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Sample records for emitter hollow cathode

  1. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  2. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  3. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  4. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  5. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  6. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  7. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  8. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  9. Characterization of Hollow Cathode Performance and Thermal Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan M.; Watkins, Ron; Jameson, Kristina; Yoneshige, Lance; Przybylowski, JoHanna; Cho, Lauren

    2006-01-01

    Hollow cathodes are one of the main life-limiting components in ion engines and Hall thrusters. Although state-of-the-art hollow cathodes have demonstrated up to 30,352 hours of operation in ground tests with careful handling, future missions are likely to require longer life, more margin and greater resistance to reactive contaminant gases. Three alternate hollow cathode technologies that exploit different emitter materials or geometries to address some of the limitations of state-of-the-art cathodes are being investigated. Performance measurements of impregnated tungsten-iridium dispenser cathodes at discharge currents of 4 to 15 A demonstrated that they have the same operating range and ion production efficiency as conventional tungsten dispenser cathodes. Temperature measurements indicated that tungsten-iridium cathodes also operate at the same emitter temperatures. They did not exhibit the expected reduction in work function at the current densities tested. Hollow cathodes with lanthanum hexaboride emitters operated over a wide current range, but suffered from lower ion production efficiency at currents below about 12.4 A because of higher insert heating requirements. Differences in operating voltages and ion production rates are explained with a simple model of the effect of cathode parameters on discharge behavior.

  10. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  11. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  12. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  13. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  14. 12Cao-7Al2o3 Electride Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Lauren P. (Inventor); Williams, John D. (Inventor); Martinez, Rafael A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The use of the electride form of 12CaO-7Al.sub.2O.sub.3, or C12A7, as a low work function electron emitter in a hollow cathode discharge apparatus is described. No heater is required to initiate operation of the present cathode, as is necessary for traditional hollow cathode devices. Because C12A7 has a fully oxidized lattice structure, exposure to oxygen does not degrade the electride. The electride was surrounded by a graphite liner since it was found that the C12A7 electride converts to it's eutectic (CA+C3A) form when heated (through natural hollow cathode operation) in a metal tube.

  15. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice

  16. Hollow cathode, quasi-steady MPD arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, N.; Jahn, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    A quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been operated with four different hollow cathodes over a power range from 5 kilowatts to 5 megawatts. The absolute level of the argon mass flow, as well as the fractional division of the flow between the cathode and the six standard chamber injectors, is varied over a range of 1 to 12 grams per second. For a fixed total current, it is observed that the voltage increases monotonically with mass flow rate, compared to the usual experience with solid cathodes where the voltage decreases with mass flow rate. For a fixed percentage of flow through the cathode, each hollow cathode configuration displays a minimum impedance at a particular value of the total mass flow. It is asserted that in order to keep the discharge inside the hollow cathode the magnetic pressure and gasdynamic pressure have to match inside the cavity.

  17. Discharge with Hollow Cathode (Selected Chapters),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-12

    view of its mechanism made Rose in [77]. Let us dismantle/select the fundamental conclusions of this work which are based on the study of the...too little in order to support discharge by means of : 7-processes, and therefore the mechanism of secondary processes in the arc with hollow cathode...which leads to the output of electrons from the cathode, thermoemission, then the temperature of cathode surface T3 must be T.=p33OK. Unfortunately, the

  18. Development and Testing of High Current Hollow Cathodes for High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Van Noord, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist In-Space Propulsion project is sponsoring the testing and development of high power Hall thrusters for implementation in NASA missions. As part of the project, NASA Glenn Research Center is developing and testing new high current hollow cathode assemblies that can meet and exceed the required discharge current and life-time requirements of high power Hall thrusters. This paper presents test results of three high current hollow cathode configurations. Test results indicated that two novel emitter configurations were able to attain lower peak emitter temperatures compared to state-of-the-art emitter configurations. One hollow cathode configuration attained a cathode orifice plate tip temperature of 1132 degC at a discharge current of 100 A. More specifically, test and analysis results indicated that a novel emitter configuration had minimal temperature gradient along its length. Future work will include cathode wear tests, and internal emitter temperature and plasma properties measurements along with detailed physics based modeling.

  19. Argon hollow cathode. M.S. Thesis; [propellants for ion bombardment thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehn, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    An interest in alternate propellants for ion-bombardment thrusters, together with ground applications of this technology, has prompted consideration of argon. Several variations of conventional hollow cathode designs were tried, but the bulk of the testing used a hollow tube with an internal tungsten emitter and an orifice at one end. The optimum cathode tube diameter was found to be in the range of 1.0-2.5 cm, somewhat larger than those used for cesium and mercury. Optimum orifice diameter depended on operating conditions, and varied from 0.5 to 5 mm. Biasing the internal emitter negative relative to the cathode chamber reduced the external coupling voltage and should therefore improve orifice lifetime. The expected effect of this bias on emitter lifetime was less clear. Lifetime tests were not conducted as part of this investigation, but several designs show promise of long lifetime in specific applications.

  20. Destructive Evaluation of a Xenon Hollow Cathode after a 28,000 Hour Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system requires a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) with a lifetime of at least 18,000 hours. In order to demonstrate the lifetime capability of the HCA, a series of hollow cathode wear tests was performed which included a life test operated at the maximum current of the HCA. This test sought to verify hollow cathode lifetime capability and contamination control protocols. This hollow cathode accumulated 27,800 hours of operation before it failed during a restart attempt. The cathode was subsequently destructively analyzed in order to determine the failure mechanism. Microscopic examination of the cathode interior determined that relatively small changes in the cathode physical geometry had occurred and barium tungstates, which are known to limit the emission process, had formed over a majority of the electron emitter surface. Because the final state of the insert was consistent with expected impregnate chemistry, the hollow cathode was believed to have reached the end of its usable life under the test conditions.

  1. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  2. 12CaO-7Al2O3 Electride Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Lauren P. (Inventor); Williams, John D. (Inventor); Martinez, Rafael A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The use of the electride form of 12CaO-7Al2O3, or C12A7, as a low work function electron emitter in a hollow cathode discharge apparatus is described. No heater is required to initiate operation of the present cathode, as is necessary for traditional hollow cathode devices. Because C12A7 has a fully oxidized lattice structure, exposure to oxygen does not degrade the electride. The electride was surrounded by a graphite liner since it was found that the C12A7 electride converts to it's eutectic (CA+C3A) form when heated (through natural hollow cathode operation) in a metal tube.

  3. The Hollow Cathode Phase of Pseudospark Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    THE HOLLOW CATHODE PHASE OF PSEUDOSPARK OPERATION L. Pitchford and J. P. Boeuf University Paul Sabatier, France V. Puech University De Paris-Sud...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University Paul Sabatier, France 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME...Appl. Phys. 53, 1699 (1988). [9] A. Anders, S. Anders, and M. Gundersen, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. [10] J. P. Boeuf and L. Pitchford , IEEE

  4. A model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Brophy, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry based on the observation that xenon ion mobility is diffusion limited due to resonant charge exchange reactions. The model shows that vapor phase barium atoms are ionized almost immediately and electric fields accelerate the ions upstream from the emission zone. We have also applied the model to the orifice region, where the resultant ion generation profile correlates with previously reported orifice erosion.

  5. C12A7 Electride Hollow Cathode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    those found in clathrate phases of ice and in zeolites , there is an important difference in that the unit cell of C12A7 is positively charged. In other...while Ba-W is heated above 1300 K (Goebel, Watkins & Jameson, 2007). These temperatures require well-made heaters and good thermal insulation. Ba-W...Chu, L. (2006, July 9-12). Characterization of Hollow Cathode Performance and Thermal Behavior. AIAA-2006-5150. Sacramento, California. 11

  6. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  7. High pressure working mode of hollow cathode arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minoo, H.; Popovici, C.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of high pressure cathotrons is discussed. Methods of preheating either the gas or the cathode itself are detailed together with various geometries for the hollow cathode. Three special configurations were tested, and the results are analyzed.

  8. Low-pressure glow discharge with a hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, Valeriy; Bogodielnyi, Illia

    2011-10-01

    We measured the breakdown curves of a dc glow discharge with hollow cathode and flat electrodes in the gap between the electrodes L = 100 mm. At low gas pressure, the left branches of the breakdown curves for the hollow cathode and the flat electrodes are identical. At high gas pressures, the right branch of the breakdown curve of the discharge with a hollow cathode is close to the breakdown curve for the distance between the plane electrodes, equal to the gap between the edge of the plates of the hollow cathode and flat anode. Current-voltage characteristics of the hollow cathode discharge were measured. At low gas pressure discharge is in the high-voltage (electron beam) form with ascending CVC. In the gas pressure range p > 0.1 Torr the discharge first burns in the glow mode. At higher current the discharge goes into the hollow cathode mode, filling the space between the plates, and it has an almost vertical CVC. The transition from a glow discharge mode into a hollow one possesses a hysteresis. At gas pressures p ~ 1 Torr the hollow cathode effect disappears, since the thickness of the cathode layer is small compared with the gap between the plates of the cathode.

  9. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1986-01-01

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  10. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  11. Hollow cathode plasma coupling study, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The electron collection and emission characteristics of a simple hollow cathode contactor, an extended anode hollow cathode contactor supplied by JSC, and a ring cusp magnetic field contactor are presented and the effects of discharge power and argon or xenon expellant flowrate on these characteristics are examined. All of the contactors are shown to exhibit good electron emission performance over a wide range of discharge power and expellant type and flowrate. Good electron performance is shown to be more difficult to achieve. Results suggest that the extended anode and ring cusp contactors should perform satisfactorily to electron emission currents beyond 1000 mA and electron collection currents beyond 500 mA. All contactors performed better on xenon than argon. A general theory of plasma contactor operation in both the electron collection and electron emission modes, which describes the current-limiting effects of space-charge phenomena is given. This current-limiting and collecting phenomenon is shown to be a function of driving potential differences and emitting and collecting surface radius ratio for the case of a spherical geometry. Discharge power did not appear to influence the electron collection current substantially in the experiments so it is suggested in light of the model that the contactors are generally not limited by their ion production capabilities under conditions at which they were tested.

  12. Hollow Cathode Assembly Development for the HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Kamhawi, Hani; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Robinson, Dale A.

    2016-01-01

    To support the operation of the HERMeS 12.5 kW Hall Thruster for NASA's Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, hollow cathodes using emitters based on barium oxide impregnate and lanthanum hexaboride are being evaluated through wear-testing, performance characterization, plasma modeling, and assessment of system implementation concerns. This paper will present the development approach used to assess the cathode emitter options. A 2,000-hour wear-test of development model barium-oxide-based (BaO) hollow cathode is being performed as part of the development plan. The cathode was operated with an anode that simulates the HERMeS hall thruster operating environment. Cathode discharge performance has been stable with the device accumulating 740 hours at the time of this report. Cathode operation (i.e. discharge voltage and orifice temperature) was repeatable during period variation of discharge current and flow rate. The details of the cathode assembly operation during the wear-test will be presented.

  13. Long lifetime hollow cathodes for 30-cm mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hollow cathodes for 30-cm Hg bombardment thrusters was carried out. Both main and neutralizer cathode configurations were tested with both rolled foil inserts coated with low work function material and impregnated porous tungsten inserts. Temperature measurements of an impregnated insert at various positions in the cathode were made. These, along with the cathode thermal profile are presented. A theory for rolled foil and impregnated insert operation and lifetime in hollow cathodes is developed. Several endurance tests, as long as 18000 hours at emission currents of up to 12 amps were attained with no degradation in performance.

  14. Energetic ion production and electrode erosion in hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the discharge voltage have been reported in high current hollow cathode discharges. Models of DC potential hills downstream of the cathode and ion acoustic instabilities in a double layer postulated in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain these energetic ions, but have not been substantiated in experiments.

  15. Emission current control system for multiple hollow cathode devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, John R. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An emission current control system for balancing the individual emission currents from an array of hollow cathodes has current sensors for determining the current drawn by each cathode from a power supply. Each current sensor has an output signal which has a magnitude proportional to the current. The current sensor output signals are averaged, the average value so obtained being applied to a respective controller for controlling the flow of an ion source material through each cathode. Also applied to each controller are the respective sensor output signals for each cathode and a common reference signal. The flow of source material through each hollow cathode is thereby made proportional to the current drawn by that cathode, the average current drawn by all of the cathodes, and the reference signal. Thus, the emission current of each cathode is controlled such that each is made substantially equal to the emission current of each of the other cathodes. When utilized as a component of a multiple hollow cathode ion propulsion motor, the emission current control system of the invention provides for balancing the thrust of the motor about the thrust axis and also for preventing premature failure of a hollow cathode source due to operation above a maximum rated emission current.

  16. Modeling of LaB6 hollow cathode performance and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrini, Daniela; Albertoni, Riccardo; Paganucci, Fabrizio; Andrenucci, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Thermionic hollow cathodes are currently used as sources of electrons in a variety of space applications, in particular as cathodes/neutralizers of electric thrusters (Hall effect and ion thrusters). Numerical tools are needed to guide the design of new devices before their manufacturing and testing, since multiple geometrical parameters influence the cathode performance. A reduced-order, numerical model was developed to assess the performance of orificed hollow cathodes, with a focus on the operational lifetime. The importance of the lifetime prediction is tied to its impact on the operational lifetime of the thruster to which the cathode is coupled. The cathode architecture consists of a refractory metal tube with an internal electron emitter made of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6). The choice of LaB6 accounts for the reduced evaporation rate, the low sensitivity to poisoning and the absence of an activation procedure with respect to oxide cathodes. A LaB6 emitter is thus a valuable option for long-lasting cathodes, despite its relatively high work-function and reactivity with many refractory metals at high temperatures. The suggested reduced-order model self-consistently predicts the key parameters of the cathode operation, shedding light on the power deposition processes as well as on the main erosion mechanisms. Preliminary results showed good agreement with both the experimental data collected by Alta and data available from the literature for different operating conditions and power levels. Next developments will include further comparisons between theoretical and experimental data, considering cathodes of various size and operating conditions.

  17. Studies on an experimental quartz tube hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which a quartz tube, hollow cathode was operated in a test fixture allowing the simultaneous measurement of internal cathode pressure, insert temperature profiles, and the emission currents from various cathode components as a function of discharge current and propellant (mercury) mass flow rate for a number of different cathode orifice diameters. Results show that the insert temperature profile is essentially independent of orifice diameter but depends strongly on internal cathode pressure and emission current. The product of internal cathode pressure and insert diameter is shown to be important in determining the emission location and the minimum keeper voltage.

  18. Extended-testing of xenon ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    A hollow cathode wear-test of 508 hours was successfully completed at an emission current of 23.0 A and a xenon flow rate of 10 Pa-L/s. This test was the continuation of a hollow cathode contamination investigation. Discharge voltage was stable at 16.7 V. The cathode temperature averaged 1050 C with a 7 percent drop during the wear-test. Discharge ignition voltage was found to be approximately 20 V and was repeatable over four starts. Post-test analyses of the hollow cathode found a much improved internal cathode condition with respect to earlier wear-test cathodes. Negligible tungsten movement occurred and no formation of mono-barium tungsten was observed. These results correlated with an order-of-magnitude reduction in propellant feed-system leakage rate. Ba2CaWO6 and extensive calcium crystal formation occurred on the upstream end of the insert. Ba-Ca compound depositions were found on the Mo insert collar, on the Re electrical leads, and in the gap between the insert and cathode wall. This wear-test cathode was found to be in the best internal condition and had the most stable operating performance of any hollow cathode tested during this contamination investigation.

  19. Preliminary test results of a hollow cathode MPD thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.; Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Performance of four hollow cathode configurations with low work function inserts was evaluated in a steady-state 100 kW class applied magnetic field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster. Two of the configurations exhibited stable discharge current attachment to the low work function inserts of the hollow cathodes. A maximum discharge current of 2250 A was attained. While the applied-field increased the performance of the thruster, at high applied fields the discharge current attachment moved from the insert to the cathode body. The first successful hollow cathode performed well in comparison with a conventional rod cathode MPD thruster, attaining a thrust efficiency with argon of close to 20 percent at a specific impulse of about 2000 s. The second successful configuration had significantly lower performance.

  20. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-12-23

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  1. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R.J. Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence. PMID:28008918

  2. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  3. Reduction of gas flow into a hollow cathode ion source for a neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shigeru; Akiba, Masato; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Horiike, Hiroshi; Sakuraba, Junji

    1982-07-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the reduction of the gas flow rate into ion sources which utilize a hollow cathode. The electron emitter of the hollow cathode was a barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten tube. The hollow cathode was mounted to a circular or a rectangular bucket source and the following results were obtained. There was a tendency for the minimum gas flow rate for the stable source operation to decrease with increasing orifice diameter of the hollow cathode up to 10 mm. A molybdenum button with an appropriate diameter set in front of the orifice reduced the minimum gas flow rate to one half of that without button. An external magnetic field applied antiparallel to the field generated by the heater current stabilized the discharges and reduced the minimum gas flow rate to one half of that without field. Combination of the button and the antiparallel field reduced the minimum gas flow rate from the initial value (9.5 Torr 1/s) to 2.4 Torr 1/s. The reason for these effects was discussed on the basis of the theory for arc starvation.

  4. Plasma generation near an Ion thruster disharge chamber hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Anderson, John R.; Goebel, Dan M.; Wirz, Richard; Sengupta, Anita

    2003-01-01

    In gridded electrostatic thrusters, ions are produced by electron bombardment in the discharge chamber. In most of these thrusters, a single, centrally located hollow cathode supplies the ionizing electrons. An applied magnetic field in the discharge chamber restricts the electrons leaving the hollow cathode to a very narrow channel. In this channel, the high electron current density ionizes both propellant gas flowing from the hollow cathode, and other neutrals from the main propellant flow from the plenum. The processes that occur just past the hollow cathode exit are very important. In recent engine tests, several cases of discharge cathode orifice place and keeper erosion have been reported. In this paper we present results from a new 1-D, variable area model of the plasma processes in the magnetized channel just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. The model predicts plasma densities, and temperatures consistent with those reported in the literature for the NSTAR engine, and preliminary results from the model show a potential maximum just downstream of the cathode.

  5. Heaterless ignition of inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Heaterless inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes were investigated with the aim of reducing ion thruster complexity and increasing ion thruster reliability. Cathodes heated by glow discharges are evaluated for power requirements, flowrate requirements, and life limiting mechanisms. An accelerated cyclic life test is presented.

  6. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  7. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  8. Characterization of a High Current, Long Life Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Kamhawi, Hani; McEwen, Heather K.

    2006-01-01

    The advent of higher power spacecraft makes it desirable to use higher power electric propulsion thrusters such as ion thrusters or Hall thrusters. Higher power thrusters require cathodes that are capable of producing higher currents. One application of these higher power spacecraft is deep-space missions that require tens of thousands of hours of operation. This paper presents the approach used to design a high current, long life hollow cathode assembly for that application, along with test results from the corresponding hollow cathode. The design approach used for the candidate hollow cathode was to reduce the temperature gradient in the insert, yielding a lower peak temperature and allowing current to be produced more uniformly along the insert. The lower temperatures result in a hollow cathode with increased life. The hollow cathode designed was successfully operated at currents from 10 to 60 A with flow rates of 5 to 19 sccm with a maximum orifice temperature measured of 1100 C. Data including discharge voltage, keeper voltage, discharge current, flow rates, and orifice plate temperatures are presented.

  9. Microanalysis of extended-test xenon hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Four hollow cathode electron sources were analyzed via boroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and x ray diffraction analysis. These techniques were used to develop a preliminary understanding of the chemistry of the devices that arise from contamination due to inadequate feed-system integrity and improper insert activation. Two hollow cathodes were operated in an ion thruster simulator at an emission current of 23.0 A for approximately 500 hrs. The two tests differed in propellant-feed systems, discharge power supplies, and activation procedures. Tungsten deposition and barium tungstate formation on the internal cathode surfaces occurred during the first test, which were believed to result from oxygen contamination of the propellant feed-system. Consequently, the test facility was upgraded to reduce contamination, and the test was repeated. The second hollow cathode was found to have experienced significantly less tungsten deposition. A second pair of cathodes examined were the discharge and the neutralizer hollow cathodes used in a life-test of a 30-cm ring-cusp ion thruster at a 5.5 kW power level. The cathodes' test history was documented and the post-test microanalyses are described. The most significant change resulting from the life-test was substantial tungsten deposition on the internal cathode surfaces, as well as removal of material from the insert surface. In addition, barium tungstate and molybdate were found on insert surfaces. As a result of the cathode examinations, procedures and approaches were proposed for improved discharge ignition and cathode longevity.

  10. Structure of CNT thin films for cold cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, M.; Stepińska, I.; Sobczak, K.; Czerwosz, E.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper different structures of CNT layer cathode showing different electron emission characteristics depending on Ni concentration are presented. The cathode's layers were obtained by PVD/CVD method. Nanocomposite C-Ni layer were prepared in PVD step. This C-Ni layer was precursor layer for CNT layer growth in CVD process. Prepared CNT layers were studied with SEM and TEM. Their emissive properties were investigated in means F-N theory. It was found that the threshold field for these emitters varies from 1,7 V/μm to 20 V/μm. For some types of CNT cathodes it is possible to obtain the emission current intensity 55μA at the electric field ~3 V/μm.

  11. Correlation of inert gas hollow cathode performance. [for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehn, L.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    A use of the inert gases argon and xenon as possible alternatives to mercury and cesium is being considered for electrical propulsion applications. Operation up to 200 hours has been demonstrated for hollow cathodes employing argon as propellant. A description is presented of an investigation which has been conducted to obtain basic information for an improvement of hollow cathode performance with inert gases. Neutralizer tests were conducted in a 1.2-m diameter vacuum tank, with a 15-cm multipole thruster. Progress was achieved towards the goal of a generalized description of hollow cathode performance. Extrapolation of the erosion based upon a 200-hour endurance test predicts an ultimate lifetime of 1400 to 10,000 hours.

  12. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  13. Hollow cathodes in high pressure arc discharges. [for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.; Curran, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    An orified hallow cathode was tested at high pressure to improve lifetime and efficiency in arcjet thrusters. It is indicated that the arc would not operate with emission from the insert above 200 torr in nitrogen regardless of insert material, orifice diameter, or gas flow direction. Emission occurred from the insert in argon and xenon although it could not be ascertained whether diffuse or spot emission existed within the cathode. Over the extended range of configurations and operating parameters explored the desired diffuse emission mode could not be obtained at high enough pressures for orified hollow cathodes to operate in the range which is considered for arcjet applications.

  14. Thrust measurements of a hollow-cathode discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Banks, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thrust measurements of a hollow cathode mercury discharge were made with a synthetic mica target on a torsion pendulum. Thrust measurements were made for various target angles, tip temperatures, flow rates, keeper discharge powers, and accelerator electrode voltages. The experimental thrust data are compared with theoretical values for the case where no discharge power was employed.

  15. Potential Fluctuations and Energetic Ion Production in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  16. Extended test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 4700 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge experienced 4 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was reignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  17. Continuing life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 10,000 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge has experienced 10 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was re-ignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1 A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  18. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    PubMed

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

  19. Hollow cathode-based plasma contactor experiments for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors are reviewed. This research includes the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation as electron collectors from a simulated space plasma. The discovery of an 'ignited mode' regime of high contactor efficiency and low impedance is discussed, as well as is the application of recent models of the plasma coupling process to contactor operation. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma in this regime. A discussion of design considerations for plasma contactors is given which includes expressions defining the total mass flow rate and power requirements of plasma contactors operating in both the cathodic and anodic regimes, and correlation of this to the tether current. Finally, future ground and spaceflight experiments are proposed to resolve critical issues of plasma contactor operation.

  20. Instability of plasma plume of micro-hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-11-15

    The micro-hollow cathode gas discharge driven by thermionic emission is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions simulation. The electron current is extracted from the plasma plume penetrating into the keeper–anode space through a small keeper orifice from the cathode-keeper space. The results of simulations and a simplified analytical model showed that the plasma density and extracted current can exhibit deep modulation in the range of frequencies of tens of MHz. This modulation appears when the space-charge limited current between the plume boundary and the anode exceeds the plasma thermal electron current through the orifice.

  1. Numerical Simulations of the Partially-Ionized Gas in a 100-A LaB6 Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.; Guerrero, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a hollow cathode with a LaB6 emitter operating at 100 A have been performed for the first time using the 2-D Orificed Cathode (OrCa2D) code. Results for a variety of plasma properties are presented and compared with laboratory measurements. The large size of the device permits peak electron number densities in the cathode interior that are lower than those established in the NSTAR hollow cathode, which operates with a 7.3x lower discharge current and 3.2x lower mass flow rate. Also, despite the higher discharge current in the LaB6 cathode, the maximum electron current density is lower, by 4.2x, than that in the NSTAR cathode due to the larger orifice size. Simulations and direct measurements show that at 12 sccm of xenon flow the peak emitter temperature is in the range of 1594-1630 C. It is also found that the conditions for the excitement of current-driven streaming instabilities and ion-acoustic turbulence (IAT) are satisfied in this cathode, similarly to what was found in the past in its smaller counterparts like the NSTAR cathode. Based on numerical simulations, it has long been argued that these instabilities may be responsible for the anomalously large ion energies that have been measured in these discharges as well as for the enhancement of the plasma resistivity. Confirmation of the presence of IAT in this cathode is presented for the first time in a companion paper.

  2. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  3. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  4. Hollow nanoparticle cathode materials for sodium electrochemical cells and batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Elena; Rajh, Tijana; Johnson, Christopher S.; Koo, Bonil

    2016-07-12

    A cathode comprises, in its discharged state, a layer of hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles disposed between two layers of carbon nanotubes, and preferably including a metallic current collector in contact with one of the layers of carbon nanotubes. Individual particles of the hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles comprise a crystalline shell of .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 including cation vacancies within the crystal structure of the shell (i.e., iron vacancies of anywhere between 3% to 90%, and preferably 44 to 77% of available octahedral iron sites). Sodium ions are intercalated within at least some of the cation vacancies within the crystalline shell of the hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles.

  5. The hollow cathode in the quasi-steady MPD discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Jaskowsky, W. F.; Jahn, R. G.; Clark, K. E.; Krishnan, M.

    1973-01-01

    A large hollow cathode has been operated in a quasi-steady MPD discharge over a range of current from 7 to 30 kA and argon mass flow from 0.04 to 6.0 g/sec. The 1.3-cm-i.d. cathode cavity attains steady emission characteristics in some tens of microseconds without the assistance of auxiliary heating, low work function inserts, or external keeper electrodes. Measured current and potential distributions within the cavity reveal that the current attaches in a zone 1 to 2 cm long with a surface current density greater than 1000 A/sq cm and a local axial electric field less than 10 V/cm. Electron densities within the cavity, estimated from spectroscopic records, are above 10 to the 17th power per cu cm, at least one order of magnitude greater than has been reported for either ion engine hollow cathodes or conventional solid cathodes in similar arc discharges.

  6. Performance of Synchronization and Emittance of the Mg cathode photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, H.; Uesaka, M.; Ueda, T.; Sakumi, A.; Muroya, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Mg cathode photoinjector has been stably operating for three years mainly for radiation chemistry analysis. Generally a combination of the photocathode RF injector as a source of pump-beam and the femtosecond laser as one of probe-laser realizes this technique. Especially, the chemical reactions of hot, room temperature and critical water in a time-range of picosecond and sub-picosecond are very interesting phenomena. The important factor for such as the fast radiation chemistry is not only the pulse duration of beam and laser but also the synchronization between the pump-beam and probe-laser. For the experiments of radiation chemistry, the photoinjector, in which the driven laser synchronized with the probe-laser illuminates the photo-cathode, is normally utilized with a accelerating structure and a magnetic bunch compressor such as chicane-type magnets. Although this short bunch and 100 fs laser light are enough to perform the experiment of radiation chemistry in the time-range of sub-picosecond, the instability of synchronization reduced the total time-resolution. The main source was not the synchronization of the driven- and probe-laser but that of laser and radio frequency. The stability of laser depends on environmental factors: The fluctuation of room temperature causes the instability. Now we have recognized that 0.5 degree (peak-to-peak) fluctuation of the laser-room temperature had approximately corresponded to the instability of 10 ps. This timing-drift is a period of 1 hour roughly. In addition, the cathode damage and emittance evaluation are represented.

  7. Investigation of Energetic Ions in a 100-A Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion acoustic turbulence in the formation of high-energy ion tails in the plume of a 100-A LaB6 hollow cathode is experimentally and theoretically examined. At fixed flow rate and varying discharge current, single-point measurements of fluctuation intensity in the cathode plume are taken and compared to ion energy measurements. It is shown that for high discharge current the formation of energetic ions is correlated with the amplitude of the ion acoustic turbulence. Two-dimensional maps of background plasma parameters and wave turbulence are made at the highest discharge current investigated, 140 A. A simple, one-dimensional quasilinear model for the interaction of the ion energy distribution with the ion acoustic turbulence is employed, and it is shown that the energy in the measured wave turbulence is sufficiently large to explain the formation of ion tails in the cathode plume. Mitigation techniques for minimizing the amplitude of the turbulence are discussed.

  8. Note: Improved heater design for high-temperature hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. S.; Gallimore, A. D.; Goebel, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved heater design for thermionic cathodes using a rhenium filament encased in a boron nitride ceramic sleeve. This heater is relatively simple to fabricate, yet has been successfully used to reliably and repeatably light a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) hollow cathode based on a previously published design without noticeable filament degradation over hundreds of hours of operation. The high decomposition temperature of boron nitride (2800 C for inert environments) and melting point for rhenium (3180 C) make this heater especially attractive for use with LaB6, which may require operating temperatures upwards of 1700 C. While boron nitride decomposes in air above 1000 C, the heater was used only at vacuum with an inert gas discharge, and no degradation was observed. Limitations of current state of the art cathode heaters are also discussed and compared with the rhenium-boron nitride combination.

  9. Pulsed hollow-cathode ion lasers: pumping and lasing parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zinchenko, S P; Ivanov, I G

    2012-06-30

    Optimal discharge conditions have been experimentally found for ion lasers excited in the hollow-cathode discharge plasma by microsecond current pulses by pumping working atoms in secondkind collisions with ions and metastable buffer-gas atoms. Measurements of the output power of krypton ion and zinc-, cadmium-, mercury-, thallium-, copper-, and gallium-vapour lasers in tubes with cathodes of different diameters showed that the pulse power reaches several tens of watts, and the average power obtained with cathodes 2 cm in diameter and a length of 40 cm or more approaches 1 W. Lasing in most media is observed simultaneously at several lines (the multi-wavelength regime). Lasing on a three-component (He - Kr - Hg) mixture is realised in the multi-wavelength regime at blue, red, and IR lines.

