilat, Fulvia C.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    The electron collider ring of the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is designed to provide an electron beam with a small beam size at the IP for collisions with an ion beam in order to reach a desired high luminosity. For a chosen beta-star at the IP, electron beam size is determined by the equilibrium emittance that can be obtained through a linear optics design. This paper briefly describes the baseline design of the electron collider ring reusing PEP-II components and considering their parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and reports a few approaches to reducing the equilibrium emittance in the electron collider ring.

  2. Low emittance lattice for the storage ring of the Turkish Light Source Facility TURKAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergiz, Z.; Aksoy, A.

    2015-06-01

    The TAC (Turkish Accelerator Center) project aims to build an accelerator center in Turkey. The first stage of the project is to construct an Infra-Red Free Electron Laser (IR-FEL) facility. The second stage is to build a synchrotron radiation facility named TURKAY, which is a third generation synchrotron radiation light source that aims to achieve a high brilliance photon beam from a low emittance electron beam at 3 GeV. The electron beam parameters are highly dependent on the magnetic lattice of the storage ring. In this paper a low emittance storage ring for TURKAY is proposed and the beam dynamic properties of the magnetic lattice are investigated. Supported by Turkish Republic Ministry of Development (DPT2006K120470)

  3. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  4. Decoherence of beam oscillations in the SSC due to beam-beam collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Shih, H.J.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Banda-Herath, M. ); Taratin, A. )

    1994-10-01

    Computer simulations were made to study the decoherence of beam oscillations in the SSC collider due to the tune shift generated by the head-on beam-beam interaction. The simulation results on the average tune shift and the rums tune spread were compared with previous theoretical estimates and excellent agreement was found. The simulations also confirmed the expectation that the decoherence time increases with decreasing tune spread in the beam. A simple procedure was presented to quantify the decoherence time from the simulated growth of the beam emittance relative to the beam centroid.

  5. Foldable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Coyner, J. V.; Crawford, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A foldable beam possessing superior qualities of light weight, compactness for transportation, quick deployment with minimum use of force, and high strength is described. These qualities are achieved through the use of a series of longitudinally rigid segments, hinged along one side and threaded by one or two cables along the opposite side. Tightening the cables holds the beam extended. Loosening the cables permits the segments to fold away from the threaded side. In one embodiment the segments are connected by canted hinges with the result that the beam may be folded in a helix-like configuration around a cylinder. In another embodiment the segments themselves may be hinged to fold flat laterally as the beam is folded, resulting in a configuration that may be helixed around a shorter cylinder.

  6. Thermophotovoltaic Generators Using Selective Metallic Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Samaras, John E.; Avery, James E.; Ewell, Richard

    1995-01-01

    In the literature to date on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generators, two types of infrared emitter's have been emphasized : gray body emitters and rare earth oxide selective emitters. The gray body emitter is defined as an emitter with a spectral emissivity independent of wavelength whereas the rare earth oxide selective emitter is idealized as a delta function emitter with a high emissivity at a select wavelength and a near zero emissivity at all other wavelengths. Silicon carbide is an example of a gray body emitter and ER-YAG is an example of a selective emitter. The Welsbach mantle in a common lantern is another example of an oxide selective emitter. Herein, we describe an alternative type of selective emitter, a selective metallic emitter. These metallic emitters are characterized by a spectral emissivity curve wherein the emissivity monotonically increases with shorter infrared wavelengths as is shown. The metal of curve "A", tungsten, typifies this class of selective metallic emitter's. In a thermophotovoltaic generator, a photovoltaic cell typically converts infrared radiation to electricity out to some cut-off wavelength. For example, Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) TPV cells respond out to 1.7 microns. The problem with gray body emitters is that they emit at all wavelengths. Therefore, a large fraction of the energy emitted will be outside of the response band of the TPV cell. The argument for the selective emitter is that, ideally, all the emitted energy can be in the cells response band. Unfortunately, rare earth oxide emitters are not ideal. In order to suppress the emissivity toward zero away from the select wavelength, the use of thin fiber's is necessary. This leads to a fragile emitter typical of a lantern mantle. Even given a thin ER-YAG emitter, the measured emissivity at the select wavelength of 1.5 microns has been reported to be 0.6 while the off wavelength background emissivity falls to only 0.2 at 5 microns. This gives a selectivity ratio of only 3

  7. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  8. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  9. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  10. New approach to obtain boron selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlecke, A.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    Selective emitters, used in high efficiency solar cells, need a series of oxidations and photolithographic steps that render the process more expensive. In this paper, a new way to make selective emitters using boron is presented. The main feature of this approach is to save oxide growths and photolithographic processes and it is based on the property of boron doped silicon surfaces to be resistant to anisotropic etchings like the one performed during the texturization. Using this characteristic of boron emitter surfaces, the authors can obtain a highly doped emitter under metal grid and simultaneously a shield to avoid texture on these surfaces. First cells were processed and short wavelength response of p{sup +}nn{sup +} solar cells was enhanced by using lightly doped boron emitters in the uncovered area.

  11. TPV Systems with Solar Powered Tungsten Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A. S.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Khvostikova, O. A.; Gazaryan, P. Y.; Sorokina, S. V.; Andreev, V. M.