  10. Source Properties of a Hollow Cathode Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogels, J. M. M. J.; Konings, L. U. E.; Schram, D. C.

    1986-04-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the properties of a hollow cathode as an ion-source. The measured electron density, ion and neutral temperatures and drift velocities have been compared with predictions from the conservation laws for matter, momentum and energy. Very large exit drift velocities of ions and neutrals are observed. The magnitude and direction, against the electric field, can be explained on the basis of the momentum balance. At weak magnetic field strengths even supersonic drift velocities are found. The charge flux carried by the ions is about five percent of the net arc current. For small flows, the ionized fraction of the gas supply approaches 100%. The neutral particle density outside the cathode consist of a fraction drifting with a large velocity out of the cathode and a fraction of cool background atoms. The change of the ratio of these fractions with increasing distance to the cathode causes the average neutral particle drift to decrease very rapidly. Finally, an analysis of the overall cathode power balance is given.

  11. Intrinsic emittance reduction of copper cathodes by laser wavelength tuning in an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divall, Marta Csatari; Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Vicario, Carlo; Trisorio, Alexandre; Schietinger, Thomas; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-03-01

    With the improvement of acceleration techniques, the intrinsic emittance of the cathode has a strong impact on the final brightness of a free electron laser. The systematic studies presented in this paper demonstrate for the first time in a radiofrequency photocathode gun a reduction of the intrinsic emittance when tuning the laser photon energies close to the effective work function of copper. The intrinsic emittance was determined by measuring the core slice emittance as a function of the laser beam size at laser wavelengths between 260 and 275 nm. The results are consistent with the measured effective work function of the cathode. Slice emittance values normalized to the laser beam size reached values down to 500 nm /mm , close to that expected from theory. A 20% reduction of the intrinsic emittance was observed over the spectral range of the laser.

  12. Characteristics of Ozone Generation using a Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yasunobu; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Shozo

    A new type of ozone generator using a micro hollow cathode discharge has been developed and evaluated on its operating characteristics. The electrode system consists of two thin metal cathodes and a ceramic spacer with a center hole of a few 100 µm diameter. By feeding high- pressure oxygen gas through the center hole, the residence time of the oxygen gas within the discharge space decreases to the order of micro second. The ozone generation efficiency increases up to 45 g/kWh at the ozone concentration of 7.6 g/Nm3 without any cooling systems. In this ozone generating system, the ozone decomposition mechanisms such as electron impacts and the heat rise of oxygen gas are effectively removed by decreasing the gas-residence time.

  13. Radiation Efficiency of AC-excited Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Biborosch, L. D.; Popescu, S.; Luca, D.; Petzenhauser, I.; Frank, K.

    2006-01-15

    This contribution reports on micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) generated in a device supplied by rectified but non-filtered low-frequency currents to preserve the cathode function of one micro electrode. The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation efficiency of such an MHCD was investigated in high-pressure argon in the frequency range from 40 kHz to 140 kHz. Both the currents and voltages of the MHCD device are nonlinear and the power input shows a flat maximum at about 50 kHz. The VUV relative efficiency also displays a more pronounced maximum at this frequency but remains still comparable with those of the dc supplied MHCD. Unfortunately, this VUV efficiency rather refers to the resonant lines of oxygen impurity at about 130.5 nm and not to the argon excimer radiation.

  14. Neutralizer Hollow Cathode Simulations and Validation with Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.; Snyder, John S.; Katz, Ira; Herman, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The fidelity of electric propulsion physics-based models depends largely on the validity of their predictions over a range of operating conditions and geometries. In general, increased complexity of the physics requires more extensive comparisons with laboratory data to identify the region(s) that lie outside the validity of the model assumptions and to quantify the uncertainties within its range of application. This paper presents numerical simulations of neutralizer hollow cathodes at various operating conditions and orifice sizes. The simulations were performed using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model that solves numerically a relatively extensive system of conservation laws for the partially-ionized gas in these devices. The results for the plasma are compared directly with Langmuir probe measurements. The computed keeper voltages are also compared with the observed values. Wherever model inputs and/or specific physics of the cathode discharge are uncertain, additional sensitivity calculations have been performed to quantify the uncertainties.

  15. Prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime based on measurement of I- V curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashov, V. S.; Nikolski, K. N.; Baturin, A. S.; Sheshin, E. P.

    2003-06-01

    A technique is presented, which allows the prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime without long-term direct measurements of cathode parameters stability. This technique is based on periodic measurements of cathode I- V characteristics. Moreover, it allows performing a post-experiment optimization for the appropriate choice of the feedback system to provide a stable operation during a long time. The proposed technique was applied to study the emission properties of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and thermo-enlarged graphite (TEG). For the given cathodes, the characteristic time of the cathode destruction was estimated.

  16. Langmuir probe measurements in the Hollow Cathode Magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Mirko; Lai, Kwok-Fai

    1997-10-01

    The Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM) is a new kind of a high density plasma device which has been proposed as an ionized physical vapor deposition source for semiconductor device fabrication(John C. Helmer, Kwok F. Lai, Robert L. Anderson US Patent 5,482,661, Jan. 9, 1996). The target is of high purity metal machined to resemble a hollow cathode (id. 4cm, depth 6cm). It resides in a cooled metal housing. The magnetic field (several hundred Gauss) is generated by permanent magnets stacked on the outside of the metal housing, aligned parallel to the HCM axis. At the mouth of the HCM, a magnetic cusp traps a high density plasma. Beyond the cusp, a slowly diverging magnetic field produces a low temperature (T_e ~ 2-3eV), high density (n_e ~ 10^12-10^13cm-3∝ P_DC) plume. The HCM serves to both sputter and ionize metal atoms from the target. These ions may deposit onto a silicon device wafer, enabling metal deposition into the bottom of very small (<0.5μm) high aspect ratio (>=6:1) features. The unique properties of the films deposited using the HCM will be presented and related to the plasma parameters obtained from Langmuir probe data and magnetic field modeling. discharge is on the inside wall

  17. Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; He, F. Jiang, X. X.; Ouyang, J. T.; Xie, K.

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

  18. Neutralizer Hollow Cathode Simulations and Comparisons with Ground Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Snyder, John S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Katz, Ira; Herman, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The fidelity of electric propulsion physics-based models depends largely on the validity of their predictions over a range of operating conditions and geometries. In general, increased complexity of the physics requires more extensive comparisons with laboratory data to identify the region(s) that lie outside the validity of the model assumptions and to quantify the uncertainties within its range of application. This paper presents numerical simulations of neutralizer hollow cathodes at various operating conditions and orifice sizes. The simulations were performed using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model that solves numerically a relatively extensive system of conservation laws for the partially ionized gas in these devices. A summary of the comparisons between simulation results and Langmuir probe measurements is provided. The model has also been employed to provide insight into recent ground test observations of the neutralizer cathode in NEXT. It is found that a likely cause of the observed keeper voltage drop is cathode orifice erosion. However, due to the small magnitude of this change, is approx. 0.5 V (less than 5% of the beginning-of-life value) over 10 khrs, and in light of the large uncertainties of the cathode material sputtering yield at low ion energies, other causes cannot be excluded. Preliminary simulations to understand transition to plume mode suggest that in the range of 3-5 sccm the existing 2-D model reproduces fairly well the rise of the keeper voltage in the NEXT neutralizer as observed in the laboratory. At lower flow rates the simulation produces oscillations in the keeper current and voltage that require prohibitively small time-steps to resolve with the existing algorithms.

  19. Atlas of uranium emission intensities in a hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.A.; Keller, R.A.; Engleman, R. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The uranium emission spectrum from a hollow cathode discharge is displayed from 11,000 to 26,000 cm/sup -1/. This atlas lists 4928 spectral lines of uranium; 3949 are classified to the neutral spectrum and 431 are classified to the singly ionized spectrum. Listed wavenumbers are accurate to +-0.003 cm/sup -1/ and the listed relative intensities to +-8%. The richness of the spectrum makes this atlas useful for wavenumber calibration of lasers, spectrographs, and monochromators to an accuracy of 1 part in 10/sup 7/. This atlas is also useful as a guide to the uranium spectrum, and relative oscillator strengths (gf values) can be calculated from the intensities to a precision of +-20%.

  20. The hollow-cathode helium-fluorine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, J. K.; Verdeyen, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    It is possible to obtain uniform stable long-pulse excitation (in excess of 100 microsec) in gas mixtures involving highly electronegative constituents (SF6, CCl4, NF3, and I2). Such a system was used to investigate the atomic fluorine laser. In the hollow cathode, lasing on fluorine transitions in the doublet system lasted for up to 80 microsec with no signs of the self-termination as reported previously in positive-column devices. The excitation process of the laser appears to depend heavily upon the fluorine donor utilized. For instance, a single-step process is involved when NF3 is used whereas a two-step process is evident for SF6. The details are discussed.

  1. High-pressure dc glow discharges in hollow diamond cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, B. S.; Turner, C.; May, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    We report the generation and characterization of dc helium microdischarges at several times atmospheric pressure in monolithic diamond hollow-cathode devices having cavity diameters on the order of 100 μm. I-V characteristics indicated operation in the glow discharge regime even at nearly 10 atm, while spectroscopic measurements of the N2 C3Πu  →  B3Πg emission returned rotational temperatures always around 420 K, with a pressure-dependent vibrational population distribution. The variation of breakdown voltage with pressure closely followed Paschen’s law, but with offsets in both axes that we tentatively ascribe to strong diffusive loss and a partial thermalization of electron energies under the high pressures considered here.

  2. Numerical simulation of the sustaining discharge in radio frequency hollow cathode discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xin-Xian; He, Feng Ouyang, Ji-Ting; Chen, Qiang Ge, Teng

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the radio frequency (RF) hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in argon at 1 Torr. The evolutions of the particle density distribution and the ionization rate distribution in RF HCD at 13.56 MHz indicate that the discharge mainly occurs inside the hollow cathode. The spatio-temporal distributions of the ionization rate and the power deposition within the hollow cathode imply that sheath oscillation heating is the primary mechanism to sustain the RF HCD, whereas secondary electron emission plays a negligible role. However, as driving frequency decreases, secondary electron heating becomes a dominant mechanism to sustain the discharge in RF hollow cathode.

  3. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  4. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities of employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Andrews, Heather L.; Herman, Matthew J.; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Weis, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of a stand-alone practical dielectric laser accelerator (DLA) requires innovation in two major critical components: high-current ultra-low-emittance cathodes and efficient laser accelerator structures. LANL develops two technologies that in our opinion are applicable to the novel DLA architectures: diamond field emitter array (DFEA) cathodes and additive manufacturing of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. This paper discusses the results of testing of DFEA cathodes in the field-emission regime and the possibilities for their operation in the photoemission regime, and compares their emission characteristics to the specific needs of DLAs. We also describe recent advances in additive manufacturing of dielectric woodpile structures using a Nanoscribe direct laser-writing device capable of maskless lithography and additive manufacturing, and the development of novel infrared dielectric materials compatible with additive manufacturing.

  5. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-15

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  6. Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsreshath, M. K.; Schwaederle, L.; Dufour, T.; Lefaucheux, P.; Dussart, R.; Overzet, L. J.

    2013-12-28

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250 μm thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8 μm thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2 μs long current peak as high as 24 mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400 Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the extinction period at high pressure also appeared on the density of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms, but delayed by a few μs relative to the current oscillations. Metastable atoms thus cannot be at the origin of the generation of the observed instabilities.

  7. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the 88Sr (5s2)1S0 − (5s5p)1P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization. PMID:27418112

  8. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  9. Model of the Plasma Potential Distribution in the Plume of a Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present results from a new model of the plasma potentials in the plume just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. We examine the electron drift velocity as the hollow cathode plasma and neutral gas expand downstream of the keeper. If the drift velocity exceeds the thermal velocity a double layer potential structure develops that is the source of hot electrons. Ions are accelerated upstream through the double layer. The locations of the double layers are calculated using a simple model. It is shown that as the cathode gas flow increases, the location of the double layer moves farther downstream.

  10. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Colwyn Bartnik, Adam Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-02

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9–9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  11. Experimental investigation of a capacitive blind hollow cathode discharge with central gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Müller, M.; Petkow, D.; Herdrich, G.; Lein, S.

    2014-12-01

    The operating parameters and resulting plasma properties of a blind hollow cathode (BHC) discharge have been investigated. The hollow cathode was driven capacitively with a pulsed dc signal of 200 kHz in a power range between 50 and 100 W at an ambient pressure of about 10 Pa. The working gas was argon, which was introduced with a ceramic capillary at different positions of the longitudinal axis of the hollow cathode with flow rates of between 30 and 1000 sccm. The current-voltage characteristics were recorded. The pressure at the end of the BHC was measured with a miniaturized pressure transducer with varying volumetric flow rate and axial position of the capillary in the hollow cathode. To characterize the ignition behaviour of the system, the measured breakdown voltages were compared with phenomenological Paschen curves calculated from the pressure data. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the origins of the light emission, comparing the glow mode and hollow cathode mode in particular. A high-speed camera recorded some plasma processes. A mounting with an indium tin oxide coated glass was used to observe the inner volume of the BHC along the longitudinal axis, while the plasma was operated with different parameters. The optical observations revealed an inhomogeneous plasma condition along the axis.

  12. Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

  13. Self-pulsing in a low-current hollow cathode discharge: From Townsend to glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yu; Xie, Kan; Zhang, Yu; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of a low current cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in pure argon. The waveforms of pulsed current and voltage are measured, and the time-averaged and time-resolved images of hollow cathode discharge are recorded by using high-speed intensified charge coupled device camera. The results show that the self-pulsing is a mode transition between low-current stage of Townsend discharge and high-current stage of glow discharge. During the self-pulsing, the current rising time relates to the dissipation of space charges, and the decay time relates to the reconstruction of the virtual anode by the accumulation of positive ions. Whether or not space charges can form and keep the virtual anode is responsible for the discharge mode and hence plays an important role in the self-pulsing phenomenon in low current hollow cathode discharge.

  14. Life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    A plasma contacting device using a hollow cathode for plasma production has been baselined for use on the Space Station. This application will require reliable, continuous operation of the cathode at electron emission currents of between 0.75 and 10 A for two years (17,500 hours). In order to validate life-time capability, a hollow cathode, operated in a diode configuration, has been tested for more than 8600 hours of stable discharge operation as of March 30, 1994. This cathode is operated at a steady-state emission current of 12.0 and a fixed xenon flow rate of 4.5 sccm. Discharge voltage and cathode temperature have remained relatively stable at approximately 12.9 V and 1260 C during the test. The test has experienced 7 shutdowns to date. In all instances, the cathode was reignited at about 42 V and resumed stable operation. This test represents the longest demonstration of stable operation of high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathodes reported to date.

  15. Hollow Cathode and Keeper-region Plasma Measurements Using Ultra-fast Miniature Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Watkins, Ron M.; Katz, Ira

    2004-01-01

    In order to support the development of comprehensive performance and life models for future deep space missions that will utilize ion thrusters, we have undertaken a study of the plasma structure in hollow cathodes using an new pneumatic scanning probe diagnostic. This device is designed to insert a miniature probe directly into the hollow cathode orifice from either the upstream insert region in the interior of the hollow cathode, or from the downstream keeper-plasma region at the exit of the hollow cathode, to provide complete axial profiles of the discharge plasma parameters. Previous attempts to diagnose this region with probes was Limited by the melting of small probes in the intense discharge near the orifice, or caused significant perturbation of the plasma by probes large enough to survive. Our new probe is extremely compact, and when configured as a single Langmuir probe, the ceramic tube insulator is only 0.5mm in diameter and the current collecting conductor has a total area of 0.002 cm2. A series of current-voltage characteristics are obtained by applying a rapid sawtooth voltage waveform to the probe as it is scanned by the pneumatic actuator into and out of the plasma region, The bellow-sealed pneumatic drive scans the probe 4 cm in the cathode insert region and 10 cm in the anode/keeper plasmas region at average speeds of about 1 mm/msec, and the residence time at the end of the insertion stroke in the densest part of the plasma near the orifice is measured to be only 10 msec. Since the voltage sweep time is fast compared to the motion of the probe, axial profiles of the plasma density, temperature and potential with reasonable spatial resolution are obtained. Measurements of the internal cathode pressures and the axial plasma-parameter profiles for a hollow cathode operating at discharge currents of up to 35 A in xenon will be presented.

  16. Influence of the floating potential on micro-hollow cathode operation

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-06-15

    The influence of a keeper electrode with a floating potential on the operation of a micro-hollow cathode is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model. The floating potential is determined self-consistently, taking into account the electron and ion charges collected by the keeper and the potential induced by the plasma non-compensated space charge. It is shown that the parameters of the micro-hollow cathode operation vary significantly, according to whether the keeper potential is floating or has a specified constant value.

  17. Plasma Emission Characteristics From a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  18. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  19. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities for employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna; Andrews, Heather Lynn; Herman, Matthew Joseph; Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Weis, Eric

    2016-09-20

    These are slides for a presentation at Stanford University. The outline is as follows: Motivation: customers for compact accelerators, LANL's technologies for laser acceleration, DFEA cathodes, and additive manufacturing of micron-size structures. Among the stated conclusions are the following: preliminary study identified DFEA cathodes as promising sources for DLAs--high beam current and small emittance; additive manufacturing with Nanoscribe Professional GT can produce structures with the right scale features for a DLA operating at micron wavelengths (fabrication tolerances need to be studied, DLAs require new materials). Future plans include DLA experiment with a beam produced by the DFEA cathode with field emission, demonstration of photoemission from DFEAs, and new structures to print and test.

  20. Mechanisms of a linear hollow cathode used for the production of a helium plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillault, L.; Larigaldie, S.

    2002-05-01

    A hollow-cathode device has been shown to operate as a plasma reflector for radar electronic beam steering using helium in the 0.2-0.5 Torr pressure range. Compared to former experiments, the use of this light gas reduces significantly spurious sputtering effect on the cathode materials. In a previous paper, a semi-quantitative physical model was developed to calculate the time evolution of the sheet reflectivity from the experimental current Id(t) measured across the discharge. A self-consistent, numerical, stationary model is now developed to describe the main physical mechanisms that govern the hollow-cathode source. The model describes the coupling between the high-voltage collisional sheath and the magnetized plasma through the hollow cathode. The cold electron creation rate includes the efficiency of ionization from the fast secondary electrons emitted from the surface of the cathode, lowered by the three-body recombination process in volume and by the ejection of a part of these fast electrons out of the cathode plasma. As the recombination rate scales as Te-9/2, the energy balance of the electrons must be solved precisely, so that the collisional-radiative exchanges in Helium are included in the model. The results are then compared to the experimental V-I characteristics for different pressures of the neutral gas; there is good agreement between the theoretical plasma model and the experiment.

  1. Analysis of XeC1 Emission in a Hollow Cathode Discharge.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Discharge .......... ................... 7 3 Potential Energy Diagram for AB* Excimer ...... ............ 9 4 Hollow Cathode Construction...Containing Ne, Xe, HCl .... .................. ... 30 IV Calculated and Experimental Emission Energies (AE), Wave- lengths (1), and Lifetimes (r) for...characteristic by pro- viding both 200 - 400 ev "beam like" electrons and high densities ( 1012/cm3) of low energy ( 700K) electrons. A simple model is

  2. Instability of a Low-Pressure Hollow-Cathode Discharge in a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M.; Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.; Soloshenko, I.A.; Shchedrin, A.I.

    2005-11-15

    Mechanisms responsible for current oscillations at the ion branch of the probe characteristic are investigated experimentally and theoretically. A comparison between experiment and theory shows that the oscillations in a hollow-cathode discharge in a longitudinal magnetic field are most likely related to the onset of helical instabili0008.

  3. Optimization of hollow cathode discharge electrode for damage free remote plasma removal process for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Tae S.; Han, Qing; Yang, Dongqing; Park, Soonam; Lubomirsky, Dima; Venkataraman, Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Cone-shaped hollow cathode electrode configuration for a damage free remote plasma removal process has been optimized for given pressures based on Paschen characteristic curves, voltage-current characteristics and time-resolved discharge observations as well as oxide film removal performances. Remote plasmas have been generated in two types of cone-shaped electrodes with mixtures of He, NF3, and NH3 for pressure range of 1-30 Torr. Paschen characteristic curves and voltage-current (V-I) characteristics define an operating pressure for low breakdown voltage and the hollow cathode effect to minimize the particles. Sinusoidal voltage waveform and asymmetry electrode configuration alternate the glow discharge and hollow cathode discharge modes in a cycle. The current and infrared emission intensity from the glow discharge increases together for both cone-shaped electrodes with increasing pressure, whereas the hollow cathode discharge plasma emits strong infrared only when pD condition is satisfied. For the wide cone electrode configuration, high voltage operation at higher pressure results in particle contamination on the processed wafer by high energy ion bombardment. Operating at optimum pressure for a given electrode configuration shows faster oxide etch rate with better uniformity over a whole 300 mm wafer.

  4. Improvement of electron emission characteristics of porous silicon emitter by using cathode reduction and electrochemical oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Wenjiang, Wang; Xiaoning, Zhang

    2017-03-01

    A new simple and convenient post-treat technique combined the cathode reduction (CR) and electrochemical oxidation (ECO) was proposed to improve the electron emission properties of the surface-emitting cold cathodes based on the porous silicon (PS). It is demonstrated here that by introducing this new technique combined CR and ECO, the emission properties of the diode have been significantly improved than those as-prepared samples. The experimental results showed that the emission current densities and efficiencies of sample treated by CR were 62 μA/cm2 and 12.10‰, respectively, nearly 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of as-prepared sample. Furthermore, the CR-treated PS emitter shows higher repeatability and stability compared with the as-prepared PS emitter. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), furier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results indicated that the improved mechanism is mainly due to the passivation of the PS, which not only improve the PS morphology by the passivation of the H+ but also improve the uniformity of the oxygen content distribution in the whole PS layer. Therefore, the method combined the CR treatment and ECO is expected to be a valuable technique to enhance the electron emission characteristics of the PS emitter.

  5. Low-Current, Xenon Orificed Hollow Cathode Performance for In-Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the operating characteristics of 3.2-mm diameter orificed hollow cathodes was conducted to examine low current and low flow rate operation. Cathode power was minimized with an orifice aspect ratio of approximately one and the use of an enclosed keeper. Cathode flow rate requirements were proportional to orifice diameter and the inverse of the orifice length. The minimum power consumption in diode mode was 10-W, and the minimum mass flow rate required for spot-mode emission was approximately 0.08-mg/s. Cathode temperature profiles were obtained using an imaging radiometer and conduction was found to be the dominant heat transfer mechanism from the cathode tube. Orifice plate temperatures were found to be weakly dependent upon the flow rate and strongly dependent upon the current.

  6. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10 (exp -3) sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  7. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  8. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A wear test of four hollow cathodes was conducted to resolve issues associated with the Space Station plasma contactor. The objectives of this test were to evaluate unit-to-unit dispersions, verify the transportability of contamination control protocols developed by the project, and to evaluate cathode contamination control and activation procedures to enable simplification of the gas feed system and heater power processor. These objectives were achieved by wear testing four cathodes concurrently to 2000 hours. Test results showed maximum unit-to-unit deviations for discharge voltages and cathode tip temperatures to be +/-3 percent and +/-2 percent, respectively, of the nominal values. Cathodes utilizing contamination control procedures known to increase cathode lifetime showed no trends in their monitored parameters that would indicate a possible failure, demonstrating that contamination control procedures had been successfully transferred. Comparisons of cathodes utilizing and not utilizing a purifier or simplified activation procedure showed similar behavior during wear testing and pre- and post-test performance characterizations. This behavior indicates that use of simplified cathode systems and procedures is consistent with long cathode lifetimes.

  9. An Investigation of the Initiation of Hollow Cathode Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    34 4 INTRODUCTION Many electric propulsion devices exist which are capable in principle of efficiently performing the station-keeping, attitude control ...supplies and control cilcuits. Thus the work described here has implications beyond the design of the cathode itself. Early in the programwe, alternative... control ; (ii) coating a thin strip of tantalum foil which is then rolled into a spiral on a mandrel before being inserted into the cathode body. This

  10. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies July 2001 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the on-orbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  11. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies from July 2011 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the onorbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  12. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 1: Neutralizer Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Upon the completion of two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion engine, the orifice channel of the neutralizer hollow cathode was eroded away to as much as twice its original diameter. Whereas the neutralizer cathode orifice opened significantly, no noticeable erosion of the discharge cathode orifice was observed. Noquantitative explanation of these erosion trends has been established since the completion of the two life tests. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas inside these devices has been developed and applied to the neutralizer hollow cathode. The numerical simulations show that the main mechanism responsible for the channel erosion is sputtering by Xe+. These ions are accelerated by the sheath along the channel and bombard the surface with kinetic energy/charge of about 17 V at the beginning of cathode life. The density of the ions inside the neutralizer orifice is computed to be as high as 2.1 x 10(sup 22) m(sup -3). Because of the 3.5-times larger diameter of the discharge cathode orifice, the ion density inside the orifice is more than 40 times lower and the sheath drop 7 V lower compared with the values in the neutralizer. At these conditions, Xe+ can cause no significant sputtering of the surface.

  13. Hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathodes for high specific capacity rechargeable lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangyuan; Yang, Yuan; Cha, Judy J; Hong, Seung Sae; Cui, Yi

    2011-10-12

    Sulfur has a high specific capacity of 1673 mAh/g as lithium battery cathodes, but its rapid capacity fading due to polysulfides dissolution presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathode for effective trapping of polysulfides and demonstrate experimentally high specific capacity and excellent electrochemical cycling of the cells. The hollow carbon nanofiber arrays were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, through thermal carbonization of polystyrene. The AAO template also facilitates sulfur infusion into the hollow fibers and prevents sulfur from coating onto the exterior carbon wall. The high aspect ratio of the carbon nanofibers provides an ideal structure for trapping polysulfides, and the thin carbon wall allows rapid transport of lithium ions. The small dimension of these nanofibers provides a large surface area per unit mass for Li(2)S deposition during cycling and reduces pulverization of electrode materials due to volumetric expansion. A high specific capacity of about 730 mAh/g was observed at C/5 rate after 150 cycles of charge/discharge. The introduction of LiNO(3) additive to the electrolyte was shown to improve the Coulombic efficiency to over 99% at C/5. The results show that the hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur structure could be a promising cathode design for rechargeable Li/S batteries with high specific energy.

  14. Operating modes of a hydrogen ion source based on a hollow-cathode pulsed Penning discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E. M.; Shandrikov, M. V. Vizir, A. V.

    2016-02-15

    An ion source based on a hollow-cathode Penning discharge was switched to a high-current pulsed mode (tens of amperes and tens of microseconds) to produce an intense hydrogen ion beam. With molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the ion beam contained three species: H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +}. For all experimental conditions, the fraction of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the beam was about 10 ÷ 15% of the total ion beam current and varied little with ion source parameters. At the same time, the ratio of H{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} depended strongly on the discharge current, particularly on its distribution in the gap between the hollow and planar cathodes. Increasing the discharge current increased the H{sup +} fraction in ion beam. The maximum fraction of H{sup +} reached 80% of the total ion beam current. Forced redistribution of the discharge current in the cathode gap for increasing the hollow cathode current could greatly increase the H{sub 3}{sup +} fraction in the beam. At optimum parameters, the fraction of H{sub 3}{sup +} ions reached 60% of the total ion beam current.

  15. Comparison of On-orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Units (PCUs) were developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Boeing for charge control on board the International Space Station (ISS). Since the first ignition of a PCU on 10/16/2000 over 3,900 hours of operation have been demonstrated on a single unit. In order to guarantee that the PCUs hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs), which emit the electrons used for charge control, would satisfy the life requirement of 18,000 hours, a ground based hollow cathode life test program was initiated at GRC. The life test program aimed at 27,000 hours of operation on a single unit to demonstrate the industry standard 1.5 times operational life requirement. As of this printing, over 18,000 hours of operation have been accumulated on a single hollow cathode. By comparing the data received from the on-orbit HCAs to the data obtained for the life test cathodes, a comparison may be drawn to determine if the on-orbit HCAs are operating normally, with a final goal of predicting lifetime. Based on the data taken thus far, it can be concluded that the on-orbit HCAs are operating within their design specifications.

  16. Process for Ignition of Gaseous Electrical Discharge Between Electrodes of a Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  17. Process for testing a xenon gas feed system of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  18. Hollow cathode operation at high discharge currents. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedly, Verlin Joe

    1990-01-01

    It was shown that ion thruster hollow cathode operation at high discharge current levels can induce reduced thruster lifetimes by causing cathode insert overheating and/or erosion of surfaces located downstream of the cathode. The erosion problem has been particularly baffling because the mechanism by which it occurs has not been understood. The experimental investigation described reveals the energies of the ions produced close to the cathode orifice can be several times the anode-to-cathode potential difference generally considered available to accelerate them. These energies (of order 50 eV) are sufficient to cause the observed erosion rates. The effects of discharge current (to 60 A), magnetic field configuration and the cathode flowrate, orifice diameter and insert design on the energies and current densities of these jet ions are examined. A model describing the mechanism by which the high energy ions could be produced when the anode-cathode potential difference is insufficient is proposed. The effects of discharge current on cathode temperature and internal pressure are also examined experimentally and described phenomenologically.

  19. Auxiliary glow discharge in the trigger unit of a hollow-cathode thyratron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Landl, N. V.; Geyman, V. G.; Frants, O. B.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.

    2016-08-01

    Results from studies of a low-current glow discharge with a hollow cathode are presented. A specific feature of the discharge conditions was that a highly emissive tablet containing cesium carbonate was placed in the cathode cavity. In the absence of a tablet, the discharge ignition voltage was typically ≥3.5 kV, while the burning voltage was in the range of 500-600 V. The use of the tablet made it possible to decrease the ignition voltage to 280 V and maintain the discharge burning voltage at a level of about 130 V. A model of the current sustainment in a hollow-cathode discharge is proposed. Instead of the conventional secondary emission yield, the model uses a generalized emission yield that takes into account not only ion bombardment of the cathode, but also the emission current from an external source. The model is used to interpret the observed current-voltage characteristics. The results of calculations agree well with the experimental data. It is shown that, in some discharge modes, the external emission current from the cathode can reach 25% of the total discharge current.

  20. A Particle and Energy Balance Model of the Orificed Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.

    2002-01-01

    A particle and energy balance model of orificed hollow cathodes was developed to assist in cathode design. The model presented here is an ensemble of original work by the author and previous work by others. The processes in the orifice region are considered to be one of the primary drivers in determining cathode performance, since the current density was greatest in this volume (up to 1.6 x 10(exp 8) A/m2). The orifice model contains comparatively few free parameters, and its results are used to bound the free parameters for the insert model. Next, the insert region model is presented. The sensitivity of the results to the free parameters is assessed, and variation of the free parameters in the orifice dominates the calculated power consumption and plasma properties. The model predictions are compared to data from a low-current orificed hollow cathode. The predicted power consumption exceeds the experimental results. Estimates of the plasma properties in the insert region overlap Langmuir probe data, and the predicted orifice plasma suggests the presence of one or more double layers. Finally, the model is used to examine the operation of higher current cathodes.

  1. Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 112 Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å (Web, free access)   Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å contains wavelengths and intensities for about 5600 lines in the region 4330 Å. An atlas plot of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed.

  2. Dynamics of a helium plasma sheet created by a hollow-cathode electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larigaldie, S.; Caillault, L.

    2000-12-01

    A hollow-cathode device has been shown to operate as a plasma reflector for electronic steering of radar beams using helium in the 0.2-0.5 Torr pressure range. Compared to previous experiments, the use of this light gas significantly reduces the spurious sputtering effects on the cathode materials. A semi-quantitative physical model was developed to describe the observed evolution of microwave beam transmissions through the plasma sheet as a function of frequency. This model stresses the importance of electron-ion recombination on the edge of the plasma sheet, due to simultaneous low electron temperatures and high electron densities.

  3. Spatio-temporal characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Ha; He, Shoujie

    2015-02-15

    The characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge at low pressure have been investigated. The voltage-current (V-I) curves, the influence of ballast resistor on the self-pulses, and the evolution of current and voltage are measured. Both the axial and radial spatio-temporal discharge images of self-pulse are recorded. The results show that there exists the hysteresis effect in the present hollow cathode discharge. The high value of ballast resistors is favourable for the observation of self-pulses. The process of the self-pulse can be divided into three stages from the temporal discharge images, i.e., the pre-discharge, the transition from mainly axial electric field to mainly radial electric field, and the decaying process. The self-pulse is suggested to originate from the mode transition of the discharge in essence.

  4. Dielectric barrier hollow cathode discharge and its enhanced performance for light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae Il; Park, Ki Wan; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Seong-Min

    2005-12-01

    We invented the dielectric barrier hollow cathode discharge (DBHCD) configuration as a novel light source and studied on the physical properties of discharge and the possibility of the parallel operation of many holes of the DBHCD without additional impedances such as inductance or capacitance. The electrical characteristics and the photo images of discharges sustained in cavity were investigated. The experimental result showed that the surface discharge mode was transformed into a hollow cathode mode according to a decrease of the pD (operating pressure times hole diameter). The parallel operation of the 13 arrays of DBHCD was also possible without additional impedances for limiting current. We measured the relative IR emission efficiency of the coplanar dielectric barrier discharge (CDBD) and DBHCD to evaluate the enhanced performance as light sources. According to the experiment, the 25 arrays of DBHCD result in 30%-enhanced performance in IR emission efficiency compared with CDBD.

  5. Optogalvanic effect and laser-induced current oscillations in hollow-cathode lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldakli, Mohsan S. A.; Ivković, Saša S.; Obradović, Bratislav M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a study of two commercial hollow-cathode lamps (HCLs) with the intention of demonstrating different phenomena in gas discharges. The optogalvanic effect in both HCLs is produced by a laser diode radiated at the wavelength that corresponds to neon transition 1s2–2p2 at 659.89 nm. The voltage–current characteristics of the lamps are explained using a classical theory of hollow-cathode discharge, while the optogalvanic signal is treated as a small perturbation of the discharge current. For certain values of voltage self-sustained current oscillations are observed in one of the HCLs. In the same HCL laser-induced optogalvanic dumped oscillations are detected. A phenomenological model that includes the effective circuit parameters of the discharge is used to explain the oscillation characteristics.

  6. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2013-08-06

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high energy physics applications.

  7. Time-resolved Langmuir Probing of a New Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) Hollow Cathode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    like texture and is easily machineable with standard tooling. Competing thermally conductive but electrically insulating ceramics such as aluminum...The 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, Wiesbaden, Germany September 11 – 15, 2011 1 Time-resolved Langmuir Probing of a New...Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) Hollow Cathode IEPC-2011-245 Presented at the 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, Wiesbaden

  8. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  9. Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes of argon metastable transitions in a hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes were observed in a commercial hollow cathode lamp containing argon buffer gas. Deviations from Gaussian line shapes were particularly strong for transitions originating from the 3P2 metastable level of argon. The anomalous line shapes can be described reasonably well by the assumption that two regions in the discharge are excited simultaneously, each giving rise to a purely Gaussian line shape, but with different polarities, amplitudes, and linewidths.

  10. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  11. A Review of Testing of Hollow Cathodes for the International Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Patterson, M. J.; Soulas, G. C.; Sarver-Verhey, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Since October 2000, two plasma contactors have been providing charge control on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of each of the two plasma contactors is a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) that produces the contacting xenon plasma. The HCA is the result of 9 years of design and testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper summarizes HCA testing that has been performed to date. As of this time, one cathode has demonstrated approximately 28,000 hr of lifetime during constant, high current use. Another cathode, HCA.014. has demonstrated 42,000 ignitions before cathode heater failure. In addition to these cathodes, four cathodes. HCA.006, HCA.003, HCA.010, and HCA.013 have undergone cyclic testing to simulate the variable current demand expected on the ISS. HCA.006 accumulated 8,000 hr of life test operation prior to being voluntarily stopped for analysis before the flight units were fabricated. HCA.010 has accumulated 15,876 hr of life testing, and 4,424 ignitions during ignition testing. HCA.003 and HCA.0 13 have accumulated 12,415 and 18,823 hr of life testing respectively.

  12. Simultaneous plasma treatment for carburizing and carbonitriding using hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Terakado, Katsuyoshi; Urao, Ryoichi; Ohmori, Miyajiro

    1996-02-01

    Ion carburizing and nitriding are effective processes for saving energy and providing pollutionless surface treatment but have the disadvantage of using much electric energy. A cylindric subsidiary cathode was set up around a rod-shaped workpiece with a gap, and hollow cathode discharge for ion carburizing was studied. Thus, simultaneous plasma treatments for ion carburizing and ion carbonitriding in one workpiece were researched using Cr-Mo steel to save electric treatment power. First, the effects of the gap between the test piece and subsidiary cathode and the pressure of electric discharge gas, including methane gas, on fundamental plasma treatment conditions were experimentally researched. It was found that the temperature for ion carburizing in a H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}-Ar-CH{sub 4} gas mixture was 1,123 to 1,193 K with a gap of 3 to 5 mm under a gas pressure of 133 to 532 Pa. Next, the test piece was ion carburized with hollow cathode discharge and carbonitrided with normal glow discharge simultaneously. The ion-carburized layer was formed in the area covered by the subsidiary cathode. The surface hardness was 800 Hv, the effective case depth was 0.6 mm, and the surface carbon content was 0.75 wt pct. An ion carbonitriding layer was formed in the area without the subsidiary cathode. The surface hardness was 700 Hv and the case depth was 0.1 mm. It is useful to form the different layers of ion carburizing and ion carbonitriding in one treatment process and to give different mechanical and tribological properties on one workpiece simultaneously.

  13. Simultaneous plasma treatment for carburizing and carbonitriding using hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakado, Katsuyoshi; Urao, Ryoichi; Ohmori, Miyajiro

    1996-02-01

    Ion carburizing and nitriding are effective processes for saving energy and providing polutionless surface treatment but have the disadvantage of using much electric energy. A cylindric subsidiary cathode was set up around a rod-shaped workpiece with a gap, and hollow cathode discharge for ion carburizing was studied. Thus, simultaneous plasma treatments for ion carburizing and ion car-bonitriding in one workpiece were researched using Cr-Mo steel to save electric treatment power. First, the effects of the gap between the test piece and subsidiary cathode and the pressure of electric discharge gas, including methane gas, on fundamental plasma treatment conditions were experimen-tally researched. It was found that the temperature for ion carburizing in a H2-N2-Ar-CH4 gas mixture was 1123 to 1193 K with a gap of 3 to 5 mm under a gas pressure of 133 to 532 Pa. Next, the test piece was ion carburized with hollow cathode discharge and carbonitrided with normal glow dis-charge simultaneously. The ion-carburized layer was formed in the area covered by the subsidiary cathode. The surface hardness was 800 Hv, the effective case depth was 0.6 mm, and the surface carbon content was 0.75 wt pct. An ion carbonitriding layer was formed in the area without the subsidiary cathode. The surface hardness was 700 Hv and the case depth was 0.1 mm. It is useful to form the different layers of ion carburizing and ion carbonitriding in one treatment process and to give different mechanical and tribological properties on one workpiece simultaneously.

  14. Oxygen transport in the internal xenon plasma of a dispenser hollow cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Capece, Angela M. Shepherd, Joseph E.; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-04-21

    Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor modify the surface morphology of BaO dispenser cathodes and degrade the electron emission properties. For vacuum cathodes operating at fixed temperature, the emission current drops rapidly when oxygen adsorbs on top of the low work function surface. Previous experiments have shown that plasma cathodes are more resistant to oxygen poisoning and can operate with O{sub 2} partial pressures one to two orders of magnitude higher than vacuum cathodes before the onset of poisoning occurs. Plasma cathodes used for electric thrusters are typically operated with xenon; however, gas phase barium, oxygen, and tungsten species may be found in small concentrations. The densities of these minor species are small compared with the plasma density, and thus, their presence in the discharge does not significantly alter the xenon plasma parameters. It is important, however, to consider the transport of these minor species as they may deposit on the emitter surface and affect the electron emission properties. In this work, we present the results of a material transport model used to predict oxygen fluxes to the cathode surface by solving the species conservation equations in a cathode with a 2.25 mm diameter orifice operated at a discharge current of 15 A, a Xe flow rate of 3.7 sccm, and 100 ppm of O{sub 2}. The dominant ionization process for O{sub 2} is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Ba is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O{sub 2} are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion-limited; therefore, the high resistance to oxygen poisoning observed in plasma cathodes likely results from surface processes not considered here.

  15. Local Electric Field Strength in a Hollow Cathode Determined by Stark Splitting of the 2S Level of Hydrogen Isotopes by Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.; Rosa, M. I. de la; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.; Gonzalo, A. B.

    2008-10-22

    In this work we present Doppler-free two-photon optogalvanic spectroscopy as a tool to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic deuterium. The strong electric field strength present in the hollow cathode is determined for various discharge conditions which allows studying the corresponding variations of the cathode fall, and its changes with discharge operation time.

  16. Excimer radiation from pulsed micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzenhauser, Isfried; Ernst, Uwe; Frank, Klaus

    2001-10-01

    Since several years d.c. microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are under investigation as efficient sources of VUV excimer radiation [1]. Up to now overall efficiency and the radiation power of the MHCDs are too low to compete e.g. with silent discharges. Substantial improvement in these parameters would make by its simple geometry MCHDs attractive for a wide range of applications. Experiments and simulations show that the efficiency of MCHDs is substantially reduced by high gas temperatures beyond 1500 K. Measurements in pure nitrogen showed that the gas temperature can be reduced about 40The actual experiments are with Xe and Ar bands in the VUV and the results of radiation output under d.c. and pulsed operation for different pulse duration and repetition rates are presented. [1] A. El-Habachi, K.H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73(7), pp. 885-887 (1998) [2] U. Ernst, "Emissionsspektroskopische Charakterisierung von Hochdruck-Mikrohohlkathodenentladungen", Ph. D thesis, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 2001 This work was supported by DFG under the contact FR 1273-1

  17. A phenomenological model for orificed hollow cathodes. Ph.D. Thesis, 1 Dec. 1981 - 1 Dec. 1982; [electrostatic thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A quartz hollow tube cathode was used to determine the operating conditions within a mercury orificed hollow cathode. Insert temperature profiles, cathode current distributions, plasma properties profile, and internal pressure-mass flow rate results are summarized and used in a phenomenological model which qualitatively describes electron emission and plasma production processes taking place within the cathode. By defining an idealized ion production region within which most of the plasma processes are concentrated, this model is expressed analytically as a simple set of equations which relate cathode dimensions and specifiable operating conditions, such as mass flow rate and discharge current, to such important parameters as emission surface temperature and internal plasma properties. Key aspects of the model are examined.

  18. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 2: Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The wear of the keeper electrode in discharge hollow cathodes is a major impediment to the implementation of ion propulsion onboard long-duration space science missions. The development of a predictive theoretical model for hollow cathode keeper life has long been sought, but its realization has been hindered by the complexities associated with the physics of the partially ionized gas and the associated erosion mechanisms in these devices. Thus, although several wear mechanisms have been hypothesized, a quantitative explanation of life test erosion profiles has remained incomplete. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas in a discharge cathode has been developed and applied to understand the mechanisms that drove the erosion of the keeper in two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion thruster. An extensive set of comparisons between predictions by the numerical simulations and measurements of the plasma properties and of the erosion patterns is presented. It is found that the near-plume plasma oscillations, predicted by theory and observed by experiment, effectively enhance the resistivity of the plasma as well as the energy of ions striking the keeper.

  19. Evidence of nonclassical plasma transport in hollow cathodes for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2007-03-15

    Measurements, simplified analyses, and two-dimensional numerical simulations with a fluid plasma model show that classical resistivity cannot account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in a 25-27.5 A electric propulsion hollow cathode. The cathode consisted of a 1.5 cm hollow tube with an {approx}0.28 cm diameter orifice and was operated with 5.5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) of xenon flow using two different anode geometries: a segmented cone and a circular flat plate. The numerical simulations show that classical resistivity yields as much as four times colder electron temperatures compared to the measured values in the orifice and near-plume regions of the cathode. Classical transport and Ohm's law also predict exceedingly high electron-ion relative drift speeds compared to the electron thermal speed (>4). It is found that the addition of anomalous resistivity based on existing growth rate formulas for electron-ion streaming instabilities improves qualitatively the comparison between the numerical results and the time-averaged measurements. Simplified analyses that have been based largely on the axial measurements support the conclusion that additional resistivity is required in Ohm's law to explain the measurements. The combined results from the two-dimensional simulations and the analyses bound the range of enhanced resistivity to be 3-100 times the classical value.

  20. Characterization of a Pt-Ne hollow cathode spectral line source.

    PubMed

    Klose, J Z; Hartig, G F; Rosenberg, W J

    1990-07-01

    A source which produces a rather uniform distribution of spectral lines over the wavelength range from 115 to ~350 nm is being investigated as a secondary radiometric standard for use in space. This source is a sealed lamp with a hollow cathode of platinum and a fill gas of neon. A version of this lamp has already been flown in space but only as a wavelength standard. The following properties were studied: warmup time, stability, emission as a function of current, repeatability, spatial characteristics, impurities, angular dependence, long term behavior, and radiance.

  1. The thrust generated by a T6 ion engine hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessini, Paolo; Coletti, Michele; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    2014-09-01

    The thrust produced by a T6 ion engine main discharge hollow cathode was characterized using different propellants with a target-based measurement system, for discharge current values of 5-25 A and a wide range of mass flow rates. The calculated values of specific impulse are far in excess of those that could be attributed to the heating of a gas to thermal equilibrium with the walls, as in a resistojet. This would suggest an operation mechanism more similar to that of an arcjet. The main scaling parameter for the specific impulse appears to be the discharge power per unit mass flow rate (specific power).

  2. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-12-01

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a "soft" photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  3. Ion acoustic turbulence in a 100-A LaB₆ hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Benjamin A; Mikellides, Ioannis G; Goebel, Dan M

    2014-12-01

    The temporal fluctuations in the near plume of a 100-A LaB(6) hollow cathode are experimentally investigated. A probe array is employed to measure the amplitude and dispersion of axial modes in the plume, and these properties are examined parametrically as a function of cathode operating conditions. The onset of ion acoustic turbulence is observed at high current and is characterized by a power spectrum that exhibits a cutoff at low frequency and an inverse dependence on frequency at high values. The amplitude of the turbulence is found to decrease with flow rate but to depend nonmonotonically on discharge current. Estimates of the anomalous collision frequency based on experimental measurements indicate that the ion acoustic turbulence collision frequency can exceed the classical rate at high discharge current densities by nearly two orders of magnitude.

  4. Hot ion plasma production in HIP-1 using water-cooled hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Layman, R. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    A steady-state ExB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the mirror throats. Most of the results were for hydrogen, but deuterium and helium plasmas were also studied. Three water-cooled hollow cathodes were operated in the hot-ion plasma mode with the following results: (1) thermally emitting cathodes were not required to achieve the hot-ion mode; (2) steady-state operation (several minutes) was attained; (3) input powers greater than 40 kW were achieved; (4) cathode outside diameters were increased from 1.2 cm (uncooled) to 4.4 cm (water-cooled); (5) steady-state hydrogen plasma with ion temperatures from 185 to 770 eV and electron temperatures from 5 to 21 eV were produced. Scaling relations were empirically obtained for discharge current, ion temperature, electron temperature, and relative ion density as a function of hydrogen gas feed rate, magnetic field, and cathode voltage. Neutrons were produced from deuterium plasma, but it was not established whether thay came from the plasma volume or from the electrode surfaces.

  5. Absolute Doppler shift calibration of laser induced fluorescence signals using optogalvanic measurements in a hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    The paper investigates the use of optogalvanic (OG) measurements on the neutral 3P1 and 3P2 levels of argon in a hollow cathode lamp for the purpose of calibrating Doppler shifts of laser-induced fluorescence signals from an arcjet plume. It is shown that, even with non-Doppler-free OG detection, accuracy to better than 10 MHz is possible but that, depending on the experiment geometry, corrections of 10-35 MHz may be necessary to offset small axial drift velocities of neutral atoms in the hollow cathode lamp.

  6. Criteria of radio-frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Yujiro

    2013-01-21

    In order to achieve high-density capacitively coupled plasma, a radio-frequency (RF) ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge has been developed as a candidate for processing plasma sources. The plasma density in the hollow cathode discharge reaches a high magnitude of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge depends on the pressure and mass of the working gas. Criteria required for producing a RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge have been investigated for various gas pressures using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for high-density plasma production. The results reveal that the criteria for the occurrence of the hollow cathode effect are that the trench width should be approximately equal to the sum of the electron-neutral mean free paths and twice the sheath thickness of the RF powered electrode.

  7. Enhanced IR hollow cathode laser in a 3He Ne gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.; Karelin, A. V.

    2005-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on 3He-Ne and 4He-Ne helical hollow cathode lasers is presented. Enhanced laser operation on the near IR NeI lines is observed when the natural isotope 4He is substituted by the lighter isotope 3He. A four-fold increase in the laser output power and a three-fold increase in the laser gain for the strongest NeI 1.1523 µm line is measured in the 3He-Ne gas mixture compared to the 4He-Ne gas mixture. On the basis of the theoretical analysis done by means of a non-stationary kinetic model for the negative glow plasma of 3He-Ne and 4He-Ne hollow cathode lasers, a study on the changes in the particle kinetics is carried out and an explanation of the experimental results is proposed. In the 3He-Ne mixture the electron temperature is lower than in the 4He-Ne mixture, while the gas temperature is higher. As a result the helium triplet metastable density and the rate constant for excitation transfer to neon atoms are higher in the 3He-Ne mixture. The lower laser level de-excitation due to intra-multiplet mixing of 2p1-10levels by 3He atoms is more efficient.

  8. An experimental investigation of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which describe operation of the plasma environment associated with a hollow cathod-based plasma contactor collecting electrons from or emitting them to an ambient, low density Maxwellian plasma. A one-dimensional, phenomenological model of the near-field electron collection process, which was formulated from experimental observations, is presented. It considers three regions, namely, a plasma cloud adjacent to the contactor, an ambient plasma from which electrons are collected, and a double layer region that develops between the contactor plasma cloud and the ambient plasma regions. Results of the electron emission experiments are also presented. An important observation is made using a retarding potential analyzer (RPA) which shows that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted. A mechanism for this phenomenon is presented and it involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice. This can result in the development of a region of high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggest that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and shown to agree qualitatively with these observations.

  9. Surface Charging Controlling of the Chinese Space Station with Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kai; Wang, Xianrong; Qin, Xiaogang; Yang, Shengsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Chengxuan; Chen, Yifeng; Shi, Liang; Tang, Daotan; Xie, Kan

    2016-07-01

    A highly charged manned spacecraft threatens the life of an astronaut and extravehicular activity, which can be effectively reduced by controlling the spacecraft surface charging. In this article, the controlling of surface charging on Chinese Space Station (CSS) is investigated, and a method to reduce the negative potential to the CSS is the emission electron with a hollow cathode plasma contactor. The analysis is obtained that the high voltage (HV) solar array of the CSS collecting electron current can reach 4.5 A, which can be eliminated by emitting an adequate electron current on the CSS. The theoretical analysis and experimental results are addressed, when the minimum xenon flow rate of the hollow cathode is 4.0 sccm, the emission electron current can neutralize the collected electron current, which ensures that the potential of the CSS can be controlled in a range of less than 21 V, satisfied with safety voltage. The results can provide a significant reference value to define a flow rate to the potential controlling programme for CSS.

  10. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

  11. Prediction of the cathodic arc root behaviour in a hollow cathode thermal plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freton, Pierre; Gonzalez, Jean-Jacques; Escalier, Gaelle

    2009-10-01

    The upper part of a well type cathode (WTC) plasma torch is modelled for several conditions in an air medium in the presence of an electric arc. The plasma flow created by the electric arc is described and the results compared with the data from the literature. Special attention is paid to the description of arc root attachment and to its movement due to the balance of forces. A fine description of the magnetic field produced by the external solenoid is reported. The model is based on the @Fluent software implemented with specific developments to be adapted to the thermal plasma domain. The paper shows the necessity to provide an accurate description of the external magnetic field due to the strong influence of the radial magnetic field component. Overall, we propose an original approach for arc root movement description which contributes to the understanding of the flow behaviour in the WTC torch.

  12. Hollow cathode sustained plasma microjets: Characterization and application to diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan; Giapis, Konstantinos P.

    2002-09-01

    Extending the principle of operation of hollow cathode microdischarges to a tube geometry has allowed the formation of stable, high-pressure plasma microjets in a variety of gases including Ar, He, and H2. Direct current discharges are ignited between stainless steel capillary tubes (d=178 mum) which are operated as the cathode and a metal grid or plate that serves as the anode. Argon plasma microjets can be sustained in ambient air with plasma voltages as low as 260 V for cathode-anode gaps of 0.5 mm. At larger operating voltage, this gap can be extended up to several millimeters. Using a heated molybdenum substrate as the anode, plasma microjets in CH4/H2 mixtures have been used to deposit diamond crystals and polycrystalline films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of these films shows mainly sp3 carbon content with slight shifting of the diamond peak due to internal stresses. Optical emission spectroscopy of the discharges used in the diamond growth experiments confirms the presence of atomic hydrogen and CH radicals.

  13. Anomalous Broadening of Balmer H{sub {alpha}} Line in Aluminum and Copper Hollow Cathode Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-10-22

    The presented results are concerned with the shape of Balmer alpha line emitted from a low pressure DC glow discharge with aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) in pure H{sub 2} and Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture. The analysis indicates that the line profile represents a convolution of Gaussian profiles resulting from different collision excitation processes.

  14. Robust Low-Cost Cathode for Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under funding from the NASA Commercial Technology Office, a cathode assembly was designed, developed, fabricated, and tested for use in plasma sources for ground-based materials processing applications. The cathode development activity relied on the large prior NASA investment and successful development of high-current, high-efficiency, long-life hollow cathodes for use on the International Space Station Plasma Contactor System. The hollow cathode was designed and fabricated based on known engineering criteria and manufacturing processes for compatibility with the requirements of the plasma source. The transfer of NASA GRC-developed hollow cathode technology for use as an electron emitter in the commercial plasma source is anticipated to yield a significant increase in process control, while eliminating the present issues of electron emitter lifetime and contamination.

  15. Hollow spherical carbonized polypyrrole/sulfur composite cathode materials for lithium/sulfur cells with long cycle life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongbao; Zhang, Shichao; Zhang, Lan; Lin, Ruoxu; Wu, Xiaomeng; Fang, Hua; Ren, Yanbiao

    2014-02-01

    Hollow carbonized polypyrrole (PPy) spheres are synthesized using poly(methyl methacrylate-ethyl acrylate-acrylic acid) latex spheres as sacrificial templates. The hollow spherical carbonized PPy/sulfur composite cathode materials are prepared by heating the mixture of hollow carbonized PPy spheres and element sulfur at 155 °C for 24 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show the hollow structures of the carbonized PPy spheres and the homogeneous distribution of sulfur on the carbonized PPy shells. The hollow spherical carbonized PPy/sulfur composite with 60.9 wt.% S shows high specific capacity and excellent cycling stability when used as the cathode materials in lithium/sulfur cells, whose initial specific discharge capacity reaches as high as 1320 mA h g-1 and the reversible discharge capacity retains 758 mA h g-1 after 400 cycles at 0.2C. The excellent electrochemical properties benefit from the hollow structures and the flexible shells of the carbonized PPy spheres.

  16. Plasma Dynamics and VUV Emission in a Fast Hollow Cathode Capillary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Esaulov, Andrey; Silva, Patricio; Sylvester, Gustavo; Moreno, José; Zambra, Marcelo; Nazarenko, Andrey

    2000-10-01

    Following the world tendency to study the physical mechanisms to obtain laser emission in the VUV to soft X-ray region in table-top device, a fast capillary discharge has been constructed at Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN. The device is identical to designed by P. Choi and M. Favre, included an electron beam from the hollow cathode region to provide ionization on the axis (1). The discharge operates in Argon with a cathode pressure of 100-500 mtorr. The system works with differential vacuum, thus the anode pressure is around five times less than the cathode pressure. The radius of capillary is 0.4 mm and the length is 2.5 cm. For an applied voltage of 10 kV a peak current of 5 kA with a rise time of 4.8 ns is obtained (10^12 A/s). MHD simulations in order to study the plasma dynamics an temperature evolution were performed (2). A final radius of 100-200 microns is expected at 8 ns, 2 ns after the peak current with a electron density of 2 x 10^18 cm-3. An electron and ion temperature of 80 and 40 eV respectively are predicted. In addition to usual electrical diagnostics, time-space resolution pinhole images (multipinhole camera with a multichannel plate, four frames, one frame every 4 ns) and time resolved spectra in the region of 10 to 100 nm were performed. Dynamics of plasma compresion was studied from time resolved pinhole images. Detected spectra show that plasma consists of argon ions with ionization potential from ArVI to ArX. This work has been funded by FONDECYT grant 1980187 and a Presidential Chair in Science granted by Chilean government. Authors are thankful to K. Koshelev and P. Antsiferov (ISAN, Troitsk) for fruitful discussions and comments. 1.- P. Choi and M. Favre, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 3118, (1998) 2.- A. Esaulov, P. Sasorov, L. Soto, M. Zambra and J. Sakai, ``Fast Hollow Cathode Capillary Discharge. MHD Simulation''. Submitted for publication.

  17. Plasma Treatment of Polyethylene Powder Particles in Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Quitzau, Meike; Bornholdt, Sven; Kersten, Holger

    2008-09-07

    Polyethylen (PE) is widely used in the production of foils, insulators, packaging materials, plastic bottles etc. Untreated PE is hydrophobic due to its unpolar surface. Therefore, it is hard to print or glue PE and the surface has to be modified before converting.In the present experiments a hollow cathode glow discharge is used as plasma source which is mounted in a spiral conveyor in order to ensure a combines transport of PE powder particles. With this set-up a homogeneous surface treatment of the powder is possible while passing the glow discharge. The plasma treatment causes a remarkable enhancement of the hydrophilicity of the PE powder which can be verified by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  18. Stratification of the plasma column in transverse nanosecond gas discharges with a hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashurbekov, N. A.; Iminov, K. O.

    2015-10-01

    Electric and optical characteristics and the structure of spatial distribution of optical radiation from a transverse nanosecond discharge with a hollow cathode in inert gases are systematically studied experimentally. It is found that for moderate working gas pressures in nanosecond discharges with extended electrodes, a periodic plasma structure appears in the form of standing strata. The strata formation boundaries and the critical values of the discharge voltage and current are determined from the gas pressure in helium, neon, and argon under experimental conditions. It is found that the most probable mechanisms of strata formation are the direct ionization of atoms by an electron impact and electron drift in an electric field. The smearing of the plasma structure upon an increase in the voltage applied to electrodes is explained by the emergence of accelerated electrons in the discharge gap.

  19. Broadband microwave propagation in a novel large coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Liu, Sha; Yue, Feng; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Wu, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The broadband microwave propagating characteristics of a novel, large volume, coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma is reported in this paper. The basic plasma parameters were determined using an Impedans Ltd. Langmuir probe under a variety of conditions. The transmission attenuation was recorded by using Scattering Parameters (S-parameters) of a vector network analyzer with the frequency range from 2 GHz to 18 GHz and a propagation model was established using the Z transform finite-difference time-domain method for simulating the transmission of microwave. The effects of both the gas pressure and the input power on the electromagnetic wave propagation are analyzed. The results showed that the computational and experimental results of transmission attenuation were in good agreements. Moreover, the electron density ne and the effective collision rate ν c were found to play important roles in the propagation of microwave.

  20. Broadband microwave measurement of electron temperature of a large coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou; Li, Hui; Wu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports a new kind of large coaxial gridded hollow cathode discharge at low pressure in a helium atmosphere. A method is presented to determine the electron temperature by measuring the broadband microwave properties; typically, the frequency band extends from 2 to 12 GHz. The method involves positioning the discharge device between the two antenna ports to measure the scattering parameter using a network analyzer. For a weak ionized plasma, this method is stable over the entire frequency range. A microwave signal loss of 0.27-37.83 dB was measured within the frequency range. Based on the measured attenuation of the microwaves, the electron temperature was estimated to range from 1.6-4.6 eV under different conditions, which showed good agreements with the results of Langmuir Probe measurements.