    2007-02-22

    A solar TPV generator development and characterization are presented. A double stage sunlight concentrator ensures 4600x concentration ratio. TPV modules based on tungsten emitters and GaSb cells were designed, fabricated and tested at indoor and outdoor conditions. The performance of tungsten emitter under concentrated solar radiation was analyzed. Emitter temperatures in the range of 1400-2000 K were measured, depending on the emitter size. The light distribution in the module has been characterized, 1x1 cm GaSb TPV cells were fabricated with the use of the Zn-diffusion and LPE technologies. The cell efficiency of 19% under illumination by a tungsten emitter (27% under spectra cut-off at {lambda} > 1820 nm) heated up to 1900-2000 K had been derived from experimentally measured PV parameters. The series connection of PV cells was ensured by the use of BeO ceramics. The possibilities of system performance improvement are discussed.

  12. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  13. Flat Pack Toy Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the concept of flat pack toys. Flat pack toys are designed using a template on a single sheet of letter-sized card stock paper. Before being cut out and built into a three-dimensional toy, they are scanned into the computer and uploaded to a website. With the template accessible from the website, anyone with…

  14. Flat feet in children.

    PubMed

    Barry, R J; Scranton, P E

    1983-12-01

    In the assessment of the child with flat feet a sound knowledge of arch and subtalar biomechanics, epidemiology, and etiology is important. The occurrence and natural history of flat feet are presented, and treatment modalities that have withstood the test of time are discussed.

  15. Microlensless interdigitated photoconductive terahertz emitters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Prabhu, S S

    2015-01-26

    We report here fabrication of interdigitated photoconductive antenna (iPCA) terahertz (THz) emitters based on plasmonic electrode design. Novel design of this iPCA enables it to work without microlens array focusing, which is otherwise required for photo excitation of selective photoconductive regions to avoid the destructive interference of emitted THz radiation from oppositely biased regions. Benefit of iPCA over single active region PCA is, photo excitation can be done at larger area hence avoiding the saturation effect at higher optical excitation density. The emitted THz radiation power from plasmonic-iPCAs is ~2 times more than the single active region plasmonic PCA at 200 mW optical excitation, which will further increase at higher optical powers. This design is expected to reduce fabrication cost of photoconductive THz sources and detectors.

  16. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  17. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  18. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  19. Summary from Working Group on Multiple Beams and Funneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wangler, T. P.

    1985-01-01

    The working group on Multiple Beams and Funneling discussed various topics related to multiple beams and funneling, including (1) design considerations for multiple-beam accelerators; (2) scaling of current, emittance, and brightness for multiple-beam systems; (3) funneling lines using either discrete components or a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) funneling structure; and (4) alternatives to funneling.

  20. FLASH X-RAY (FXR) LINEAR INDUCTION ACCELERATOR (LIA) OPTIMIZATION Upgrade of the OTR Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Wargo, P E

    2006-12-01

    Knowing the electron beam parameters at the exit of an accelerator is critical for several reasons. Foremost is to optimize the application of the beam, which is flash radiography in the case of the FXR accelerator. The beam parameters not only determine the theoretical dose, x-ray spectrum, and radiograph resolution (spot size), they are required to calculate the final transport magnetic fields that focus the beam on the bremsstrahlung converter to achieve the theoretical limits. Equally important is the comparison of beam parameters to the design specifications. This comparison indicates the ''health'' of the accelerator, warning the operator when systems are deteriorating or failing. For an accelerator of the size and complexity of FXR, a large suite of diagnostics is normally employed to measure and/or infer beam parameters. These diagnostics are distributed throughout the accelerator and can require a large number of ''shots'' (measurements) to calculate a specific beam parameter. The OTR Emittance Diagnostic, however, has the potential to measure all but one of the beam parameters simultaneous at a specific location. Using measurements from a scan of a few shots, this final parameter can also be determined. Since first deployment, the OTR Emittance Diagnostic has been limited to measuring only one of the seven desired parameters, the beam's divergence. This report describes recent upgrades to the diagnostic that permit full realization of its potential.

  1. Luminosity dilution due to random offset beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.

    1991-11-01

    We consider beam-beam interaction in a collider in the case when the beams randomly displace around the equilibrium orbit at the interaction point. Due to the random part of the interaction, particles diffuse over the betatron amplitude causing an emittance growth of the beam. A Fokker-Planck equation is derived in which a diffusion coefficient is related with the spectral density of the noise. Estimations for the Superconducting Super Collider parameters give a tolerable level of the high-frequency beam offset at the interaction point. 2 refs.

  2. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Haga, A; Sugita, S; Kita, S; Tanaka, S-I; Okuyama, F; Kobayashi, N

    2007-01-01

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10beam extracted from the CNFs was estimated to be D<50 microm in diameter. Superior performance was realized by using CNFs with larger fiber radii (100-500 nm) grown sparsely on the metal tips, which were installed in a holder at the short length L=0.5 mm.

  3. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  4. Plasmons in doped finite carbon nanotubes and their interactions with fast electrons and quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Sandra; Cox, Joel D.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2016-08-01

    We study the potential of highly doped finite carbon nanotubes to serve as plasmonic elements that mediate the interaction between quantum emitters. Similar to graphene, nanotubes support intense plasmons that can be modulated by varying their level of electrical doping. These excitations exhibit large interaction with light and electron beams, as revealed upon examination of the corresponding light extinction cross-section and electron energy-loss spectra. We show that quantum emitters experience record-high Purcell factors, while they undergo strong mutual interaction mediated by their coupling to the tube plasmons. Our results show the potential of doped finite nanotubes as tunable plasmonic materials for quantum optics applications.