  1. Towards a reduced chemistry module of a He-Ar-Cu hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; Grozeva, M.; Degrez, G.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2011-05-01

    This study is aimed at finding a reduced chemistry module for a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) excited in a He-Ar-Cu mixture. This enables us to construct lean and reliable models that can be used as a part of the design tool of HCDs. To this end estimative calculations and numerical simulations are performed under optimal conditions for lasing. An analysis of the species behaviour and reactions is made and as a result the model is simplified by means of reducing the number of species and reactions. The consequences of these reductions are justified by comparing the results of the simplified models with those of a more complete one. This study delivers a model that is chemically lean and thus, much less time consuming. It can be used in optimization studies to find the optimum in the plasma control parameter set of HCDs. The technique developed in this study for HCDs can be applied to glow discharges in general.

  2. On the Operational Status of the ISS Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Thomas P. (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian B.

    2004-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of The Boeing Company to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as qualification and wear tests. GRC tracks the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs in order to ascertain their overall health. As of April 5, 2004, 43 ignitions and over 6000 hours have been accumulated on a single unit. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. This paper will discuss the operation of the HCAs during ground tests and on-orbit operation from initial startup to April 30, 2004.

  3. Comparison of On-Orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of Boeing to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as wear tests and qualification tests. GRC is currently tracking the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs. This data will be discussed with comparison to operating parameters verified by ground based HCA tests. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. The first unit has accumulated more than 3650 hours of on-orbit operation and the second unit has accumulated over 5550 hours.

  4. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a hollow cathode arc discharge - Theory and experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilic, D. B.; Rognlien, T. D.; Self, S. A.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of two low-frequency electrostatic flute instabilities of a low-pressure hollow cathode arc discharge are reported. Mode I has azimuthal mode number m = 1, and occurs when the radial electric field is negative (directed inward), while mode II has m = - 1 and occurs when the field is positive. The radial electric field is controlled by varying the potential of a secondary anode cylinder located close to the outer discharge radius. A linear perturbation analysis, based on the two-fluid equations, is given for a low-beta, collisionless, cylindrical plasma column, immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field, having a Gaussian density profile and an arbitrary radial electric field profile. Reasonable correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated for both modes.

  5. The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 161 The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database (Web, free access)   This atlas presents observations of the infra-red (IR) spectrum of a low current Th-Ar hollow cathode lamp with the 2-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at NIST. These observations establish more than 2400 lines that are suitable for use as wavelength standards in the range 691 nm to 5804 nm. The observations were made in collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in order to provide calibration reference data for new high-resolution Echelle spectrographs, such as the Cryogenic High-Resolution IR Echelle Spectrograph ([CRIRES]), ESO's new IR spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in Chile.

  6. Process for thermal imaging scanning of a swaged heater for an anode subassembly of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for thermal imaging scanning of a swaged heater of an anode subassembly of a hollow cathode assembly, comprising scanning a swaged heater with a thermal imaging radiometer to measure a temperature distribution of the heater; raising the current in a power supply to increase the temperature of the swaged heater; and measuring the swaged heater temperature using the radiometer, whereupon the temperature distribution along the length of the heater shall be less than plus or minus 5 degrees C.

  7. Hollow cathode arc discharge as an effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerovnyi, V. M.; Khakhalev, A. D.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of thermal and physical properties of the hollow cathode arc discharge (HCAD) with respect to its application for welding processes in vacuum. The following main parameters of the arc discharge were studied: the external voltage-current (V-I) characteristics; plasma parameters inside the cathode cavity and in the arc external column and the radial heat flux density distribution into the anode. Langmuir electrical probes have been utilized to investigate plasma parameters. Electron energy distribution function was determined from the probe V-I characteristics by the computation of an inverse ill-posed problem. It was shown that, depending on welding parameters, HCAD can exist in two different forms: diffusive or constricted. At currents below 60 A, HCAD has the diffusive form, and with the increase in the current it changes to the constricted form. The discharge constriction phenomenon, we believe, could be explained by the appearance in the external plasma of high velocity electrons with energies from 12 to 22 eV. Parameters of the heat flux into the anode were investigated with spot and split-anode calorimeters. The heat flux density on the anode of the diffusive form of the discharge has a Gaussian distribution. The heat flux of the constricted form is significantly different from the diffusive one and can be approximated by the sum of two combined normal-circular heat sources with different power concentration coefficients. It was also found that the efficiency parameter of the discharge energy transfer to the anode can reach 0.7-0.86 of the discharge voltage, which confirmed that HCAD is a highly effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum. Examples of industrial applications of HCAD for welding, brazing and alloying in vacuum are presented.

  8. Discharge Hollow Cathode and Extraction Grid Analysis for the MiXI Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard; Sullivan, Regina; Przybylowski, JoHanna; Silva, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Miniature ion thrusters are well-suited future space missions such as Terrestrial Planet Finder - Interferometer (TPF-I), where high efficiency thrusters using non-contaminating noble gas propellant are desirable. Transient dynamic and orbital analyses have shown that the low-noise, continuous thrust of the Miniature Xenon Ion (MiXI) thruster is desirable for TPF-I formation rotation maneuvers when compared with other thruster options [1], [2]. The 3cm diameter MiXI thruster, Figure 1, was originally designed using experimental methods and is capable of high Isp (> 3,000 sec), propellant efficiency > 80%, and thrust from <0.1 mN to >1.5 mN [3]. The MiXI thruster must demonstrate high levels of thrust resolution and a low minimum impulse bit to ensure it meets the precision formation flying needs of missions such as TPF-I. A novel concept for controlling the ion extraction voltages yields the necessary thrust characteristics for the MiXI thruster. Experiments verify these techniques and two dimensional computational models show that such techniques should have minimal effect on the lifetime of the thruster. During this effort, the MiXI thruster incorporates, for the first time, flight like hollow cathodes for both the discharge chamber and beam neutralization.

  9. First results on Ge resonant laser photoionization in hollow cathode lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpa, Daniele Andrighetto, Alberto; Barzakh, Anatoly; Fedorov, Dmitry; Mariotti, Emilio; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Tomaselli, Alessandra

    2016-02-15

    In the framework of the research and development activities of the SPES project regarding the optimization of the radioactive beam production, a dedicated experimental study has been recently started in order to investigate the possibility of in-source ionization of germanium using a set of tunable dye lasers. Germanium is one of the beams to be accelerated by the SPES ISOL facility, which is under construction at Legnaro INFN Laboratories. The three-step, two color ionization schemes have been tested using a Ge hollow cathode lamp. The slow and the fast optogalvanic signals were detected and averaged by an oscilloscope as a proof of the laser ionization inside the lamp. As a result, several wavelength scans across the resonances of ionization schemes were collected with the fast optogalvanic signal. Some comparisons of ionization efficiency for different ionization schemes were made. Furthermore, saturation curves of the first excitation transitions have been obtained. This investigation method and the setup built in the laser laboratory of the SPES project can be applied for the photo-ionization scheme studies also for the other possible radioactive elements.

  10. Magnetic control of breakdown: Toward energy-efficient hollow-cathode magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, O.; Romanov, M.; Kumar, S.; Zong, X. X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-03-15

    Characteristics of electrical breakdown of a planar magnetron enhanced with an electromagnet and a hollow-cathode structure, are studied experimentally and numerically. At lower pressures the breakdown voltage shows a dependence on the applied magnetic field, and the voltage necessary to achieve the self-sustained discharge regime can be significantly reduced. At higher pressures, the dependence is less sensitive to the magnetic field magnitude and shows a tendency of increased breakdown voltage at the stronger magnetic fields. A model of the magnetron discharge breakdown is developed with the background gas pressure and the magnetic field used as parameters. The model describes the motion of electrons, which gain energy by passing the electric field across the magnetic field and undergo collisions with neutrals, thus generating new bulk electrons. The electrons are in turn accelerated in the electric field and effectively ionize a sufficient amount of neutrals to enable the discharge self-sustainment regime. The model is based on the assumption about the combined classical and near-wall mechanisms of electron conductivity across the magnetic field, and is consistent with the experimental results. The obtained results represent a significant advance toward energy-efficient multipurpose magnetron discharges.

  11. Scaling of hollow cathode magnetrons for ionized metal physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Vivek; Kushner, Mark J.

    2006-09-15

    Ionized metal physical vapor deposition is being increasingly used to deposit diffusion barriers and Cu seed layers into high aspect ratio trenches for microelectronics fabrication. Hollow cathode magnetrons (HCMs) represent a technology capable of depositing metal over large areas at pressures of a few millitorrs. The fundamental mechanisms of these devices are not well understood and so their optimization is difficult. In this article, results from a two-dimensional computational investigation of HCMs are discussed to illuminate scaling issues. The hybrid model incorporates algorithms whereby transport coefficients for use in fluid equations are derived using a kinetic simulation. The goal is to enable the fluid algorithms in the model to be able to more accurately represent low pressure operation. The consequences of power, pressure, and magnitude and orientation of applied magnetic fields were investigated. The authors found that the magnetic field configuration significantly affects the magnitude and distribution of fluxes incident on the substrate. A study of the Cu seed layer deposition process, carried out using a feature scale model, correlates changes in plasma properties with conformal deposition into trenches.

  12. Characteristics of end Hall ion source with magnetron hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Deli; Wang, Lisheng; Pu, Shihao; Cheng, Changming; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-04-01

    An end Hall ion source with magnetron hollow cathode discharge is described. The source is suitable for high current, low energy ion beam applications such as Hall current plasma accelerators. The end Hall ion source is based on an anode layer thruster with closed drift electrons that move in a closed path in the E × B field. Only a simple magnetron power supply is used in the ion source. The special configuration enables uninterrupted and expanded operation with oxygen as well as other reactive gases because of the absence of an electron source in the ion source. In our evaluation, the ion beam current was measured by a circular electrostatic probe and the energy distribution of the ion beam was measured by a retarding potential analyzer (RPA). An ion beam current density of up to 10 mA/cm2 was obtained at a mean ion energy of 100-250 eV using Ar or O2. The ion source can be operated in a stable fashion at a discharge voltage between 200 and 500 V and without additional electron triggering. The discharge power of the ion source can be easily changed by adjusting the gas flow rate and anode voltage. No water cooling is needed for power from 500 W to 2 kW. The simple and rugged ion source is suitable for industrial applications such as deposition of thin films with enhanced adhesion. The operational characteristics of the ion source are experimentally determined and discussed.

  13. Characterization of Downstream Ion Energy Distributions From a High Current Hollow Cathode in a Ring Cusp Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 10 Angstroms) has been documented in the literature. As part of an ongoing effort to uncover the underlying physics of the formation of these ions, ion efflux from a high current hollow cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated. Using a spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer located downstream of the discharge cathode, the ion energy distribution over a 0 to 60 eV energy range was measured. The sensitivity of the ion energy distribution function to zenith angle was also assessed at 3 different positions: 0, 15, and 25 degrees. The measurements suggest that the majority of the ion current at the measuring point falls into the analyzer with an energy approximately equal to the discharge voltage. The ion distribution, however, was found to be quite broad. The high energy tail of the distribution function tended to grow with increasing discharge current. Sensitivity of the profiles to flow rate at fixed discharge current was also investigated. A simple model is presented that provides a potential mechanism for the production of ions with energies above the discharge voltage.

  14. Wavelengths and intensities of a platinum/neon hollow cathode lamp in the region 1100-4000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of a platinum hollow cathode lamp containing neon carrier gas was recorded photographically and photoelectrically with a 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph. Wavelengths and intensities were determined for about 3000 lines in the region 1100-4000 A. The uncertainty of the measured wavelengths is estimated to be + or - 0.0020 A. Ritz-type wavelengths are given for about 550 classified lines of Pt II with uncertainites varying from + or - 0.0004 A to + or - 0.0025 A. The uncertainty of the relative intensities is estimated to be about 20 percent.

  15. A simplified 461-nm laser system using blue laser diodes and a hollow cathode lamp for laser cooling of Sr.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yosuke; Chida, Yuko; Ohtsubo, Nozomi; Aoki, Takatoshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kuga, Takahiro; Torii, Yoshio

    2013-06-01

    We develop a simplified light source at 461 nm for laser cooling of Sr without frequency-doubling crystals but with blue laser diodes. An anti-reflection coated blue laser diode in an external cavity (Littrow) configuration provides an output power of 40 mW at 461 nm. Another blue laser diode is used to amplify the laser power up to 110 mW by injection locking. For frequency stabilization, we demonstrate modulation-free polarization spectroscopy of Sr in a hollow cathode lamp. The simplification of the laser system achieved in this work is of great importance for the construction of transportable optical lattice clocks.

  16. A simplified 461-nm laser system using blue laser diodes and a hollow cathode lamp for laser cooling of Sr

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yosuke; Chida, Yuko; Ohtsubo, Nozomi; Aoki, Takatoshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kuga, Takahiro; Torii, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    We develop a simplified light source at 461 nm for laser cooling of Sr without frequency-doubling crystals but with blue laser diodes. An anti-reflection coated blue laser diode in an external cavity (Littrow) configuration provides an output power of 40 mW at 461 nm. Another blue laser diode is used to amplify the laser power up to 110 mW by injection locking. For frequency stabilization, we demonstrate modulation-free polarization spectroscopy of Sr in a hollow cathode lamp. The simplification of the laser system achieved in this work is of great importance for the construction of transportable optical lattice clocks. PMID:23822327

  17. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 800 times.

  18. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 900 times.

  19. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  20. Correlation of Hollow Cathode Assembly and Plasma Contactor Data from Ground Testing and In-Space Operation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalkeski, Scott D.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    Charge control on the International Space Station (ISS) is currently being provided by two plasma contactor units (PCUs). The plasma contactor includes a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), power processing unit and Xe gas feed system. The hollow cathode assemblies in use in the ISS plasma contactors were designed and fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Prequalification testing of development HCAs as well as acceptance testing of the flight HCAs is presented. Integration of the HCAs into the Boeing North America built PCU and acceptance testing of the PCU are summarized in this paper. Finally, data from the two on-orbit PCUs is presented.

  1. Assessments of Hollow Cathode Wear in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPs(c)) by Numerical Analyses and Wear Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The standard approach presently followed by NASA to qualify electric propulsion for the required mission throughput has been based largely on life tests, which can be costly and time consuming. Revised electric propulsion lifequalification approaches are being formulated that combine analytical and/or computational methods with (shorter-duration) wear tests. As a model case, a wear test is being performed at JPL to assess the lifetime of the discharge hollow cathode in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS(c)), a 25-cm ion engine developed by L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. for commercial applications. Wear and plasma data accumulated throughout this life-assessment program are being used to validate the existing 2-D hollow cathode code OrCa2D. We find that the OrCa2D steady-state solution predicts very well the time-averaged plasma data and the keeper voltage after 5500 hrs of operation in high-power mode. When the wave motion that occurs naturally in these devices is accounted for, based on an estimate of the maximum wave amplitude, the molybdenum-keeper erosion profile observed in the XIPS(c) discharge cathode is also reproduced within a factor of two of the observation. When the same model is applied to predict the erosion of a tantalum keeper we find that erosion is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the molybdenum keeper due the significantly lower sputtering yield of tantalum. A tantalum keeper would therefore allow keeper lifetimes that greatly exceed the present requirements for deep-space robotic missions considered by NASA. Moreover, such large reduction of the erosion renders the largest uncertainties in the models, which are associated with the wave amplitude estimates and the electron transport model, negligible.

  2. Hollow-spherical Co/N-C nanoparticle as an efficient electrocatalyst used in air cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Ziqi; Ge, Baochao; Pan, Yajun; Liu, Ying

    2016-12-15

    The hollow-spherical Co/N-C nanoparticle, which is synthesized via a simple hydrothermal reaction followed by heat treatment, is firstly used as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC). The maximum power density of MFC with 10% Co/N-C air-cathode is as high as 2514±59mWm(-2), which is almost 174% higher than the control. The exchange current density (i0) of cathode equipped with 10% Co/N-C is 238% higher than that of untreated AC. While the total resistance of treated samples decreases from 13.017 to 10.255Ω. The intensity ratio of Raman D to G band (ID/IG) decreases from 0.93 (N-C) to 0.73 (Co/N-C), indicating the catalyst forms graphite structure. Both XRD and XPS testify that Co is bonded to N within graphitic sheets and serves as the active sites in ORR. The four-electron pathway of the Co/N-C also plays a crucial role in electrochemical catalytic activity. As a result, it can be expected that the as-synthesized Co/N-C, with extraordinary electro-catalytic performance towards ORR, will be a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art non-precious metal ORR electro-catalysts for electrochemical energy applications.

  3. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  4. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  5. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-21

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed "bottom-up" approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical "bottom" bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the "top" product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a "bottom-up" mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na(3.12)Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

  6. Observation of radio frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge plasma with MgO and Al electrodes for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori Matsumoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    Various high-density plasma sources have been proposed for plasma processing. Especially, the hollow cathode discharge is one of the powerful ones. In this work, radio-frequency (RF) driven ring-shaped hollow cathode discharges with high secondary-electron emission have been investigated, using an aluminum (Al) cathode, coated or not with magnesium oxide (MgO). The thickness of MgO thin film is approximately 200 nm. The RF discharge voltage for the coated cathode is almost the same as that for the uncoated one, in a wide range of Ar gas pressure, from 5.3 to 53.2 Pa. The results reveal that the plasma density has a peak at an Ar gas pressure of 10.6 Pa for both cathodes. The plasma density for the coated cathode is about 1.5–3 times higher than that for the uncoated one, at various gas pressures. To the contrary, the electron temperature for the coated cathode is lower than temperature obtained with the uncoated cathode, at various gas pressures. Radial profiles of electron saturation current, which is proportional to plasma flux, are also examined for a wide range of gas pressure. Radial profiles of electron temperature at various axial positions are almost uniform for both cathodes so that the diffusion process due to density gradient is dominant for plasma transport. The secondary electrons emitted from the coated cathode contribute to the improvement of the plasma flux radial profile obtained using the uncoated cathode.

  7. Scalable synthesis of Na3V2(PO4)(3)/C porous hollow spheres as a cathode for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, JF; Luo, C; Gao, T; Fan, XL; Wang, CS

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2(PO4)(3) (NVP) has been considered as a very promising cathode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) due to its typical NASICON structure, which provides an open and three dimensional (3D) framework for Na+ migration. However, the low electronic conductivity of NVP limits its rate capability and cycling ability. In this study, carbon coated hollow structured NVP/C composites are synthesized via a template-free and scalable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process, where the carbon coated NVP particles are uniformly decorated on the inner and outer surfaces of the porous hollow carbon spheres. When evaluated as a cathode material for SIBs, the unique NVP/C porous hollow sphere cathode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 99.2 mA h g(-1) and retains 89.3 mA h g(-1) after 300 charge/discharge cycles with a very low degradation rate of 0.035% per cycle. For comparison, the NVP/C composite, prepared by the traditional sol-gel method, delivers a lower initial discharge capacity of 97.4 mA h g(-1) and decreases significantly to 71.5 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance of NVP/C porous hollow spheres is attributed to their unique porous, hollow and spherical structures, as well as the carbon-coating layer, which provides a high contact area between electrode/electrolyte, high electronic conductivity, and high mechanical strength.

  8. Ion sources with arc-discharge plasma box driven by directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter or cold cathode.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander A; Davydenko, Vladimir I; Deichuli, Petr P; Shulzhenko, Grigori I; Stupishin, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    In the Budker Institute, Novosibirsk, an ion source with arc-discharge plasma box has been developed in the recent years for application in thermonuclear devices for plasma diagnostics. Several modifications of the ion source were provided with extracted current ranging from 1 to 7 A and pulse duration of up to 4 s. Initially, the arc-discharge plasma box with cold cathode was used, with which pulse duration is limited to 2 s by the cathode overheating and sputtering in local arc spots. Recently, a directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter was employed instead, which has extended lifetime compared to the cold cathode. In the paper, characteristics of the beam produced with both arrangements of the plasma box are presented.

  9. Hollow-cathode electrode for high-power, high-pressure discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-08-22

    Several different cold cathode configurations are disclosed for a gas discharge device each having a plurality of grooves of selected spacing, depth and width to improve the emission of electrons in a gas discharge device. Each of the cold cathode configurations can be machined from a single piece of a selected material. Several of the configurations can be assembled with individual elements which is easily seen from the various figures. 8 figs.

  10. Hollow - cathode electrode for high-power, high-pressure discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    Several different cold cathode configurations for a gas discharge device each having a plurality of grooves of selected spacing, depth and width to improve the emission of electrons in a gas discharge device. Each of the cold cathode configurations can be machined from a single piece of a selected material. Several of the configurations can be assembled with individual elements which is easily seen from the various figures.

  11. The influence of pressure and gas flow on size and morphology of titanium oxide nanoparticles synthesized by hollow cathode sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnarsson, Rickard; Pilch, Iris; Boyd, Robert D.; Brenning, Nils; Helmersson, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Titanium oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized via sputtering of a hollow cathode in an argon atmosphere. The influence of pressure and gas flow has been studied. Changing the pressure affects the nanoparticle size, increasing approximately proportional to the pressure squared. The influence of gas flow is dependent on the pressure. In the low pressure regime (107 ≤ p ≤ 143 Pa), the nanoparticle size decreases with increasing gas flow; however, at high pressure (p = 215 Pa), the trend is reversed. For low pressures and high gas flows, it was necessary to add oxygen for the particles to nucleate. There is also a morphological transition of the nanoparticle shape that is dependent on the pressure. Shapes such as faceted, cubic, and cauliflower can be obtained.

  12. Studies on inverse optogalvanic and Penning ionization effects in ytterbium and neon transitions in Yb-Ne hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Saini, V. K.; Purbia, G. S.; Prakash, O.; Dixit, S. K.; Nakhe, S. V.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents novel observations on inverse optogalvanic effect in Yb transition at 679.9 nm (3P1→3S1) in contrast with the observed normal optogalvanic effect at 648.9 nm (3P0→3S1) transition and Penning ionization in Yb3Ne mixture by probing Ne transitions at 626.65 (1s3→2p5), 633.44 (1s5→2p8), 650.65 (1s4→2p8) and 659.89 nm (1s2→2p2) in Yb3Ne hollow cathode lamp. These conclusions are derived by studying the optogalvanic signals temporal profile probed by DCM dye based narrow line-width ~2 GHz, short pulse ~20 ns, high repetition rate 5.0 kHz tunable dye laser, as a function of discharge current. The observed inverse optogalvanic effect is attributed to the transfer of Yb population in the level 3P0 through radiative decay from the upper level 3S1 of the transition. This proposition is confirmed by recording the emission spectra of Yb3Ne hollow cathode lamp. The Penning ionization signature in Ne optogalvanic signals is due to the quasi-resonances between Yb and Ne energy levels. Penning signature observed in optogalvanic signal of Ne transition at 650.65 nm is unique and attributed to the increase in concentration of Ne metastable level 1s5 through radiative decay from the 2p8 level.

  13. Pulse ignition characterization of mercury ion thruster hollow cathode using an improved pulse ignitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Gruber, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation of the high voltage pulse ignition characteristics of the 8 cm mercury ion thruster neutralizer cathode identified a low rate of voltage rise and long pulse duration as desirable factors for reliable cathode starting. Cathode starting breakdown voltages were measured over a range of mercury flow rates and tip heater powers for pulses with five different rates of voltage rise. Breakdown voltage requirements for the fastest rising pulse (2.5 to 3.0 kV/micro sec) were substantially higher (2 kV or more) than for the slowest rising pulse (0.3 to 0.5 kV/micro sec) for the same starting conditions. Also described is an improved, low impedance pulse ignitor circuit which reduces power losses and eliminates problems with control and packaging associated with earlier designs.

  14. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed ``bottom-up'' approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical ``bottom'' bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the ``top'' product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a ``bottom-up'' mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of

  15. A hollow cathode neutralizer for a 30-cm diameter bombardment thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    Recent improvements in overall thrustor performance have imposed new constraints on neutralizer performance. The use of compensated grid extraction system requires a re-evaluation of neutralizer position. In addition a suitable control logic for the neutralizer has proven difficult. A series of tests were conducted to determine what effect neutralizer cathode geometry has on performance. The parameters investigated included orifice diameter and length, and cathode diameter. Similar tests investigated open and enclosed keeper geometries. Neutralizer position tests with compensated grids suggest positions approximately 10 cm from the accelerator and radially out of the beam envelope should result in satisfactory performance and long life. Finally operation at keeper currents of 1.5 amp has resulted in lower total neutralizer power, the elimination of tip heater power, and suitable closed loop control of the neutralizer vaporizer.

  16. Production of High Energy Ions Near an Ion Thruster Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, I. G.; Goebel, D. M.; Jameson, K. K.; Wirz, R.; Polk, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several researchers have measured ions leaving ion thruster discharge chambers with energies far greater than measured discharge chamber potentials. Presented in this paper is a new mechanism for the generation of high energy ions and a comparison with measured ion spectra. The source of high energy ions has been a puzzle because they not only have energies in excess of measured steady state potentials, but as reported by Goebel et. al. [1], their flux is independent of the amplitude of time dependent plasma fluctuations. The mechanism relies on the charge exchange neutralization of xenon ions accelerated radially into the potential trough in front of the discharge cathode. Previous researchers [2] have identified the importance of charge exchange in this region as a mechanism for protecting discharge cathode surfaces from ion bombardment. This paper is the first to identify how charge exchange in this region can lead to ion energy enhancement.

  17. Search for a ''3.5-eV isomer'' in {sup 229}Th in a hollow-cathode electric discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Inamura, T. T.; Haba, H.

    2009-03-15

    A hollow-cathode electric discharge, a well-established source in optical spectroscopy, was used to populate the ''3.5-eV isomer'' in {sup 229}Th with use of nuclear excitation by electron transition (NEET). The radiochemically purest {sup 229}Th sample was loaded into the hollow cathode in which the electric discharge excited the {sup 229}Th to atomic states some of which could be expected to lie close to the excitation energy of the sought isomer. Although there remain some uncertainties, our experiments indicate that the isomer was populated by NEET and its {alpha} decay observed after switching off the electric discharge with a corresponding isomer half-life 1 min < or approx. T{sub 1/2}{sup m} < or approx. 3 min. From the present NEET condition, the isomer appears to lie between 3 eV and 7 eV. The probability of the isomer population by NEET is discussed.

  18. Synthesis and Electrochemical Property of LiMn2O4 Porous Hollow Nanofiber as Cathode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lianfeng; Zhang, Xueyu; Yue, Kaiqiang; Wu, Yue; Zhuang, Jian; Lü, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The LiMn2O4 hollow nanofibers with a porous structure have been synthesized by modified electrospinning techniques and subsequent thermal treatment. The precursors were electrospun directly onto the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The heating rate and FTO as substrate play key roles on preparing porous hollow nanofiber. As cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), LiMn2O4 hollow nanofibers showed the high specific capacity of 125.9 mAh/g at 0.1 C and a stable cycling performance, 105.2 mAh/g after 400 cycles. This unique structure could relieve the structure expansion effectively and provide more reaction sites as well as shorten the diffusion path for Li(+) for improving electrochemical performance for LIBs.

  19. Synthesis and Electrochemical Property of LiMn2O4 Porous Hollow Nanofiber as Cathode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lianfeng; Zhang, Xueyu; Yue, Kaiqiang; Wu, Yue; Zhuang, Jian; Lü, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The LiMn2O4 hollow nanofibers with a porous structure have been synthesized by modified electrospinning techniques and subsequent thermal treatment. The precursors were electrospun directly onto the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The heating rate and FTO as substrate play key roles on preparing porous hollow nanofiber. As cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), LiMn2O4 hollow nanofibers showed the high specific capacity of 125.9 mAh/g at 0.1 C and a stable cycling performance, 105.2 mAh/g after 400 cycles. This unique structure could relieve the structure expansion effectively and provide more reaction sites as well as shorten the diffusion path for Li+ for improving electrochemical performance for LIBs.

  20. A contribution to spectroscopic diagnostics and cathode sheath modeling of micro-hollow gas discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cvejic, M.; Spasojevic, Dj.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen Balmer beta line shape from a micro-hollow gas discharge (MHGD) in argon with traces of hydrogen is used for simultaneous diagnostics of plasma and cathode sheath (CS) parameters. For this purpose, a simple model of relevant processes responsible for the line broadening is introduced and applied to the Balmer beta profile recorded from a MHGD generated in the microhole (diameter 100 {mu}m at narrow side and 130 {mu}m at wider side) of a gold-alumina-gold sandwich in the pressure range (100-900 mbar). The electron number density N{sub e} in the range (0.4-4.5) x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} is determined from the width of the central part of the Balmer beta line profile, while, from the extended wings of the Balmer beta profile, induced by dc Stark effect, the next three parameters are determined: the average value E{sub a} of electric field strength in the CS in the range (16-95 kV/cm), the electric field strength E{sub 0} at the cathode surface in the range (32-190 kV/cm), and the CS thickness z{sub g} in the range (18-70 {mu}m). All four MHGD parameters, N{sub e}, E{sub a}, E{sub 0}, and z{sub g}, compare reasonably well with results of the modeling experiment by M. J. Kushner [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, 1633 (2005)]. The results for N{sub e} are compared with other emission experiments.

  1. Electronic and optical device applications of hollow cathode plasma assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, Sami Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices, namely, thin film transistors (TFTs) and metal–semiconductor–metal (MSM) photodetectors, based on GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) are demonstrated. Resistivity of GaN thin films and metal-GaN contact resistance are investigated as a function of annealing temperature. Effect of the plasma gas and postmetallization annealing on the performances of the TFTs as well as the effect of the annealing on the performance of MSM photodetectors are studied. Dark current to voltage and responsivity behavior of MSM devices are investigated as well. TFTs with the N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} PA-ALD based GaN channels are observed to have improved stability and transfer characteristics with respect to NH{sub 3} PA-ALD based transistors. Dark current of the MSM photodetectors is suppressed strongly after high-temperature annealing in N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} ambient.

  2. Low temperature thin film transistors with hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, S. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, B.; Ozgit-Akgun, C.; Biyikli, N.; Okyay, A. K. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2014-06-16

    We report GaN thin film transistors (TFT) with a thermal budget below 250 °C. GaN thin films are grown at 200 °C by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). HCPA-ALD-based GaN thin films are found to have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure with an average crystallite size of 9.3 nm. TFTs with bottom gate configuration are fabricated with HCPA-ALD grown GaN channel layers. Fabricated TFTs exhibit n-type field effect characteristics. N-channel GaN TFTs demonstrated on-to-off ratios (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF}) of 10{sup 3} and sub-threshold swing of 3.3 V/decade. The entire TFT device fabrication process temperature is below 250 °C, which is the lowest process temperature reported for GaN based transistors, so far.

  3. Operating characteristics of a hollow-cathode neutralizer for 5 and 8 centimeter-diameter electron bombardment mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Thin-tip 0.3-cm-outside-diameter hollow-cathode neutralizers were used to investigate causes of neutralizer tip erosion experienced in thruster endurance tests. Bell-jar tests indicated that neutralizers with new rolled tantalum foil inserts coated with an emissive mixture eroded very little over the neutral flow rates investigated (3 to 10 mA) for simulated 5- and 8-cm-diameter thruster neutralizer conditions. Tip erosion rates of neutralizers operated with no insert or emissive mixture increased by two orders of magnitude for both configurations as the neutral flow rate decreased. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharge plasma from neutralizers operated with inserts coated with the emissive mixture detected tungsten at all neutral flow rates for both thruster neutralizer conditions. The only source of tungsten was the tip. Therefore, detection of tungsten indicated neutralizer tip erosion. Barium, an element of the emissive mixture, was detected at low neutral flow rates for the 5-cm-diameter thruster neutralizer operating condition only.

  4. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  5. A comparison between micro hollow cathode discharges and atmospheric pressure plasma jets in Ar/O2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2016-12-01

    Using global models, micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are compared to radiofrequency atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Ar/O2 gas mixtures are investigated, typically with a small percentage of oxygen in argon. The same chemical reaction set, involving 17 species and 128 chemical reactions in the gas phase, is used for both devices, operated in the typical geometries previously published; the APPJ is driven by a radiofrequency voltage across a 1 mm gap, at atmospheric pressure, while the MHCD is driven by a DC voltage source, at 100 Torr and in a 400 μm hole. The MHCD may be operated either in the self-pulsing or in the normal (stationary) regime, depending on the driving voltage. The comparison shows that in both regimes, the MHCD produces larger amounts of \\text{O}2\\ast , while the APPJ produces predominantly reactive oxygen ground state species, \\text{O} and {{\\text{O}}3} . These large differences in ROS composition are mostly due to the higher plasma density produced in the MHCD. The difference in operating pressure is a second order effect.

  6. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; ...

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) withmore » highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.« less

  7. On a focal point instability in (B3Πg - C3Πu)N2 optogalvanic circuit with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencheva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The (B3Πg, v = 0 - C3 Πu, v = 0) N2 dynamic optogalvanic signals have been registered illuminating an Al hollow cathode lamp with a pulsed N2 laser generating at the wavelength of 337.1nm. The dynamic optogalvanic signal (DOGS) at certain discharge current of 8 mA is a harmonic oscillator due to a focal point instability produced by our optogalvanic circuit. This damped harmonic oscillator can be described as a solution of linear second order homogeneous differential equation. The oscillation frequency is estimated from the registered DOGS using Fourier synthesis. The analytical description of the damped harmonic DOGS is obtained.

  8. Pulsed electromagnetic gas accelleration. [incorporation of hollow cathode in plasma discharge and suitability determination of MPD discharge as plasmadynamic laser source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurement with thermocouples of the power deposited in the anode of a multi-megawatt magnetoplasmadynamic discharge has shown the fractional anode power to decrease from 50% at 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW. Using local measurements of current density, electric potential, and electron temperature, the traditional model for heat conduction to the anode is found to be inadequate. Other experiments in which the voltage-current characteristics and exhaust velocities of MPD arcs using Plexiglas and boron nitride chamber insulators and various mass injection configurations show that ablation can affect nominal accelerator operation in several distinct ways. The incorporation of a hollow cathode in a 7 kA plasma discharge has shown that a stable current attachment can be realized in the cavity without the aid of cathode heaters, keeper electrodes, or emissive coatings.

  9. Multishelled Ni-Rich Li(Ni x Co y Mn z )O2 Hollow Fibers with Low Cation Mixing as High-Performance Cathode Materials for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yihui; Yang, Xianfeng; Lv, Chunxiao; Liu, Tongchao; Xia, Yanzhi; Shang, Lu; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Yang, Dongjiang; Zhang, Tierui

    2017-01-01

    A simple seaweed biomass conversion strategy is proposed to synthesize highly porous multishelled Ni-rich Li(Ni x Co y Mn z )O2 hollow fibers with very low cation mixing. The low cation mixing results from the cation confinement by the novel "egg-box" structure in the alginate template. These hollow fibers exhibit remarkable energy density, high-rate capacity, and long-term cycling stability when used as cathode material for Li-ion batteries.

  10. Efficient small molecular organic light emitting diode with graphene cathode covered by a Sm layer with nano-hollows and n-doped by Bphen:Cs2CO3 in the hollows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Li, Lei; Qin, Laixiang; Ma, Yaoguang; Wang, Wei; Meng, Hu; Jin, Weifeng; Wang, Yilun; Xu, Wanjin; Ran, Guangzhao; You, Liping; Qin, Guogang

    2017-03-01

    Graphene is a favorable candidate for electrodes of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Graphene has quite a high work function of ∼4.5 eV, and has been extensively studied when used as anodes of OLEDs. In order to use graphene as a cathode, the electron injection barrier between the graphene cathode and the electron transport layer has to be low enough. Using 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen):Cs2CO3 to n-dope graphene is a very good method, but the electron injection barrier between the n-doped graphene and Bphen:Cs2CO3 is still too high to be ∼1.0 eV. In this work, in order to further reduce the electron injection barrier, a novel method is suggested. On the graphene cathode, a Sm layer with a lot of nano-hollows, and subsequently a layer of Bphen:Cs2CO3, are deposited. The Bphen:Cs2CO3 can n-dope graphene in the nano-hollows, and the Fermi level of the graphene rises. The nano Sm layer is very easily oxidized. Oxygen adsorbed on the surface of graphene may react with Sm to form an O‑–Sm+ dipole layer. On the areas of the Sm oxide dipole layer without nano-hollows, the electron injection barrier can be further lowered by the dipole layer. Electrons tend to mainly inject through the lower electron barrier where the dipole layer exists. Based on this idea, an effective inverted small molecular OLED with the structure of graphene/1 nm Sm layer with a lot of nano-hollows/Bphen:Cs2CO3/Alq3:C545T/NPB/MoO3/Al is presented. The maximum current efficiency and maximum power efficiency of the OLED with a 1 nm Sm layer are about two and three times of those of the reference OLED without any Sm layer, respectively.

  11. Efficient small molecular organic light emitting diode with graphene cathode covered by a Sm layer with nano-hollows and n-doped by Bphen:Cs2CO3 in the hollows.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Li, Lei; Qin, Laixiang; Ma, Yaoguang; Wang, Wei; Meng, Hu; Jin, Weifeng; Wang, Yilun; Xu, Wanjin; Ran, Guangzhao; You, Liping; Qin, Guogang

    2017-03-10

    Graphene is a favorable candidate for electrodes of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Graphene has quite a high work function of ∼4.5 eV, and has been extensively studied when used as anodes of OLEDs. In order to use graphene as a cathode, the electron injection barrier between the graphene cathode and the electron transport layer has to be low enough. Using 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen):Cs2CO3 to n-dope graphene is a very good method, but the electron injection barrier between the n-doped graphene and Bphen:Cs2CO3 is still too high to be ∼1.0 eV. In this work, in order to further reduce the electron injection barrier, a novel method is suggested. On the graphene cathode, a Sm layer with a lot of nano-hollows, and subsequently a layer of Bphen:Cs2CO3, are deposited. The Bphen:Cs2CO3 can n-dope graphene in the nano-hollows, and the Fermi level of the graphene rises. The nano Sm layer is very easily oxidized. Oxygen adsorbed on the surface of graphene may react with Sm to form an O(-)-Sm(+) dipole layer. On the areas of the Sm oxide dipole layer without nano-hollows, the electron injection barrier can be further lowered by the dipole layer. Electrons tend to mainly inject through the lower electron barrier where the dipole layer exists. Based on this idea, an effective inverted small molecular OLED with the structure of graphene/1 nm Sm layer with a lot of nano-hollows/Bphen:Cs2CO3/Alq3:C545T/NPB/MoO3/Al is presented. The maximum current efficiency and maximum power efficiency of the OLED with a 1 nm Sm layer are about two and three times of those of the reference OLED without any Sm layer, respectively.

  12. Performance of the FOS and GHRS Pt/(Cr)-Ne Hollow-cathode Lamps after their Return from Space and Comparison with Archival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerber, Florian; Lindler, Don; Bristow, Paul; Lembke, Dominik; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Heap, Sara R.; Rosa, Michael R.; Wood, H. John

    2006-01-01

    The Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are collaborating to study hollow cathode calibration lamps as used onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As part of the STIS Calibration Enhancement (STIS-CE) Project we are trying to improve our understanding of the performance of hollow cathode lamps and the physical processes involved in their long term operation. The original flight lamps from the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) are the only lamps that have ever been returned to Earth after extended operation in space. We have taken spectra of all four lamps using NIST s 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph and Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) optimized for use in the ultraviolet (UV). These spectra, together with spectra archived from six years of on-orbit operations and pre-launch spectra, provide a unique data set - covering a period of about 20 years - for studying aging effects in these lamps. Our findings represent important lessons for the choice and design of calibration sources and their operation in future UV and optical spectrographs in space.

  13. Observation of even-parity autoionization states of uranium by three-colour photoionization optogalvanic spectroscopy in U-Ne hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P. K.; Seema, A. U.; Das, R. C.; Shah, M. L.; Dev, Vas; Suri, B. M.

    2013-07-01

    Three-colour three-step photoionization spectroscopy of uranium has been performed in a U-Ne hollow cathode discharge tube by temporally resolving three-colour photoionization optogalvanic (PIOG) signal from the normal optogalvanic (OG) signal using three tunable pulsed dye lasers. U-Ne hollow cathode discharge tube has been used as a source of uranium atomic vapours and photoionization detector. Using this technique, photoionization spectra of uranium have been investigated systematically in the energy region 52,150-52,590cm-1, through three different excitation pathways, originating from its ground state, 0cm-1(5Lo6). By analysing the three-colour photoionization spectra sixty new even-parity autoionization resonances of uranium have been identified and their probable total angular momentum (J) values have been assigned according to the J-momentum selection rule. The J-value of five autoionization resonances, which have been observed either through all three excitation pathways or through two different excitation pathways where J-value of the second excited levels differs by two, has been assigned uniquely.

  14. Solvothermal synthesis of monodisperse LiFePO4 micro hollow spheres as high performance cathode material for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiliu; Hu, Mingjun; Xi, Liujiang; Ma, Ruguang; Dong, Yucheng; Chung, C Y

    2013-09-25

    A microspherical, hollow LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode material with polycrystal structure was simply synthesized by a solvothermal method using spherical Li3PO4 as the self-sacrificed template and FeCl2·4H2O as the Fe(2+) source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that the LFP micro hollow spheres have a quite uniform size of ~1 μm consisting of aggregated nanoparticles. The influences of solvent and Fe(2+) source on the phase and morphology of the final product were chiefly investigated, and a direct ion exchange reaction between spherical Li3PO4 templates and Fe(2+) ions was firstly proposed on the basis of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) transformation of the products. The LFP nanoparticles in the micro hollow spheres could finely coat a uniform carbon layer ~3.5 nm by a glucose solution impregnating-drying-sintering process. The electrochemical measurements show that the carbon coated LFP materials could exhibit high charge-discharge capacities of 158, 144, 125, 101, and even 72 mAh g(-1) at 0.1, 1, 5, 20, and 50 C, respectively. It could also maintain 80% of the initial discharge capacity after cycling for 2000 times at 20 C.

  15. The plasma properties and electron emission characteristics of near-zero differential resistance of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors with a discharge chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Kan; Farnell, Casey C.; Williams, John D.

    2014-08-15

    The formation of electron emission-bias voltage (I-V) characteristics of near-zero differential resistance in the cathodic plasma contactor for bare electrodynamic tether applications, based on a hollow cathode embedded in a ring-cusp ionization stage, is studied. The existence of such an I-V regime is important to achieve low impedance performance without being affected by the space plasma properties for a cathodic plasma contactor. Experimental data on the plasma structure and properties downstream from the ionization stage are presented as functions of the xenon flow rate and the electron emission current. The electrons were emitted from the cathode to the cylindrical vacuum chamber wall (r = 0.9 m) under ≈10{sup −5 }Torr of vacuum pressure. The ring-cusp configuration selected for the plasma contactor created a 125-Gauss axial field near the cathode orifice, along with a large-volume 50-Gauss magnitude pocket in the stage. A baseline ion energy cost of ≈300 eV/ion was measured in the ionization stage when no electrons were emitted to the vacuum chamber wall. In addition, the anode fall growth limited the maximum propellant unitization to below ≈75% in the discharge loss curves for this ion stage. Detailed measurements on the plasma properties were carried out for the no-electron emission and 3 A emission conditions. The experimental data are compared with 1-D models, and the effectiveness of the model is discussed. The four key issues that played important roles in the process of building the near-zero different resistance I-V regime are: a significant amount of ionization by the emission electrons, a decrease in the number of reflected electrons in the plume, the electron-temperature increment, and low initial ion energy at the source outlet.

  16. Baffle aperture design study of hollow cathode equipped ion thrusters. M.S. Thesis Technical Report, 1 Dec. 1979 - 1 Oct. 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R., Jr.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple theoretical model which can be used as an aid in the design of the baffle aperture region of a hollow cathode equipped ion thruster was developed. An analysis of the ion and electron currents in both the main and cathode discharge chambers is presented. From this analysis a model of current flow through the aperture, which is required as an input to the design model, was developed. This model was verified experimentally. The dominant force driving electrons through the aperture was the force due to the electrical potential gradient. The diffusion process was modeled according to the Bolm diffusion theory. A number of simplifications were made to limit the amount of detailed plasma information required as input to the model to facilitate the use of the model in thruster design. This simplified model gave remarkably consistant results with experimental results obtained with a given thruster geometry over substantial changes in operating conditions. The model was uncertain to about a factor of two for different thruster cathode region geometries. The design usefulness was limited by this factor of two uncertainty and by the accuracy to which the plasma parameters required as inputs to the model were specified.

  17. Destructive physical analysis of hollow cathodes from the Deep Space 1 Flight spare ion engine 30,000 hr life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Destructive physical analysis of the discharge and neutralizer hollow cathode assemblies from the Deep Space 1 Flight Spare 30,000 Hr life test was performed to characterize physical and chemical evidence of operationally induced effects after 30,372 hours of operation with beam extraction. Post-test inspection of the discharge-cathode assembly was subdivided into detailed analyses at the subcomponent level. Detailed materials analysis and optical inspection of the insert, orifice plate, cathode tube, heater, keeper assembly, insulator, and low-voltage propellant isolator were performed. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEW analyses were used to determine the extent and composition of regions of net deposition and erosion of both the discharge and neutralizer inserts. A comparative approach with an un-operated 4:1:1 insert was used to determine the extent of impregnate material depletion as a function of depth from the ID surface and axial position from the orifice plate. Analysis results are compared and contrasted with those obtained from similar analyses on components from shorter term tests, and provide insight regarding the prospect for successful longer-term operation consistent with SOA ion engine program life objectives at NASA.

  18. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  19. Materials characterization of impregnated W and W-Ir cathodes after oxygen poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.

    2015-05-01

    Electric thrusters use hollow cathodes as the electron source for generating the plasma discharge and for beam neutralization. These cathodes contain porous tungsten emitters impregnated with BaO material to achieve a lower surface work function and are operated with xenon propellant. Oxygen contaminants in the xenon plasma can poison the emitter surface, resulting in a higher work function and increased operating temperature. This could lead directly to cathode failure by preventing discharge ignition or could accelerate evaporation of the BaO material. Exposures over hundreds of hours to very high levels of oxygen can result in increased temperatures, oxidation of the tungsten substrate, and the formation of surface layers of barium tungstates. In this work, we present results of a cathode test in which impregnated tungsten and tungsten-iridium emitters were operated with 100 ppm of oxygen in the xenon plasma for several hundred hours. The chemical and morphological changes were studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and laser profilometry. The results provide strong evidence that high concentrations of oxygen accelerate the formation of tungstate layers in both types of emitters, a phenomenon not inherent to normal cathode operation. Deposits of pure tungsten were observed on the W-Ir emitter, indicating that tungsten is preferentially removed from the surface and transported in the insert plasma. A W-Ir cathode surface will therefore evolve to a pure W composition, eliminating the work function benefit of W-Ir. However, the W-Ir emitter exhibited less erosion and redeposition at the upstream end than the pure W emitter.

  20. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  1. Atlas of the spectrum of a platinum/neon hollow-cathode reference lamp in the region 1130-4330 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sansonetti, Jean E.; Reader, Joseph; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Acquista, Nicolo

    1992-01-01

    The spectrum of a platinum hollow-cathode lamp containing neon carrier gas was recorded photographically and photoelectrically with a 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph. Wavelengths and intensities were determined for about 5600 lines in the region 1130-4330 A. An atlas of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed. Lines of impurity species are also identified. The uncertainty of the photographically measured wavelengths is estimated to be +/- 0.0020 A. The uncertainty of lines measured in the photoelectric scans is 0.01 A for wavelengths shorter than 2030 A and 0.02 A for longer wavelengths. Ritz-type wavelengths are given for many of the classified lines of Pt II with uncertainties varying from +/- 0.0004 to +/- 0.0025 A. The uncertainty of the relative intensities is estimated to be about 20 percent.

  2. Substrate temperature influence on the properties of GaN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Alevli, Mustafa Gungor, Neşe; Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Leghari, Shahid A.; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-01-15

    Gallium nitride films were grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition using triethylgallium and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma. An optimized recipe for GaN film was developed, and the effect of substrate temperature was studied in both self-limiting growth window and thermal decomposition-limited growth region. With increased substrate temperature, film crystallinity improved, and the optical band edge decreased from 3.60 to 3.52 eV. The refractive index and reflectivity in Reststrahlen band increased with the substrate temperature. Compressive strain is observed for both samples, and the surface roughness is observed to increase with the substrate temperature. Despite these temperature dependent material properties, the chemical composition, E{sub 1}(TO), phonon position, and crystalline phases present in the GaN film were relatively independent from growth temperature.

  3. Generation of uniform low-temperature plasma in a pulsed non-self-sustained glow discharge with a large-area hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Denisov, V. V.; Koval, N. N.; Kovalsky, S. S.; Lopatin, I. V.; Schanin, P. M.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Generation of plasma in a pulsed non-self-sustained glow discharge with a hollow cathode with an area of ≥2 m2 at gas pressures of 0.4-1 Pa was studied experimentally. At an auxiliary arc-discharge current of 100 A and a main discharge voltage of 240 V, a pulse-periodic glow discharge with a current amplitude of 370 A, pulse duration of 340 μs, and repetition rate of 1 kHz was obtained. The possibility of creating a uniform gas-discharge plasma with a density of up to 1012 cm-3 and an electron temperature of 1 eV in a volume of >0.2 m3 was demonstrated. Such plasma can be efficiently used to treat material surfaces and generate pulsed ion beams with a current density of up to 15 mA/cm2.

  4. Characterization of TiO x film prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Korzec, Dariusz; Aoki, Toru; Engemann, Jurgen; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2001-05-01

    The high rate deposition of TiO x film at low temperature was achieved by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source material. The multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source was used to generate the high-density plasma, which was showered toward the substrate. The emission spectra suggest that oxygen radicals play an important role for dissociation of the source material and for yielding the precursors. The high deposition rate up to 50 nm/min was achieved by this process. The as-deposited films are completely amorphous. They consist of structures with complex bondings including both tetrahedral and octahedral components. Though they have such complex bondings, the hydrophilicity of the PECVD film is excellent comparing to that of the annealed crystalline anatase structure. It seems that the PECVD using the multi-jet plasma source is promising for fabrication of hydrophilic TiO x films in low-temperature process.

  5. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  6. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  7. Graphene-Coated Hollow Fiber Membrane as the Cathode in Anaerobic Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactors--Effect of Configuration and Applied Voltage on Performance and Membrane Fouling.

    PubMed

    Werner, Craig M; Katuri, Krishna P; Hari, Ananda Rao; Chen, Wei; Lai, Zhiping; Logan, Bruce E; Amy, Gary L; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-04-19

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated, hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 μm for rectangular reactors and 4 μm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than that in the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance.

  8. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  9. High-energy lithium-ion hybrid supercapacitors composed of hierarchical urchin-like WO3/C anodes and MOF-derived polyhedral hollow carbon cathodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Cai, Qifa; Li, Qingwei; Gao, Biao; Zhang, Xuming; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2016-09-22

    A lithium-ion hybrid supercapacitor (Li-HSC) comprising a Li-ion battery type anode and an electrochemical double layer capacitance (EDLC) type cathode has attracted much interest because it accomplishes a large energy density without compromising the power density. In this work, hierarchical carbon coated WO3 (WO3/C) with a unique mesoporous structure and metal-organic framework derived nitrogen-doped carbon hollow polyhedra (MOF-NC) are prepared and adopted as the anode and the cathode for Li-HSCs. The hierarchical mesoporous WO3/C microspheres assembled by radially oriented WO3/C nanorods along the (001) plane enable effective Li(+) insertion, thus exhibit high capacity, excellent rate performance and a long cycling life due to their high Li(+) conductivity, electronic conductivity and structural robustness. The WO3/C structure shows a reversible specific capacity of 508 mA h g(-1) at a 0.1 C rate (1 C = 696 mA h g(-1)) after 160 discharging-charging cycles with excellent rate capability. The MOF-NC achieved the specific capacity of 269.9 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.2 A g(-1). At a high current density of 6 A g(-1), 92.4% of the initial capacity could be retained after 2000 discharging-charging cycles, suggesting excellent cycle stability. The Li-HSC comprising a WO3/C anode and a MOF-NC cathode boasts a large energy density of 159.97 W h kg(-1) at a power density of 173.6 W kg(-1) and 88.3% of the capacity is retained at a current density of 5 A g(-1) after 3000 charging-discharging cycles, which are better than those previously reported for Li-HSCs. The high energy and power densities of the Li-HSCs of WO3/C//MOF-NC render large potential in energy storage.

  10. Predictive Control of Plasma Kinetics: Time-Resolved Measurements of Inert Gas Mixing in a Hollow Cathode Discharge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    magnetic field is applied towards the end of the thruster channel using anti-parallel, coaxial solenoids of different lengths. This ExB field causes...applied magnetic field. This "cross-field" electron transport, which is observed to be 10-20 times larger than what classical collision theory...predicts, is the axial drift of the electrons from the cathode, across regions of strong magnetic field towards the anode at the beginning of the

  11. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ˜5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density-voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz-5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole-Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  12. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  13. Comparison of trimethylgallium and triethylgallium as “Ga” source materials for the growth of ultrathin GaN films on Si (100) substrates via hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Alevli, Mustafa; Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Leghari, Shahid A.; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-01-15

    GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMG) and triethylgallium (TEG) as gallium precursors are compared. Optimized and saturated TMG/TEG pulse widths were used in order to study the effect of group-III precursors. The films were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Refractive index follows the same trend of crystalline quality, mean grain, and crystallite sizes. GaN layers grown using TMG precursor exhibited improved structural and optical properties when compared to GaN films grown with TEG precursor.

  14. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, Nathan E.

    1992-01-01

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

  15. Diagnostics of N2 Ar plasma mixture excited in a 13.56 MHz hollow cathode discharge system: application to remote plasma treatment of polyamide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloum, S.; Naddaf, M.; Alkhaled, B.

    2008-02-01

    N2-x% Ar plasma gas mixture, generated in a hollow cathode RF discharge system, has been characterized by both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and double Langmuir probe, as a function of experimental parameters: total pressure (5-33 Pa), and different fractions of argon (7 <= x <= 80), at a constant applied RF power of 300 W. N2 dissociation degree has been investigated qualitatively by both the actinometry method and the ratio I_N/I_{N_2} of the atomic nitrogen line emission intensity at 672.3 nm to the vibrational band (0-0) of the N2 second positive system at 337.1 nm. Both methods showed that the increase in argon fraction enhances the dissociation of N2, with a maximum at x = 50 for the pressure of 5 Pa, although the two methods give two opposite trends as a function of total pressure. Spectroscopic measurements showed that the vibrational temperature of the N2 second positive system increases with both argon fraction and total pressure increase, it lies between 4900 and 12 300 K. Langmuir probe measurements showed that, in the remote zone, the electron temperature falls in the range 1.57-1.75 eV, the N_{2}^{+} density varies between 5 × 109 and 1.4 × 1010 cm-3 and that both the plasma ionization degree and electron temperature increase towards the source. In addition, the process of plasma-polyamide (PA) surface interaction, in the remote plasma zone, has been studied through OES analysis during plasma treatment of PA to monitor the possible emissions due to the polymer etching. An increase in atomic nitrogen line (672.3 nm) intensity is obtained, atomic carbon line (833.52 nm) and the band emission (0-0) from the CN (B 2Σ+-X 2Σ+) violet system were observed. The PA surface modification has been confirmed through the improvement of its hydrophilic character as the water contact angle measured after the plasma treatment significantly decreased.

  16. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  17. Optical characteristics of nanocrystalline Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N thin films deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, Eda; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Kemal Okyay, Ali

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films have been deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition at 200 °C on c-plane sapphire and Si substrates. The dependence of film structure, absorption edge, and refractive index on postdeposition annealing were examined by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements, respectively. Well-adhered, uniform, and polycrystalline wurtzite (hexagonal) GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films were prepared at low deposition temperature. As revealed by the x-ray diffraction analyses, crystallite sizes of the films were between 11.7 and 25.2 nm. The crystallite size of as-deposited GaN film increased from 11.7 to 12.1 and 14.4 nm when the annealing duration increased from 30 min to 2 h (800 °C). For all films, the average optical transmission was ∼85% in the visible (VIS) and near infrared spectrum. The refractive indices of AlN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N were lower compared to GaN thin films. The refractive index of as-deposited films decreased from 2.33 to 2.02 (λ = 550 nm) with the increased Al content x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), while the extinction coefficients (k) were approximately zero in the VIS spectrum (>400 nm). Postdeposition annealing at 900 °C for 2 h considerably lowered the refractive index value of GaN films (2.33–1.92), indicating a significant phase change. The optical bandgap of as-deposited GaN film was found to be 3.95 eV, and it decreased to 3.90 eV for films annealed at 800 °C for 30 min and 2 h. On the other hand, this value increased to 4.1 eV for GaN films annealed at 900 °C for 2 h. This might be caused by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation and following phase change. The optical bandgap value of as-deposited Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films decreased from 5.75 to 5.25 eV when the x values decreased from 1 to 0.68. Furthermore, postdeposition annealing did not

  18. Direct fabrication of metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure as efficient cathode catalysts of fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanqi; Liu, Mingda; Nie, Huagui; Gu, Cancan; Liu, Ming; Yang, Zhi; Yang, Keqin; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    Despite the good progress in developing carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the current metal-free carbon catalysts are still far from satisfactory for large-scale applications of fuel cell. Developing hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure is considered to be an ideal method to inhibit graphene stacking and improve their catalytic performance. Herein, we fabricated metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure, through using a new strategy that involves direct metal-free catalytic growth from assembly of SiO2 spheres. To our knowledge, although much researches involving the synthesis of graphene balls have been reported, investigations into the direct metal-free catalytic growth of hollow graphene balls are rare. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic performance shows that the resulting hollow graphene balls have significantly high catalytic activity. More importantly, such catalysts also possess much improved stability and better methanol tolerance in alkaline media during the ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts. The outstanding performances coupled with an easy and inexpensive preparing method indicated the great potential of the hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure in large-scale applications of fuel cell.

  19. Invited article: physical and chemical analyses of impregnated cathodes operated in a plasma environment.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Anita; Kulleck, James; Hill, Norm; Ohlinger, Wayne

    2008-11-01

    Destructive analyses of impregnated-cathode assemblies from an ion thruster life test were performed to characterize erosion and degradation after 30,472 h of operation. Post-test inspection of each cathode included examination of the emitter (insert), orifice plate, cathode tube, heater, anode assembly, insulator, and propellant isolator. The discharge-cathode assembly experienced significant erosion due to ion sputtering from the discharge plasma. The keeper electrode plate was removed and the heater and orifice plate were heavily eroded at the conclusion of the test. Had the test continued, these processes would likely have led to cathode failure. The discharge cathode insert experienced significant tungsten transport and temperature dependent barium oxide depletion within the matrix. Using barium depletion semiempirical relations developed by Palluel and Shroff, it is estimated that 25,000 h of operation remained in the discharge insert at the conclusion of the test. In contrast, the neutralizer insert exhibited significantly less tungsten transport and barium oxide depletion consistent with its lower current operation. The neutralizer was estimated to have 140,000 h of insert life remaining at the conclusion of the test. Neither insert had evidence of tungstate or oxide layer formation, previously known to have impeded cathode ignition and operation in similar long duration hollow-cathode tests. The neutralizer cathode was in excellent condition at the conclusion of the test with the exception of keeper tube erosion from direct plume-ion impingement, a previously underappreciated life-limiting mechanism. The most critical finding from the test was a power dependent deposition process within the neutralizer-cathode orifice. The process manifested at low-power operation and led to the production of energetic ions in the neutralizer plume, a potential life-limiting process for the neutralizer. Subsequent return of the engine and neutralizer operation to full

  20. Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  1. Selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  2. Carbon nanotubes as field emitter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing; Song, Yuelin; Wang, Na; Chen, Huihui; Chen, Haihua; Wu, Jianghong; Sun, Yangang; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as a promising material of electron field emitters. They exhibit extraordinary field emission properties because of their high electrical conductivity, high aspect ratio "needle like" shape for optimum geometrical field enhancement, and remarkable thermal stability. In this Review, we emphasize the estimation and influencing factors of CNTs' emission properties, and discuss in detail the emission properties of macroscopic CNT cathodes, especially fabricated by transplant methods, and describe recent progress on understanding of CNT field emitters and analyze issues related to applications of CNT based cold cathodes in field emission display (FED). We foresee that CNT-FED will take an important place in display technologies in the near future.

  3. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  4. Effects of an Internally-Mounted Cathode on Hall Thruster Plume Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Johnson, Lee K.; Goebel, Dan M.; Fitzgerald, Dennis J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cathode position on the plume properties of an 8 kW BHT-8000 Busek Hall thruster are discussed. Experiments were conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in a vacuum chamber suitable for the development and qualification of high-power Hall thrusters. Multi-mode Hall thruster operation was demonstrated at operating conditions ranging from 200-500 V discharge voltage, 10-40 A discharge current, and 2-8 kW discharge power. Reductions in plume divergence and increased near-field plume symmetries were found to result from the use of an internally-mounted cathode instead of the traditional externally-mounted configuration. High-current hollow cathodes developed at JPL utilizing lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) emitters were also demonstrated. Discharge currents up to 100 A were achieved with the cathode operating alone and up to 40 A during operation with the Hall thruster. LaB6 cathodes were investigated because of their potential to reduce overall system cost and risk due to less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements.