  5. Tapered channel for six-dimensional muon cooling towards micron-scale emittances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys; Fernow, Richard C.; Berg, J. Scott; Palmer, Robert B.

    2013-09-01

    A high-luminosity muon collider requires a significant reduction of the six-dimensional emittance prior to acceleration. Obtaining the desired final emittances requires transporting the muon beam through long sections of a beam channel containing rf cavities, absorbers, and focusing solenoids. Here we propose a new scheme to improve the performance of the channel, consequently increasing the number of transmitted muons and the lattice cooling efficiency. The key idea of our scheme is to tune progressively the main lattice parameters, such as the cell dimensions, rf frequency, and coil strengths, while always keeping the beam emittance significantly above the equilibrium value. We adopt this approach for a new cooling lattice design for a muon collider, and examine its performance numerically. We show that with tapering the cooling rate is not only higher than conventional designs, but also maintains its performance through the channel, resulting in a notable 6D emittance decrease by 3 orders of magnitude. We also review important lattice parameters, such as the required focusing fields, absorber length, cavity frequency, and voltage.

  6. Portable infrared reflectometer for evaluating emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Optical methods are frequently used to evaluate the emittance of candidate spacecraft thermal control materials. One new optical method utilizes a portable infrared reflectometer capable of obtaining spectral reflectance of an opaque surface in the range of 2 to 25 microns using a Michelson-Type FTIR interferometer. This miniature interferometer collects many infrared spectra over a short period of time. It also allows the size of the instrument to be small such that spectra can be collected in the laboratory or in the field. Infrared spectra are averaged and integrated with respect to the room temperature black body spectrum to yield emittance at 300 K. Integrating with respect to other black body spectra yields emittance values at other temperatures. Absorption bands in the spectra may also be used for chemical species identification. The emittance of several samples was evaluated using this portable infrared reflectometer, an old infrared reflectometer equipped with dual rotating black body cavities, and a bench top thermal vacuum chamber. Samples for evaluation were purposely selected such that a range of emittance values and thermal control material types would be represented, including polished aluminum, Kapton®, silvered Teflon®, and the inorganic paint Z-93-P. Results indicate an excellent linear relationship between the room temperature emittance calculated from infrared spectral data and the emittance obtained from the dual rotating black body cavities and thermal vacuum chamber. The prospect of using the infrared spectral data for chemical species identification will also be discussed. .

  7. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  8. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  9. Noninterceptive transverse emittance measurements using BPM for Chinese ADS R&D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Chi; He, Yuan; Dou, Weiping; Tao, Yue; Chen, Wei-long; Jia, Huan; Liu, Shu-hui; Wang, Wang-sheng; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhang, X. L.

    2016-04-01

    The noninterceptive four-dimensional transverse emittance measurements are essential for commissioning the high power continue-wave (CW) proton linacs as well as their operations. The conventional emittance measuring devices such as slits and wire scanners are not well suited under these conditions due to sure beam damages. Therefore, the method of using noninterceptive Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is developed and demonstrated on Injector Scheme II at the Chinese Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (China-ADS) proofing facility inside Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) [1]. The results of measurements are in good agreements with wire scanners and slits at low duty-factor pulsed (LDFP) beam. In this paper, the detailed experiment designs, data analysis and result benchmarking are presented.

  10. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Thomas; Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio; Bravin, Enrico; Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O.; Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H- beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H- beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H0/e- pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H0 particles are separated from the unstripped H- ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H- beam, the transverse emittance of the H- beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  11. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-09-15

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  12. Flat-spectrum speech.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, M R; Strube, H W

    1986-05-01

    Flat-spectrum stimuli, consisting of many equal-amplitude harmonics, produce timbre sensations that can depend strongly on the phase angles of the individual harmonics. For fundamental frequencies in the human pitch range, many realizable timbres have vowel-like perceptual qualities. This observation suggests the possibility of constructing intelligible voiced speech signals that have flat-amplitude spectra. This paper describes a successful experiment of creating several different diphthongs by judicious choice of the phase angles of a flat-spectrum waveform. A possible explanation of the observed vowel timbres lies in the dependence of the short-time amplitude spectra on phase changes.

  13. Online clustering algorithms for radar emitter classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lee, Jim P Y; Senior; Li, Lingjie; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Wong, K Max

    2005-08-01

    Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters from received radar pulse samples. The main challenges of this task are the high dimensionality of radar pulse samples, small sample group size, and closely located radar pulse clusters. In this paper, two new online clustering algorithms are developed for radar emitter classification: One is model-based using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) criterion and the other is based on competitive learning. Computational complexity is analyzed for each algorithm and then compared. Simulation results show the superior performance of the model-based algorithm over competitive learning in terms of better classification accuracy, flexibility, and stability.