  5. Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow microspheres as anode and carbon fiber as cathode for high performance quantum dot and dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Veerappan; Kong, Eui-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Jang, Hyun Myung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2014-02-01

    Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a unique structure is used as an alternative counter electrode (CE) and compared with the standard platinum (Pt) CE. Their electrocatalytic properties are measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and Tafel-polarization. Under 1 sun illumination, solar cells made with hollow SnO2 photoanode sandwiched with the stable CNF CE showed a power conversion efficiency of 2.5% in QDSCs and 3.0% for DSCs, which is quite promising with the standard Pt CE (QDSCs: 2.1%, and DSCs: 3.6%).Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a

  6. Simple-to-prepare multipoint field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Mishin, M. V.; Kornishin, S. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate multitip field emitters prepared by electroerosion treatment of the surface of molybdenum samples. Their characteristics are determined for operation with a protecting activated fullerene coating. Our experiments indicate that such cathodes are promising for high-voltage electron devices operating in technical vacuum.

  7. Role of hydrogen diffusion in temperature-induced transformation of carbon nanostructures deposited on metallic substrates by using a specially designed fused hollow cathode cold atmospheric pressure plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Bikash; Kar, R.; Pal, Arup R.; Shilpa, R. K.; Dusane, R. O.; Patil, D. S.; Suryawanshi, S. R.; More, M. A.; Sinha, S.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on inconel substrates under two different experimental conditions using atmospheric pressure glow discharge radio-frequency (RF) PECVD process. A specially designed hollow cathode is used for this plasma generation. The growth is carried out at 610 and 660 °C substrate temperatures on inconel substrates. Our results show that CNFs and CNTs could be synthesized at 610 and 660 °C respectively irrespective of pre-treatment methods in either set. HRTEM results indicate that a temperature-induced transformation of CNFs into CNTs occur when the growth temperature is raised from 610 to 660 °C. With the help of characterization results and a schematic model, it is shown how an increase in hydrogen diffusion (~44% increase) plays a pivotal role in this transformation by providing a sink for hydrogen atoms. Field emission results show that most defective CNFs contribute to the maximum emission current density. This better field emission behavior is explained on the basis that the outer surfaces of CNFs are more defective due to the presence of the open edges of the graphene planes, which results in better field emission from the outer surfaces of the CNFs.

  8. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  9. Experimental Results of a Single Emittance Compensation Solenoidal Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 300 pC electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ɛ_n,rms = 0.7 π mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane Bz <= 10 gauss for a peak magnetic field of B_z,max = 3 KG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces a initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance ɛ_mag,n,rms scales as 0.01 π mm mrad per gauss at the cathode. Which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that show spot size and emittance as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory and simulations.

  10. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  11. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  12. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  13. Highly Durable Supportless Pt Hollow Spheres Designed for Enhanced Oxygen Transport in Cathode Catalyst Layers of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Didem C; Cho, Seonghun; Hwang, Sun-Mi; Kim, Young-Min; Guim, Hwanuk; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Park, Seok-Hee; Park, Gu-Gon; Yim, Sung-Dae

    2016-10-10

    Supportless Pt catalysts have several advantages over conventional carbon-supported Pt catalysts in that they are not susceptible to carbon corrosion. However, the need for high Pt loadings in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) to achieve state-of-the-art fuel cell performance has limited their application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Herein, we report a new approach to the design of a supportless Pt catalyst in terms of catalyst layer architecture, which is crucial for fuel cell performance as it affects water management and oxygen transport in the catalyst layers. Large Pt hollow spheres (PtHSs) 100 nm in size were designed and prepared using a carbon template method. Despite their large size, the unique structure of the PtHSs, which are composed of a thin-layered shell of Pt nanoparticles (ca. 7 nm thick), exhibited a high surface area comparable to that of commercial Pt black (PtB). The PtHS structure also exhibited twice the durability of PtB after 2000 potential cycles (0-1.3 V, 50 mV/s). A MEA fabricated with PtHSs showed significant improvement in fuel cell performance compared to PtB-based MEAs at high current densities (>800 mA/cm(2)). This was mainly due to the 2.7 times lower mass transport resistance in the PtHS-based catalyst layers compared to that in PtB, owing to the formation of macropores between the PtHSs and high porosity (90%) in the PtHS catalyst layers. The present study demonstrates a successful example of catalyst design in terms of catalyst layer architecture, which may be applied to a real fuel cell system.

  14. Endurance testing of downstream cathodes on a low-power MPD thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, J. A.; Rose, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A low-power MPD thruster with downstream cathode was tested for endurance with a series of hollow cathode designs. Failure modes and failure mechanisms were identified. A new hollow cathode (with rod inserts) has emerged which shows promise for long life. The downstream positioning of the cathode was also changed from an on-axis location to an off-axis location. Data are presented for a 1332-hour life test of this new hollow cathode located at the new off-axis location. Xenon propellant was used.

  15. High temperature battery cell comprising stress-free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J.N.; Revak, T.T.; Rossini, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyteseparator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tubesheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributing means, within the casing and employing a limp connection between the latter means and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  16. High temperature battery cell comprising stress free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J. N.; Revak, T. T.; Rossini, F. J.

    1985-04-16

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyte-separator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tube-sheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributor within the casing and employing a limp connection between the collector-distributor and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  17. A knife-edge array field emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    1994-08-01

    many cathode applications require a new type of cathode that is able to produce short pulsed electron beams at high emission current. Gated field emitter arrays of micrometer size are recognized as candidates to meet this need and have become the research focus of vacuum microelectronics. Existing fabrication methods produce emitters that are limited either in frequency response or in current emission. One reason is that the structure of these emitters are not sufficiently optimized. In this study, the author investigated the factors that affect the performance of field emitters. An optimum emitter structure, the knife-edge field emitter array, was developed from the analysis. Large field enhancement factor, large effective emission area, and small emitter capacitance are the advantages of the structure. The author next explored various options of fabricating the knife-edge emitter structure. He proposed a unique thin film process procedure and developed the fabrication techniques to build the emitters on (110) silicon wafers. Data from the initial cathode tests showed very low onset voltages and Fowler-Nordheim type emission. Emission simulation based on the fabricated emitter structure indicated that the knife-edge emitter arrays have the potential to produce high performance in modulation frequency and current emission. Several fabrication issues that await further development are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  18. Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

  19. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  20. Hollow Retroreflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A hollow retroreflector is a mirror-like instrument that reflects light and other radiations back to the source. After developing a hollow retroreflector for NASA's Apollo-Soyuz mission, PLX, Inc. continued to expand the technology and develop a variety of retroreflector systems. The Lateral Transfer Hollow Retroreflector maintains precise separation, at any wavelength, of incoming and existing beams regardless of their orientation. It can be used as an instrument or as a component of an optical system. In the laboratory, it offers a new efficient means of beam positioning. In other applications, it connects laser resonators, aligns telescope mirrors and is useful in general boresighting and alignment.

  1. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Harkay, K.; Hernandez-Garcia; Legg, R.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  2. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  3. Thermal limit to the intrinsic emittance from metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun Nasiatka, J.; Wan, Weishi; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard A.; Smedley, John

    2015-09-28

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and transverse momentum distributions obtained from a metal (antimony thin film) photocathode near and below the photoemission threshold are presented. Measurements show that the intrinsic emittance is limited by the lattice temperature of the cathode as the incident photon energy approaches the photoemission threshold. A theoretical model to calculate the transverse momentum distributions near this photoemission threshold is presented. An excellent match between the experimental measurements and the theoretical calculations is demonstrated. These measurements are relevant to low emittance electron sources for Free Electron Lasers and Ultrafast Electron Diffraction experiments.

  4. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    calculations in glow discharge in argon and neon . A Monte Carlo simulation of the ions and Grant 033083 – Final report 7 the fast neutrals generated...in high pressure xenon or in rare gas mixtures containing xenon are of interest in the context of UV and VUV generation. Numerical experiments on...The shape of the calculated characteristic is similar to those measured by Schoenbach et al1 in argon and by Moselhy and Schoenbach9 in xenon . There

  5. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  6. Long-Life/Low-Power Ion-Gun Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    New cathode has form of hollow tube through which gas enters region of high electron density, produced by electric discharge with auxiliary electrode referred to as "keeper." Ion-gun cathode emits electrons that bombard gas in chamber. Ions accelerated out of source are used to dope semiconductor material.

  7. Hollow memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    A hollow-core optical fibre filled with warm caesium atoms can temporarily store the properties of photons. Michael Sprague from the University of Oxford, UK, explains to Nature Photonics how this optical memory could be a useful building block for fibre-based quantum optics.

  8. Development program on a Spindt cold-cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode (TFFEC) array and a cold cathode electron gun based on the emitter were developed. A microwave tube gun that uses the thin film field emission cathode as an electron source is produced. State-of-the-art cathodes were fabricated and tested. The tip-packing density of the arrays were increased thereby increasing the cathode's current density capability. The TFFEC is based on the well known field emission effect and was conceived to exploit the advantages of that phenomenon while minimizing the difficulties associated with conventional field emission structures, e.g. limited life and high voltage requirements. Field emission follows the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  9. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  10. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  11. Limits to Electron Beam Emittance from Stochastic Coulomb Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Wan, Weishi

    2008-08-22

    Dense electron beams can now be generated on an ultrafast timescale using laser driven photo-cathodes and these are used for a range of applications from ultrafast electron defraction to free electron lasers. Here we determine a lower bound to the emittance of an electron beam limited by fundamental stochastic Coulomb interactions.

  12. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueangaramwong, A.; Mihalcea, D.; Andonian, G.; Piot, P.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have opened new possibilities such as enhancing quantum efficiency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper, we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated with this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes. We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  13. Photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, David U.; Clendenin, James E.; Kirby, Robert E.

    2004-06-01

    A photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electric beam. The accelerator includes a tube having an inner wall, the inner tube wall being coated by a getter material. A portable, or demountable, cathode plug is mounted within said tube, the surface of said cathode having a semiconductor material formed thereon.

  14. Restructuring hollow Au-Ag nanostructures for improved SERS activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiji, S. G.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2016-10-01

    Hollow Au-Ag nanostructures with improved SERS performance were prepared by using a modified galvanic replacement reaction. The plasmon characteristics of the hollow structures are found to be highly sensitive to the volume of cathode, whether or not a co-reductant was used in the synthesis. It is found that the presence of a co-reductant viz., ascorbic acid (AA) during the reaction make the hollow structures capable to maintain its physical structure even after addition of excess cathode and also it transformes sacrificial templates into highly efficient hollow Au-Ag SERS substrates. In the galvanic replacement reaction conducted in presence of AA, where on one side the removal of Ag atoms make cavities to occur and on the other side a coating on the surface with Au and Ag atoms due to co-reduction take place simultaneously. Morphological observations indicated that it is possible to control the competition between these two mechanisms and to make Au-Ag hollow structures in tune with applications by optimizing the volume of cathode or AA. The SERS activity of these substrates were tested with crystal violet molecule as probe, using two different laser lines, 514 and 784.8 nm. In this report, the enhancement observed for hollow structures fabricated under optimum conditions are in the order of 106. SERS measurements have shown that for a specific volume of cathode, substrates fabricated in presence of AA are superior to the other type and also the increase in enhancement factor is ˜10 fold.

  15. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  16. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  17. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  18. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  19. Reduction of Thermal Emittance by using P-polarized Laser at Oblique Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,D.; Park, S.; Park, J.; Parc, Y.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    High charge low emittance electron beam is crucial for the 4th generation light source. Conventionally the beam is generated by photoinjector with laser illuminating the cathode at nearly normal incidence. In this paper attention was called to the use of laser at oblique incidence, which we believe, may be more beneficial. It is found that when the laser illuminates the cathode at oblique incidence, the quantum efficiency (QE) and thermal emittance show strong dependence on incidence angle and polarization state. By using p-polarized laser at oblique incidence, surface photoemission is initiated by the presence of the normal electric field which results in a higher QE and lower thermal emittance. With this technique, the increase in QE by almost 5 times and the reduction of thermal emittance by 40% should be quite expectable for a Copper photo-cathode with atomically smooth surface.

  20. Raman spectroscopy system with hollow fiber probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-hong; Shi, Yi-Wei

    2012-11-01

    A Raman remote spectroscopy system was realized using flexible hollow optical fiber as laser emittion and signal collection probes. A silver-coated hollow fiber has low-loss property and flat transmission characteristics in the visible wavelength regions. Compared with conventional silica optical fiber, little background fluorescence noise was observed with optical fiber as the probe, which would be of great advantages to the detection in low frequency Raman shift region. The complex filtering and focusing system was thus unnecessary. The Raman spectra of CaCO3 and PE were obtained by using the system and a reasonable signal to noise ratio was attained without any lens. Experiments with probes made of conventional silica optical fibers were also conducted for comparisons. Furthermore, a silver-coated hollow glass waveguide was used as sample cell to detect liquid phase sample. We used a 6 cm-long hollow fiber as the liquid cell and Butt-couplings with emitting and collecting fibers. Experiment results show that the system obtained high signal to noise ratio because of the longer optical length between sample and laser light. We also give the elementary theoretical analysis for the hollow fiber sample cell. The parameters of the fiber which would affect the system were discussed. Hollow fiber has shown to be a potential fiber probe or sample cell for Raman spectroscopy.

  1. All-dielectric hollow nanodisk for tailoring magnetic dipole emission.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianhua; Xu, Yi; Liang, Zixian; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    We propose a silicon hollow nanodisk for enhancing magnetic dipole (MD) emission. The Purcell factor can be more than 300, which is one order of magnitude larger than the silicon nanosphere case. It is demonstrated that the silicon hollow nanodisk resembles the function of an azimuthally polarized beam for tailoring the magnetic and electric dipole (ED) emission. It is shown that MD emission can be significantly enhanced, while ED emission will be suppressed when emitters are located in the hollow of the nanodisk. The dependence of the Purcell factor on the geometry parameters is also studied. Our results might facilitate the on-chip engineering of magnetic light emission.

  2. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  3. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  4. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  5. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  6. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  7. Cathode degradation and erosion in high pressure arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.; Nakanishi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The various processes which control cathode erosion and degradation were identified and evaluated. A direct current arc discharge was established between electrodes in a pressure-controlled gas flow environment. The cathode holder was designed for easy testing of various cathode materials. The anode was a water cooled copper collector electrode. The arc was powered by a dc power supply with current and voltage regulated cross-over control. Nitrogen and argon were used as propellants and the materials used were two percent thoriated tungsten, barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten, pure tungsten and lanthanum hexaboride. The configurations used were cylindrical solid rods, wire bundles supported by hollow molybdenum tubes, cylindrical hollow tubes, and hollow cathodes of the type used in ion thrusters. The results of the mass loss tests in nitrogen indicated that pure tungsten eroded at a rate more than 10 times faster than the rates of the impregnated tungsten materials. It was found that oxygen impurities of less than 0.5 percent in the nitrogen increased the mass loss rate by a factor of 4 over high purity nitrogen. At power levels less than 1 kW, cathode size and current level did not significantly affect the mass loss rate. The hollow cathode was found to be operable in argon and in nitrogen only at pressures below 400 and 200 torr, respectively.

  8. Cathode degradation and erosion in high pressure arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.; Nakanishi, S.

    1984-01-01

    The various processes which control cathode erosion and degradation were identified and evaluated. A direct current arc discharge was established between electrodes in a pressure-controlled gas flow environment. The cathode holder was designed for easy testing of various cathode materials. The anode was a water cooled copper collector electrode. The arc was powered by a dc power supply with current and voltage regulated cross-over control. Nitrogen and argon were used as propellants and the materials used were two percent thoriated tungsten, barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten, pure tungsten and lanthanum hexaboride. The configurations used were cylindrical solid rods, wire bundles supported by hollow molybdenum tubes, cylindrical hollow tubes, and hollow cathodes of the type used in ion thrusters. The results of the mass loss tests in nitrogen indicated that pure tungsten eroded at a rate more than 10 times faster than the rates of the impregnated tungsten materials. It was found that oxygen impurities of less than 0.5 percent in the nitrogen increased the mass loss rate by a factor of 4 over high purity nitrogen. At power levels less than 1 kW, cathode size and current level did not significantly affect the mass loss rate. The hollow cathode was found to be operable in argon and in nitrogen only at pressures below 400 and 200 torr, respectively.

  9. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  10. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  11. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  12. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-10

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm(-2)) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm(-2) for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm(-2)). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  13. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  14. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Faupel, Franz; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2015-08-15

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  15. Investigation of the flickering of La2O3 and ThO2 doped tungsten cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoebing, T.; Hermanns, P.; Bergner, A.; Ruhrmann, C.; Traxler, H.; Wesemann, I.; Knabl, W.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P.

    2015-07-01

    Short-arc lamps are equipped with tungsten electrodes due to their ability to withstand a high thermal load during operation. Nominal currents of more than one hundred amperes lead to a cathode tip temperature near the melting point of tungsten. To reduce the electrode temperature and, thereby, to increase the maintenance of such lamps, ThO2 or tentatively La2O3 are added to the electrode material. They generate a reduced work function by establishing a monolayer of emitter atoms on the tungsten surface. Emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of doped cathodes are formed. They are traced back to transport mechanisms of emitter oxides in the interior of the electrode and on the electrode surface in dependence of the electrode temperature and to the redeposition of vaporized and ionized emitter atoms onto the cathode tip by the electric field in front. The investigation is undertaken by means of glow discharge mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscope images, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and through measurements of the optical surface emissivity. The effect of emitter enrichments on the stability of the arc attachment is presented by means of temporally resolved electrode temperature measurements and by measurements of the luminous flux from the cathode-near plasma. They show that the emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of the cathode are attractive for the arc attachment if the emitter at the cathode tip is depleted. In this case, it moves along the lateral surface from the cathode tip to sections of the cathode with a reduced work function. It induces a temporary variation of the cathode tip temperature and of the light intensity from the cathode-near plasma, a so-called flickering. In particular, in case of lanthanated cathodes, strong flickering is observed.

  16. International Space Station Cathode Life Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate adequate lifetime and performance capabilities of a hollow cathode for use on the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system, life tests of multiple hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs) were initiated at operating conditions simulating on-orbit operation. Three HCAs are presently being tested. These HCAs are operated with a continuous 6 sccm xenon flow rate and 3 A anode current. Emission current requirements are simulated with a square waveform consisting of 50 minutes at a 2.5 A emission current and 40 minutes with no emission current. As of July 1998, these HCAs have accumulated between 1 1,700 and 14,200 hours. While there have been changes in operatin, behavior the three HCAs continue to operate stably within ISS specifications and are expected to demonstrate the required lifetime.

  17. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  18. Preparation and characterization of zirconium carbide field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, W.A.; Hinrichs, C.H. ); Davis, P.R. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors' report on experiments to determine the feasibility of using the refractory transition metal carbide ZrC as a stable field-emission cathode. Applications of such cathodes could include radiation-immune microcircuitry, flat-panel displays, e-beam lithography, and other uses where the need is for very high-density, small spot size electron sources. The primary emphasis of this paper is the preparation and analysis of methods needed to obtain stable electron emission from a cold field-emission cathode. CrC single-crystal specimens were prepared by arc floating zone refinement from sintered stock, yielding an average bulk stoichiometry of C/Zr = 0.913. Due to its brittle nature and the high temperatures required for cleaning of this carbide, new mounting methods were developed and are described. Emitter etching procedures are reported for ZrC, as well as {ital in situ} tip sharpening techniques of neon-ion bombardment and temperatures required for thermal cleaning. A temperature of 1500{degrees}C is required to remove adsorbates including oxygen. A clean ZrC field-emission pattern is shown. Ordering of work functions of various crystal planes is reported through field-emission microscopy and comparisons made with thermionic projection microscopy. Effective thermionic work functions are presented for clean surfaces to further support the ordering obtained. The ability of ZrC field emitters to operate at pressures far above those commonly found for field-emission cathodes is demonstrated.

  19. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  20. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  1. Monte Carlo Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Optogalvanic Waveforms FOR 1s5-2pj (j = 7,8,9) transitions of Neon in a Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogungbemi, Kayode; Han, Xianming; Misra, Prabhakar

    2010-02-01

    The laser optogalvanic (OG) waveforms associated with the 1s5 -- 2pj (j=7,8,9) transitions of neon in a hollow discharge lamp have been investigated as a function of discharge current (2.0 -- 19.0 mA). We have refined a mathematical model in determining the amplitudes, decay constants, and time constants associated with these transitions. Monte Carlo least-squares fitting of these waveforms has helped to specifically determine the decay rate constant (ai), exponential rates (bi) and time constant (τ) parameters associated with the evolution of the OG signals. In our investigation of the 1s5 -- 2pj (j=7,8,9)optogalvanic transitions of neon, we have measured the intensity of each transition (3.65*10-28 , 1.43*10-27 and 5.82*10-27 cm-1/mole-cm-2, respectively), which in turn has provided insight into the excitation temperature of the plasma (estimated to be 2847±285 K). The population distribution of the excited neon atoms in the pertinent energy levels has also been estimated using the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. )

  2. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  3. Ir-coated dispenser cathode for CRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Sakae; Yakabe, Toru; Matsumoto, Sadao; Miyazaki, Daisuke; Yoshii, Tsuyoshi

    1990-12-01

    A compact dispenser cathode has been developed for application to CRTs. A cathode emitter, comprising BaO, CaO, and Al2O3 in a molar ratio of 4:1:1, was impregnated into a porous tungsten pellet. An intermetallic compound of tungsten and iridium was formed on the cathode pellet. Heater ratings were 6.3 V x 0.2 A. Emission characteristics were measured by using color CRTs. As a result, a cathode peak loading of 15 A/sq cm was ensured in the space-charge region. Furthermore, life tests with a peak loading of 7.5 A/sq cm were conducted over 10,000 h. The decrease in emission current after 10 000 h was within only 10 percent of the initial value. Reliability of cathode performance was assured in terms of breakdown potential between the heater and the cathode, emission characteristics, life performance, grid emission, and the drift in cutoff potential. In addition, the effects of the coating thickness on the emission characteristics are discussed.

  4. Hardened planar nitride based cold cathode electron emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, R.; Starikov, D.; Boney, C.; Bensaoula, A.

    2012-03-01

    Low threshold electron emission from planar AlN/Silicon heterostructures is reported. The surface emitting ballistic electron structure consisted of an undoped AlN layer grown on Silicon by Molecular Beam Epitaxy, a Ti/Au Ohmic contact, and a thin Pt Schottky contact fabricated by e-beam deposition. Tunnel-transparent Pt Schottky contact was deposited on a 1 μm thick Silicon Dioxide (SiO2) layer and covered a 4 x 4 matrix of 50 μm diameter via produced in the SiO2 layer using photolithography The measurements were performed in vacuum (~10-8 Torr) using a metal grid separated from the structure by a 60 micron thick Kapton® polyimide film having an opening aligned with the via. Bias voltages in the range of 0-130 V were applied across the Schottky diode, while currents were recorded across the structure for grid voltages ranging from 0 to 50 V. The field emission nature of the measured currents was confirmed by plotting the Fowler-Nordheim dependence. Current density of at least 2.5x10-4A/cm2 was achieved for a grid voltage of 50 V and a bias of 130 V. Degradation of the structure performance was observed at bias voltages exceeding 90 V as a result of Schottky barrier modification under the elevated temperature and high electric field operation. The solid-state electron emitting structure indicated a threshold field as low as 0.2 V/μm under applied grid voltage of 12 V.

  5. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  6. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1997-07-22

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two. 12 figs.

  7. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.; Miller, William E.; Laidler, James J.

    1997-01-01

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two.

  8. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  9. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  10. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  11. Electric Field Screening by the Proximity of Two Knife-Edge Field Emitters of Finite Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, B.

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affect the emission current. Previously we calculated analytically the electric field profile of two-dimensional knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Here we extend this previous work to include the finite width of two identical emitters. From the electric field profile, the field enhancement factor, thereby the severity of the electric field screening, are determined. It is found that for two identical emitters with finite width, the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h / a and h / r , where h is the height of the knife-edge cathode, 2a is the distance between the cathodes, and 2 r represents their width. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the analytical results on the emission current distribution. P. Y. Wong was supported by a Directed Energy Summer Scholar internship at Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, and by AFRL Award No. FA9451-14-1-0374.

  12. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  13. Hollow lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Mitchell, Scott; Lang, John; Maderas, Dennis; Speth, Joel; Payne, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    A hollow lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of focusing using a spherical or cylindrical lens followed by reflective waveguiding. The hollow duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side consisting of a lens that may be coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The inside surfaces of the hollow lens duct are appropriately coated to be reflective, preventing light from escaping by reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The hollow duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials.

  14. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  15. Investigation of the flickering of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ThO{sub 2} doped tungsten cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoebing, T.; Hermanns, P.; Bergner, A.; Ruhrmann, C.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Traxler, H.; Wesemann, I.; Knabl, W.

    2015-07-14

    Short-arc lamps are equipped with tungsten electrodes due to their ability to withstand a high thermal load during operation. Nominal currents of more than one hundred amperes lead to a cathode tip temperature near the melting point of tungsten. To reduce the electrode temperature and, thereby, to increase the maintenance of such lamps, ThO{sub 2} or tentatively La{sub 2}O{sub 3} are added to the electrode material. They generate a reduced work function by establishing a monolayer of emitter atoms on the tungsten surface. Emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of doped cathodes are formed. They are traced back to transport mechanisms of emitter oxides in the interior of the electrode and on the electrode surface in dependence of the electrode temperature and to the redeposition of vaporized and ionized emitter atoms onto the cathode tip by the electric field in front. The investigation is undertaken by means of glow discharge mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscope images, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and through measurements of the optical surface emissivity. The effect of emitter enrichments on the stability of the arc attachment is presented by means of temporally resolved electrode temperature measurements and by measurements of the luminous flux from the cathode-near plasma. They show that the emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of the cathode are attractive for the arc attachment if the emitter at the cathode tip is depleted. In this case, it moves along the lateral surface from the cathode tip to sections of the cathode with a reduced work function. It induces a temporary variation of the cathode tip temperature and of the light intensity from the cathode-near plasma, a so-called flickering. In particular, in case of lanthanated cathodes, strong flickering is observed.

  16. Elastomeric Cathode Binder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble copolymer binder mixed with cathode material and solvent forms flexible porous cathode used in lithium and Ni/Cd batteries. Cathodes prepared by this process have lower density due to expanding rubbery binder and greater flexibility than conventional cathodes. Fabrication procedure readily adaptable to scaled-up processes.

  17. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  18. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  19. Microwave-Assisted Solvothermal Synthesis of VO2 Hollow Spheres and Their Conversion into V2O5 Hollow Spheres with Improved Lithium Storage Capability.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhong, Li; Li, Ming; Luo, Yuanyuan; Li, Guanghai

    2016-01-22

    Monodispersed hierarchically structured V2O5 hollow spheres were successfully obtained from orthorhombic VO2 hollow spheres, which are in turn synthesized by a simple template-free microwave-assisted solvothermal method. The structural evolution of VO2 hollow spheres has been studied and explained by a chemically induced self-transformation process. The reaction time and water content in the reaction solution have a great influence on the morphology and phase structure of the resulting products in the solvothermal reaction. The diameter of the VO2 hollow spheres can be regulated simply by changing vanadium ion content in the reaction solution. The VO2 hollow spheres can be transformed into V2O5 hollow spheres with nearly no morphological change by annealing in air. The nanorods composed of V2O5 hollow spheres have an average length of about 70 nm and width of about 19 nm. When used as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the V2O5 hollow spheres display a diameter-dependent electrochemical performance, and the 440 nm hollow spheres show the highest specific discharge capacity of 377.5 mAhg(-1) at a current density of 50 mAg(-1) , and are better than the corresponding solid spheres and nanorod assemblies.

  20. Emittance compensation in split photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floettmann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The compensation of correlated emittance contributions is of primary importance to optimize the performance of high brightness photoinjectors. While only extended numerical simulations can capture the complex beam dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in sufficient detail to optimize a specific injector layout, simplified models are required to gain a deeper understanding of the involved dynamics, to guide the optimization procedure, and to interpret experimental results. In this paper, a slice envelope model for the emittance compensation process in a split photoinjector is presented. The emittance term is included in the analytical solution of the beam envelope in a drift, which is essential to take the emittance contribution due to a beam size mismatch into account. The appearance of two emittance minima in the drift is explained, and the matching into the booster cavity is discussed. A comparison with simulation results points out effects which are not treated in the envelope model, such as overfocusing and field nonlinearities.

  1. Development program on a cold cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype electron gun with a field emitter cathode capable of producing 95 mA in a 1/4 mm diameter beam at 12 kV was produced. Achievement of this goal required supporting studies in cathode fabrication, cathode performance, gun design, cathode mounting and gun fabrication. A series of empirical investigations advanced fabrication technology: More stable emitters were produced and multiple cone failure caused by chain reaction discharges were reduced. The cathode is capable of producing well over 95 mA, but a substantial collector development effort was required to demonstrate emission levels in the 100 mA region. Space charge problems made these levels difficult to achieve. Recommendations are made for future process and materials investigation. Electron gun designs were modeled and tested. A pair of two-electrode gun structures were fabricated and tested; one gun was delivered to NASA. Cathodes were pretested up to 100 mA at SRI and delivered to NASA for test in the gun structure.

  2. Highly directional thermal emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  3. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  4. Towards graphane field emitters

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shuyi; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M.; Kang, Moon H.; Parmee, Richard J.; Zhang, Xiaobing; Milne, William I.; Wang, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm–1), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm–2 (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm–2 (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function. PMID:28066543

  5. The design of a cathode to operate in an oxygen-rich environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marrese, Colleen M.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Mackie, William A.; Evans, David E.

    1997-01-10

    The primary problem with Hall plasma accelerator operation on oxygen is poor cathode performance and short lifetime. The primary problem with micro Hall thrusters is the absence of a stable low power cathode. Cathodes traditionally used for both applications employ thermionic emitters which are not efficient and which are easily oxidized in an oxygen-rich environment. The field emitter cathode presented in this report has the potential of filling both vacancies since it does not require a high-power heater and can be scaled down with the size of the thruster. The advantages to using Hf and HfC as emitting materials are low work functions and high resistance to oxygen poisoning. Preliminary investigations proved that HfC emitters can operate in 7.6 mTorr oxygen pressure environments. The initial cathode design employs an electrostatic lens that also acts as an ion filter to prevent thruster ions from bombarding the field emitters while decelerating the electron beam and keeping it focused to ensure efficient performance. Electron trajectories through the cathode and ion filtering capabilities are presented in this report as predicted by the charged particle code, MAGIC.