  14. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  15. Flat bunch creation and acceleration: a possible path for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Increasing the collider luminosity by replacing bunches having Gaussian line-charge distribution with flat bunches, but with same beam-beam tune shift at collision, has been studied widely in recent years. But, creation of 'stable' flat bunches (and their acceleration) using a multiple harmonic RF system has not been fully explored. Here, we review our experience with long flat bunches in the barrier RF buckets at Fermilab.We presentsome preliminary results from beam dynamics simulations and recent beam studies in the LHC injectors to create stable flat bunches using double harmonic RF systems. The results deduced from these studies will be used to model the necessary scheme for luminosity upgrade in the LHC. We have also described a viable (and economical) way for creation and acceleration of flat bunches in the LHC. The flat bunch scheme may have many advantages over the LHC baseline scenario, particularly because of the reduced momentum spread of the bunch for increased intensities.

  16. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Van Zeijts, J

    2003-05-12

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

  17. High Brightness Electron Beam Studies at the NSLS SDL

    SciTech Connect

    Qian,H.; Hidaka, Y.; Murphy, J. B.; Podobedov, B.; Seletskiy, S.; Shen, Y.; Yang, X.; Wang, X. J.; Tang, C. X.

    2009-05-04

    Experimental optimization of electron beam brightness at the NSLS SDL is reported in this paper. Using a high quantum efficiency (QE) Mg metal cathode and the S-band BNL-type RF gun, we have systematically studied electron beams transverse and longitudinal emittance. The measured thermal emittance for the Mg cathode is 0.85{+-}0.04 mm-mrad/mm, which contradicts the current thermal emittance model. For a 50 pC beam, measured normalized transverse and longitudinal RMS emittance are 0.6 mm-mrd and 5.2 ps-keV, respectively. The smallest projected transverse emittance observed for a 20 pC charge is 0.15 {+-} 0.02 mm-mrad.

  18. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  19. Flat-space singletons

    SciTech Connect

    Fronsdal, C.

    1987-02-15

    Singletons exist, as particles and as local fields, only in 3+2 de Sitter space. Their kinematical properties make them natural candidates for constituents of massless fields, and perhaps for quarks. It is interesting to find out how to describe this type of compositeness in flat space. A theory of interacting singleton fields in de Sitter space is now available, and in this paper we study the flat-space limit of the Green's functions of that theory. The flat-space limit is an autonomous theory of Green's functions, but is not an operator field theory. The three-point function is calculated and its flat-space limit is found to reveal glimpses of a physical interpretation. Causal and spectral properties are in accord with the tenets of axiomatic field theory. The theory is a generalization of local field theory, in which photons appear as composite objects although the physical S matrix is the same as in conventional QED.

  20. A low-emittance APS lattice with alternating horizontal beta functions at insertion devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-09-29

    Previously we looked at the possibility of reducing the horizontal beta function in a straight section in order to optimize the beam properties for certain uses. This is difficult to do as an insertion because of the many constraints on the APS lattice. In particular, the emittance inevitably increases, and it can only be done for one or two sectors. We noted in that an ESRF-style lattice with alternating high- and low-{beta}{sub s} sectors might provide reasonably good emittance for the APS, while providing two types of beta function. In this note, we present such a lattice that not only provides alternating {beta}{sub s}, but also improved emittance.

  1. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  2. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  3. Improving Touschek lifetime in ultralow-emittance lattices through systematic application of successive closed vertical dispersion bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunlin, J.; Leemann, S. C.; Andersson, Å.

    2016-06-01

    In present ultralow-emittance storage ring designs the emittance coupling required for the production of vertically diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation in the hard x-ray regime is achieved and in many cases surpassed by a correction of the orbit and the linear optics alone. However, operating with a vertical emittance lower than required is disadvantageous, since it decreases Touschek lifetime and reduces brightness due to the transverse emittance increase from intrabeam scattering. In this paper we present a scheme consisting of closed vertical dispersion bumps successively excited in each arc of the storage ring by skew quadrupoles that couple horizontal dispersion into the vertical plane to a desired level and thereby raise the vertical emittance in a controlled fashion. A systematic approach to vertical dispersion bumps has been developed that suppresses dispersion and betatron coupling in the straight sections in order to maintain a small projected emittance for insertion devices. In this way, beam lifetime can be significantly increased without negatively impacting insertion device source properties and hence brightness. Using simulation results for the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring including magnet and alignment imperfections we demonstrate that Touschek lifetime can be increased by more than a factor 2 by adjusting the vertical emittance from 1.3 pm rad (after orbit correction) to 8 pm rad (after application of dispersion bumps) using two to three independent skew quadrupole families all the while ensuring deviations from design optics are restrained to a minimum.

  4. Field emission from ZrC films on Si and Mo single emitters and emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, T.; Mackie, W.A.; Davis, P.R.

    1996-05-01

    Field emission from ZrC films deposited on Si and Mo single emitters and field emitter arrays (FEAs) has been studied. For single emitters, the results show dramatic improvements in emitter performance by reducing work functions{emdash}on the order of 1 eV{emdash}and increasing stability. For FEAs, deposition of a ZrC film reduced the operating voltage 30{percent}{endash}50{percent} at an emission current of 1.0 {mu}A/tip and increased the emission stability. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  5. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  6. Coaxial inverted geometry transistor having buried emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Cress, S. B.; Dunn, W. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to an inverted geometry transistor wherein the emitter is buried within the substrate. The transistor can be fabricated as a part of a monolithic integrated circuit and is particularly suited for use in applications where it is desired to employ low actuating voltages. The transistor may employ the same doping levels in the collector and emitter, so these connections can be reversed.