  6. Cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalser, I.L.; Brannan, M.S.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a cathodic protection system for protecting a metallic structure in contact with the earth from corrosion. It comprises at least one electrically conductive member positioned in a borehole in the earth which is defined by an earthen sidewall: a quantity of a particulate mixture of a clay and a carbonaceous solid which at least partially fills the borehole around the at least one conductive member such that the mixture contacts the earthen sidewall and the at least one conductive member, wherein the mixture has a clay to carbonaceous solid weight ratio of at least about 0.1:1; means for applying a DC electrical voltage to the metallic structure and the at least one conductive member such that the metallic structure is at a negative polarity and the at least one conductive member is at a positive polarity, whereby a current is established between the metallic structure and the at least one conductive member through the earth and the mixture.

  7. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  8. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  9. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  10. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  11. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H.; Jarvis, J.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ∼10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15 mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  12. Space charge effects on the current-voltage characteristics of gated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.; Kodis, M. A.; Murphy, R. A.; Zaidman, E. G.

    1997-07-01

    Microfabricated field emitter arrays (FEAs) can provide the very high electron current densities required for rf amplifier applications, typically on the order of 100 A/cm2. Determining the dependence of emission current on gate voltage is important for the prediction of emitter performance for device applications. Field emitters use high applied fields to extract current, and therefore, unlike thermionic emitters, the current densities can exceed 103A/cm2 when averaged over an array. At such high current densities, space charge effects (i.e., the influence of charge between cathode and collector on emission) affect the emission process or initiate conditions which can lead to failure mechanisms for field emitters. A simple model of a field emitter will be used to calculate the one-dimensional space charge effects on the emission characteristics by examining two components: charge between the gate and anode, which leads to Child's law, and charge within the FEA unit cell, which gives rise to a field suppression effect which can exist for a single field emitter. The predictions of the analytical model are compared with recent experimental measurements designed to assess space charge effects and predict the onset of gate current. It is shown that negative convexity on a Fowler-Nordheim plot of Ianode(Vgate) data can be explained in terms of field depression at the emitter tip in addition to reflection of electrons by a virtual cathode created when the anode field is insufficient to extract all of the current; in particular, the effects present within the unit cell constitute a newly described effect.

  13. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Ahmed, M. M.; Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  14. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  15. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  16. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  17. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  18. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  19. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  20. Axis-1 diode simulations I: standard 2-inch cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2011-01-11

    The standard configuration of the DARHT Axis-I diode features a 5.08-cm diameter velvet emitter mounted in the flat surface of the cathode shroud. The surface of the velvet is slightly recessed {approx}2.5 mm. This configuration produces a 1.75 kA beam when a 3.8-MV pulse is applied to the anode-cathode (AK) gap. This note addresses some of the physics of this diode through the use of finite-element simulations.

  1. A long pulse high-power diode based on a microelectronic emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, B.; Clark, C.; Walko, R.; Fleming, J.

    1995-11-01

    Microelectronic cathode emitter technology being developed at Sandia for supplying continuous low current for flat panel displays appears to be a promising technology for providing high currents when operated in a pulsed, higher voltage mode. If currents in excess of one amp per square centimeter could be produced for tens of microseconds at several kilohertz repetition rate, important applications in such as large volume food or waste sterilization in situ detection, and high power microwave production could be achieved. A testbed was built to perform the experiments. The desired current densities have been demonstrated using small emitter arrays.

  2. Generalized Mechanism of Field Emission from Nanostructured Semiconductor Film Cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ru-Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Yan, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Considering the effect of both the buffer layer and substrate, a series of ultrathin multilayered structure cathodes (UTMC) is constructed to simulate the field emission (FE) process of nanostructured semiconductor film cathodes (NSFCs). We find a generalized FE mechanism of the NSFCs, in which there are three distinct FE modes with the change of the applied field. Our results clearly show significant differences of FE between conventional emitters and nanofilm emitters, which the non-Fowler-Nordheim characteristics and the resonant FE will be inevitable for NSFCs. Moreover, the controllable FE can be realized by fine-tuning the quantum structure of NSFCs. The generalized mechanism of NSFCs presented here may be particularly useful for design high-speed and high-frequency vacuum nano-electronic devices.

  3. Generalized Mechanism of Field Emission from Nanostructured Semiconductor Film Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Yan, Hui

    2017-03-01

    Considering the effect of both the buffer layer and substrate, a series of ultrathin multilayered structure cathodes (UTMC) is constructed to simulate the field emission (FE) process of nanostructured semiconductor film cathodes (NSFCs). We find a generalized FE mechanism of the NSFCs, in which there are three distinct FE modes with the change of the applied field. Our results clearly show significant differences of FE between conventional emitters and nanofilm emitters, which the non-Fowler-Nordheim characteristics and the resonant FE will be inevitable for NSFCs. Moreover, the controllable FE can be realized by fine-tuning the quantum structure of NSFCs. The generalized mechanism of NSFCs presented here may be particularly useful for design high-speed and high-frequency vacuum nano-electronic devices.

  4. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, I. V. Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-15

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8–12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa)

  5. A miniature origami biofuel cell based on a consumed cathode.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Han, Yujie; Lou, Baohua; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-10

    Considerable interest has been focused on miniature biofuel cells (BFCs) because of their portability and possibility to be implantable. Origami devices with hollow channels will provide novel insight into the assembly methods of miniature BFCs. Herein a miniature origami BFC has been fabricated from a MnO2-graphite flake consumed solid-state cathode. For further practical applications, miniature origami BFCs can directly generate energy from soft drinks.

  6. Determination of satellite valley position in GaN emitter from photoexcited field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Argon plasma etched GaN field-emitter rods with nanometer-scale diameter were fabricated on GaN grown on an n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated both without and under illumination by using light sources with various wavelengths. The Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics of the cathodes show a change in slope for illuminated cathodes. The electron affinity difference ΔE between the different valleys in the conduction band has been ascertained and is in the range from 1.18 up to 1.21 eV.

  7. Optical and Electrical Investigations into Cathode Ignition and Diode Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Laboratory Pulsed Power Systems Group, MS E525 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract A combination of optical and electrical diagnostics has been fielded on the...velocity measurements are presented showing little dependance on applied magnetic field for both velvet and carbon felt emitters. We also report the...diag- nostics has been fielded in a study of the formation and expansion of cathode plasmas. In the standard model [3], microscopic surface features

  8. Emittance compensation with dynamically optimized photoelectron beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; England, R. J.; Dunning, M.; Anderson, S. G.; Ferrario, Massimo

    2006-02-01

    Much of the theory and experimentation concerning creation of a high-brightness electron beam from a photocathode, and then applying emittance compensation techniques, assumes that one must strive for a uniform density electron beam, having a cylindrical shape. On the other hand, this shape has large nonlinearities in the space-charge field profiles near the beam's longitudinal extrema. These nonlinearities are known to produce both transverse and longitudinal emittance growth. On the other hand, it has recently been shown by Luiten that by illuminating the cathode with an ultra-short laser pulse of appropriate transverse profile, a uniform density, ellipsoidally shaped bunch is dynamically formed, which then has linear space-charge fields in all dimensions inside of the bunch. We study here this process, and its marriage to the standard emittance compensation scenario that is implemented in most recent photoinjectors. It is seen that the two processes are compatible, with simulations indicating a very high brightness beam can be obtained. The robustness of this scheme to systematic errors is examined. Prospects for experimental tests of this scheme are discussed.

  9. Low-temperature thermionic emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Richard W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved photodelineatable cathode material is disclosed comprising a combination of triple carbonate (TC) and a hydrocarbon polymeric photoresist PR. A mixture of TC powder and PR is applied to a cathode by spraying, spinning or dipping and is then subjected to activation at a temperature from about 800.degree. C up to the melting temperature. The cathodes can be activated at a temperature as low as 800.degree. C and still deliver a 0-field, temperature-limited current density of 750 milliamperes per sq. centimeter at 600.degree. C. If a pattern is desired, the coating is exposed through a suitable mask to actinic light to harden the photoresist in the desired areas. Following exposure, the exposed image areas are developed and the unexposed portions of the coating are removed with solvent. When dry, the cathode is ready for activation.

  10. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  11. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  12. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10 000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm-2. The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  13. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-14

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10,000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm(-2). The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  14. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  15. A high-DC-voltage GaAs photoemission gun: Transverse emittance and momentum spread measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Engwall, D.; Bohn, C.; Cardman, L.

    1997-06-01

    We have built a high-DC-voltage photoemission gun and a diagnostic beamline permitting us to measure rms transverse emittance ({epsilon}{sub x}) and rms momentum spread ({delta}) of short-duration electron pulses produced by illuminating the cathode with light from a mode-locked, frequency-doubled Nd:YLF laser. The electron gun is a GaAs photocathode source designed to operate at 500kV. We have measured {epsilon}{sub x} and {delta} for conditions ranging from emittance-dominated to space-charge-dominated. We report these measurements as functions of microbunch charge for different beam radii, pulse lengths, and voltages/field gradients at the cathode, and compare them with PARMELA calculations.

  16. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  17. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  18. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  19. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  20. Virtual Cathode Oscillator Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    emission region then con- sists of an array of fibers perpendicular to a conducting cathode surface . A surface flashover along the individual fibers...acts like the Corona electron source developed by Helionetics13 for laser pre-ioniza- tion. The axial surface flashover mechanism is more desirable than...the conventional cold cathode emission process, because production of plasma in this manner inhibits the formation of surface cathode spots. 7 75

  1. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  2. High-Performance Field-Emission Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Field Emitters.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ki Nam; Sun, Yuning; Han, Jun Soo; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-01-18

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have attracted considerable attention as a field emission material because of their high mechanical strength, high negative electron affinity, and high oxidation resistance. Nevertheless, the obtained field-emission properties of BNNTs have indicated poor emission performance, which is a very high turn-on electric field with a low emission current. We fabricated BNNT field emitters and investigated their field-emission properties. The field-emission properties of the BNNT field emitters were considerably enhanced compared to those of other BN nanomaterial-based field emitters. The turn-on and the threshold electric fields of the BNNT field emitter were 3.1 and 5.4 V/μm at the gap distance of 750 μm, respectively. Both the turn-on and the threshold electric fields of the BNNT field emitters were decreased by increasing the gap distance between the emitter tip and the anode electrode. Degradation of the emission current during field emission operation for 20 h showed no significant difference according to the gap distance. Emission current fluctuation of the BNNT field emitters showed that the smaller gap was more unstable than the larger gap. The enhanced emission properties are mainly attributed to the small diameter, high-quality, and straight structure of BNNTs as well as the stable network formation of the BNNT film with good mechanical and electrical contact between the BNNTs and the cathode electrode. The remarkable emission performance of the BNNT field emitters might have promising applications for various field-emission devices.

  3. Evaluation of an Electrochromic Device for Variable Emittance in Simulated Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puterbaugh, Rebekah L.; Mychkovsky, Alexander G.; Ponnappan, Rengasamy; Kislov, Nikolai

    2005-02-01

    Unprotected skin and external surfaces of a spacecraft in earth orbit may experience temperature variations from -50°C to +100°C during exposure to cold space or sun. As a result, thermal management of spacecraft becomes extremely important. One latest trend is to provide flexibility and control in the thermal design that involves variable emittance surfaces consisting of electrochromic (EC) coatings. For investigational purposes, a sample electrochromic device is evaluated for variable emittance in simulated space conditions. A vacuum chamber with a liquid nitrogen circulated blackbody shroud is employed to simulate space conditions. The 63.5 × 63.5 mm test sample supplied by a small business research firm is mounted on an aluminum plate heated by an electrical resistance heater. The sample is thermally insulated by a heat shield from all surroundings excluding the active front surface facing the shroud. The heat shield is uniformly maintained at the sample temperature using an independent circuit of resistance heaters and temperature controllers. A steady state energy balance is applied to the test sample to determine the emittance as a function of temperature and DC bias voltage applied across the anode and cathode. Tests were performed to verify the switchability from high to low emittance states and vice versa. The difference between the high and low emittance values (Δɛ) obtained in the present calorimetric measurement is compared with the data obtained from FTIR measurements performed by the supplier of the EC sample. Results obtained in the present experiments compare closely with supplier data and prove the effectiveness of the variable emittance sample in space conditions. The validity of the calorimetric experiment is confirmed by testing materials with known emittances, such as black paint and polished metals. Error analysis of the system predicts an emittance accuracy of ±5% at sample temperatures in the range of -50°C to 100°C.

  4. Cathode interface studies of polymer light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiontek, Stephen; Tzolov, Marian

    2010-03-01

    Efficient injection of charge carriers is a key factor for successful operation of any electronic device and especially of devices with non-crystalline or wide band gap active material. Our study concentrates on the cathode interface of light emitting devices with a conjugated polymer as light emitter. We apply two principally different methods for the cathode deposition, physical and chemical, in order to fundamentally understand if in addition to the commonly accepted notion for the matching of the work functions also material modification takes place. The completed devices are studies by steady-state electrical measurements, impedance spectroscopy, current and emission lifetime measurements, and electroluminescence spectroscopy. The morphology of the cathodes is studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy and the formation of additional phases by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. The results help to define ways for more cost efficient fabrication of light emitting devices with applications in displays, electronic newspapers, room illumination, etc.

  5. Extreme regimes of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode in a dc electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmans, P. L. E. M.; van Vugt, D. C.; van Lieshout, J. P.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-10-01

    The femtosecond photoemission yield from a copper cathode and the emittance of the created electron beams has been studied in a 12 MeV /m , 100 keV dc electron gun over a wide range of laser fluence, from the linear photoemission regime until the onset of image charge limitations and cathode damaging. The measured photoemission curves can be described well with available theory which includes the Schottky effect, second-order photoemission, and image charge limitation. The second-order photoemission can be explained by thermally assisted one-photon photoemission (1PPE) and by above-threshold two-photon photoemission (2PPE). Measurements with a fresh cathode suggest that the 2PPE process is dominant. The beam emittance has been measured for the entire range of initial surface charge densities as well. The emittance measurements of space-charge dominated beams can be described well by an envelope equation with generalized perveance. The dc gun produces 0.1 pC bunches with 25 nm rms normalized emittance, corresponding to a normalized brightness usually associated with rf photoguns. In this experimental study the limits of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode have been explored and analyzed in great detail, resulting in improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  6. Controlled synthesis of double-wall a-FePO4 nanotubes and their LIB cathode properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ren; Liu, Hai; Zhang, Wenyu; Tan, Huiteng; Yang, Dan; Huang, Yizhong; Hng, Huey Hoon; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Yan, Qingyu

    2013-04-08

    Double-wall amorphous FePO4 nanotubes are prepared by an oil-phase chemical route. The inward diffusion of vacancies and outward diffusion of ions through passivation layers result in double-wall nanotubes with thin walls. Such a process can be extended to prepare hollow polydedral nanocrystals and hollow ellipsoids. The double-wall FePO4 nanotubes show interesting cathode performance in Li ion batteries.

  7. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  8. Fuel cell components and systems having carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Langry, Kevin C.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-08

    According to one embodiment, a system includes a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst coupled to the hollow fiber, an anode extending along at least part of a length of the structure, and a cathode extending along at least part of the length of the structure, the cathode being on an opposite side of the hollow fiber as the anode. In another embodiment, a method includes acquiring a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst along one side thereof, adding an anode that extends along at least part of a length of the structure, and adding a cathode that extends along at least part of the length of the structure on an opposite side as the anode.

  9. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  10. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  11. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  12. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  13. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  14. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ˜50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  15. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ∼50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  16. Investigations of the Transient Behavior of the Cathode Fall Region in Planar and Hollow Cathodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-21

    Power Semiconductor Data Book, Powerex Inc. 1988 [12] Rashid, M.H., "Power Electronics: Circuits and Applications", Prentice Hall, 1988. [13] Hayt , William, ’Engineering Circuit Analysis", McGraw Hill, 1978

  17. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a approximately 450 kV, approximately 400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, approximately 250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  18. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  19. Field Emitter Arrays for Plasma and Microwave Source Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kevin L.

    1998-11-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are attractive cathode candidates for many applications, e.g., electron microguns(C. Constancias, D. Herve, R. Accomo, and E. Molva, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. B13, 611, 1995.), miniaturized TWTs(H. Imura, S. Tsuida, M. Takahasi, A. Okamoto, H. Makishima, and S. Miyano, Tech. Dig. of the IEEE-IEDM (Dec. 7-11, Washington, DC) p721.), radiation sources, instrumentation , sensors, mass spectrometers, and electric propulsion (Hall thrusters (C. M. Marrese and Alec D. Gallimore, Tech. Dig. of Int'l. Conf. on Plasma Science, (Raleigh, NC, June 4-5, 1998), 1D05.)) due to their instant ON/OFF capability, high brightness and current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, low voltage operation, and so on. Two applications are significant: in the most widely pursued, FEAs may enable significant reductions in physical dimensions, weight, and power consumption of flat panel displays (FPDs)(A. Ghis, R. Meyer, P. Rambaud, F. Levy, and T. Leroux, IEEE-Trans. Elect. Dev. 36, 2320 (1991)), whereas the most challenging application, advanced RF tubes(M. A. Kodis, K. L. Jensen, E. G. Zaidman, B. Goplen, D. N. Smithe, IEEE-Trans. on Plas. Sci. 24, 970 (1996).), may benefit from the current densities and high pulse repetition frequencies field emitters are capable of. FEAs (a coplanar gate less than one micron from a microfabricated conical emitter for field enhancement), provide high current density for low gate voltages, are relatively temperature insensitive, and are capable of emission modulation at 10 GHz. High currents due to quantum mechanical tunneling are made possible by narrowing the field emission barrier to nanometer widths. Greater performance and robustness may be enabled through rugged low work function coatings. We shall describe the process of field emission by quantum mechanical tunneling, provide an overview of the applications and their demands on field emitters, and present a model of FEAs used to characterize their performance

  20. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Positron Acceleration by Plasma Wakefields Driven by a Hollow Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T. M.; Palastro, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for positron plasma wakefield acceleration using hollow or donut-shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular-shaped, electron-free region forms around the hollow driver beam, creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing) for positron acceleration. For Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)-like parameters, the hollow beam driver produces accelerating gradients on the order of 10 GV /m . The accelerating gradient increases linearly with the total charge in the driver beam. Simulations show acceleration of a 23-GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm is possible.

  2. Cathodes - Technological review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-01

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  3. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  4. Mercury - the hollow planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  5. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  6. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  7. Rotating dipole and quadrupole field for a multiple cathode system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skarita, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    A multiple cathode system has been designed to provide the high average current polarized electron bunches for the future electron-ion collider eRHIC [1]. One of the key research topics in this design is the technique to generate a combined dipole and quadrupole rotating field at high frequency (700 kHz). This type of field is necessary for combining bunches from different cathodes to the same axis with minimum emittance growth. Our simulations and the prototype test results to achieve this will be presented. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of EHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. For polarized-electron and polarized proton collisions, it requires a polarized electron source with high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the quantum efficiency, lifetime, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and combine the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because its operations bear similarity to a multi-barrel Gatling gun. The electron spin direction is not affected by electric field but will follow to the direction of the magnetic bending. This requires that, to preserve the spin polarization from cathode, the fixed bending field after the solenoid and the rotating bending field in combiner must be either a pair of electric bendings or a pair of magnetic bendings. We choose the scheme with a pair of magnetic bendings because it is much easier than the scheme with a pair of electric bendings at our 200 keV electron energy level.

  8. An ESS system for ECRIS Emittance Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Sun, L.T.; He, W.; Ma, L.; Zhang, Z.M.; Zhao, H.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhang, X.Z.; Guo, X.H.; Ma, B.H.; Li, J.; Wang, H.; Li, J.Y.; Li, X.X.; Feng, Y.C.; Lu, W.

    2005-03-15

    An emittance scanner named Electric-Sweep Scanner had been designed and fabricated in IMP. And it has been set up on the LECR3 beam line for the ion beam quality study. With some development, the ESS system has become a relatively dependable and reliable emittance scanner. Its experiment error is about 10 percent. We have done a lot of experiments of emittance measurement on LECR3 ion source, and have researched the relations between ion beam emittance and the major parameters of ECR ion source. The reliability and accuracy test results are presented in this paper. And the performance analysis is also discussed.

  9. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  10. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 microns, a density of about I to about 6 pounds/ft3 and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bounded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cu ft and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq in.

  11. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 microns a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic ft and a volume change of 1 to about 20 percent by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic ft and a compression strength 2 of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq in.

  12. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 micrometers, a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic foot and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic feet and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq inch.

  13. Chemical regeneration of emitter surface increases thermionic diode life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breiteieser, R.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical regeneration of sublimated emitter electrode increases the operating efficiency and life of thermionic diodes. A gas which forms chemical compounds with the sublimated emitter material is introduced into the space between the emitter and the collector. The compounds migrate to the emitter where they decompose and redeposit the emitter material.

  14. Hafnium carbide films and film-coated field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, W.A.; Xie, T.; Davis, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    Uses for field emitter arrays range from video displays to microwave applications. The authors report here on experiments with physical vapor deposition of HfC and the subsequent electron emission properties of these film surfaces. In previous work, they have reported improvements to field emission turn on voltages and stability with the addition of ZrC to individual prefabricated W and Mo emitters and on field emission arrays of Mo and Si. This work with HfC seems to better the results obtained with ZrC. They have observed high current density field emission, greater than 1 {times} 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2}, from single crystal HfC and ZrC cathodes. These materials have work functions approximately 1 eV lower than W and Mo, making them attractive candidates for low voltage microelectronic field emitter arrays. However, in order to make these materials useful for practical arrays, it is necessary to be able to fabricate many identical field emitters from them. One possible way to achieve this is to deposit carbide films onto arrays fabricated from W, Mo, or Si. The challenge with this approach is the achievement of the desired properties (stability and low work function) in the deposited layers.

  15. Cathode materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  16. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  17. Development of potassium ion conducting hollow glass fibers. [potassium sulfur battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, F. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Potassium ion conducting glasses, chemically resistant to potassium, potassium sulfide and sulfur, were made and their possible utility as the membrane material for a potassium/sulfur battery was evaluated. At least one satisfactory candidate was found. It possesses an electrical resistance which makes it usable as a membrane in the form of a fine hollow fiber. It's chemical and electrochemical resistances are excellent. The other aspects of the possible potassium sulfur battery utilizing such fine hollow fibers, including the header (or tube sheet) and a cathode current collector were studied. Several cathode materials were found to be satisfactory. None of the tube sheet materials studied possessed all the desired properties. Multi-fiber cells had very limited life-time due to physical failure of fibers at the fiber/tube sheet junctions.

  18. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Jarvis, J.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the first successful operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of $\\sim 10^6$ diamond diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15~mA were reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed. Numerical simulations of the beam dynamics are also presented.

  19. Thermophotovoltaic Generators Using Selective Metallic Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Samaras, John E.; Avery, James E.; Ewell, Richard

    1995-01-01

    In the literature to date on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generators, two types of infrared emitter's have been emphasized : gray body emitters and rare earth oxide selective emitters. The gray body emitter is defined as an emitter with a spectral emissivity independent of wavelength whereas the rare earth oxide selective emitter is idealized as a delta function emitter with a high emissivity at a select wavelength and a near zero emissivity at all other wavelengths. Silicon carbide is an example of a gray body emitter and ER-YAG is an example of a selective emitter. The Welsbach mantle in a common lantern is another example of an oxide selective emitter. Herein, we describe an alternative type of selective emitter, a selective metallic emitter. These metallic emitters are characterized by a spectral emissivity curve wherein the emissivity monotonically increases with shorter infrared wavelengths as is shown. The metal of curve "A", tungsten, typifies this class of selective metallic emitter's. In a thermophotovoltaic generator, a photovoltaic cell typically converts infrared radiation to electricity out to some cut-off wavelength. For example, Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) TPV cells respond out to 1.7 microns. The problem with gray body emitters is that they emit at all wavelengths. Therefore, a large fraction of the energy emitted will be outside of the response band of the TPV cell. The argument for the selective emitter is that, ideally, all the emitted energy can be in the cells response band. Unfortunately, rare earth oxide emitters are not ideal. In order to suppress the emissivity toward zero away from the select wavelength, the use of thin fiber's is necessary. This leads to a fragile emitter typical of a lantern mantle. Even given a thin ER-YAG emitter, the measured emissivity at the select wavelength of 1.5 microns has been reported to be 0.6 while the off wavelength background emissivity falls to only 0.2 at 5 microns. This gives a selectivity ratio of only 3

  20. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  1. New approach to obtain boron selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlecke, A.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    Selective emitters, used in high efficiency solar cells, need a series of oxidations and photolithographic steps that render the process more expensive. In this paper, a new way to make selective emitters using boron is presented. The main feature of this approach is to save oxide growths and photolithographic processes and it is based on the property of boron doped silicon surfaces to be resistant to anisotropic etchings like the one performed during the texturization. Using this characteristic of boron emitter surfaces, the authors can obtain a highly doped emitter under metal grid and simultaneously a shield to avoid texture on these surfaces. First cells were processed and short wavelength response of p{sup +}nn{sup +} solar cells was enhanced by using lightly doped boron emitters in the uncovered area.

  2. TPV Systems with Solar Powered Tungsten Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A. S.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Khvostikova, O. A.; Gazaryan, P. Y.; Sorokina, S. V.; Andreev, V. M.

    2007-02-22

    A solar TPV generator development and characterization are presented. A double stage sunlight concentrator ensures 4600x concentration ratio. TPV modules based on tungsten emitters and GaSb cells were designed, fabricated and tested at indoor and outdoor conditions. The performance of tungsten emitter under concentrated solar radiation was analyzed. Emitter temperatures in the range of 1400-2000 K were measured, depending on the emitter size. The light distribution in the module has been characterized, 1x1 cm GaSb TPV cells were fabricated with the use of the Zn-diffusion and LPE technologies. The cell efficiency of 19% under illumination by a tungsten emitter (27% under spectra cut-off at {lambda} > 1820 nm) heated up to 1900-2000 K had been derived from experimentally measured PV parameters. The series connection of PV cells was ensured by the use of BeO ceramics. The possibilities of system performance improvement are discussed.

  3. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  4. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  5. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  6. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOEpatents

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  7. RECENT PROGRESS ON THE DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTO-CATHODE EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; GRIMES, J.; RAO, T.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.; WU, Q.

    2007-06-25

    We report recent progress on the Diamond Amplified Photo-cathode (DAP). The use of a pulsed electron gun provides detailed information about the DAP physics. The secondary electron gain has been measured under various electric fields. We have achieved gains of a few hundred in the transmission mode and observed evidence of emission of electrons from the surface. A model based on recombination of electrons and holes during generation well describes the field dependence of the gain. The emittance measurement system for the DAP has been designed, constructed and is ready for use. The capsule design of the DAP is also being studied in parallel.

  8. Metal free nitrogen doped hollow mesoporous graphene-analogous spheres as effective electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Meng, Hui; Xie, Fangyan; Yuan, Xiaoli; Yu, Wendan; Lin, Worong; Ouyang, Wenpeng; Yuan, Dingsheng

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres has been synthesized from mesoporous silica spheres using glycine as carbon and nitrogen precursor. The wall of the spheres is composed by broken graphene. The metal free nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres are proven to be active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution. A unique advantage of the nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon sphere is its methanol-tolerant property because of the absence of active metal. The catalytic activity is ascribed to the pyridinic-nitrogen formed during pyrolysis and the graphene-like structure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon sphere as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction which is an important reaction in fuel cell. The prepared mesoporous carbon material can also be used as catalyst support and find application both in the anode and cathode of fuel cell.

  9. Microlensless interdigitated photoconductive terahertz emitters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Prabhu, S S

    2015-01-26

    We report here fabrication of interdigitated photoconductive antenna (iPCA) terahertz (THz) emitters based on plasmonic electrode design. Novel design of this iPCA enables it to work without microlens array focusing, which is otherwise required for photo excitation of selective photoconductive regions to avoid the destructive interference of emitted THz radiation from oppositely biased regions. Benefit of iPCA over single active region PCA is, photo excitation can be done at larger area hence avoiding the saturation effect at higher optical excitation density. The emitted THz radiation power from plasmonic-iPCAs is ~2 times more than the single active region plasmonic PCA at 200 mW optical excitation, which will further increase at higher optical powers. This design is expected to reduce fabrication cost of photoconductive THz sources and detectors.

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  11. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  12. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  13. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  14. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  15. Emittance measurement & optimization for the photocathode RF gun with laser profile shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Guang; Masafumi, Fukuda; Sakae, Araki; Nobuhiro, Terunuma; Junji, Urakawa

    2010-05-01

    The Laser Undulator Compact X-ray source (LUCX) is a test bench for a compact high brightness X-ray generator, based on inverse Compton Scattering at KEK, which requires high intensity multi-bunch trains with low transverse emittance. A photocathode RF gun with emittance compensation solenoid is used as an electron source. Much endeavor has been made to increase the beam intensity in the multi-bunch trains. The cavity of the RF gun is tuned into an unbalanced field in order to reduce space charge effects, so that the field gradient on the cathode surface is relatively higher when the forward RF power into gun cavity is not high enough. A laser profile shaper is employed to convert the driving laser profile from Gaussian into uniform. In this research we seek to find the optimized operational conditions for the decrease of the transverse emittance. With the uniform driving laser and the unbalanced RF gun, the RMS transverse emittance of a 1 nC bunch has been improved effectively from 5.46 μmm · mrad to 3.66 μmm · mrad.