  7. Charge neutrality in heavily doped emitters

    SciTech Connect

    del Alamo, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The applicability of the quasineutrality approximation to modern emitters of solar cells is analytically reviewed. It is shown that this approximation is fulfilled in more than 80% of the depth of a typical solar-cell emitter, being particularly excellent in the heavily doped regions beneath the surface where most of the heavy doping effects arise. Our conclusions are in conflict with Redfield's recent affirmations.

  8. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  9. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  10. Phase space analysis of velocity bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cultrera, L.; di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Pace, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vicario, C.; Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Cianchi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giannessi, L.; Labat, M.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Marrelli, C.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serluca, M.

    2011-09-01

    Peak current represents a key demand for new generation electron beam photoinjectors. Many beam applications, such as free electron laser, inverse Compton scattering, terahertz radiation generation, have efficiencies strongly dependent on the bunch length and current. A method of beam longitudinal compression (called velocity bunching) has been proposed some years ago, based on beam longitudinal phase space rotation in a rf field potential. The control of such rotation can lead to a compression factor in excess of 10, depending on the initial longitudinal emittance. Code simulations have shown the possibility to fully compensate the transverse emittance growth during rf compression, and this regime has been experimentally proven recently at SPARC. The key point is the control of transverse beam plasma oscillations, in order to freeze the emittance at its lowest value at the end of compression. Longitudinal and transverse phase space distortions have been observed during the experiments, leading to asymmetric current profiles and higher final projected emittances. In this paper we discuss in detail the results obtained at SPARC in the regime of velocity bunching, analyzing such nonlinearities and identifying the causes. The beam degradation is discussed, both for slice and projected parameters. Analytical tools are derived to experimentally quantify the effect of such distortions on the projected emittance.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Yuhong Zhang

    2010-05-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  12. Study of thermionic RF-gun phase-space dynamics and slice emittance under influence of external electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2011-07-01

    A high brightness electron source of ultra-small emittance and high-average current is one of the most important components for future accelerators. In a RF-electron-gun, rapid acceleration can reduce emittance growth due to space charge effects. However, twisting or rotation of the transverse phase-space distribution as a function of time is observed in thermionic RF-electron-guns and may set a lower limit to the projected beam emittance. Such rotation being caused by the variation of the RF field with time may be compensated by fields from a specific cavity. In this work, we study RF-electron-gun phase-space dynamics and emittance under the influence of external fields to evaluate the compensation schemes.

  13. Electron-Beam Dynamics for an Advanced Flash-Radiography Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-11-17

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for multipulse flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Furthermore, beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in-cell codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup, image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. The beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  14. Electron-beam dynamics for an advanced flash-radiography accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2015-06-22

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in cell (PIC) codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup (BBU), image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. Beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  15. Improving ion beam injector performance by augmenting capacitance of vacuum diode

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D. A., LLNL

    1998-06-24

    The recirculating induction accelerator is a new class of particle accelerator being developed at LLNL as a reduced-cost driver for heavy-ion beam driven inertial fusion energy. Ongoing research and development of advanced beam control technologies for the recirculator system requires a very stable and reproducible ion beam source. The injector pulse modulator must be capable of producing very precise high-voltage pulses in order to reduce the current modulation instability and achieve the required beam reproducibility. Computer modeled simulations of beam dynamics have established that errors greater than 0.1 percent in the flatness of the 120 kV injector pulse can create intolerable energy deviations. The pulse modulator that was developed to satisfy the stringent requirements is described in the accompanying paper by Wilson [1]. A crucial aspect of the overall solution is a modification made to the vacuum diode apparatus, whereby high-voltage capacitors were added in close proximity to the thermionic potassium-ion emitter. This paper discusses the rationale for augmenting the normally small capacitance of the injector diode, and presents design information, including an illustrated layout, electrostatic field modeling results, and data on ceramic capacitors operating at elevated levels.

  16. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed.

  17. A Design Report of the Baseline for PEP-X: an Ultra-Low Emittance Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl; Bertsche, Kirk; Cai, Yunhai; Chao, Alex; Corbett, Willian; Fox, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Xiaobiao; Huang, Zhirong; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nosochkov, Yuri; Novokhatski, Sasha; Radedeau, Thomas; Raubenheimer, Tor; Rivetta, Claudio; Safranek, James; Seeman, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2010-06-02

    Over the past year, we have worked out a baseline design for PEP-X, as an ultra-low emittance storage ring that could reside in the existing 2.2-km PEPII tunnel. The design features a hybrid lattice with double bend achromat (DBA) cells in two arcs and theoretical minimum emittance (TME) cells in the remaining four arcs. Damping wigglers are used to reduce the horizontal emittance to 86 pm-rad at zero current for a 4.5 GeV electron beam. At a design current of 1.5 A, the horizontal emittance increases, due to intrabeam scattering, to 164 pm-rad when the vertical emittance is maintained at a diffraction limited 8 pm-rad. The baseline design will produce photon beams achieving a brightness of 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV in a 3.5-m conventional planar undulator. Our study shows that an optimized lattice has adequate dynamic aperture, while accommodating a conventional off-axis injection system. In this report, we present the results of study, including the lattice properties, nonlinear dynamics, intra-beam scattering and Touschek lifetime, RF system, and collective instabilities. Finally, we discuss the possibility of partial lasing at soft X-ray wavelengths using a long undulator in a straight section.

  18. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  19. Consequences of bounds on longitudinal emittance growth for the design of recirculating linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Recirculating linear accelerators (RLAs) are a cost-effective method for the acceleration of muons for a muon collider in energy ranges from a couple GeV to a few 10s of GeV. Muon beams generally have longitudinal emittances that are large for the RF frequency that is used, and it is important to limit the growth of that longitudinal emittance. This has particular consequences for the arc design of the RLAs. I estimate the longitudinal emittance growth in an RLA arising from the RF nonlinearity. Given an emittance growth limitation and other design parameters, one can then compute the maximum momentum compaction in the arcs. I describe how to obtain an approximate arc design satisfying these requirements based on the deisgn in [1]. Longitudinal dynamics also determine the energy spread in the beam, and this has consequences on the transverse phase advance in the linac. This in turn has consequences for the arc design due to the need to match beta functions. I combine these considerations to discuss design parameters for the acceleration of muons for a collider in an RLA from 5 to 63 GeV.

  20. Beam distribution function after filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors calculate the beam distribution function after filamentation (phase-mixing) of a focusing mismatch. This distribution is relevant when interpreting beam measurements and sources of emittance dilution in linear colliders. It is also important when considering methods of diluting the phase space density, which may be required for the machine protection system in future linear colliders, and it is important when studying effects of trapped ions which filament in the electron beam potential. Finally, the resulting distribution is compared with measured beam distributions from the SLAC linac.

  1. Poker Flat improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee approved on September 14 a $10.8 million upgrade to University of Alaska Fairbanks Poker Flat Research Range pending full House and Senate approval. The funding will provide for building design, scientific program planning, and initial road and foundation construction. Senator Ted Stevens (RAK) said, “It is an important recognition of the roles Poker Flat, the Geophysical Institute and this university play in the international science area,“ that the Senate approved the money in a time of budget pressure.Poker Flat's facilities include rocket assembly and launching capabilities, telemetry receiving stations and ground-based diagnostic systems needed for launch decisions for space, aeronomy and atmospheric science experiments.

  2. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Kyritsakis, A. Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-28

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  3. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyritsakis, A.; Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  4. Holograms of Flat Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Grumiller, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The holographic principle has a concrete realization in the Anti-de Sitter/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence. If this principle is a true fact about quantum gravity then it must also hold beyond AdS/CFT. In this paper, we address specifically holographic field theory duals of gravitational theories in asymptotically flat spacetimes. We present some evidence of our recent conjecture that three-dimensional (3d) conformal Chern-Simons gravity (CSG) with flat space boundary conditions is dual to an extremal CFT.

  5. Growth of carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber: a linear electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ha Jin; Jong Bae, Min; Kim, Yong C.; Cho, Eun S.; Sohn, Y. C.; Kim, D. Y.; Lee, S. E.; Kang, H. S.; Han, In T.; Kim, Young H.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji Beom

    2011-03-01

    The multi-stage effect has been revisited through growing carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber with a thickness of 11 µm. A prepared linear electron source exhibits a turn-on field as low as 0.4 V µm - 1 and an extremely high field enhancement factor of 19 300, when compared with those results from reference nanotube emitters grown on flat silicone wafer; 3.0 V µm - 1 and 2500, respectively. In addition, we introduce a novel method to grow nanotubes uniformly around the circumference of carbon fibers by using direct resistive heating on the continuously feeding carbon threads. These results open up not only a new path for synthesizing nanocomposites, but also offer an excellent linear electron source for special applications such as backlight units for liquid crystal displays and multi-array x-ray sources.

  6. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  7. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  8. Variable emittance behavior of smart radiative coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Fan, Desong; Li, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Smart radiative coating on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was prepared by the sol-gel La{}1-xSr x MnO3 (x = 0.125, 0.175 and 0.2) nanoparticles and the binder composed of terpineol and ethyl cellulose. The crystallized structure, grain size, chemical compositions, magnetization and the surface morphology were characterized. The thermal radiative properties of coating in the infrared range was evaluated from infrared reflectance spectra at various temperatures. A single perovskite structure is detected in sol-gel nanoparticles with size 200 nm. Magnetization measurement reveals that room temperature phase transition samples can be obtained by appropriate Sr substitution. The influence of surface conditions and sintering temperature on the emittance of coating was observed. For rough coatings with root-mean-square roughness 640 nm (x = 0.125) and 800 nm (x = 0.175) , its emittance increment is 0.24 and 0.26 in in the temperature range of 173-373 K. Increasing sintering temperature to 1673 K, coating emittance variation improves to 0.3 and 0.302 respectively. After mechanical polishing treatment, the emittance increment of coatings are enhanced to 0.31 and 0.3, respectively. The results suggested that the emittance variation can be enhanced by reducing surface roughness and increasing sintering temperature of coating.

  9. Design of a low emittance and high repetition rate S-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jang-Hui

    2014-09-01

    As an electron beam injector of X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), photoinjectors have been developed for the past few decades. Such an injector starting with a photocathode RF gun provides high brightness beams and therefore it is being adopted as an injector of X-ray FELs. In this paper we show how to improve photoinjector performance in terms of emittance and repetition rates by means of injector components optimization, especially with the gun. Transverse emittance at the end of an injector is reduced by optimizing the gun design, gun solenoid position, and accelerating section position. The repetition rate of an injector mainly depends on the gun. It is discussed that a repetition rate of 1 kHz at a normal-conducting S-band photoinjector is feasible by adopting a coaxial RF coupler and improving cooling-water channels surrounding the gun.

  10. SNS Emittance Scanner, Increasing Sensitivity and Performance through Noise Mitigation ,Design, Implementation and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, J.

    2006-11-20

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The SNS MEBT Emittance Harp consists of 16 X and 16 Y wires, located in close proximity to the RFQ, Source, and MEBT Choppers. Beam Studies for source and LINAC commissioning required an overall increase in sensitivity for halo monitoring and measurement, and at the same time several severe noise sources had to be effectively removed from the harp signals. This paper is an overview of the design approach and techniques used in increasing gain and sensitivity while maintaining a large signal to noise ratio for the emittance scanner device. A brief discussion of the identification of the noise sources, the mechanism for transmission and pick up, how the signals were improved and a summary of results.

  11. Studies and calculations of transverse emittance growth in high-energy proton storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.; Jackson, G.

    1989-03-01

    In the operation of proton-antiproton colliders, an important goal is to maximize the integrated luminosity. During such operations in the Fermilab Tevatron, the transverse beam emittances were observed to grow unexpectedly quickly, thus causing a serious reduction of the luminosity. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. A formula for the emittance growth rate, due to random dipole kicks, is derived. In the experiment, RF phase noise of known amplitude was deliberately injected into the Tevatron to kick the beam randomly, via dispersion at the RF cavities. Theory and experiment are found to agree reasonably well. We also briefly discuss the problem of quadrupole kicks. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-01-06

    We discuss the approach of generating round beams for ultimate storage rings using vertical damping wigglers (with horizontal magnetic field). The vertical damping wigglers provide damping and excite vertical emittance. This eliminates the need to generate large linear coupling that is impractical with traditional off-axis injection. We use a PEP-X compatible lattice to demonstrate the approach. This lattice uses separate quadrupole and sextupole magnets with realistic gradient strengths. Intrabeam scattering effects are calculated. As a result, the horizontal and vertical emittances are 22.3 pm and 10.3 pm, respectively, for a 200 mA, 4.5 GeV beam, with a vertical damping wiggler of a total length of 90 m, a peak field of 1.5 T and a wiggler period of 100 mm.

  13. Head-on beam-beam compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Heimerle, M.; Luo, Y.; Pikin, A.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R. C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Lambiase, R.; Mapes., M.; Meng, W.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, w.

    2010-07-29

    Head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses had been proposed for the SSC, LHC, and the Tevatron [1,2]. Two electron lenses are installed in the Tevatron [2-4], where they are routinely used as gap cleaner and have been tested in many other configurations. In RHIC there are 2 head-on beam-beam interactions at IP6 and IP8, and 4 long-range beam-beam interactions with large separation (10 mm) at the other IPs. We consider the partial indirect compensation of the head-on beam-beam effect with one electron lens in each ring. Together with intensity and emittance upgrades [5,6] our goal is to approximately double the luminosity over what can be achieved without these upgrades. A RHIC electron lens consists of: a DC electron gun, an electron beam transport to the main solenoid, the superconducting main solenoid in which the interaction with the hadron beam occurs, an electron beam transport to the collector, and an electron collector. The 2 electron lenses are located in IR10 between the DX beam separation dipoles. The proton beams pass through the main solenoids of both electron lenses, and interact head-on with one of them. The following is a slightly modified version of Ref. [7]. The table shows the main parameters of the proton beam and the electron lenses. References [8-11] present simulations for and discuss beam dynamics problems.

  14. An Observation of a Transverse to Longitudinal Emittance Exchange at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Koeth, Timothy W

    2009-05-01

    An experimental program to perform a proof of principle of transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (ϵxin ↔ ϵzout and ϵxin ↔ ϵzout) has been developed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, including two magnetic dogleg channels and a TM110 deflecting mode radio frequency cavity, were constructed for the emittance exchange experiment. The first priority was a measurement of the Emittance Exchange beamline transport matrix. The method of difference orbits was used to measure the transport matrix. Through varying individual beam input vector elements, such as xin, x'in, yin, y'in, zin, or δin, and measuring the changes in all of the beam output vector's elements, xout, x'out, yout, y'out, zout, δout, the full 6 x 6 transport matrix was measured. The measured emittance exchange transport matrix was in overall good agreement with our calculated transport matrix. A direct observation of an emittance exchange was performed by measuring the electron beam's characteristics before and after the emittance exchange beamline. Operating with a 14.3 MeV, 250pC electron bunch, ϵzin of 21.1 ± 1.5 mm • mrad was observed to be exchanged with ϵxout of 20.8 ± 2.00 mm • mrad. Diagnostic limitations in the ϵzout measurement did not account for an energy-time correlation, thus potentially returning values larger than the actual longitudinal emittance. The ϵxin of 4.67 ± 0.22 mm • mrad was observed to be exchanged with ϵzout of 7.06 ± 0.43 mm • mrad. The apparent ϵzoutgrowth is consistent with calculated values in which the correlation term is neglected.

  15. Spectral Emittance of Uncoated and Ceramic-Coated Inconel and Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Joseph C.; Stewart, James E.

    1959-01-01

    The normal spectral emittance of Inconel and type 321 stainless steel with different surface treatments was measured at temperatures of 900, 1,200, 1,500, and 1,800 F over a wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 microns. The measurements involved comparison of the radiant energy emitted by the heated specimen with that emitted by a comparison standard at the same temperature by means of a recording double-beam infrared spectrophotometer. The silicon carbide comparison standard had previously been calibrated against a laboratory black-body furnace. Surface treatments included electropolishing, sandblasting, electro-polishing followed by oxidation in air for 1/2 hour at 1,800 F, sandblasting followed by oxidation in air for 1/2 hour at 1,800 F, application of National Bureau of Standards coating A-418, and application of NBS ceramic coating N-143. The normal spectral emittance of both alloys in the electropolished condition was low and decreased very slightly with increasing wavelength while in the sandblasted condition it was somewhat higher and did not vary appreciably with wavelength. The oxidation treatment greatly increased the normal spectral emittance of both the electropolished and sandblasted type 321 stainless steel specimens and of the electropolished Inconel specimens and introduced some spectral selectivity into the curves. The oxidation increased the normal spectral emittance of the sandblasted Inconel specimens only moderately. Of the specimens to which a coating about 0.002 inch thick was applied, those coated with A-418 had higher emittance at all wavelengths than did those coated with N-143, and the coated specimens of Inconel had higher spectral emittance at all wavelengths than did the corresponding specimens of type 321 stainless steel. Both coatings were found to be partially transparent to the emitted energy at this thickness but essentially opaque at a thickness of 0.005 inch. Coated specimens with 0.005 inch or more of coating did not show the effect

  16. NLC Luminosity as a Function of Beam Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2002-06-06

    Realistic calculation of NLC luminosity has been performed using particle tracking in DIMAD and beam-beam simulations in GUINEA-PIG code for various values of beam emittance, energy and beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP). Results of the simulations are compared with analytic luminosity calculations. The optimum range of IP beta functions for high luminosity was identified.

  17. T-ray profile synthesis using photoconductive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Toshiaki; Masuda, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Masaya; Egawa, Kazuhiro; Itatani, Taro; Ohi, Akihiko

    2007-09-01

    We have observed coherent synthesis of spatial profiles of THz radiation emitted from a photoconductive antenna array. The antenna array is composed of seven independently addressable photoconductive antenna units having interdigitated electrodes. The antennas were pumped by amplified 800 nm femtosecond optical pulses. Emitted THz radiation was focused, and the time-resolved spatial profile of the THz radiation on the focal plane was observed using a newly developed real-time imaging apparatus, which can correct the terahertz field images for nonuniformity in birefringence of the EO crystal. By scanning the delay time, frequency-resolved images were also obtained, which exhibit frequency-dependent field profiles. Field profiles observed were coherent superpositions of terahertz waves emitted from the antenna units constituting the array. By inverting the bias voltage to the central unit of the emitter array, we observed super-resolution beam size of terahertz waves, which are smaller than the diffraction limit.

  18. An automated focal point positioning and emittance measurement procedure for the interaction point of the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, N.; Bambade, P.; Kozanecki, W.; Koska, W.

    1989-08-01

    To achieve maximum luminosity at the SLC, both the electron and positron beams must reach their minimum transverse size within 1 mm of the longitudinal location where the two bunches collide. This paper describes an automated procedure for positioning the focal point of each beam at this collision plant. The technique is based on measurements of the beam size utilizing either secondary emission or bremsstrahlung signals from carbon fibers a few microns in diameter. We have achieved simultaneous and reproducible measurements of the angular speed (/approximately/200 /mu/rad) and the optimum beam spot size (/approximately/2 /mu/m), which when combined yield measurements of the beam emittance consistent with those obtained using conventional profile monitor techniques. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Operational Performance of LCLS Beam Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Edstrom, S.; Emma, P.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miahnahri, A.; Moeller, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore

    2010-06-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray FEL utilizing the last km of the SLAC linac has been operational since April 2009 and finished its first successful user run last December. The various diagnostics for electron beam properties including beam position monitors, wire scanners, beam profile monitors, and bunch length diagnostics are presented as well as diagnostics for the X-ray beam. The low emittance and ultra-short electron beam required for X-ray FEL operation has implications on the transverse and longitudinal diagnostics. The coherence effects of the beam profile monitors and the challenges of measuring fs long bunches are discussed.

  20. Transport and emittance study for 18 GHz superconducting-ECR ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Kibayashi, M; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A

    2012-02-01

    As the upgrade program of the azimuthally varying field (AVF) cyclotron is at the cyclotron facility of the RCNP, Osaka University for the improvement of the quality, stability, and intensity of accelerated beams, an 18 GHz superconducting (SC) ECR ion source has been installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions, especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by RCNP AVF cyclotron. The production development of several ions such as B, O, N, Ne, Ar, Ni, Kr, and Xe has been performed by Yorita et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311(2008); 81, 02A332 (2010)]. Further studies for the beam transport have been done in order to improve the beam current more for injection of cyclotron. The effect of field leakage of AVF main coil is not negligible and additional steering magnet has been installed and then beam transmission has been improved. The emittance monitor has also been developed for the purpose of investigating correlation between emittance of beam from ECR ion sources and injection efficiency. The monitor consists with BPM82 with rotating wire for fast measurement for efficient study.