  16. Hollow Force, Hollow Metaphor: Assessing the Current Defense Drawdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    testimony to Congress, the Army’s Chief of Staff, General Edward Meyer, used the phrase “hollow Army” to articulate his perception of an undermanned...force?” Panetta employed a metaphor used previously in post-conflict periods when political and defense leaders debated the extent and depth of...phrase to articulate his perception of an undermanned, poorly trained post- Vietnam U.S. Army.5 The phrase was later expanded to “hollow force” by

  17. Hollow Force, Hollow Metaphor: Assessing The Current Defense Drawdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    testimony to Congress, the Army’s Chief of Staff, General Edward Meyer, used the phrase “hollow Army” to articulate his perception of an undermanned...force?” Panetta employed a metaphor used previously in post-conflict periods when political and defense leaders debated the extent and depth of...phrase to articulate his perception of an undermanned, poorly trained post- Vietnam U.S. Army.5 The phrase was later expanded to “hollow force” by

  18. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  19. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  20. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  1. 'Laguna Hollow'Undisturbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the patch of soil at the bottom of the shallow depression dubbed 'Laguna Hollow' where the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit will soon begin trenching. Scientists are intrigued by the clustering of small pebbles and the crack-like fine lines, which indicate a coherent surface that expands and contracts. A number of processes can cause materials to expand and contract, including cycles of heating and cooling; freezing and thawing; and rising and falling of salty liquids within a substance. This false-color image was created using the blue, green and infrared filters of the rover's panoramic camera. Scientists chose this particular combination of filters to enhance the heterogeneity of the martian soil.

  2. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  3. Method for sizing hollow microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1975-10-29

    Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

  4. Ferroelectric Emission Cathodes for Low-Power Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, Scott D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Low- or no-flow electron emitters are required for low-power electric thrusters, spacecraft plasma contactors, and electrodynamic tether systems to reduce or eliminate the need for propellant/expellant. Expellant-less neutralizers can improve the viability of very low-power colloid thrusters, field emission electric propulsion devices, ion engines, Hall thrusters, and gridded vacuum arc thrusters. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is evaluating ferroelectric emission (FEE) cathodes as zero expellant flow rate cathode sources for the applications listed above. At GRC, low voltage (100s to approx. 1500 V) operation of FEE cathodes is examined. Initial experiments, with unipolar, bipolar, and RF burst applied voltage, have produced current pulses 250 to 1000 ns in duration with peak currents of up to 2 A at voltages at or below 1500 V. In particular, FEE cathodes driven by RF burst voltages from 1400 to 2000 V peak to peak, at burst frequencies from 70 to 400 kHz, emitted average current densities from 0.1 to 0.7 A/sq cm. Pulse repeatability as a function of input voltage has been initially established. Reliable emission has been achieved in air background at pressures as high as 10(exp -6) Torr.

  5. Pyrometric cathode temperature measurements in metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Schneidenbach, H.; Kettlitz, M.

    2013-10-01

    Time-averaged temperature distributions along the electrodes of vertically operated high-intensity discharge lamps with cylindrical quartz burners filled with mercury and additives of NaI, TlI and DyI3 have been measured. The lamps have been driven by 120 Hz switched-dc currents between 0.4 and 1.78 A and the measurements have been performed during the cathodic phase at the lower electrode. All considered currents are characterized by a diffuse arc attachment. For the correction of disturbing effects the measured distributions have been fitted with solutions of the quasi-one-dimensional and steady-state energy balance of a rod-shaped tungsten cathode. A model of the near-cathode layer in a multi-species plasma has been applied for the determination of the boundary layer characteristics where the work function has been treated as a free parameter. The required plasma component concentrations have been estimated from spectroscopic measurements in the arc column. The fit procedure includes the adjustment of the extension of the lateral arc attachment region which has a distinct impact on the determined tip temperature, power input from the plasma into the cathode and the work function. For the latter the tungsten value has been verified in the pure Hg lamp, but strong deviations result in the case of a TlI admixture. The lamp with DyI3 clearly shows the gas-phase emitter effect of lowering the work function induced by Dy.

  6. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  7. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  8. Thermal-resistive current filamentation in the cathode plasma of a pinch-reflex diode

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V.K.; Ottinger, P.F.; Guillory, J.

    1983-06-01

    Electron current flow drawn off a hollow cylindrical cathode in a pinch-reflex ion diode is observed to have a filamentary structure. Such filamentation can lead to nonuniform anode turn on and ion emission. Consequently, ion beam brightness is degraded. In this context a purely growing thermal-resistive instability in the cathode plasma is examined. The instability causes current filamentation and grows on a time scale comparable to the electron--ion energy equilibration time. Electron inelastic collisions have a stabilizing influence on the instability.

  9. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is expected

  11. Portable infrared reflectometer for evaluating emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Optical methods are frequently used to evaluate the emittance of candidate spacecraft thermal control materials. One new optical method utilizes a portable infrared reflectometer capable of obtaining spectral reflectance of an opaque surface in the range of 2 to 25 microns using a Michelson-Type FTIR interferometer. This miniature interferometer collects many infrared spectra over a short period of time. It also allows the size of the instrument to be small such that spectra can be collected in the laboratory or in the field. Infrared spectra are averaged and integrated with respect to the room temperature black body spectrum to yield emittance at 300 K. Integrating with respect to other black body spectra yields emittance values at other temperatures. Absorption bands in the spectra may also be used for chemical species identification. The emittance of several samples was evaluated using this portable infrared reflectometer, an old infrared reflectometer equipped with dual rotating black body cavities, and a bench top thermal vacuum chamber. Samples for evaluation were purposely selected such that a range of emittance values and thermal control material types would be represented, including polished aluminum, Kapton®, silvered Teflon®, and the inorganic paint Z-93-P. Results indicate an excellent linear relationship between the room temperature emittance calculated from infrared spectral data and the emittance obtained from the dual rotating black body cavities and thermal vacuum chamber. The prospect of using the infrared spectral data for chemical species identification will also be discussed. .

  12. The preservation of low emittance flat beams

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1993-04-01

    Many future linear collider designs require beams with very small transverse emittances and large emittance ratios {epsilon}{sub x} {much_gt} {epsilon}{sub y}. In this paper, we will discuss issues associated with the preservation of these small emittances during the acceleration of the beams. The primary sources of transverse emittance dilution in a high energy linear accelerator are the transverse wakefields, the dispersive errors, RF deflections, and betatron coupling. We will discuss the estimation of these effects and the calculation of tolerances that will limit the emittance dilution with a high degree of confidence. Since the six-dimensional emittance is conserved and only the projected emittances are increased, these dilutions can be corrected if the beam has not filamented (phase mixed). We discuss methods of correcting the dilutions and easing the tolerances with beam-based alignment and steering techniques, and non-local trajectory bumps. Finally, we discuss another important source of luminosity degradation, namely, pulse-to-pulse jitter.

  13. Self-Aligned Integrally Gated Nanofilament Field Emitter Cell and Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-09

    composed of carbon nanotubes , alternate nanofilaments may be nanowires composed of Si, Ge, SiC, GaAs, GaP, InAs, InP, ZnS, ZnSe, CdS, CdSe, MoS2 , WS2...integrally gated, self-aligned field emitter cell and array whose cathode is formed of a recently discovered class of materials of nanotubes and...nanotechnology have resulted in the creation of nanofilaments including nanotubes . One such example is carbon nanotubes . These nanotubes behave like

  14. Hollow Retroreflectors Offer Solid Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A technician who lead a successful team of scientists, engineers, and other technicians in the design, fabrication, and characterization of cryogenic retroreflectors for the NASA Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) mission to Saturn, developed a hollow retroreflector technology while working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. With 16 years of NASA experience, the technician teamed up with another NASA colleague and formed PROSystems, Inc., of Sharpsburg, Maryland, to provide the optics community with an alternative source for precision hollow retroreflectors. The company's hollow retroreflectors are front surface glass substrates assembled to provide many advantages over existing hollow retroreflectors and solid glass retroreflectors. Previous to this new technology, some companies chose not to use hollow retroreflectors due to large seam widths and loss of signal. The "tongue and groove" facet design of PROSystems's retroreflector allows for an extremely small seam width of .001 inches. Feedback from users is very positive regarding this characteristic. Most of PROSystems's primary customers mount the hollow retroreflectors in chrome steel balls for laser tracker targets in applications such as automobile manufacturing and spacecraft assembly.

  15. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  16. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  17. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  18. Online clustering algorithms for radar emitter classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lee, Jim P Y; Senior; Li, Lingjie; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Wong, K Max

    2005-08-01

    Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters from received radar pulse samples. The main challenges of this task are the high dimensionality of radar pulse samples, small sample group size, and closely located radar pulse clusters. In this paper, two new online clustering algorithms are developed for radar emitter classification: One is model-based using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) criterion and the other is based on competitive learning. Computational complexity is analyzed for each algorithm and then compared. Simulation results show the superior performance of the model-based algorithm over competitive learning in terms of better classification accuracy, flexibility, and stability.

  19. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high

  20. Preliminary calculations of ballistic bunch compression with thermionic cathode rf guns

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J.W.; Milton, S.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary calculations using the computer code PARMELA indicate that it is possible to achieve peak currents on the order of 1 kA using a thermionic-cathode rf gun and ballistic bunch compression. In contrast to traditional magnetic bunching schemes, ballistic bunch compression uses a series of rf cavities to modify the energy profile of the beam and properly chosen drifts to allow the bunching to occur naturally. The method, suitably modified, should also be directly applicable to photoinjector rf guns. Present work is focusing on simultaneously compressing the bunch while reducing the emittance of the electron beam. At present, the calculated normalized rms emittance is in the neighborhood of 6.8 {pi} mm mrad with a peak current of 0.88 kA, and a peak bunch charge of 0.28 nC from a thermionic-cathode gun.

  1. Synopsis of Cathode #4 Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature.

  2. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  3. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  4. Field emission from ZrC films on Si and Mo single emitters and emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, T.; Mackie, W.A.; Davis, P.R.

    1996-05-01

    Field emission from ZrC films deposited on Si and Mo single emitters and field emitter arrays (FEAs) has been studied. For single emitters, the results show dramatic improvements in emitter performance by reducing work functions{emdash}on the order of 1 eV{emdash}and increasing stability. For FEAs, deposition of a ZrC film reduced the operating voltage 30{percent}{endash}50{percent} at an emission current of 1.0 {mu}A/tip and increased the emission stability. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  5. Coaxial inverted geometry transistor having buried emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Cress, S. B.; Dunn, W. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to an inverted geometry transistor wherein the emitter is buried within the substrate. The transistor can be fabricated as a part of a monolithic integrated circuit and is particularly suited for use in applications where it is desired to employ low actuating voltages. The transistor may employ the same doping levels in the collector and emitter, so these connections can be reversed.

  6. Charge neutrality in heavily doped emitters

    SciTech Connect

    del Alamo, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The applicability of the quasineutrality approximation to modern emitters of solar cells is analytically reviewed. It is shown that this approximation is fulfilled in more than 80% of the depth of a typical solar-cell emitter, being particularly excellent in the heavily doped regions beneath the surface where most of the heavy doping effects arise. Our conclusions are in conflict with Redfield's recent affirmations.

  7. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  8. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  9. Cold-Cathodes for Sensors and Vacuum Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tallant, D.R.; Simpson, R.L.; DiNardo, N.J.; Mercer, T.W.; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this laboratory-directed research and development project was to study amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films for eventual cold-cathode electron emitter applications. The development of robust, cold-cathode emitters are likely to have significant implications for modern technology and possibly launch a new industry: vacuum micro-electronics (VME). The potential impact of VME on Sandia`s National Security missions, such as defense against military threats and economic challenges, is profound. VME enables new microsensors and intrinsically radiation-hard electronics compatible with MOSFET and IMEM technologies. Furthermore, VME is expected to result in a breakthrough technology for the development of high-visibility, low-power flat-panel displays. This work covers four important research areas. First, the authors studied the nature of the C-C bonding structures within these a-C thin films. Second, they determined the changes in the film structures resulting from thermal annealing to simulate the effects of device processing on a-C properties. Third, they performed detailed electrical transport measurements as a function of annealing temperature to correlate changes in transport properties with structural changes and to propose a model for transport in these a-C materials with implications on the nature of electron emission. Finally, they used scanning atom probes to determine important aspects on the nature of emission in a-C.

  10. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    This study is an effort to develop new variations on the infrared silver-silver iodide hollow glass waveguide (HGW) with application specific properties. Four variations are presented: a HGW with a long, gradual taper, a HGW with a rectangular cross-section, curved HGW tips and a new all-dielectric hollow waveguide based on photonic bandgap guidance principles. A hollow glass waveguide tapered over its entire length offers ease of coupling at the proximal end and excellent flexibility at the distal end. Waveguides tapered from 1000 to 500 mum and 700 to 500 mum over 1.5 m were fabricated in this study. Compared to similarly sized non-tapered waveguides, laser losses for the tapered guides were high but decreased when bent. This behavior is contrary to that of non-tapered guides and an iterative ray tracing model was also developed to explain the observed loss characteristics of tapered hollow waveguides. Hollow glass waveguides with round profiles do not maintain the polarization state of the delivered radiation to any appreciable degree. HGWs with large- and small-aspect ratio rectangular cross sections were developed and shown to preserve polarization up to 96%, even when bent. The large aspect ratio guide was able to effectively rotate the transmitted polarization when twisted along its axis. Curved distal tips for medical and dental laser applications were developed by removing the low-OH silica fiber from commercially available stainless steel dental tips, and inserting HGWs of various sizes. The optical performances and heating profiles of the various configurations indicate the tips are suitable for certain medical applications, but the minimum bending radius is limited by the mechanical properties of the glass substrate. A small radii bending loss study confirms that propagating modes periodically couple as the radius of curvature is reduced. Through the application of the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance, hollow waveguides can be made entirely from

  11. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  12. Understanding the role of different conductive polymers in improving the nanostructured sulfur cathode performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyang; Zhang, Qianfan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have brought significant advancement to the current state-of-art battery technologies because of their high theoretical specific energy, but their wide-scale implementation has been impeded by a series of challenges, especially the dissolution of intermediate polysulfides species into the electrolyte. Conductive polymers in combination with nanostructured sulfur have attracted great interest as promising matrices for the confinement of lithium polysulfides. However, the roles of different conductive polymers on the electrochemical performances of sulfur electrode remain elusive and poorly understood due to the vastly different structural configurations of conductive polymer-sulfur composites employed in previous studies. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of different conductive polymers on the sulfur cathode based on conductive polymer-coated hollow sulfur nanospheres with high uniformity. Three of the most well-known conductive polymers, polyaniline (PANI), polypyrrole (PPY), and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), were coated, respectively, onto monodisperse hollow sulfur nanopsheres through a facile, versatile, and scalable polymerization process. The sulfur cathodes made from these well-defined sulfur nanoparticles act as ideal platforms to study and compare how coating thickness, chemical bonding, and the conductivity of the polymers affected the sulfur cathode performances from both experimental observations and theoretical simulations. We found that the capability of these three polymers in improving long-term cycling stability and high-rate performance of the sulfur cathode decreased in the order of PEDOT > PPY > PANI. High specific capacities and excellent cycle life were demonstrated for sulfur cathodes made from these conductive polymer-coated hollow sulfur nanospheres.

  13. New route for hollow materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivaldo-Gómez, C. M.; Ferreira, F. F.; Landi, G. T.; Souza, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Hollow micro/nano structures form an important family of functional materials. We have used the thermal oxidation process combined with the passage of electric current during a structural phase transition to disclose a colossal mass diffusion transfer of Ti ions. This combination points to a new route for fabrication of hollow materials. A structural phase transition at high temperature prepares the stage by giving mobility to Ti ions and releasing vacancies to the system. The electric current then drives an inward delocalization of vacancies, condensing into voids, and finally turning into a big hollow. This strong physical phenomenon leading to a colossal mass transfer through ionic diffusion is suggested to be driven by a combination of phase transition and electrical current followed by chemical reaction. We show this phenomenon for Ti leading to TiO2 microtube formation, but we believe that it can be used to other metals undergoing structural phase transition at high temperatures.

  14. New route for hollow materials

    PubMed Central

    Rivaldo-Gómez, C. M.; Ferreira, F. F.; Landi, G. T.; Souza, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hollow micro/nano structures form an important family of functional materials. We have used the thermal oxidation process combined with the passage of electric current during a structural phase transition to disclose a colossal mass diffusion transfer of Ti ions. This combination points to a new route for fabrication of hollow materials. A structural phase transition at high temperature prepares the stage by giving mobility to Ti ions and releasing vacancies to the system. The electric current then drives an inward delocalization of vacancies, condensing into voids, and finally turning into a big hollow. This strong physical phenomenon leading to a colossal mass transfer through ionic diffusion is suggested to be driven by a combination of phase transition and electrical current followed by chemical reaction. We show this phenomenon for Ti leading to TiO2 microtube formation, but we believe that it can be used to other metals undergoing structural phase transition at high temperatures. PMID:27554448

  15. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  16. Radiation tolerant compact image sensor using CdTe photodiode and field emitter array (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Okamoto, Tamotsu; Nagao, Masayoshi; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Ikuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    A growing demand on incident detection is recognized since the Great East Japan Earthquake and successive accidents in Fukushima nuclear power plant in 2011. Radiation tolerant image sensors are powerful tools to collect crucial information at initial stages of such incidents. However, semiconductor based image sensors such as CMOS and CCD have limited tolerance to radiation exposure. Image sensors used in nuclear facilities are conventional vacuum tubes using thermal cathodes, which have large size and high power consumption. In this study, we propose a compact image sensor composed of a CdTe-based photodiode and a matrix-driven Spindt-type electron beam source called field emitter array (FEA). A basic principle of FEA-based image sensors is similar to conventional Vidicon type camera tubes, but its electron source is replaced from a thermal cathode to FEA. The use of a field emitter as an electron source should enable significant size reduction while maintaining high radiation tolerance. Current researches on radiation tolerant FEAs and development of CdTe based photoconductive films will be presented.

  17. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the

  18. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  19. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  20. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  1. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  2. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  3. Emittance control in Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Chiu, C.; Breitling, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we summarize our recent effort and results in theoretical study of the emittance issues of multistaged Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in TeV energy range. In such an energy regime the luminosity and therefore the emittance requirements become very stringent and tantamount to the success or failure of such an accelerator. The system of such a machine is very sensitive to jitters due to misalignment between the beam and the wakefield. In particular, the effect of jitters in the presence of a strong focusing wakefield and initial longitudinal phase space spread of the beam leads to severe transverse emittance degradation of the beam. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration in a superunit setup, the "horn" model based on exactly synchronous acceleration achieved through plasma density variation and lastly an algorithm based on minimization of the final beam emittance to actively control the stage displacement of such an accelerator.

  4. Variable emittance behavior of smart radiative coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Fan, Desong; Li, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Smart radiative coating on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was prepared by the sol-gel La{}1-xSr x MnO3 (x = 0.125, 0.175 and 0.2) nanoparticles and the binder composed of terpineol and ethyl cellulose. The crystallized structure, grain size, chemical compositions, magnetization and the surface morphology were characterized. The thermal radiative properties of coating in the infrared range was evaluated from infrared reflectance spectra at various temperatures. A single perovskite structure is detected in sol-gel nanoparticles with size 200 nm. Magnetization measurement reveals that room temperature phase transition samples can be obtained by appropriate Sr substitution. The influence of surface conditions and sintering temperature on the emittance of coating was observed. For rough coatings with root-mean-square roughness 640 nm (x = 0.125) and 800 nm (x = 0.175) , its emittance increment is 0.24 and 0.26 in in the temperature range of 173-373 K. Increasing sintering temperature to 1673 K, coating emittance variation improves to 0.3 and 0.302 respectively. After mechanical polishing treatment, the emittance increment of coatings are enhanced to 0.31 and 0.3, respectively. The results suggested that the emittance variation can be enhanced by reducing surface roughness and increasing sintering temperature of coating.

  5. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  6. Enhancing local luminescence in a hollow ZnO microcolumn by antiresonant reflecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. H.; He, X. T.; Dong, H. M.; Dong, J. W.; Lei, H. X.; Li, B. J.; Yang, G. W.

    2016-04-01

    Hollow ZnO microcolumns with size induced photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties were prepared by a thermal chemical vapor transport and condensation method. It was found that the luminescence emission could be confined in the nano-sized hollow core and the wavelength dependent light intensity could be influenced by the geometric structure of the ZnO microcolumn, which can act as a hollow optical waveguide. Based on the antiresonant reflection in the optical waveguide, we established a theoretical model to address the field enhancement in the hollow ZnO microcolumn, which systematically clarifies the influence of the geometric structure of the microcolumn on the field enhancement. We report for the first time, the enhanced emission of the near ultraviolet light (working wavelength of 385 nm) along the axial direction of the ZnO microcolumn. The corresponding microsized light emitter has also been obtained. Experiments agree well with both theoretical predictions and computer simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain method with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions. These findings provide valuable information for the application of ZnO micro- and nanostructures in optoelectronic devices.

  7. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  8. Gate assisted turn-off thyristor with cathode shunts and dynamic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, E. S.; Page, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    A 1,000-V, 200-A gate-assisted turn-off thyristor (GATT) is described, whose design features include an interdigitated shunted cathode, a dynamic gate, a means for optimizing the carrier lifetime level, and a bypass diode. The device physics of gate-assisted turn-off are reviewed. Based on this, improvements in the design are described. It is shown that a prime failure mode can be eliminated and that the gate-assist signal voltage can be substantially decreased by employing a shunted cathode emitter. The test data show excellent turn-on characteristics due to the dynamic gate and the long perimeter of the edge of the main cathode. Turn-off times as short as 3 microsec are obtained. The combination of controlling the carrier lifetime with a precisely controlled and easily variable irradiation dose of high energy electrons with gate assist current provides for simple, precision tailoring of the device characteristics to the intended application.

  9. Simulation study on the emittance compensation of off-axis emitted beam in RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Mitchell, Chad; Jia, Qi-Ka; Papadopoulos, Christos; Sannibale, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    To make full use of the photocathode material and improve its quantum efficiency lifetime, it can be necessary to operate the laser away from the cathode center in photoinjectors. In RF guns, the off-axis emitted beam will see a time-dependent RF effect, which would generate a significant growth in transverse emittance. It has been demonstrated that such an emittance growth can be almost completely compensated by orienting the beam on a proper orbit in the downstream RF cavities along the injector [1]. In this paper we analyze in detail the simulation techniques used in reference [1] and the issues associated with them. The optimization of photoinjector systems involving off-axis beams is a challenging problem. To solve this problem, one needs advanced simulation tools including both genetic algorithms and an efficient algorithm for 3D space charge. In this paper, we report on simulation studies where the two codes ASTRA and IMPACT-T are used jointly to overcome these challenges, in order to optimize a system designed to compensate for the emittance growth in a beam emitted off axis. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11375199), and Chinese Scholarship Council

  10. COMPENSATION FOR BUNCH EMITTANCE IN A MAGNETIZATION AND SPACE CHARGE DOMINATED BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    In order to obtain sufficient cooling rates for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) electron cooling, a bunched beam with high bunch charge, high repetition frequency and high energy is required and it is necessary to use a ''magnetized'' beam, i.e., an electron beam with non-negligible angular momentum. Applying a longitudinal solenoid field on the cathode can generate such a beam, which rotates around its longitudinal axis in a field-free region. This paper suggests how a magnetized beam can be accelerated and transported from a RF photocathode electron gun to the cooling section without significantly increasing its emittance. The evolution of longitudinal slices of the beam under a combination of space charge and magnetization is investigated, using paraxial envelope equations and numerical simulations. We find that we must modify the traditional method of compensating for emittance as used for normal non-magnetized beam with space charge to account for magnetization. The results of computer simulations of successful compensation are presented. Alternately, we show an electron bunch density distribution for which all slices propagate uniformly and which does not require emittance compensation.

  11. Rectangular computed tomography using a stationary array of CNT emitters: initial experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Brian; Spronk, Derrek; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Xiaochuan; Beckmann, Moritz; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    XinRay Systems Inc has a rectangular x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging setup using multibeam x-ray tubes. These multibeam x-ray tubes are based on cold cathodes using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. Due to their unique design, a CNT x-ray tube can contain a dense array of independently controlled electron emitters which generate a linear array of x-ray focal spots. XinRay uses a set of linear CNT x-ray tubes to design and construct a stationary CT setup which achieves sufficient CT coverage from a fixed set of views. The CT system has no moving gantry, enabling it to be enclosed in a compact rectangular tunnel. The fixed locations of the x-ray focal spots were optimized through simulations. The rectangular shape creates significant variation in path length from the focal spots to the detector for different x-ray views. The shape also results in unequal x-ray coverage in the imaged space. We discuss the impact of this variation on the reconstruction. XinRay uses an iterative reconstruction algorithm to account for this unique geometry, which is implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The fixed focal spots prohibit the use of an antiscatter grid. Quantitative measure of the scatter and its impact on the reconstruction will be discussed. These results represent the first known implementation of a completely stationary CT setup using CNT x-ray emitter arrays.

  12. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  13. Preparation and electrochemical properties of carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bin-bin; Wu, Yan-bo; Yu, Fang-yuan; Zhou, Ya-nan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries were obtained by coaxial electrospinning. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area analysis, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to investigate the crystalline structure, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the as-prepared hollow nanofibers. The results indicate that the carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers have good long-term cycling performance and good rate capability: at a current density of 0.2C (1.0C = 170 mA·g-1) in the voltage range of 2.5-4.2 V, the cathode materials achieve an initial discharge specific capacity of 153.16 mAh·g-1 with a first charge-discharge coulombic efficiency of more than 97%, as well as a high capacity retention of 99% after 10 cycles; moreover, the materials can retain a specific capacity of 135.68 mAh·g-1, even at 2C.

  14. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  15. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  16. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  17. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  18. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  19. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  20. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  1. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  2. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  3. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  4. Triservice/NASA cathode life test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windes, D.; Dutkowski, J.; Kaiser, R.; Justice, R.

    1999-05-01

    Since December 1992, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Crane Division (NSWCCD) has logged over 1,318,000 h of cathode life testing on 6 different cathode systems in the Triservice/NASA Cathode Life Test Facility. These include two types of reservoir cathodes designated as MK (Siemens), and RV (CPI, formerly Varian), and impregnated matrix cathodes designated M type (manufactured by Semicon and Hughes), TM (Transition Metal cathodes-CPI) and MMM (Mixed Metal Matrix cathodes-CPI). This paper will present results of the cathode life testing at this facility.

  5. Erythrocyte-like hollow carbon capsules and their application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2010-12-14

    Hierarchical nanostructured erythrocyte-like hollow carbon (EHC) with a hollow hemispherical macroporous core of ca. 230 nm in diameter and 30-40 nm thick mesoporous shell was synthesized and explored as a cathode catalyst support in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The morphology control of EHC was successfully achieved using solid core/mesoporous shell (SCMS) silica template and different styrene/furfuryl alcohol mixture compositions by a nanocasting method. The EHC-supported Pt (20 wt%) cathodes prepared have demonstrated markedly enhanced catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) and greatly improved PEMFC polarization performance compared to carbon black Vulcan XC-72 (VC)-supported ones, probably due to the superb structural characteristics of the EHC such as uniform size, well-developed porosity, large specific surface area and pore volume. In particular, Pt/EHC cathodes exhibited ca. 30-60% higher ORR activity than a commercial Johnson Matthey Pt catalyst at a low catalyst loading of 0.2 mg Pt cm(-2).

  6. Cheaper Hydride-Forming Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Blue, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Hydride-forming cathodes for electrochemical experiments made of materials or combinations of materials cheaper and more abundant than pure palladium, according to proposal. Concept prompted by needs of experimenters in now-discredited concept of electrochemical nuclear fusion, cathodes useful in other electrochemical applications involving generation or storage of hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium.

  7. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    PubMed Central

    Weßling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products. PMID:26199673

  9. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins.

    PubMed

    Weßling, Michael; Schäfer, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C-C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products.

  10. A simple synthesis of hollow carbon nanofiber-sulfur composite via mixed-solvent process for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Zhian; Zhang, Kai; Fang, Jing; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie

    2014-06-01

    A hollow carbon nanofiber supported sulfur (HCNF-S) composite cathode material is prepared by a mixed-solvent (DMF/CS2) process in an organic solution for lithium-sulfur batteries. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show the hollow structures of the HCNF and the homogeneous distribution of sulfur in the composite. The performance of the HCNF-S cathode is evaluated in lithium-sulfur batteries using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the HCNF-S cathode shows perfect cycling stability. The results exhibit an initial discharge capacity of 1090 mAh g-1 and retains 600 mAh g-1 after 100 discharge/charge cycles at a high rate of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical properties benefit from the hollow and highly conductive network-like structure of HCNFs, which contribute to disperse sulfur and absorb polysulfides, and suppress the formation of residual Li2S layer.

  11. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. From the theory of remote sensing of surface temperatures, an equation of the upper bound of absolute error of emittance was determined. It showed that the absolute error decreased with an increase in contact temperature, whereas, it increased with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. Change in emittance had little effect on the absolute error. A plot of the difference between temperature and band radiance temperature vs. emittance was provided for the wavelength intervals: 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns, and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  12. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  13. Ampère-Class Pulsed Field Emission from Carbon-Nanotube Cathodes in a Radiofrequency Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, D.; Faillace, L.; Hartzell, J.; Panuganti, H.; Boucher, S. M.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Thangaraj, J. C.T.

    2014-12-01

    Pulsed field emission from cold carbon-nanotube cathodes placed in a radiofrequency resonant cavity was observed. The cathodes were located on the backplate of a conventional $1+\\frac{1}{2}$-cell resonant cavity operating at 1.3-GHz and resulted in the production of bunch train with maximum average current close to 0.7 Amp\\`ere. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristic, transverse emittance, and pulse duration are presented and, when possible, compared to numerical simulations. The implications of our results to high-average-current electron sources are briefly discussed.

  14. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  15. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  16. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  17. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus_minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus_minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  18. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  19. A mulitple cathode gun design for the eRHIC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    The future electron-ion collider eRHIC requires a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), low emittance ({approx}20 {micro}m) polarized electron source. The maximum average current of a polarized electron source so far is more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA, from a GaAs:Cs cathode. One possible approach to overcome the average current limit and to achieve the required 50 mA beam for eRHIC, is to combine beamlets from multiple cathodes to one beam. In this paper, we present the feasibility studies of this technique. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of RHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. It requires polarized electron source with a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the low quantum efficiency, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and funnel the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. Fig.1 illustrates schematically the concept of combining the multiple beams. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because it bears functional similarity to a Gatling gun. Laser beams strike the cathodes sequentially with revolution frequency of 700 kHz. Each beam bunch is focused by a solenoid and is bent toward the combiner. The combiner with rotating bending field bends all bunches arriving the combiner with a rotational pattern to the same axis. The energy of each bunch is modified by a bunching cavity (112MHz) and a 3rd harmonic cavity (336MHz). The bunch length is compressed ballistically in the drift space and is frozen after energy has been boosted to 10 MeV by the Booster linac. Each beam bunch contains 3.5 nC charge. The

  20. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection