Science.gov

Sample records for emitter labeled enzyme

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  2. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  3. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  4. Short-lived positron emitter labeled radiotracers - present status

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of labelled compounds is important for the application of positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT) in biomedical sciences. This paper describes problems and progress in the synthesis of short-lived positron emitter (/sup 11/C, /sup 18/F, /sup 13/N) labelled tracers for PETT. Synthesis of labelled sugars, amino acids, and neurotransmitter receptors (pimozide and spiroperidol tagged with /sup 11/C) is discussed in particular. (DLC)

  5. Hypoxia imaging agents labeled with positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Hoigebazar, Lathika; Jeong, Jae Min

    2013-01-01

    Imaging hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET) is of great importance for therapy of cancer. [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) was the first PET agent for hypoxia imaging, and various radiolabeled nitroimidazole derivatives such as [(18)F]fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM), [(18)F]1-α-D: -(2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA), [(18)F]2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl) acetamide (EF-5), and [(18)F]fluoroetanidazole (FETA) have been developed successively. To overcome the high cost of cyclotron installation, (68)Ga-labeled nitroimidazole derivatives also have been developed. Another important hypoxia imaging agent is (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM), which can distribute in cancer tissue rapidly due to high lipophilicity. However, its application is limited due to high cost of radionuclide production. Although various hypoxia imaging agents have been reported and tested, hypoxia PET images still have to be improved, because of the low blood flow in hypoxic tissues and resulting low uptake of the agents.

  6. Enzymic synthesis of labelled chiral substances.

    PubMed

    Battersby, A R

    1985-01-01

    The enzymic synthesis of chiral substances in which one hydrogen atom of a methylene group has been replaced by deuterium or tritium is illustrated. Such labelled products can be used to determine the stereochemistry of other enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  7. [Intestinal resorption with 3H labeled enzyme mixture (wobenzyme)].

    PubMed

    Steffen, C; Menzel, J; Smolen, J

    1979-01-01

    0.2 g of an enzyme mixture (Wobenzym) labelled with 3H-acetic anhydride, were given orally to guinea pigs, which were arranged in 4 groups of 5 animals. The animals of each group were sacrificed at intervals of 30 minutes, 2, 4 and 24 hours after application. Radioactivity of the small and large intestine, plasma, urine, liver, heart, kidney, and skeletal muscle were determined. It could be shown that the labelled mixture of enzymes was absorbed from the intestine and was demonstrable in significant amounts in plasma, urine, heart, kidney, liver and skeletal muscle.

  8. Label free screening of enzyme inhibitors at femtomole scale using segmented flow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuwen; Slaney, Thomas R; Kennedy, Robert T

    2012-07-03

    Droplet-based microfluidics is an attractive platform for screening and optimizing chemical reactions. Using this approach, it is possible to reliably manipulate nanoliter volume samples and perform operations such as reagent addition with high precision, automation, and throughput. Most studies using droplet microfluidics have relied on optical techniques to detect the reaction; however, this requires engineering color or fluorescence change into the reaction being studied. In this work, we couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to nanoliter scale segmented flow reactions to enable direct (label-free) analysis of reaction products. The system is applied to a screen of inhibitors for cathepsin B. In this approach, solutions of test compounds (including three known inhibitors) are arranged as an array of nanoliter droplets in a tube segmented by perfluorodecalin. The samples are pumped through a series of tees to add enzyme, substrate (peptides), and quenchant. The resulting reaction mixtures are then infused into a metal-coated, fused silica ESI emitter for MS analysis. The system has potential for high-throughput as reagent addition steps are performed at 0.7 s per sample and ESI-MS at up to 1.2 s per sample. Carryover is inconsequential in the ESI emitter and between 2 and 9% per reagent addition depending on the tee utilized. The assay was reliable with a Z-factor of ~0.8. The method required 0.8 pmol of test compound, 1.6 pmol of substrate, and 5 fmol of enzyme per reaction. Segmented flow ESI-MS allows direct, label free screening of reactions at good throughput and ultralow sample consumption.

  9. Electrochemiluminescent DNA sensing using carbon nitride nanosheets as emitter for loading of hemin labeled single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaqiang; Wang, Quanbo; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-11-15

    Carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) have been reported as a cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) emitter in the presence of dissolved oxygen to produce an endogenous coreactant H2O2 on electrode surface. This work uses this emitter to construct an ECL sensing platform for sensitive DNA detection through its adsorption ability toward single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The adsorption of hemin-labeled ssDNA on CNNS leads to in situ consumption of dissolved oxygen via hemin-mediated electrocatalytic reduction, thus decreases the formation of coreactant and quenches the ECL emission of CNNS. The ECL sensing platform is designed using hemin-labeled ssDNA to recognize the target DNA, which results in the departure of hemin-labeled hybridization product from the CNNS modified electrode, thus inhibits the annihilation of coreactant and recovers the ECL emission. Under optimized conditions, the proposed sensing strategy shows a wide detection range over 6 orders of magnitude and wondrously high sensitivity with a detection limit down to 2.0 fM. Moreover, the ECL sensor exhibits good performance with excellent selectivity, high reliability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. The sensitive sensing strategy provides a new paradigm for the design of ultrasensitive detection method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tissue distributions of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters and problems in relating them to human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, D R

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses a few specific examples of organ distributions involving positron-emitting nuclides intended to illustrate some specific points in this area. In particular, work with 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose will be discussed in some detail, and its distribution in the body compared with the closely related (chemically but not biologically) 3-fluoro-3-deoxyglucose and 1-/sup 11/C-2-deoxyglucose. Other compounds labeled with these two nuclides, and with /sup 13/N and /sup 15/O will also be discussed.

  11. Comparative studies with penicillinase, horseradish peroxidase, and alkaline phosphatase as enzyme labels in developing enzyme immunoassay of cortisol.

    PubMed

    Kumari, G Lakshmi; Dhir, Ravindra N

    2003-01-01

    Relative merit of different enzyme labels for measuring cortisol directly in serum by competitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) was examined. Cortisol-21-hemisuccinate was labeled separately with penicillinase, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) under identical reaction conditions. Antibody developed in rabbits against cortisol-3-0-(carboxymethyl)-oxime-bovine serum albumin was used to coat polystyrene tubes that were precoated with anti-rabbit gamma globulin (ARGG). Cortisol standards were prepared in steroid-free human serum in buffer (1:4) contaning 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (8-ANS). Assay buffer also consisted 8-ANS. The assay involved adding standard cortisol or serum sample to antibody-coated tubes, followed by addition of enzyme label and buffer, and incubation for 2 h at 37 degrees C. The whole procedure took 3 h for completion. All three labels proved to be sensitive, with a slope around -2.0. Although penicillinase as an enzyme label was highly sensitive and stable compared with others, the assays were not always accurate and precise, especially at low concentrations of cortisol. This was mainly due to the color reagent used for measuring penicillinase activity. Serum samples that underwent 2-3 freeze-thaw cycles gave high values with HRP label compared with ALP. Therefore, utilizing ALP as an enzyme label, an ELISA was developed and its performance was comparable with some of the commercial kits already in the market.

  12. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  13. Combination of online enzyme digestion with stable isotope labeling for high-throughput quantitative proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangjun; Wei, Xiaoluan; Zhou, Hu; Liu, Jing; Figeys, Daniel; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-11-01

    Various enzyme reactors and online enzyme digestion strategies have been developed in recent years. These reactors greatly enhanced the detection sensitivity and proteome coverage in qualitative proteomics. However, these devices have higher rates of miscleavage in protein digestion. Therefore, we investigated the effect of online enzyme digestion on the quantification accuracy of quantitative proteomics using chemical or metabolic isotope labeling approaches. The incomplete digestion would introduce some unexpected variations in comparative quantification when the samples are digested and then chemically isotope labeled in different aliquots. Even when identical protein aliquots are processed on these devices using post-digestion chemical isotope labeling and the CVs of the ratios controlled to less than 50% in replicate analyses, about 10% of the quantified proteins have a ratio greater than two-fold, whereas in theory the ratio is 1:1. Interestingly, the incomplete digestion with enzyme reactor is not a problem when metabolic isotope labeling samples were processed because the proteins are isotopically labeled in vivo prior to their simultaneous digestion within the reactor. Our results also demonstrated that both high quantification accuracy and high proteome coverage can be achieved in comparative proteome quantification using online enzyme digestion even when a limited amount of metabolic isotope labeling samples is used (1683 proteins comparatively quantified from 10(5) Hela cells).

  14. Durable donor engraftment after radioimmunotherapy using α-emitter astatine-211–labeled anti-CD45 antibody for conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Kornblit, Brian; Hamlin, Donald K.; Sale, George E.; Santos, Erlinda B.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Storer, Barry E.; Storb, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    To reduce toxicity associated with external γ-beam radiation, we investigated radioimmunotherapy with an anti-CD45 mAb labeled with the α-emitter, astatine-211 (211At), as a conditioning regimen in dog leukocyte antigen-identical hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Dose-finding studies in 6 dogs treated with 100 to 618 μCi/kg 211At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) without HCT rescue demonstrated dose-dependent myelosuppression with subsequent autologous recovery, and transient liver toxicity in dogs treated with 211At doses less than or equal to 405 μCi/kg. Higher doses of 211At induced clinical liver failure. Subsequently, 8 dogs were conditioned with 155 to 625 μCi/kg 211At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) before HCT with dog leukocyte antigen-identical bone marrow followed by a short course of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil immunosuppression. Neutropenia (1-146 cells/μL), lymphopenia (0-270 cells/μL), and thrombocytopenia (1500-6560 platelets/μL) with prompt recovery was observed. Seven dogs had long-term donor mononuclear cell chimerism (19%-58%), whereas 1 dog treated with the lowest 211At dose (155 μCi/kg) had low donor mononuclear cell chimerism (5%). At the end of follow-up (18-53 weeks), only transient liver toxicity and no renal toxicity had been observed. In conclusion, conditioning with 211At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb is safe and efficacious and provides a platform for future clinical trials of nonmyeloablative transplantation with radioimmunotherapy-based conditioning. PMID:22134165

  15. Durable donor engraftment after radioimmunotherapy using α-emitter astatine-211-labeled anti-CD45 antibody for conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Kornblit, Brian; Hamlin, Donald K; Sale, George E; Santos, Erlinda B; Wilbur, D Scott; Storer, Barry E; Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2012-02-02

    To reduce toxicity associated with external γ-beam radiation, we investigated radioimmunotherapy with an anti-CD45 mAb labeled with the α-emitter, astatine-211 ((211)At), as a conditioning regimen in dog leukocyte antigen-identical hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Dose-finding studies in 6 dogs treated with 100 to 618 μCi/kg (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) without HCT rescue demonstrated dose-dependent myelosuppression with subsequent autologous recovery, and transient liver toxicity in dogs treated with (211)At doses less than or equal to 405 μCi/kg. Higher doses of (211)At induced clinical liver failure. Subsequently, 8 dogs were conditioned with 155 to 625 μCi/kg (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) before HCT with dog leukocyte antigen-identical bone marrow followed by a short course of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil immunosuppression. Neutropenia (1-146 cells/μL), lymphopenia (0-270 cells/μL), and thrombocytopenia (1500-6560 platelets/μL) with prompt recovery was observed. Seven dogs had long-term donor mononuclear cell chimerism (19%-58%), whereas 1 dog treated with the lowest (211)At dose (155 μCi/kg) had low donor mononuclear cell chimerism (5%). At the end of follow-up (18-53 weeks), only transient liver toxicity and no renal toxicity had been observed. In conclusion, conditioning with (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb is safe and efficacious and provides a platform for future clinical trials of nonmyeloablative transplantation with radioimmunotherapy-based conditioning.

  16. From sequence to enzyme mechanism using multi-label machine learning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this work we predict enzyme function at the level of chemical mechanism, providing a finer granularity of annotation than traditional Enzyme Commission (EC) classes. Hence we can predict not only whether a putative enzyme in a newly sequenced organism has the potential to perform a certain reaction, but how the reaction is performed, using which cofactors and with susceptibility to which drugs or inhibitors, details with important consequences for drug and enzyme design. Work that predicts enzyme catalytic activity based on 3D protein structure features limits the prediction of mechanism to proteins already having either a solved structure or a close relative suitable for homology modelling. Results In this study, we evaluate whether sequence identity, InterPro or Catalytic Site Atlas sequence signatures provide enough information for bulk prediction of enzyme mechanism. By splitting MACiE (Mechanism, Annotation and Classification in Enzymes database) mechanism labels to a finer granularity, which includes the role of the protein chain in the overall enzyme complex, the method can predict at 96% accuracy (and 96% micro-averaged precision, 99.9% macro-averaged recall) the MACiE mechanism definitions of 248 proteins available in the MACiE, EzCatDb (Database of Enzyme Catalytic Mechanisms) and SFLD (Structure Function Linkage Database) databases using an off-the-shelf K-Nearest Neighbours multi-label algorithm. Conclusion We find that InterPro signatures are critical for accurate prediction of enzyme mechanism. We also find that incorporating Catalytic Site Atlas attributes does not seem to provide additional accuracy. The software code (ml2db), data and results are available online at http://sourceforge.net/projects/ml2db/ and as supplementary files. PMID:24885296

  17. sup 18 F-labeled insulin: A prosthetic group methodology for incorporation of a positron emitter into peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shai, Y.; Kirk, K.L.; Channing, M.A.; Dunn, B.B.; Lesniak, M.A.; Eastman, R.C.; Finn, R.D.; Roth, J.; Jacobson, K.A. )

    1989-05-30

    In the present study we synthesize {sup 18}F-labeled insulin of high specific radioactivity. A new prosthetic group methodology, in which ({sup 18}F)fluoride displaces a bromide group of 4-(bromomethyl)-benzoylamine intermediates, was used. The 4-(fluoromethyl)benzoyl product was chemically stable. {sup 18}F-Labeled insulin retains the essential biological properties of native insulin, as measured in vitro by binding to insulin receptors on human cells and stimulation of glucose metabolism in rat adipocytes. The overall process can be carried out speedily to yield a product of sufficient purity to permit in vivo studies. The method appears to be applicable to a wide variety of peptides.

  18. 18F-Labeled Insulin: A Prosthetic Group Methodology for Incorporation of a Positron Emitter into Peptides and Proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Shai, Yechiel; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Channing, Michael A.; Dunn, Bonnie B.; Lesniak, Maxine A.; Eastman, Richard C.; Finn, Ronald D.; Roth, Jesse; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we synthesize 18F-labeled insulin of high specific radioactivity. A new prosthetic group methodology, in which [18F]fluoride displaces a bromide group of 4-(bromomethyl)-benzoylamine intermediates, was used. The 4-(fluoromethyl)benzoyl product was chemically stable. 18F-Labeled insulin retains the essential biological properties of native insulin, as measured in vitro by binding to insulin receptors on human cells and stimulation of glucose metabolism in rat adipocytes. The overall process can be carried out speedily to yield a product of sufficient purity to permit in vivo studies. The method appears to be applicable to a wide variety of peptides. PMID:2669963

  19. A versatile photoactivatable probe designed to label the diphosphate binding site of farnesyl diphosphate utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Henry, Olivier; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Agger, Sean A; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Sen, Stephanie; Shintani, David; Cornish, Katrina; Distefano, Mark D

    2009-07-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is a substrate for a diverse number of enzymes found in nature. Photoactive analogues of isoprenoid diphosphates containing either benzophenone, diazotrifluoropropionate or azide groups have been useful for studying both the enzymes that synthesize FPP as well as those that employ FPP as a substrate. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of a new class of FPP analogues that links an unmodified farnesyl group to a diphosphate mimic containing a photoactive benzophenone moiety; thus, importantly, these compounds are photoactive FPP analogues that contain no modifications of the isoprenoid portion of the molecule that may interfere with substrate binding in the active site of an FPP utilizing enzyme. Two isomeric compounds containing meta- and para-substituted benzophenones were prepared. These two analogues inhibit Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein farnesyltransferase (ScPFTase) with IC(50) values of 5.8 (meta isomer) and 3.0 microM (para isomer); the more potent analogue, the para isomer, was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of ScPFTase with respect to FPP with a K(I) of 0.46 microM. Radiolabeled forms of both analogues selectively labeled the beta-subunit of ScPFTase. The para isomer was also shown to label Escherichia coli farnesyl diphosphate synthase and Drosophila melanogaster farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Finally, the para isomer was shown to be an alternative substrate for a sesquiterpene synthase from Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120, a cyanobacterial source; the compound also labeled the purified enzyme upon photolysis. Taken together, these results using a number of enzymes demonstrate that this new class of probes should be useful for a plethora of studies of FPP-utilizing enzymes.

  20. A Versatile Photoactivatable Probe Designed to Label the Diphosphate Binding Site of Farnesyl Diphosphate Utilizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Olivier; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Agger, Sean A.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Sen, Stephanie; Shintani, David; Cornish, Katrina; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is a substrate for a diverse number of enzymes found in nature. Photoactive analogues of isoprenoid diphosphates containing either benzophenone, diazotrifluropropionate or azide groups have been useful for studying both the enzymes that synthesize FPP as well as those that employ FPP as a substrate. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of a new class of FPP analogues that links an unmodified farnesyl group to a diphosphate mimic containing a photoactive benzophenone moiety; thus, importantly, these compounds are photoactive FPP analogues that contain no modifications of the isoprenoid portion of the molecule that may interfere with substrate binding in the active site of an FPP utilizing enzyme. Two isomeric compounds containing meta- and para-substituted benzophenones were prepared. These two analogues inhibit S. cerevisiae protein farnesyltransferase (ScPFTase) with IC50 values of 5.8 (meta isomer) and 3.0 µM (para isomer); the more potent analogue, the para isomer, was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of ScPFTase with respect to FPP with a KI of 0.46 µM. Radiolabeled forms of both analogues selectively labelled the β-subunit of ScPFTase. The para isomer was also shown to label E. coli farnesyl diphosphate synthase and Drosophila melanogaster farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Finally, the para isomer was shown to be an alternative substrate for a sesquiterpene synthase from Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120, a cyanobacterial source; the compound also labeled the purified enzyme upon photolysis. Taken together, these results using a number of enzymes demonstrate that this new class of probes should be useful for a plethora of studies of FPP-utilizing enzymes. PMID:19447628

  1. Identification of Multi-Functional Enzyme with Multi-Label Classifier.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuxin; Ju, Ying; Xuan, Ping; Long, Ren; Xing, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are important and effective biological catalyst proteins participating in almost all active cell processes. Identification of multi-functional enzymes is essential in understanding the function of enzymes. Machine learning methods perform better in protein structure and function prediction than traditional biological wet experiments. Thus, in this study, we explore an efficient and effective machine learning method to categorize enzymes according to their function. Multi-functional enzymes are predicted with a special machine learning strategy, namely, multi-label classifier. Sequence features are extracted from a position-specific scoring matrix with autocross-covariance transformation. Experiment results show that the proposed method obtains an accuracy rate of 94.1% in classifying six main functional classes through five cross-validation tests and outperforms state-of-the-art methods. In addition, 91.25% accuracy is achieved in multi-functional enzyme prediction, which is often ignored in other enzyme function prediction studies. The online prediction server and datasets can be accessed from the link http://server.malab.cn/MEC/.

  2. Identification of Multi-Functional Enzyme with Multi-Label Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yuxin; Ju, Ying; Xuan, Ping; Long, Ren; Xing, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are important and effective biological catalyst proteins participating in almost all active cell processes. Identification of multi-functional enzymes is essential in understanding the function of enzymes. Machine learning methods perform better in protein structure and function prediction than traditional biological wet experiments. Thus, in this study, we explore an efficient and effective machine learning method to categorize enzymes according to their function. Multi-functional enzymes are predicted with a special machine learning strategy, namely, multi-label classifier. Sequence features are extracted from a position-specific scoring matrix with autocross-covariance transformation. Experiment results show that the proposed method obtains an accuracy rate of 94.1% in classifying six main functional classes through five cross-validation tests and outperforms state-of-the-art methods. In addition, 91.25% accuracy is achieved in multi-functional enzyme prediction, which is often ignored in other enzyme function prediction studies. The online prediction server and datasets can be accessed from the link http://server.malab.cn/MEC/. PMID:27078147

  3. Fluorescent labeling of pectic oligosaccharides with 2-aminobenzamide and enzyme assay for pectin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tadashi; Ichita, Junji; Matsue, Hajime; Ono, Hiroshi; Maeda, Ikuko

    2002-06-05

    Oligogalacturonides [oligomers composed of (1-->4)-linked alpha-D-galactosyluronic acid residues] with degrees of polymerization (DP) from 1 to 10, and a tri-, penta-, and heptasaccharide generated from the backbone of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) were labeled at their reducing ends using aqueous 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride in over 90% yield. These derivatives were analyzed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and structurally characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) and by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The 2AB-labeled oligogalacturonides and RG-I oligomers are fragmented by endo- and exo-polygalacturonase and by Driselase, respectively. 2AB-labeled oligogalacturonide is an exogenous acceptor for galacturonosyltransferase of transferring galacturonic acid from UDP-GalA. Thus, the 2AB-labeled oligogalacturonides and RG-I oligomers are useful for studying enzymes involved in pectin degradation and biosynthesis and may be of value in determining the biological functions of pectic fragments in plants.

  4. Intratumour injection of immunoglobulins labelled with the alpha-particle emitter 211At: analyses of tumour retention, microdistribution and growth delay.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, R. H.; Bruland, O. S.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effects of 211At-labelled antibodies in solid tumour tissue, nude mice carrying OHS human osteosarcoma xenografts received intratumour injections at dosages of 1, 2 or 4 MBq (-1) tumour. The radioisotope was conjugated to either the osteosarcoma-specific monoclonal antibody TP-3 or the non-specific polyclonal antibody hlgGkappa. Tumour retention of injected radioimmunoconjugate (RIC), measured as the percentage of injected activity dosage per gram, was significantly higher for the [211At]TP-3 (203 +/- 93 at 24.1 h post injection) compared with the [211At]hlgGkappa (57 +/- 22 at 23.2 h post injection). The radioactive count rates in body (measured at neck and abdomen) were significantly lower with the TP-3 than with the hlgGkappa. Microautoradiography of the tumour radionuclide distribution was different for the two RICs, i.e. the [211At]TP-3 was to a larger extent concentrated near the injection site, whereas the [211At]hlgGkappa was more evenly distributed all over the tumour. The tumour growth was significantly delayed as a function of the injected activity dosage but without significant difference between the specific and the non-specific RIC. According to this study, it is possible to deliver highly selective radiation doses to solid tumours using intratumour injection of alpha-particle-emitting RICs. Improved tumour retention caused by antigen binding indicates that reduced normal tissue exposure can be obtained with antigen-specific antibodies. The heterogeneous tumour dose distribution observed is, however, a major impediment to the use of alpha-particle emitters against solid tumours. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9569048

  5. Cell-specific Labeling Enzymes for Analysis of Cell–Cell Communication in Continuous Co-culture*

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Norrie, Ida C.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDCM.tub-KDEL) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (LyrM37-KDEL) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell–cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. PMID:24820872

  6. Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  7. Selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  8. Labeling and enzyme studies of the central carbon metabolism in Metallosphaera sedula.

    PubMed

    Estelmann, Sebastian; Hügler, Michael; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Werner, Katharina; Berg, Ivan A; Ramos-Vera, W Hugo; Say, Rafael F; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Gad'on, Nasser; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-03-01

    Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales, Crenarchaeota) uses the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle for autotrophic carbon fixation. In this pathway, acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and succinyl-CoA are the only intermediates that can be considered common to the central carbon metabolism. We addressed the question of which intermediate of the cycle most biosynthetic routes branch off. We labeled autotrophically growing cells by using 4-hydroxy[1-¹⁴C]butyrate and [1,4-¹³C₁]succinate, respectively, as precursors for biosynthesis. The labeling patterns of protein-derived amino acids verified the operation of the proposed carbon fixation cycle, in which 4-hydroxybutyrate is converted to two molecules of acetyl-CoA. The results also showed that major biosynthetic flux does not occur via acetyl-CoA, except for the formation of building blocks that are directly derived from acetyl-CoA. Notably, acetyl-CoA is not assimilated via reductive carboxylation to pyruvate. Rather, our data suggest that the majority of anabolic precursors are derived from succinyl-CoA, which is removed from the cycle via oxidation to malate and oxaloacetate. These C₄intermediates yield pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Enzyme activities that are required for forming intermediates from succinyl-CoA were detected, including enzymes catalyzing gluconeogenesis from PEP. This study completes the picture of the central carbon metabolism in autotrophic Sulfolobales by connecting the autotrophic carbon fixation cycle to the formation of central carbon precursor metabolites.

  9. Bi-enzyme functionlized hollow PtCo nanochains as labels for an electrochemical aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lijuan; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Yali; Zhuo, Ying; Mao, Li

    2011-07-15

    In this work, a new signal amplification strategy based on hollow PtCo nanochains (HPtCoNCs) functionalized by bi-enzyme-horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme (HRP-DNAzyme) and glucose oxidase (GOD), as well as ferrocene-labeled secondary thrombin aptamer (Fc-TBA 2), is developed to construct a highly sensitive electrochemical aptasensor. The HRP-DNAzyme contains a special G-quadruplex structure with an intercalated hemin. With the surface area enlarged by HPtCoNCs, the amount of immobilized Fc-TBA 2, hemin and GOD can be enhanced. Under the enzyme catalysis of GOD, d-glucose is rapidly oxidized into gluconic acid accompanying with the generation of H₂O₂, which is further electrocatalyzed by Pt nanoparticles and HPR-DNAzyme to improve the electrochemical signal of Fc. With several amplification factors mentioned above, a wide linear ranged from 0.001 to 30 nM is acquired with a relatively low detection limit of 0.39 pM for thrombin. The present work demonstrates that using HPtCoNCs as labels is a promising way to amplify the analysis signal and improve the sensitivity of aptasensors.

  10. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions).

  11. In situ end labelling: effect of proteolytic enzyme pretreatment and hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, N. J.; Talbot, I. C.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of dilute hydrochloric acid on the in situ end labelling (ISEL) reaction, with and without a variety of different proteolytic enzymes. METHODS: Sections of tissue fixed in buffered formalin were pretreated with trypsin, protease XIV (at two different concentrations), or protease XXIV (for two different incubation times), with and without subsequent 1 M hydrochloric acid treatment. The results were compared with those obtained using hydrochloric acid alone, with proteinase K, and pepsin pretreatment, and with no pretreatment. RESULTS: When hydrochloric acid was added to the sections in addition to trypsin, protease XIV, and protease XXIV, there was a significant increase in ISEL reactivity in both apoptotic nuclei and morphologically normal nuclei. Hydrochloric acid alone had no significant effect. CONCLUSIONS: Hydrochloric acid has a distinctive effect on the ISEL reaction that is dependent on prior proteolytic digestion. Images PMID:9292152

  12. EnzML: multi-label prediction of enzyme classes using InterPro signatures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Manual annotation of enzymatic functions cannot keep up with automatic genome sequencing. In this work we explore the capacity of InterPro sequence signatures to automatically predict enzymatic function. Results We present EnzML, a multi-label classification method that can efficiently account also for proteins with multiple enzymatic functions: 50,000 in UniProt. EnzML was evaluated using a standard set of 300,747 proteins for which the manually curated Swiss-Prot and KEGG databases have agreeing Enzyme Commission (EC) annotations. EnzML achieved more than 98% subset accuracy (exact match of all correct Enzyme Commission classes of a protein) for the entire dataset and between 87 and 97% subset accuracy in reannotating eight entire proteomes: human, mouse, rat, mouse-ear cress, fruit fly, the S. pombe yeast, the E. coli bacterium and the M. jannaschii archaebacterium. To understand the role played by the dataset size, we compared the cross-evaluation results of smaller datasets, either constructed at random or from specific taxonomic domains such as archaea, bacteria, fungi, invertebrates, plants and vertebrates. The results were confirmed even when the redundancy in the dataset was reduced using UniRef100, UniRef90 or UniRef50 clusters. Conclusions InterPro signatures are a compact and powerful attribute space for the prediction of enzymatic function. This representation makes multi-label machine learning feasible in reasonable time (30 minutes to train on 300,747 instances with 10,852 attributes and 2,201 class values) using the Mulan Binary Relevance Nearest Neighbours algorithm implementation (BR-kNN). PMID:22533924

  13. Nanopore-based electrical and label-free sensing of enzyme activity in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2015-09-15

    A generic strategy to expand the analytical scope of electrical nanopore sensing is presented. We specifically and electrically detect the activity of a diagnostically relevant hydrolytic enzyme and remove the analytically harmful interference from the biochemically complex sample matrix of blood serum. Our strategy is demonstrated at the example of the renin protease which is involved in regulation of blood pressure. The analysis scheme exploits a new approach to reduce sample complexity while generating a specific read-out signal. Within a single spin-column (i), the protease cleaves a resin-tethered peptide substrate (ii) which is affinity-purified using the same multifunctional resin to remove interfering blood serum components, followed by (iii) detecting the peptide via electrical nanopore recordings. Our approach is beneficial in several ways. First, by eliminating serum components, we overcome limitations of nanopore sensing when challenging samples lead to membrane instability and a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Second, the label-free sensing avoids drawbacks of currently used radiolabel-immunoassays for renin. Finally, the strategy of simultaneous generation and purification of a signal peptide within a multifunctional resin can very likely be expanded to other hydrolytic enzymes dissolved in any analyte matrix and exploited for analytical read-out methods other than nanopore sensing.

  14. Label-free and selective photoelectrochemical detection of chemical DNA methylation damage using DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Zhang, Bintian; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2013-07-16

    Exogenous chemicals may produce DNA methylation that is potentially toxic to living systems. Methylated DNA bases are difficult to detect with biosensors because the methyl group is small and chemically inert. In this report, a label-free photoelectrochemical sensor was developed for the selective detection of chemically methylated bases in DNA films. The sensor employed two DNA repair enzymes, human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, to convert DNA methylation sites in DNA films on indium tin oxide electrodes into strand breaks. A DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy)2(dppz)(2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was then used as the photoelectrochemical signal indicator to detect the DNA strand breaks. Its photocurrent signal was found to correlate inversely with the amount of 3-methyladenines (metAde) produced with a methylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). The sensor detected the methylated bases produced with as low as 1 mM MMS, at which concentration the amount of metAde on the sensor surface was estimated to be 0.5 pg, or 1 metAde in 1.6 × 10(5) normal bases. Other DNA base modification products, such as 5-methylcytosine and DNA adducts with ethyl and styrene groups did not attenuate the photocurrent, demonstrating good selectivity of the sensor. This strategy can be utilized to develop sensors for the detection of other modified DNA bases with specific DNA repair enzymes.

  15. Cell-specific labeling enzymes for analysis of cell-cell communication in continuous co-culture.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Norrie, Ida C; Worboys, Jonathan D; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-07-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDC(M.tub-KDEL)) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (Lyr(M37-KDEL)) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell-cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. DT-Diaphorase as a Bifunctional Enzyme Label That Allows Rapid Enzymatic Amplification and Electrochemical Redox Cycling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheolho; Kang, Juyeon; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Yoon, Young Ho; Yang, Haesik

    2017-08-01

    The most common enzyme labels in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are alkaline phosphatase and horseradish peroxidase, which, however, have some limitations for use in electrochemical immunosensors. This Article reports that the small and thermostable DT-diaphorase (DT-D) and electrochemically inactive 4-nitroso-1-naphthol (4-NO-1-N) can be used as a bifunctional enzyme label and a rapidly reacting substrate, respectively, for electrochemical immunosensors. This enzyme-substrate combination allows high signal amplification via rapid enzymatic amplification and electrochemical redox cycling. DT-D can convert an electrochemically inactive nitroso or nitro compound into an electrochemically active amine compound, which can then be involved in electrochemical-chemical (EC) and electrochemical-enzymatic (EN) redox cycling. Six nitroso and nitro compounds are tested in terms of signal-to-background ratio. Among them, 4-NO-1-N exhibits the highest signal-to-background ratio. The electrochemical immunosensor using DT-D and 4-NO-1-N detects parathyroid hormone (PTH) in phosphate-buffered saline containing bovine serum albumin over a wide range of concentrations with a low detection limit of 2 pg/mL. When the PTH concentration in clinical serum samples is measured using the developed immunosensor, the calculated concentrations are in good agreement with the concentrations obtained using a commercial instrument. Thus, the use of DT-D as an enzyme label is highly promising for sensitive electrochemical detection and point-of-care testing.

  17. A fluorescently labeled dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugate carrying multiple copies of two different types of active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Grotzky, Andrea; Nauser, Thomas; Erdogan, Huriye; Schlüter, A Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2012-07-18

    A hybrid structure of a synthetic dendronized polymer, two different types of enzymes (superoxide dismutase and horseradish peroxidase), and a fluorescent dye (fluorescein) was synthesized. Thereby, a single polymer chain carried multiple copies of the two enzymes and the fluorescein. The entire attachment chemistry is based on UV/vis-quantifiable bis-aryl hydrazone bond formation that allows direct quantification of bound molecules: 60 superoxide dismutase, 120 horseradish peroxidase, and 20 fluorescein molecules on an average polymer chain of 2000 repeating units. To obtain other enzyme ratios the experimental conditions were altered accordingly. Moreover, it could be shown that both enzymes remained fully active and catalyzed a two-step cascade reaction.

  18. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  19. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  20. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  1. Photoaffinity labeling of Ras converting enzyme using peptide substrates that incorporate benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) residues: improved labeling and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Kyro, Kelly; Manandhar, Surya P; Mullen, Daniel; Schmidt, Walter K; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-12-15

    Rce1p catalyzes the proteolytic trimming of C-terminal tripeptides from isoprenylated proteins containing CAAX-box sequences. Because Rce1p processing is a necessary component in the Ras pathway of oncogenic signal transduction, Rce1p holds promise as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. However, its mechanism of proteolysis and active site have yet to be defined. Here, we describe synthetic peptide analogues that mimic the natural lipidated Rce1p substrate and incorporate photolabile groups for photoaffinity-labeling applications. These photoactive peptides are designed to crosslink to residues in or near the Rce1p active site. By incorporating the photoactive group via p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine (Bpa) residues directly into the peptide substrate sequence, the labeling efficiency was substantially increased relative to a previously-synthesized compound. Incorporation of biotin on the N-terminus of the peptides permitted photolabeled Rce1p to be isolated via streptavidin affinity capture. Our findings further suggest that residues outside the CAAX-box sequence are in contact with Rce1p, which has implications for future inhibitor design.

  2. Photoaffinity Labeling of Ras Converting Enzyme using Peptide Substrates that Incorporate Benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) Residues: Improved Labeling and Structural Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kyro, Kelly; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mullen, Daniel; Schmidt, Walter K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Rce1p catalyzes the proteolytic trimming of C-terminal tripeptides from isoprenylated proteins containing CAAX-box sequences. Because Rce1p processing is a necessary component in the Ras pathway of oncogenic signal transduction, Rce1p holds promise as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. However, its mechanism of proteolysis and active site have yet to be defined. Here, we describe synthetic peptide analogues that mimic the natural lipidated Rce1p substrate and incorporate photolabile groups for photoaffinity-labeling applications. These photoactive peptides are designed to crosslink to residues in or near the Rce1p active site. By incorporating the photoactive group via p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bpa) residues directly into the peptide substrate sequence, the labeling efficiency was substantially increased relative to a previously-synthesized compound. Incorporation of biotin on the N-terminus of the peptides permitted photolabeled Rce1p to be isolated via streptavidin affinity capture. Our findings further suggest that residues outside the CAAX-box sequence are in contact with Rce1p, which has implications for future inhibitor design. PMID:22079863

  3. 3D restoration microscopy improves quantification of enzyme-labeled fluorescence-based single-cell phosphatase activity in plankton.

    PubMed

    Diaz-de-Quijano, Daniel; Palacios, Pilar; Horňák, Karel; Felip, Marisol

    2014-10-01

    The ELF or fluorescence-labeled enzyme activity (FLEA) technique is a culture-independent single-cell tool for assessing plankton enzyme activity in close-to-in situ conditions. We demonstrate that single-cell FLEA quantifications based on two-dimensional (2D) image analysis were biased by up to one order of magnitude relative to deconvolved 3D. This was basically attributed to out-of-focus light, and partially to object size. Nevertheless, if sufficient cells were measured (25-40 cells), biases in individual 2D cell measurements were partially compensated, providing useful and comparable results to deconvolved 3D. We also discuss how much caution should be used when comparing the single-cell enzyme activities of different sized bacterio- and/or phytoplankton populations measured on 2D images. Finally, a novel method based on deconvolved 3D images (wide field restoration microscopy; WFR) was devised to improve the discrimination of similar single-cell enzyme activities, the comparison of enzyme activities between different size cells, the measurement of low fluorescence intensities, the quantification of less numerous species, and the combination of the FLEA technique with other single-cell methods. These improvements in cell enzyme activity measurements will provide a more precise picture of individual species' behavior in nature, which is essential to understand their functional role and evolutionary history.

  4. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Design of a single-step immunoassay principle based on the combination of an enzyme-labeled antibody release coating and a hydrogel copolymerized with a fluorescent enzyme substrate in a microfluidic capillary device.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Hideki; Henares, Terence G; Jigawa, Kaede; Funano, Shun-ichi; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2013-11-21

    A combination of an enzyme-labeled antibody release coating and a novel fluorescent enzyme substrate-copolymerized hydrogel in a microchannel for a single-step, no-wash microfluidic immunoassay is demonstrated. This hydrogel discriminates the free enzyme-conjugated antibody from an antigen-enzyme-conjugated antibody immunocomplex based on the difference in molecular size. A selective and sensitive immunoassay, with 10-1000 ng mL(-1) linear range, is reported.

  6. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  7. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1p) using a benzophenone-containing peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kyro, Kelly; Manandhar, Surya P; Mullen, Daniel; Schmidt, Walter K; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-08-01

    Isoprenylation is a post-translational modification that increases protein hydrophobicity and helps target certain proteins to membranes. Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1p) is an endoprotease that catalyzes the removal of a three residue fragment from the C-terminus of isoprenylated proteins. To obtain structural information about this membrane protein, photoaffinity labeling agents are being prepared and employed. Here, we describe the synthesis of a benzophenone-containing peptide substrate analogue for Rce1p. Using a continuous spectrofluorometric assay, this peptide was shown to be a substrate for Rce1p. Mass spectrometry was performed to confirm the site of cleavage and structure of the processed probe. Photolysis of the biotinylated compound in the presence of membranes containing Rce1p followed by streptavidin pull-down and Western blot analysis indicated that Rce1p had been labeled by the probe. Photolysis in the presence of both the biotinylated, benzophenone-containing probe and a farnesylated peptide competitor reduced the extent of labeling, suggesting that labeling is occurring in the active site.

  9. Photoaffinity Labeling of Ras Converting Enzyme 1 (Rce1p) using a Benzophenone-Containing Peptide Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Kyro, Kelly; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mullen, Daniel; Schmidt, Walter K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Isoprenylation is a post-translational modification that increases protein hydrophobicity and helps target certain proteins to membranes. Ras Converting Enzyme 1 (Rce1p) is an endoprotease that catalyzes the removal of a three residue fragment from the C-terminus of isoprenylated proteins. To obtain structural information about this membrane protein, photoaffinity labeling agents are being prepared and employed. Here, we describe the synthesis of a benzophenone-containing peptide substrate analogue for Rce1p. Using a continuous spectrofluorometric assay, this peptide was shown to be a substrate for Rce1p. Mass spectrometry was performed to confirm the site of cleavage and structure of the processed probe. Photolysis of the biotinylated compound in the presence of membranes containing Rce1p followed by streptavidin pull-down and Western blot analysis indicated that Rce1p had been labeled by the probe. Photolysis in the presence of both the biotinylated, benzophenone-containing probe and a farnesylated peptide competitor reduced the extent of labeling, suggesting that labeling is occurring in the active site. PMID:20619662

  10. Use of enzyme-labelled protein G assay for the detection of anti Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in wild animal sera.

    PubMed

    Deruaz, D; Eid, P; Deruaz, J; Sempéré, A; Bourgouin, C; Rodhain, F; Pérez-Eid, C

    1996-10-01

    A modified ELISA was developed for the detection of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) IgG antibodies in wild animal sera based on an Enzyme-Labelled-protein G Assay (ELGA). Microplates were coated with an extract of Bb sensu stricto strain (SVI) as antigen. Specific antibodies of the serum samples were detected by a peroxidase-labelled-protein G. Using comparative immunodiagnosis by means of a passive hemagglutination test (HA), ELGA was tested on 82 roe-deer blood samples. A correlation was found between the two methods (r = 0.66). Good reproducibility of titers was observed by ELGA technique. A minimal cross-reactivity was discovered with Leptospira. ELGA could facilitate the recognition of specific antibodies in collections of wild animal sera.

  11. A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical aptasensor based on DNA in situ metallization.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Gao, Fenglei; Du, Lili; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Daoquan; Yang, Dongzhi

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we presented a novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical aptasensor based on DNA in situ silver metallization as effective electrochemical label. Molecular beacon 2 (MB2, Peptide nucleic acid) was first immobilized on the gold electrode (AuE) through Au-S bond. In the presence of thrombin, the thrombin binding aptamer (MB1) preferred to form thrombin/aptamer complex in lieu of aptamer-DNA duplex, resulting in the 8-17 DNAzyme liberating from the caged structure and hybridization with the MB2, the MB2 will replace and free the target thrombin when it hybridizes with MB1. The released target thrombin can participate in the next hybridization process with MB1. Eventually, each target thrombin went through many cycles, resulting in numerous MB1 confining close to the AuE, which leaded to the surface became negatively charged and allowed the absorption of silver ions on the DNA skeleton. After chemical reduction by hydroquinone, the formed silver nanoparticles could be afforded a signal trace for electrochemical stripping analysis of target thrombin. Through introducing a hybridization chain reaction to increase the DNA length, the current signal was further amplified, achieved the detection of thrombin with a linear range from 1.0×10(-16) to 1.0×10(-11) M and a detection limit of 37 aM. In addition, the signal amplification is realized without using any enzymes or sophisticated label process, and the sensing strategy is completely non-labeled. The success in the present biosensor served as a significant step towards the development of monitoring ultratrace thrombin in clinical detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiolipin: a stereospecifically spin-labeled analogue and its specific enzymic hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cable, M B; Jacobus, J; Powell, G L

    1978-01-01

    The spin-labeled cardiolipin 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl)-3-[1-acyl-2-(16-doxylstearoyl)glycero(3)phosphol]-sn-glycerol has been prepared. The stereoselective synthesis makes use of the monolysocardiolipin 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl)-3-[1-acyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero(3)phospho]-sn-glycerol, available from the stereospecific hydrolysis of cardiolipin by phospholipase A2 (phosphatide 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) of Trimeresurus flavoviridis. The results of treatment of the spin-labeled cardiolipin with the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase D (phosphatidylcholine phosphatidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.4) (Hemophilus parainfluenzae) of known specificity and with phospholipase C (phosphatidylcholine cholinephosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.3) of Bacillus cereus are consistent with the assigned structure. The spin-labeled cardiolipin is further characterized and the unique features of this diastereomer are discussed in the context of the unusual stereochemistry of the natural phospholipid. PMID:274715

  13. 13C-labeled D-ribose: chemi-enzymic synthesis of various isotopomers.

    PubMed

    Serianni, A S; Bondo, P B

    1994-04-01

    Current interest in the use of heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to assess the structures, conformations and/or dynamics of oligonucleotides in solution has created an immediate need for nucleosides and their derivatives labeled in various ways with stable isotopes (13C, 2H, 15N and/or 17,18O). This short review focuses exclusively on chemienzymic methods to introduce one or more 13C labels into D-ribose, a precursor to ribo- and 2'-deoxyribonucleosides. It will be demonstrated that five convenient reactions, applied in specific sequences, provide access to 26 of the 32 13C-labeled isotopomers of D-ribose in acceptable yields. While not explicitly discussed herein, these same reactions, appropriately modified, can also be used to insert one or more 2H and/or 17,18O isotopes into this aldopentose.

  14. Advantages of soybean peroxidase over horseradish peroxidase as the enzyme label in chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of sulfamethoxypyridazine.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Berlina, Anna N; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2010-03-24

    An indirect competitive chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CL-ELISA) of sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMP) was developed. The conjugates of streptavidin with cationic horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anionic soybean peroxidase (SbP) were used in CL-ELISA for the detection of biotinylated anti-SMP antibodies. For streptavidin-HRP conjugate-catalyzed chemiluminescence measured 20 s after the initiation of the enhanced chemiluminescence reaction (ECR), the limit of detection (IC(10)), the IC(50) value, and the working range in CL-ELISA of SMP are 0.3, 12.4, and 1.2-85.0 ng/mL, respectively. An increase in the time interval between the ECR initiation and the luminescence measurement results in the loss in the quality of analytical measurements because of the time-dependent quenching of chemiluminescence typical of the HRP-catalyzed ECR. In the case of SbP-based CL-ELISA of SMP, the limit of detection, the IC(50) value, and the working range (0.025, 0.17, and 0.045-0.63 ng/mL, respectively) are better than those for HRP-based CL-ELISA. Furthermore, the analytical parameters of SbP-based CL-ELISA remain unchanged during a long period of time (for at least 30 min). The recovery values from four spiked milk samples with different concentrations of SMP in SbP-based CL-ELISA vary from 70 to 130%.

  15. Emittance Theory for Cylindrical Fiber Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    A fibrous rare earth selective emitter is approximated as an infinitely long cylinder. The spectral emittance, epsilon(lambda), is obtained by solving the radiative transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions and uniform temperature. For optical depths, Kappa(R) = alpha(lambda)R, where alpha(lambda) is the extinction coefficient and R is the cylinder radius, greater than 1 the spectral emittance is nearly at its maximum value. There is an optimum cylinder radius, R(opt), for maximum emitter efficiency, eta(E). Values for R(opt) are strongly dependent on the number of emission bands of the material. The optimum radius decreases slowly with increasing emitter temperature, while the maximum efficiency and useful radiated power increase rapidly with increasing temperature.

  16. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates with enzyme-labeled synthetic oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Medon, P P; Lanser, J A; Monckton, P R; Li, P; Symons, R H

    1988-01-01

    Commercially available kits containing alkaline phosphatase-labeled oligonucleotide probes for Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxins (STI-H, STI-P, and STII) and the heat-labile enterotoxin were compared with bioassays and radiolabeled recombinant DNA probes to identify enterotoxigenic E. coli from 100 clinical isolates. There was very good agreement between the three methods. PMID:3053766

  17. Single molecule super-resolution imaging of proteins in living Salmonella enterica using self-labelling enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Barlag, Britta; Beutel, Oliver; Janning, Dennis; Czarniak, Frederik; Richter, Christian P.; Kommnick, Carina; Göser, Vera; Kurre, Rainer; Fabiani, Florian; Erhardt, Marc; Piehler, Jacob; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the subcellular localization, dynamics and interaction of proteins and protein complexes in prokaryotes is complicated by the small size of the cells. Super-resolution microscopy (SRM) comprise various new techniques that allow light microscopy with a resolution that can be up to ten-fold higher than conventional light microscopy. Application of SRM techniques to living prokaryotes demands the introduction of suitable fluorescent probes, usually by fusion of proteins of interest to fluorescent proteins with properties compatible to SRM. Here we describe an approach that is based on the genetically encoded self-labelling enzymes HaloTag and SNAP-tag. Proteins of interest are fused to HaloTag or SNAP-tag and cell permeable substrates can be labelled with various SRM-compatible fluorochromes. Fusions of the enzyme tags to subunits of a type I secretion system (T1SS), a T3SS, the flagellar rotor and a transcription factor were generated and analysed in living Salmonella enterica. The new approach is versatile in tagging proteins of interest in bacterial cells and allows to determine the number, relative subcellular localization and dynamics of protein complexes in living cells. PMID:27534893

  18. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  19. Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using enzyme-loaded carbon nanotube labels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Du, Dan; Chen, Baowei; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-09-07

    Here we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids assay amplified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based labels for the detection of human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) related p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcript. The carboxylated CNTs were functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules and target-specific detection probes (DP) via diimide-activated amidation, and used to label and amplify target hybridization signal. The activity of captured HRP was monitored by square-wave voltammetry measuring the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 2-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide substrate solution. The effect of DP and HRP loading of the CNT-based labels on its signal-to-noise ratio of electrochemical detection was studied systematically for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the signal-amplified assay achieved a detection limit of 83 fM targets oligonuecleotides and a 4-order wide dynamic range of target concentration. The resulting assay allowed a robust discrimination between the perfect match and a three-base mismatch sequence. When subjected to full-length (491 bp) DNA oncogene, the approach demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 33 pg of the target gene. The high sensitivity and specificity of assay enabled PCR-free detection of target transcripts in as little as 65 ng of mRNA extracted from positive ALL cell lines SUP-B15, in comparison to those obtained from negative cell lines HL-60. The approach holds promise for simple, low cost and ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids detection in portable devices, point-of-care and early disease diagnostic applications.

  20. Nanogold Labels, Covalent Gold, and Enzyme Metallography as Components of Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.; Gutierrez, Edmund; Furuya, Frederic R.; Joshi, Vishwas N.; Liu, Wenqiu; Takvorian, Peter M.

    2008-10-01

    Covalently linkable gold nanoparticles provide both highly sensitive and precise localization and detection of biological targets, and components that may be integrated into nanoscale devices with molecular precision to impart a variety of useful properties. The applications of the 1.4 nm Nanogold particle to biological staining and detection are described, and its applications to nanostructured materials and nanodevices are reviewed. In addition, a new method for depositing metal from solution using targeted enzyme probes, EnzMet (enzyme metallography) allows highly sensitive and specific detection of genetic and protein targets in cells and tissues, and has been used to develop an improved test for HER2 gene amplification in breast cancer. EnzMet also provides a novel method for immunoelectron microscopic staining, a reagent for highly sensitive blotting, and a method for target detection on conductive array biochips.

  1. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase enzyme assay using a BODIPY-labeled substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Li Zaiguo; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D.

    2009-03-06

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is responsible for the irreversible catabolism of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which signals through five membrane receptors to mediate cell stress responses, angiogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. The standard assay for SPL activity utilizes a radioactive dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate substrate and is expensive and cumbersome. In this study, we describe an SPL assay that employs an {omega}-labeled BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate substrate, allowing fluorescent product detection by HPLC and incorporating advantages of the BODIPY fluorophore. The major aldehyde product is confirmed by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The SPL-catalyzed reaction is linear over a 30 min time period and yields a K{sub m} of 35 {mu}M for BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate.

  2. Pharmacokinetics, microscale distribution, and dosimetry of alpha-emitter-labeled anti-PD-L1 antibodies in an immune competent transgenic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Nedrow, Jessie R; Josefsson, Anders; Park, Sunju; Bäck, Tom; Hobbs, Robert F; Brayton, Cory; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2017-12-01

    Studies combining immune checkpoint inhibitors with external beam radiation have shown a therapeutic advantage over each modality alone. The purpose of these works is to evaluate the potential of targeted delivery of high LET radiation to the tumor microenvironment via an immune checkpoint inhibitor. The impact of protein concentration on the distribution of (111)In-DTPA-anti-PD-L1-BC, an (111)In-antibody conjugate targeted to PD-L1, was evaluated in an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer. (225)Ac-DOTA-anti-PD-L1-BC was evaluated by both macroscale (ex vivo biodistribution) and microscale (alpha-camera images at a protein concentration determined by the (111)In data. The evaluation of (111)In-DTPA-anti-PD-L1-BC at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg highlighted the impact of protein concentration on the distribution of the labeled antibody, particularly in the blood, spleen, thymus, and tumor. Alpha-camera images for the microscale distribution of (225)Ac-DOTA-anti-PD-L1-BC showed a uniform distribution in the liver while highly non-uniform distributions were obtained in the thymus, spleen, kidney, and tumor. At an antibody dose of 3 mg/kg, the liver was dose-limiting with an absorbed dose of 738 mGy/kBq; based upon blood activity concentration measurements, the marrow absorbed dose was 29 mGy/kBq. These studies demonstrate that (225)Ac-DOTA-anti-PD-L1-BC is capable of delivering high LET radiation to PD-L1 tumors. The use of a surrogate SPECT agent, (111)In-DTPA-anti-PD-L1-BC, is beneficial in optimizing the dose delivered to the tumor sites. Furthermore, an accounting of the microscale distribution of the antibody in preclinical studies was essential to the proper interpretation of organ absorbed doses and their likely relation to biologic effect.

  3. Discovering the enzyme mimetic activity of metal-organic framework (MOF) for label-free and colorimetric sensing of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Yingjing; Binyam, Atsebeha; Liu, Misha; Wu, Yinan; Li, Fengting

    2016-12-15

    A label-free sensing strategy based on the enzyme-mimicking activity of MOF was demonstrated for colorimetric detection of biomolecules. Firstly obvious blue color was observed due to the high efficiency of peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Fe-MIL-88A (an ion-based MOF material) toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). Then in the presence of target biomolecule and corresponding aptamer, the mimetic activity of Fe-MIL-88A can be strongly inhibited and used directly to realize the colorimetric detection. On the basis of the interesting findings, we designed a straightforward, label-free and sensitive colorimetric method for biomolecule detection by using the enzyme mimetic property of MOF coupling with molecular recognition element. Compared with the existed publications, our work breaks the routine way by setting up an inorganic-organic MOF-aptamer hybrid platform for colorimetric determination of biomolecules, expanding the targets scope from H2O2 or glucose to biomolecules. As a proof of concept, thrombin and thrombin aptamer was used as a model analyte. The limit of detection of 10nM can be achieved with naked eyes and ultrahigh selectivity of thrombin toward numerous interfering substances with 10-fold concentration was demonstrated significantly. Of note, the method was further applied for the detection of thrombin in human serum samples, showing the results in agreement with those values obtained in an immobilization buffer by the colorimetric method. This inorganic-organic MOF-aptamer sensing strategy may in principle be universally applicable for the detection of a range of environmental or biomedical molecules of interests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzyme-antibody dual labeled gold nanoparticles probe for ultrasensitive detection of κ-casein in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Zhou, Y; Meng, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Liu, J Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, N N; Hu, P; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Liu, Z S

    2014-11-15

    A dual labeled probe was synthesized by coating gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with anti-κ-CN monoclonal antibody (McAb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme on their surface. The McAb was used as detector and HRP was used as label for signal amplification catalytically oxidize the substrate. AuNPs were used as bridges between the McAb and HRP. Based on the probe, an immunoassay was developed for ultrasensitive detection of κ-CN in bovine milk samples. The assay has a linear response range within 4.2-560 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.2 ng mL(-1) which was 10 times lower than that of traditional McAb-HRP based ELISA. The recoveries of κ-CN from three brand bovine milk samples were from 95.8% to 111.0% that had a good correlation (R(2)=0.998) with those obtained by official standard Kjeldahl method. For higher sensitivity and as simple as the traditional ELISA, the developed immunoassay could provide an alternative approach for ultrasensitive detection of κ-CN in bovine milk sample.

  5. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  6. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  7. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  8. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  9. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  10. In situ visualization of plasma cells producing antibodies reactive to Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis: the application of the enzyme-labeled antigen method

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Y; Tsuge, S; Takeda, H; Hasegawa, Y; Shiogama, K; Onouchi, T; Inada, K; Sawasaki, T; Tsutsumi, Y

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen. Histologocally, the gingival tissue in periodontitis shows dense infiltration of plasma cells. However, antigens recognized by antibodies secreted from the immunocytes remain unknown. The enzyme-labeled antigen method was applied to detecting plasma cells producing P. gingivalis-specific antibodies in biopsied gingival tissue of periodontitis. N-terminally biotinylated P. gingivalis antigens, Ag53 and four gingipain domains (Arg-pro, Arg-hgp, Lys-pro and Lys-hgp) were prepared by the cell-free protein synthesis system using wheatgerm extract. With these five labeled proteins as probes, 20 lesions of periodontitis were evaluated. With the AlphaScreen method, antibodies against any one of the five P. gingivalis antigens were detected in 11 (55%) serum samples and 17 (85%) tissue extracts. Using the enzyme-labeled antigen method on paraformaldehyde-fixed frozen sections of gingival tissue, plasma cells were labeled with any one of the five antigens in 17 (94%) of 18 specimens, in which evaluable plasma cells were detected. The positivity rates in periodontitis were significantly higher than those found previously in radicular cysts (20% in sera and 33% in tissue extracts with the AlphaScreen method, and 25% with the enzyme-labeled antigen method). Our findings directly indicate that antibodies reactive to P. gingivalis are locally produced in the gingival lesions, and that inflammatory reactions against P. gingivalis are involved in periodontitis. PMID:24698402

  11. An enzyme-free and label-free assay for copper(II) ion detection based on self-assembled DNA concatamers and Sybr Green I.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chenchen; Chen, Junhua; Wu, Wei; Fang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Lingbo; Liu, Qi; Wang, Lin; Xing, Xuerong; Zeng, Lingwen

    2013-09-07

    An enzyme-free and label-free fluorescence turn on biosensor for amplified copper(II) ion (Cu(2+)) detection has been constructed based on self-assembled DNA concatamers and Sybr Green I. This assay is simple, inexpensive and sensitive, enabling quantitative detection of as low as 12.8 pM Cu(2+).

  12. Diurnal feeding rhythms in north sea copepods measured by Gut fluorescence, digestive enzyme activity and grazing on labelled food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, M. A.; Oosterhuis, S. S.

    Results obtained with three methods for measuring feeding rhythms of copepods were different. Gut fluorescence showed clear day-night variation during 2 out of 3 cruises at the Oyster Ground in the North Sea. The species studied ( Pseudocalanus, Temora, Centropages, Calanus) had highest gut fluorescence during the night in May and September, the larger species demonstrating the largest difference. Gut fluorescence was positively correlated with ambient chlorophyll concentrations. Gut clearance rate was not dependent on temperature but on gut fullness. Gut passage times at high gut fluorescence levels were ˜25 minutes, at low levels 2 hours. In grazing experiments with 14C labelled food, filtering rates declined after 5 to 15 minutes, presumably before the first defecation of radioactive material. Filtering rates in Temora were higher at night than by day during May and July, but not in Pseudocalanus and Calanus during September. No diurnal pattern of amylase and tryptic activity was found, except in July for amylase but then probably due to vertical migration. The activity of these digestive enzymes appeared to be least and gut fluorescence most suitable for the detection of grazing rhythms. The occurrence of high fluorescence levels at night in all species studied suggests that intermittent feeding by copepods on phytoplankton is a general phenomenon from spring to autumn. The increase in foraging activity appeared to start well before complete darkness, during May and July even one hour or more before sunset.

  13. Enzyme-Activated G-Quadruplex Synthesis for in Situ Label-Free Detection and Bioimaging of Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuoliang; Luo, Xingyu; Li, Zhu; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Wang, Hong-Hui; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-02-07

    Fluorogenic probes targeting G-quadruplex structures have emerged as the promising toolkit for functional research of G-quadruplex and biosensor development. However, their biosensing applications are still largely limited in in-tube detection. Herein, we proposed a fluorescent bioimaging method based on enzyme-generated G-quadruplexes for detecting apoptotic cells at the cell and tissue level, namely, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-activated de novo G-quadruplex synthesis (TAGS) assay. The detection target is genomic DNA fragmentation, a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. The TAGS assay can efficiently "tag" DNA fragments via using their DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to initiate the de novo synthesis of G-quadruplexes by TdT with an unmodified G-rich dNTP pool, followed by a rapid fluorescent readout upon the binding of thioflavin T (ThT), a fluorogenic dye highly specific for G-quadruplex. The feasibility of the TAGS assay was proved by in situ sensitive detection of individual apoptotic cells in both cultured cells and tissue sections. The TAGS assay has notable advantages, including being label-free and having quick detection, high sensitivity and contrast, mix-and-read operation without tedious washing, and low cost. This method not only shows the feasibility of G-quadruplex in tissue bioanalysis but also provides a promising tool for basic research of apoptosis and drug evaluation for antitumor therapy.

  14. Coupling liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry detection with microfluidic droplet array for label-free enzyme inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2014-01-07

    In this work, the combination of droplet-based microfluidics with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was achieved, for providing a fast separation and high-information-content detection method for the analysis of nanoliter-scale droplets with complex compositions. A novel interface method was developed using an oil-covered droplet array chip to couple with an LC/MS system via a capillary sampling probe and a 4 nL injection valve without the need of a droplet extraction device. The present system can perform multistep operations including parallel enzyme inhibition reactions in nanoliter droplets, 4 nL sample injection, fast separation with capillary LC, and label-free detection with ESI-MS, and has significant flexibility in the accurate addressing and sampling of droplets of interest on demand. The system performance was evaluated using angiotensin I and angiotensin II as model samples, and the repeatabilities of peak area for angiotensin I and angiotensin II were 2.7% and 7.5% (RSD, n = 4), respectively. The present system was further applied to the screening for inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2) and measurement of the IC50 value of the inhibitor. The sample consumption for each droplet assay was 100 nL, which is reduced 10-100 times compared with conventional 384-multi-well plate systems usually used in high-throughput drug screening.

  15. Photoaffinity Labeling of Mouse Fibroblast Enzymes by a Base Excision Repair Intermediate: New Evidence on the Role of PARP-1 in DNA Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Olga I.; Prasad, Rajendra; Sobol, Robert W.; Horton, Julie K.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Wilson, Samuel H.

    2001-07-06

    To examine mammalian base excision repair (BER) enzymes interacting with DNA intermediates formed during BER, we used a novel photoaffinity labeling probe and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) crude extract. The probe was formed in situ, using an end-labeled oligonucleotide containing a synthetic abasic site; this site was incised by AP endonuclease creating a nick with 3' hydroxyl and 5' reduced sugar phosphate groups at the margins, and then a dNMP carrying a photoreactive adduct was introduced at the 3' hydroxyl group. With near UV-light exposure (312nm) of the extract-probe mixture, only six proteins were strongly labeled, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) and the well-known BER participants flap endonuclease (FEN-1), DNA polymerase b (b-pol), and AP endonuclease (APE). The amount of probe crosslinked to PARP-1 was greater than that crosslinked to the other proteins. The specificity of PARP-1 labeling was examined by competition experiments involving various oligonucleotide competitors; competition of labeling by the probe was much greater for the BER intermediates tested than for normal double-stranded DNA. The specificity of PARP-1 labeling also was examined using DNA probes with alternate structures; PARP-1 labeling was stronger with a DNA oligomer representing a BER intermediate than with a molecule representing a nick in double-stranded DNA. These results identifying interaction of PARP-1 with a BER intermediate are discussed in light of PARP-1's role in mammalian BER.

  16. Label-Free and Enzyme-Free Homogeneous Electrochemical Biosensing Strategy Based on Hybridization Chain Reaction: A Facile, Sensitive, and Highly Specific MicroRNA Assay.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ting; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Feng

    2015-11-17

    Homogenous electrochemical biosensing strategies have attracted substantial attention, because of their advantages of being immobilization-free and having rapid response and improved recognition efficiency, compared to heterogeneous biosensors; however, the high cost of labeling and the strict reaction conditions of tool enzymes associated with current homogeneous electrochemical methods limit their potential applications. To address these issues, herein we reported, for the first time, a simple label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for sensitive and highly specific detection of microRNA (miRNA). The target miRNA triggers the HCR of two species of metastable DNA hairpin probes, resulting in the formation of multiple G-quadruplex-incorporated long duplex DNA chains. Thus, with the electrochemical indicator Methylene Blue (MB) selectively intercalated into the duplex DNA chain and the multiple G-quadruplexes, a significant electrochemical signal drop is observed, which is dependent on the concentration of the target miRNA. Thus, using this "signal-off" mode, a simple, label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy for sensitive miRNA assay is readily realized. This strategy also exhibits excellent selectivity to distinguish even single-base mismatched miRNA. Furthermore, this method also exhibits additional advantages of simplicity and low cost, since both expensive labeling and sophisticated probe immobilization processes are avoided. Therefore, the as-proposed label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy may become an alternative method for simple, sensitive, and selective miRNA detection, and it has great potential to be applied in miRNA-related clinical diagnostics and biochemical research.

  17. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  18. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  19. Rapid hydrophobic grid membrane filter-enzyme-labeled antibody procedure for identification and enumeration of Escherichia coli O157 in foods.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, E C; Szabo, R A; Peterkin, P; Sharpe, A N; Parrington, L; Bundle, D; Gidney, M A; Perry, M B

    1988-01-01

    An O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody, labeled by horseradish peroxidase-protein A, was used in a hydrophobic grid membrane filter-enzyme-labeled antibody method for rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157 in foods. The method yielded presumptive identification within 24 h and recovered, on average, 95% of E. coli O157:H7 artificially inoculated into comminuted beef, veal, pork, chicken giblets, and chicken carcass washings. In food samples from two outbreaks involving E. coli O157:H7, the organism was isolated at levels of up to 10(3)/g. The lower limit of sensitivity was 10 E. coli O157 per g of meat. Specific typing for E. coli O157:H7 can be achieved through staining with labeled H7 antiserum or tube agglutination. Images PMID:3060018

  20. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  1. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (abridged): radiobiology and dosimetry of alpha-particle emitters for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C; McDevitt, Michael R; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J; Fisher, Darrell R; Brill, A Bertrand; Song, Hong; Howell, Roger W; Akabani, Gamal; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fisher, Darrell R; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Wessels, Barry W; Zanzonico, Pat B

    2010-02-01

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides and radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use, have recently led to patient trials of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with alpha-particle emitters. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle emitter dosimetry.

  2. Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Inter-Emitter Electric Field Uniformity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters have been reported previously as a means of enhancing ionization efficiency or signal intensity. A key challenge when working with multiple, closely spaced ESI emitters is overcoming the deleterious effects caused by electrical interference among neighboring emitters. Individual emitters can experience different electric fields depending on their relative position in the array, such that it becomes difficult to operate all of the emitters optimally for a given applied potential. In this work, we have developed multi-nanoESI emitters arranged with a circular pattern, which enable the constituent emitters to experience a uniform electric field. The performance of the circular emitter array was compared to a single emitter and to a previously developed linear emitter array, which verified that improved electric field uniformity was achieved with the circular arrangement. The circular arrays were also interfaced with a mass spectrometer via a matching multi-capillary inlet, and the results were compared with those obtained using a single emitter. By minimizing inter-emitter electric field inhomogeneities, much larger arrays having closer emitter spacing should be feasible. PMID:18553942

  3. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  4. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  5. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  6. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  7. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  8. Beta-lactamase-catalyzed aminolysis of depsipeptides: Proof of the nonexistence of a specific D-phenylalanine/enzyme complex by double-label isotope trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Pazhanisamy, S.; Pratt, R.F. )

    1989-08-22

    The steady-state kinetics of the Enterobacter cloacae P99 beta-lactamase-catalyzed aminolysis of the depsipeptide m-(((phenylacetyl)glycyl)oxy)benzoic acid by D-phenylalanine were consistent with an ordered sequential mechanism with D-phenylalanine binding first. In terms of this mechanism, the kinetics data required that in 20 mM MOPS buffer, pH 7.5, the dissociation constant of the initially formed enzyme/D-phenylalanine complex be around 1.3 mM; at pH 9.0 in 0.1 M carbonate buffer, the complex should be somewhat more stable. Attempts to detect this complex in a binary mixture by spectroscopic methods (fluorescence, circular dichroic, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) failed. Kinetic methods were also unsuccessful--the presence of 20 mM D-phenylalanine did not appear to affect beta-lactamase activity nor inhibition of the enzyme by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, phenylboronic acid, or (3-dansylamidophenyl)boronic acid. Equilibrium dialysis experiments appeared to indicate that the dissociation constant of any binary enzyme/D-phenylalanine complex must be somewhat higher than the kinetics allowed (greater than 2 mM). Since the kinetics also required that, at high depsipeptide concentrations, and again with the assumption of the ordered sequential mechanism, the reaction of the enzyme/D-phenylalanine complex to aminolysis products be faster than its reversion to enzyme and D-phenylalanine, a double-label isotope-trapping experiment was performed.

  9. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  10. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  11. Labeling Substrates of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase with Engineered Enzymes and Matched S-Adenosyl-L-methionine Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zheng, Weihong; Yu, Haiqiang; Deng, Haiteng

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating physiological and pathogenic functions of protein methyltransferases (PMTs) relies on knowing their substrate profiles. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is the sole methyl-donor cofactor of PMTs. Recently, SAM analogues have emerged as novel small-molecule tools to label PMT substrates. Here we reported the development of a clickable SAM analogue cofactor, 4-propargyloxy-but-2-enyl SAM, and its implementation to label substrates of human protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). In the system, the SAM analogue cofactor, coupled with matched PRMT1 mutants rather than native PRMT1, was shown to efficiently label PRMT1 substrates. The transferable 4-propargyloxy-but-2-enyl moiety of the SAM analogue further allowed corresponding modified substrates to be characterized through a subsequent click chemical ligation with an azido-based probe. The SAM analogue, in combination with a rational protein-engineering approach, thus demonstrates potential to label and identify PMT targets in the context of a complex cellular mixture. PMID:21539310

  12. Enzymic synthesis of steroid sulphates. XI. Study of the oestrogen binding site of oestrogen sulphotransferase by affinity labelling with 4-mercuri-17beta-oestradiol.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, A I; Jackson, D E

    1975-04-19

    Oistrogen sulphotransferase (3"-phosphoadenylylsulphate: oestrone sulphotransferase, EC 2.8.2.4) contains asingle sulphydryl group thought to be at, or near, the oestrogen-binding site. 4-mercuri-17beta-oestradiol, the activity of the enzyme decreased with increasing concentration of the oestrogen derivative. However, some 40% of the activity remained when all the sulphydryl had reacted to form mercaptide. Formation of mercaptide was only marginally decreased in the presence of the substrate 17beta-oestradiol. Other steroids, such as 11-deoxycorticosterone and testosterone, which are non-substrates for the enzyme, were more effective than 17beta-oestradiol in inhibiting mercaptide formation. Bovine serum albumin also reacted with 4-mercure-17beta-oestradiol and the effects of various steroids on mercaptide formation by the affinity label closely paralleled those found for the enzyme. 2t is concluded that the single sulphydryl group in the enzyme is not directly involved in the binding of oestrogen at the active site but is perhaps in closer proximity to a second site capable of binding certain non-substrate steroids.

  13. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  14. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  15. Increased sensitivity of the rapid hydrophobic grid membrane filter enzyme-labeled antibody procedure for Escherichia coli O157 detection in foods and bovine feces.

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, R; Todd, E; MacKenzie, J; Parrington, L; Armstrong, A

    1990-01-01

    Several strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 artificially inoculated into vegetables and dairy products were recovered on hydrophobic grid membrane filters and enumerated by an enzyme-labeled antibody assay. The mean of the recoveries from 12 fresh vegetables was 108.8%, whereas that from 10 dairy products was 93.2%. Modified tryptic soy broth at 43 degrees C with shaking at 100 rpm provided optimum recovery of the organism from meat, with a sensitivity of less than or equal to 1 CFU/g, which is 10 times more sensitive than direct plating. The method performed equally well with vegetable and dairy products. Tryptic soy broth, however, under the same conditions gave the best results for fecal samples. Of 22 asymptomatic dairy cattle, reported as having positive Brucella titers when assayed with polyclonal antibodies, eight were found to contain E. coli O157 in their feces as demonstrated by the enzyme-labeled antibody assay by using monoclonal antibodies. This finding may explain some of the false-positive Brucella tests. PMID:2268161

  16. Enzyme-labeled Antigen Method: Development and Application of the Novel Approach for Identifying Plasma Cells Locally Producing Disease-specific Antibodies in Inflammatory Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lesions of autoimmune and infectious diseases, plasma cells are frequently observed. Antigens recognized by antibodies produced by the plasma cells mostly remain unclear. A new technique identifying these corresponding antigens may give us a breakthrough for understanding the disease from a pathophysiological viewpoint, simply because the immunocytes are seen within the lesion. We have developed an enzyme-labeled antigen method for microscopic identification of the antigen recognized by specific antibodies locally produced in plasma cells in inflammatory lesions. Firstly, target biotinylated antigens were constructed by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system or through chemical biotinylation. Next, proteins reactive to antibodies in tissue extracts were screened and antibody titers were evaluated by the AlphaScreen method. Finally, with the enzyme-labeled antigen method using the biotinylated antigens as probes, plasma cells producing specific antibodies were microscopically localized in fixed frozen sections. Our novel approach visualized tissue plasma cells that produced 1) autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, 2) antibodies against major antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis or radicular cyst, and 3) antibodies against a carbohydrate antigen, Strep A, of Streptococcus pyogenes in recurrent tonsillitis. Evaluation of local specific antibody responses expectedly contributes to clarifying previously unknown processes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27006517

  17. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for estimating red cell survival of transfused red cells-validation using CR-51 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.; Kickler, T.; Smith, B.; LaFrance, N.

    1984-01-01

    The survival time of transfused red cells antigenically distinct from the recipient's red cells was determined using an indirect enzyme linked antiglobulin test. These results were then compared to those determined by Cr-51 labeling. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias and one patient (2 studies) with traumatic hemolytic anemia caused by a prosthetic heart valve were studied. Survival times were performed by transfusing a 5cc aliquot of Cr-51 labeled cells along with the remaining unit. One hour post transfusion, a blood sample was drawn and used as the 100% value. Subsequent samples drawn over a 2-3 week period were then compared to the initial sample to determine percent survival for both methods. The ELISA method for measuring red cell survival in antigenically distinct cells is in close agreement with the Cr-51 method. Although CR-51 labeling is the accepted method for red cell survival determination the ELISA method can be used when radioisotopes are unavailable or contraindicated or when the decision to estimate red cell survival is made after transfusion.

  18. Application of an enzyme-labeled antigen method for visualizing plasma cells producing antibodies against Strep A, a carbohydrate antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes, in recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Inada, Ken-ichi; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Naito, Kensei; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the main causative pathogen of recurrent tonsillitis. Histologically, lesions of recurrent tonsillitis contain numerous plasma cells. Strep A is an antigenic carbohydrate molecule on the cell wall of S. pyogenes. As expected, plasma cells in subjects with recurrent tonsillitis secrete antibodies against Strep A. The enzyme-labeled antigen method is a novel histochemical technique that visualizes specific antibody-producing cells in tissue sections by employing a biotin-labeled antigen as a probe. The purpose of the present study was to visualize plasma cells producing antibodies reactive with Strep A in recurrent tonsillitis. Firstly, the lymph nodes of rats immunized with boiled S. pyogenes were paraformaldehyde-fixed and specific plasma cells localized in frozen sections with biotinylated Strep A. Secondly, an enzyme-labeled antigen method was used on human tonsil surgically removed from 12 patients with recurrent tonsillitis. S. pyogenes genomes were PCR-detected in all 12 specimens. The emm genotypes belonged to emm12 in nine specimens and emm1 in three. Plasma cells producing anti-Strep A antibodies were demonstrated in prefixed frozen sections of rat lymph nodes, 8/12 human specimens from patients with recurrent tonsillitis but not in two control tonsils. In human tonsils, Strep A-reactive plasma cells were observed within the reticular squamous mucosa and just below the mucosa, and the specific antibodies belonged to either IgA or IgG classes. Our technique is effective in visualizing immunocytes producing specific antibodies against the bacterial carbohydrate antigen, and is thus a novel histochemical tool for analyzing immune reactions in infectious disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Microbiology and Immunology Published by The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  20. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  1. Tuneable superradiant thermal emitter assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallawaarachchi, Sudaraka; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-04-01

    Superradiance is a signature effect in quantum photonics that explains the collective enhancement of emission power by a factor of N2 when N emitters are placed in subwavelength proximity. Although the effect is inherently transient, successful attempts have been made to sustain it in the steady-state regime. Until recently, the effects of superradiance were not considered to be applicable to thermal emitters due to their intrinsic incoherent nature. Novel nanophotonic thermal emitters display favorable coherent characteristics that enable them to obey principles of superradiance. However, published analytical work on conventional superradiant thermal emitter assemblies shows an anomalous power scaling of 1 /N , and therefore increasing the number of thermal emitters leads to a degeneration of power at resonance. This phenomenon immediately renders the effect of thermal superradiance futile since it cannot outperform noncoupled emitters in the steady-state regime. We propose an alternative assembly of thermal emitters with specific features that improves the power scaling while maintaining the effects of superradiance. In essence, we show that our emitter assembly achieves superior power delivery over conventional noncoupled emitter systems at resonance. Additionally, this assembly has the ability to be tuned to operate at specific resonant frequencies, which is a vital requirement for applications such as photothermal cancer therapy.

  2. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  3. Enzyme-free and label-free ultra-sensitive colorimetric detection of Pb(2+) using molecular beacon and DNAzyme based amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Wen; Cai, Dingzhou; Jiang, JiaoLai; Zhao, Pengxiang; Huang, Yu; Sang, Ge

    2016-06-15

    An enzyme-free and label-free colorimetric Pb(2+) sensor based on DNAzyme and molecular beacon (MB) has been developed and demonstrated by recycle using enzyme strand for signal amplification. The substrate strand DNA (S-DNA) of DNAzyme could be converted into MB structure with base pairs of stem part at the both ends. The MB could hybridize with enzyme strand DNA (E-DNA) to form DNAzyme, and be activated and cleaved in the presence of Pb(2+). The cleaved MB is much less stable, releasing from the DNAzyme as two product pieces. The product pieces of MB are flexible and could bind to unmodified AuNPs to effectively stabilize them against salt-induced aggregation. Then, the E-DNA is liberated to catalyze the next reaction and amplify the response signal. By taking advantage of repeated using of E-DNA, our proposed method exhibited high sensitive for Pb(2+) detection in a linear range from 0.05 to 5 nM with detection limit of 20 pM by UV-vis spectrometer. Moreover, this method was also used for determination of Pb(2+) in river water samples with satisfying results. Importantly, this strategy could reach high sensitivity without any modification and complex enzymatic or hairpins based amplification procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of the production yields of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O positron emitters from plasma-laser proton sources at ELI-Beamlines for labeling of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Margarone, Daniele; Pagano, Benedetta; Baldari, Sergio; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of microfluidics labeling approaches. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources such that expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility. 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O production yields were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account the broad proton spectra expected. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of 18F-, 11C- and 13N-labeled radiopharmaceuticals exploiting fast and efficient microfluidic labeling systems.

  5. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  6. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  7. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  8. Emittance compensation in split photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floettmann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The compensation of correlated emittance contributions is of primary importance to optimize the performance of high brightness photoinjectors. While only extended numerical simulations can capture the complex beam dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in sufficient detail to optimize a specific injector layout, simplified models are required to gain a deeper understanding of the involved dynamics, to guide the optimization procedure, and to interpret experimental results. In this paper, a slice envelope model for the emittance compensation process in a split photoinjector is presented. The emittance term is included in the analytical solution of the beam envelope in a drift, which is essential to take the emittance contribution due to a beam size mismatch into account. The appearance of two emittance minima in the drift is explained, and the matching into the booster cavity is discussed. A comparison with simulation results points out effects which are not treated in the envelope model, such as overfocusing and field nonlinearities.

  9. A semi-preparative enzymic synthesis of malonyl-CoA from [14C]acetate and 14CO2: labelling in the 1, 2 or 3 position.

    PubMed

    Roughan, G

    1994-06-01

    A semi-preparative enzymic synthesis of [1-14C]malonyl-CoA from [1-14C]acetate and bicarbonate, and of [3-14C]malonyl-CoA from Na2(14)CO3 and acetate, was achieved by using chloroplasts rapidly isolated from 7-8-day-old pea shoots. Around 70% of the [1-14C]acetate was converted into malonyl-CoA in 2-3 h, and the specific radioactivity of [3-14C]malonyl-CoA synthesized in the system was 25-30 Ci/mol. Reactions were monitored and labelled products were purified by h.p.l.c.

  10. Hairpin assembly circuit-based fluorescence cooperative amplification strategy for enzyme-free and label-free detection of small molecule.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunjing; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Jiewei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Here, we developed an enzyme-free, label-free, and sensitive fluorescence cooperative amplification strategy based on a hairpin assembly circuit which coupled catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for small molecule adenosine. A double-strand DNA probe with aptamer-catalysis strand (Apt-C) and inhibit strand (Inh) was designed for adenosine recognition and signal transduction which was named as Apt-C/Inh. Hairpins H1 and H2 were employed for constructing the CHA, and hairpins H3 and H4 for the HCR. Through the binding of adenosine and the Apt-C, the Inh was released from the Apt-C/Inh. Then the free Apt-C initiated the CHA through successively opening H1 and H2, generating H1/H2 complex and recyclable Apt-C. Next, the released Apt-C entered another CHA cycle, and the H1/H2 complex further initiated the HCR of H3 and H4 which induced the formation of the concatemers of H3/H4 complex. Such a process brought the two ends of hairpins H3 into close proximity, yielding numerous integrated G-quadruplexes which were initially sequestered in the stem and two terminals of H3. Finally, N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) was added to generate an enhanced fluorescence signal. In the proposed strategy, driven only by the energy from hybridization, one target could trigger multiple HCR events via CHA-based target-cycle, leading to a remarkable enzyme-free amplification for adenosine. The detection limit could achieve as low as 9.7 × 10(-7) mol L(-1). Furthermore, G-quadruplexes were applied to construct label-free hairpin assembly circuit, which made it more simple and cost-effective. The satisfactory recoveries were obtained when detecting adenosine in spiked human serum and urine samples, demonstrating the feasibility of this detection strategy in biological samples.

  11. Phosphorus cycling in the Sargasso Sea: Investigation using the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate, enzyme-labeled fluorescence, and turnover times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Sohm, Jill A.; Cutter, Gregory A.; Lomas, Michael W.; Paytan, Adina

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in surface water of vast areas of the ocean are extremely low (<10 nM) and phosphorus (P) availability could limit primary productivity in these regions. We explore the use of oxygen isotopic signature of dissolved phosphate (δ18OPO4) to investigate biogeochemical cycling of P in the Sargasso Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Additional techniques for studying P dynamics including 33P-based DIP turnover time estimates and percent of cells expressing alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity as measured by enzyme-labeling fluorescence are also used. In surface waters, δ18OPO4 values were lower than equilibrium by 3-6‰, indicative of dissolved organic phosphorous (DOP) remineralization by extracellular enzymes. An isotope mass balance model using a variety of possible combinations of enzymatic pathways and substrates indicates that DOP remineralization in the euphotic zone can account for a large proportion on P utilized by phytoplankton (as much as 82%). Relatively short DIP turnover times (4-8 h) and high expression of AP (38-77% of the cells labeled) are consistent with extensive DOP utilization and low DIP availability in the euphotoc zone. In deep water where DOP utilization rates are lower, δ18OPO4 values approach isotopic equilibrium and DIP turnover times are longer. Our data suggests that in the euphotic zone of the Sargasso Sea, DOP may be appreciably remineralized and utilized by phytoplankton and bacteria to supplement cellular requirements. A substantial fraction of photosynthesis in this region is supported by DOP uptake.

  12. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  13. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assays for the detection of activity and inhibition of phosphatase enzymes employing phosphorescently labeled peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Desmond J; O'Riordan, Tomás C; O'Sullivan, Paul J; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2007-02-05

    A rapid, homogenous, antibody-free assay for phosphatase enzymes was developed using the phosphorescent platinum (II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) and time-resolved fluorescent detection. An internally quenched decameric peptide substrate containing a phospho-tyrosine residue, labeled with PtCP-maleimide and dabcyl-NHS at its termini was designed. Phosphatase catalysed dephosphorylation of the substrate resulted in a minor increase in PtCP signal, while subsequent cleavage by chymotrypsin at the dephosphorylated Tyr-Leu site provided a 3.5 fold enhancement of PtCP phosphorescence. This phosphorescence phosphatase enhancement assay was optimized to a 96 well plate format with detection on a commercial TR-F plate reader, and applied to measure the activity and inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, recombinant human CD45, and tyrosine phosphatases in Jurkat cell lysates within 40 min. Parameters of these enzymatic reactions such as Km's, limits of detection (L.O.D's) and IC50 values for the non-specific inhibitor sodium orthovanadate were also determined.

  14. Multiplexed Electrochemical Immunoassay of Phosphorylated Proteins Based on Enzyme-Functionalized Gold Nanorod Labels and Electric Field-Driven Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Lu, Donglai; Dohnalkova, Alice; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-09

    A multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay integrating enzyme amplification and electric field-driven strategy was developed for fast and sensitive quantification of phosphorylated p53 at Ser392 (phospho-p53 392), Ser15 (phospho-p53 15), Ser46 (phospho-p53 46) and total p53 simultaneously. The disposable sensor array has four spatially separated working electrodes and each of them is modified with different capture antibody, which enables simultaneous immunoassay to be conducted without cross-talk between adjacent electrodes. The enhanced sensitivity was achieved by multi-enzymes amplification strategy using gold nanorods (AuNRs) as nanocarrier for co-immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and detection antibody (Ab2) at high ratio of HRP/Ab2, which produced an amplified electrocatalytic response by the reduction of HRP oxidized thionine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The immunoreaction processes were accelerated by applying +0.4 V for 3 min and then -0.2 V for 1.5 min, thus the whole sandwich immunoreactions could be completed in less than 5 min. The disposable immunosensor array shows excellent promise for clinical screening of phosphorylated proteins and convenient point-of-care diagnostics.

  15. Towards graphane field emitters.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyi; Cole, Matthew T; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M; Kang, Moon H; Parmee, Richard J; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Dai, Qing; Milne, William I; Wang, Baoping

    2015-12-10

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm(-1)), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm(-2) (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm(-2) (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function.

  16. Towards graphane field emitters

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shuyi; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M.; Kang, Moon H.; Parmee, Richard J.; Zhang, Xiaobing; Milne, William I.; Wang, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm–1), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm–2 (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm–2 (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function. PMID:28066543

  17. Development of an efficient signal amplification strategy for label-free enzyme immunoassay using two site-specific biotinylated recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin-Bao; Tang, Ying; Yang, Hong-Ming

    2015-02-15

    Constructing a recombinant protein between a reporter enzyme and a detector protein to produce a homogeneous immunological reagent is advantageous over random chemical conjugation. However, the approach hardly recombines multiple enzymes in a difunctional fusion protein, which results in insufficient amplification of the enzymatic signal, thereby limiting its application in further enhancement of analytical signal. In this study, two site-specific biotinylated recombinant proteins, namely, divalent biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (AP) and monovalent biotinylated ZZ domain, were produced by employing the Avitag-BirA system. Through the high streptavidin (SA)-biotin interaction, the divalent biotinylated APs were clustered in the SA-biotin complex and then incorporated with the biotinylated ZZ. This incorporation results in the formation of a functional macromolecule that involves numerous APs, thereby enhancing the enzymatic signal, and in the production of several ZZ molecules for the interaction with immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. The advantage of this signal amplification strategy is demonstrated through ELISA, in which the analytical signal was substantially enhanced, with a 32-fold increase in the detection sensitivity compared with the ZZ-AP fusion protein approach. The proposed immunoassay without chemical modification can be an alternative strategy to enhance the analytical signals in various applications involving immunosensors and diagnostic chips, given that the label-free IgG antibody is suitable for the ZZ protein.

  18. Intricate effects of primary motor neuronopathy on contractile proteins and metabolic muscle enzymes as revealed by label-free mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Ashling; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Dowling, Paul; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2014-01-01

    While the long-term physiological adaptation of the neuromuscular system to changed functional demands is usually reflected by unilateral skeletal muscle transitions, the progressive degeneration of distinct motor neuron populations is often associated with more complex changes in the abundance and/or isoform expression pattern of contractile proteins and metabolic enzymes. In order to evaluate these intricate effects of primary motor neuronopathy on the skeletal muscle proteome, label-free MS was employed to study global alterations in the WR (wobbler) mouse model of progressive neurodegeneration. In motor neuron disease, fibre-type specification and the metabolic weighting of bioenergetic pathways appear to be strongly influenced by both a differing degree of a subtype-specific vulnerability of neuromuscular synapses and compensatory mechanisms of fibre-type shifting. Proteomic profiling confirmed this pathobiochemical complexity of disease-induced changes and showed distinct alterations in 72 protein species, including a variety of fibre-type-specific isoforms of contractile proteins, metabolic enzymes, metabolite transporters and ion-regulatory proteins, as well as changes in molecular chaperones and various structural proteins. Increases in slow myosin light chains and the troponin complex and a decrease in fast MBP (myosin-binding protein) probably reflect the initial preferential loss of the fast type of neuromuscular synapses in motor neuron disease. PMID:24895011

  19. Evaluation of miglustat as maintenance therapy after enzyme therapy in adults with stable type 1 Gaucher disease: a prospective, open-label non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have provided equivocal data on the use of miglustat as maintenance therapy in Gaucher disease type 1. We report findings from a clinical trial evaluating the effects of miglustat treatment in patients with stable type 1 Gaucher disease after enzyme therapy. Methods Adult type 1 Gaucher disease patients stabilized during at least 3 years of previous enzyme therapy were included in this 2-year, prospective, open-label non-inferiority study. The primary endpoint was percent change from baseline in liver volume. Secondary endpoints included changes in spleen volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count. Results Forty-two patients were enrolled (mean±SD age, 45.1±12.7 years; previous enzyme therapy duration 9.5±4.0 years). Median (range) exposure to miglustat 100 mg t.i.d. was 658 (3–765) days. Twenty-one patients discontinued treatment prematurely; 13 due to adverse events, principally gastrointestinal. The upper 95% confidence limit of mean percent change in liver volume from baseline to end of treatment was below the non-inferiority margin of 10% (–1.1%; 95%CI −6.0, 3.9%). Mean (95%CI) changes in spleen volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count were 102 (24,180) mL, –0.95 (−1.38, –0.53) g/dL and −44.1 (–57.6, –30.7) ×109/L, respectively. Conclusions The primary efficacy endpoint was met; overall there was no change in liver volume during 24 months of miglustat therapy. Several patients showed a gradual deterioration in some disease manifestations, suggesting that miglustat could maintain clinical stability, but not in all patients. Miglustat demonstrated a predictable profile of safety and tolerability that was consistent with that reported in previous clinical trials and experience in clinical practice. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00319046 PMID:23270487

  20. Multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay of phosphorylated proteins based on enzyme-functionalized gold nanorod labels and electric field-driven acceleration.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Lu, Donglai; Dohnalkova, Alice; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-01

    A multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay integrating enzyme amplification and electric field-driven strategy was developed for fast and sensitive quantification of phosphorylated p53 at Ser392 (phospho-p53(392)), Ser15 (phospho-p53(15)), Ser46 (phospho-p53(46)), and total p53 simultaneously. The disposable sensor array has four spatially separated working electrodes, and each of them is modified with different capture antibody, which enables simultaneous immunoassay to be conducted without cross-talk between adjacent electrodes. The enhanced sensitivity was achieved by a multienzyme amplification strategy using gold nanorods (AuNRs) as nanocarrier for coimmobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and detection antibody (Ab(2)) at a high ratio of HRP/Ab(2), which produced an amplified electrocatalytic response by the reduction of HRP oxidized thionine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The immunoreaction processes were accelerated by applying +0.4 V for 3 min and then -0.2 V for 1.5 min; thus, the whole sandwich immunoreactions could be completed in less than 5 min. Under optimal conditions, this method could simultaneously detect phospho-p53(392), phospho-p53(15), phospho-p53(46), and total p53 ranging from 0.01 to 20 nM, 0.05 to 20 nM, 0.1 to 50 nM, and 0.05 to 20 nM with detection limits of 5 pM, 20 pM, 30 pM, and 10 pM, respectively. Accurate determinations of these proteins in human plasma samples were demonstrated by comparison to the standard ELISA method. The disposable immunosensor array shows excellent promise for clinical screening of phosphorylated proteins and convenient point-of-care diagnostics.

  1. Adverse drug reaction monitoring with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors: A prospective, randomized, open-label, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sangole, Nishant V; Dadkar, Vaishali N

    2010-02-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are known to possess different chemical structures, and change in structure of a drug can bring about change in its adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile. The study aims to observe the incidence and severity of ADRs between the di-carboxyl group containing ACEIs (d-ACEIs) versus phosphonate group containing ACEIs (p-ACEIs), in patients suffering from essential hypertension. One hundred and twenty patients with essential hypertension were randomized into four groups receiving enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, and fosinopril. They were followed up for four months, to observe the clinical efficacy along with the associated ADRs. Mild, dry brassy cough (% incidence; 95% CI) was observed with d-ACEIs (6.6%; 0 to 15.6) versus p-ACEI (20%; 5.7 to 34.3), in which the cough observed was moderate-to-severe in intensity and two patients required treatment discontinuation (P < 0.05). No cases of hypotension were observed with the use of d-ACEIs, whereas, two patients on p-ACEI (6.6%; 0 to15.6) had hypotension (P < 0.05). Three patients (10%; 0 to 20.7) on d-ACEIs had nausea, which was not observed with p-ACEI treatment (0%) (P < 0.05). The phosphonate group in p-ACEIs may have a probable relationship with increase in the incidence and severity of ADRs such as dry brassy cough and hypotension. The di-carboxyl group in d-ACEIs may have a probable relationship with increase in the incidence of ADRs like nausea.

  2. Adverse drug reaction monitoring with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors: A prospective, randomized, open-label, comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Sangole, Nishant V.; Dadkar, Vaishali N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are known to possess different chemical structures, and change in structure of a drug can bring about change in its adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile. The study aims to observe the incidence and severity of ADRs between the di-carboxyl group containing ACEIs (d-ACEIs) versus phosphonate group containing ACEIs (p-ACEIs), in patients suffering from essential hypertension. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with essential hypertension were randomized into four groups receiving enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, and fosinopril. They were followed up for four months, to observe the clinical efficacy along with the associated ADRs. Results: Mild, dry brassy cough (% incidence; 95% CI) was observed with d-ACEIs (6.6%; 0 to 15.6) versus p-ACEI (20%; 5.7 to 34.3), in which the cough observed was moderate-to-severe in intensity and two patients required treatment discontinuation (P < 0.05). No cases of hypotension were observed with the use of d-ACEIs, whereas, two patients on p-ACEI (6.6%; 0 to15.6) had hypotension (P < 0.05). Three patients (10%; 0 to 20.7) on d-ACEIs had nausea, which was not observed with p-ACEI treatment (0%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The phosphonate group in p-ACEIs may have a probable relationship with increase in the incidence and severity of ADRs such as dry brassy cough and hypotension. The di-carboxyl group in d-ACEIs may have a probable relationship with increase in the incidence of ADRs like nausea. PMID:20606833

  3. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  4. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  5. New approach for monitoring fish stress: A novel enzyme-functionalized label-free immunosensor system for detecting cortisol levels in fish.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyun; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Ota, Shirei; Murata, Masataka; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Endo, Hideaki

    2017-07-15

    Fishes display a wide variation in their physiological responses to stress, which is clearly evident in the plasma corticosteroid changes, chiefly cortisol levels in fish. As a well-known indicator of fish stress, a simple and rapid method for detecting cortisol changes especially sudden increases is desired. In this study, we describe an enzyme-functionalized label-free immunosensor system for detecting fish cortisol levels. Detection of cortisol using amperometry was achieved by immobilizing both anti-cortisol antibody (selective detection of cortisol) and glucose oxidase (signal amplification and non-toxic measurement) on an Au electrode surface with a self-assembled monolayer. This system is based on the maximum glucose oxidation output current change induced by the generation of a non-conductive antigen-antibody complex, which depends on the levels of cortisol in the sample. The immunosensor responded to cortisol levels with a linear decrease in the current in the range of 1.25-200ngml(-1) (R=0.964). Since the dynamic range of the sensor can cover the normal range of plasma cortisol in fish, the samples obtained from the fish did not need to be diluted. Further, electrochemical measurement of one sample required only ~30min. The sensor system was applied to determine the cortisol levels in plasma sampled from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), which were then compared with levels of the same samples determined using the conventional method (ELISA). Values determined using both methods were well correlated. These findings suggest that the proposed label-free immunosensor could be useful for rapid and convenient analysis of cortisol levels in fish without sample dilution. We also believe that the proposed system could be integrated in a miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care cortisol detection and useful as a portable diagnostic in fish farms in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  7. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  8. A multi-walled carbon nanotubes-poly(L-lysine) modified enantioselective immunosensor for ofloxacin by using multi-enzyme-labeled gold nanoflower as signal enhancer.

    PubMed

    He, Zuyu; Zang, Shuai; Liu, Yingju; He, Yuan; Lei, Hongtao

    2015-11-15

    The enantioselective detection of trace amounts of ofloxacin is very important in many fields. In this work, an enantioselective and sensitive electrochemical immunosensor was constructed for the detection of chiral antibiotic ofloxacin based on a dual amplification strategy using multiwall carbon nanotubes-poly(L-lysine) as a matrix to immobilize the antigen and multi-enzyme-antibody functionalized gold nanoflowers as an electrochemical detection label. The fabrication process of the dual-amplified immunosensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammogram and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. After the optimization of the experimental conditions, a competitive immunoassay, i.e., the association ability with the corresponding antibody between the captured antigen and free S-OFL or R-OFL in the solution, showed that the immunosensor exhibited a sensitive response to S-OFL in the range from 0.26 to 25.6 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/mL as well as a sensitive response to R-OFL in the range from 0.37 to 12.8 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.30 ng/mL. Along with the acceptable sensitivity and stability, the S-OFL or R-OFL immunosensor showed selective ability to its corresponding enantiomer, suggesting this amplification strategy may hold a potential application in the detection of OFL in food or environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme labeled with [3H]captopril. Tissue localizations and changes in different models of hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S K; Lynch, D R; Snyder, S H

    1987-01-01

    In vitro autoradiography with [3H]captopril was used to localize and quantitate angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in various tissues in two-kidney, one-clip (2K-1C) hypertension, one-kidney, one-clip (1K-1C) hypertension, desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension, and a normotensive control group. There were no significant differences in mean systolic blood pressure among the hypertensive groups. Plasma renin activity (PRA) was highest in the 2K-1C group (6.20 +/- 2.17 ng/ml per h), intermediate in the 1K-1C group (2.19 +/- 0.62 ng/ml per h) and control group (3.20 +/- 0.53 ng/ml per h), and lowest in the DOCA-salt group (0.07 +/- 0.06 ng/ml per h). In the lungs, aorta, mesenteric arteries, and adrenal medulla, ACE labeling was highest in the 2K-1C group, intermediate in the 1K-1C and control groups, and lowest in the DOCA-salt group. ACE levels in these tissues correlated positively with PRA. In the kidney, anterior pituitary, testis, and choroid plexus of the brain, ACE levels correlated negatively with PRA, with lowest ACE levels in the 2K-1C group and highest levels in the DOCA-salt group. In the epididymis, posterior pituitary, and other regions of the brain, ACE levels did not differ significantly among the groups. Images PMID:3040809

  10. Fluorinated vitamin b(12) analogs are cofactors of corrinoid-dependent enzymes: a f-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance probe for identifying corrinoid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Kerssebaum, R; Nexø, E

    1993-02-01

    The homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata synthesized the vitamin B(12) analog phenolyl cobamide or 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide when the methanol medium of growing cells was supplemented with 10 mM phenol or 5 mM 4-fluorophenol. Phenol and, presumably, 4-fluorophenol were specifically incorporated into these cobamides, since phenol was not metabolized significantly into amino acids or into acetic acid, the product of the catabolism. The phenol-containing cobamides contributed up to 90% of the protein-bound cobamides of the 1,300 to 1,900 nmol of corrinoid per g of dry cell material formed. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide exhibited a resonance near 30 ppm. An additional signal emerged at 25 ppm when 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide was investigated as the cofactor of a corrinoid-dependent protein. The two resonances indicated distinct cofactor arrangements within the protein's active site. A 5-ppm high-field shift change suggested van der Waal's interactions between the fluorinated nucleotide of the cofactor and adjacent amino acid residues of the enzyme. Similarly, Propionibacterium freudenreichii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum synthesized 5-fluorobenzimidazolyl cobamide. The human corrinoid binders intrinsic factor, transcobalamin, and haptocorrin recognized this corrinoid like vitamin B(12). Hence, it is possible to use F-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analyses of protein-bound cobamides.

  11. Fluorinated Vitamin B12 Analogs Are Cofactors of Corrinoid-Dependent Enzymes: a 19F-Labeled Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for Identifying Corrinoid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stupperich, Erhard; Eisinger, Hans-Jürgen; Kerssebaum, Rainer; Nexø, Ebba

    1993-01-01

    The homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata synthesized the vitamin B12 analog phenolyl cobamide or 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide when the methanol medium of growing cells was supplemented with 10 mM phenol or 5 mM 4-fluorophenol. Phenol and, presumably, 4-fluorophenol were specifically incorporated into these cobamides, since phenol was not metabolized significantly into amino acids or into acetic acid, the product of the catabolism. The phenol-containing cobamides contributed up to 90% of the protein-bound cobamides of the 1,300 to 1,900 nmol of corrinoid per g of dry cell material formed. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide exhibited a resonance near 30 ppm. An additional signal emerged at 25 ppm when 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide was investigated as the cofactor of a corrinoid-dependent protein. The two resonances indicated distinct cofactor arrangements within the protein's active site. A 5-ppm high-field shift change suggested van der Waal's interactions between the fluorinated nucleotide of the cofactor and adjacent amino acid residues of the enzyme. Similarly, Propionibacterium freudenreichii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum synthesized 5-fluorobenzimidazolyl cobamide. The human corrinoid binders intrinsic factor, transcobalamin, and haptocorrin recognized this corrinoid like vitamin B12. Hence, it is possible to use 19F-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analyses of protein-bound cobamides. PMID:16348877

  12. Detection of microRNA in clinical tumor samples by isothermal enzyme-free amplification and label-free graphene oxide-based SYBR Green I fluorescence platform.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Debin; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Wenge; Lu, Suqin; Xing, Xiaobo

    2015-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a kind of small molecules that involve in many important life activities. They have higher expression levels in many kinds of cancers. In this study, we developed an isothermal enzyme-free amplification (EFA) and label-free graphene oxide (GO)-based SYBR Green I fluorescence platform for detection of miRNA. MiRNA-21 was used as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Results show that the sensitivity of miRNA-21 is 1pM, and the linearity range is from 1pM to 1nM. The method can specifically discriminate miRNA-21 from miRNA-210 and miRNA-214. Three tumor cell lines of A549, HepG2 and MCF7 were detected by the method. The sensitivities of them were 10(2) cells, 10(3) cells and 10(3) cells respectively. Clinical tumor samples were also tested by this method, and 29 of 40 samples gave out positive signals. The method holds great promise in miRNA detection due to its convenience, rapidness, inexpensive and specificity.

  13. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  14. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  15. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  16. Emitter location errors in electronic recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszewski, Jan; Dikta, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The paper describes some of the problems associated with emitter location calculations. This aspect is the most important part of the series of tasks in the electronic recognition systems. The basic tasks include: detection of emission of electromagnetic signals, tracking (determining the direction of emitter sources), signal analysis in order to classify different emitter types and the identification of the sources of emission of the same type. The paper presents a brief description of the main methods of emitter localization and the basic mathematical formulae for calculating their location. The errors' estimation has been made to determine the emitter location for three different methods and different scenarios of emitters and direction finding (DF) sensors deployment in the electromagnetic environment. The emitter has been established using a special computer program. On the basis of extensive numerical calculations, the evaluation of precise emitter location in the recognition systems for different configuration alignment of bearing devices and emitter was conducted. The calculations which have been made based on the simulated data for different methods of location are presented in the figures and respective tables. The obtained results demonstrate that calculation of the precise emitter location depends on: the number of DF sensors, the distances between emitter and DF sensors, their mutual location in the reconnaissance area and bearing errors. The precise emitter location varies depending on the number of obtained bearings. The higher the number of bearings, the better the accuracy of calculated emitter location in spite of relatively high bearing errors for each DF sensor.

  17. A rapid micro-assay method for gelatinolytic activity using tritium-labeled heat-denatured polymeric collagen as a substrate and its application to the detection of enzymes involved in collagen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sunada, H; Nagai, Y

    1980-06-01

    A rapid micro-assay method for gelatinolytic activitiy has been developed using 3H-labeled heat-denatured polymeric collagen (gelatin) as a substrate to investigate enzymes involved in the post-collagenase catabolism of collagen. The method is based on the incubation of gelatin with enzyme followed by determination of the enzyme digestion products soluble in 67% dioxane. It is sensitive enough to detect microgram levels of gelatin fragments, and can be employed over wide ranges of pH and ionic strength. By applying the method to an embryonic chick skin culture system, three gelatinolytic enzyme fractions which showed high, limited and no caseinolytic activities were demonstrated to be separable by gel chromatography.

  18. Label-free and enzyme-free detection of transcription factors with graphene oxide fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Desong; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of a variety of essential cellular processes and some of them have been recognized as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets of some diseases. Sensitive and accurate detection of TFs is of great importance to better understanding their roles in gene regulation and evaluation of disease state. Here, we developed a simple, label-free and enzyme-free new fluorescent strategy for the detection of TFs by graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe (MGHP). The MGHP possessed of three functions simultaneously, adsorbing onto GO with the loop part, binding to target with the stem part and serving as signal carrier with the terminal G-quadruplex. First, the MGHP was adsorbed quickly to GO. Next, the TF bound to the stem part of MGHP to form a huge target-MGHP complex, which led to desorption of the complex from GO. Finally, NMM was inserted into G-quadruplex in the complex to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. The GO used here, as a fluorescence switch, could quickly and efficiently quench the fluorescence of NMM inserted into the MGHP absorbed on the GO, guaranteeing a high signal-to-noise ratio. Sensitive detection of purified NF-κB p50 and HeLa cell nuclear extracts were achieved with detection limits of 0.2nM and 7.8ng/µL, respectively. Moreover, this proposed strategy could be used to screen inhibitors of NF-κB p50 activity. The strategy proposed here might offer a new potential approach for reliable quantification of TFs in clinical diagnostics and treatment research of some diseases.

  19. Novel chemiluminescent imaging microtiter plates for high-throughput detection of multiple serum biomarkers related to Down's syndrome via soybean peroxidase as label enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Chai, Da; Lu, Jusheng; Yu, Jiachao; Liu, Songqin

    2015-08-01

    Novel chemiluminescent (CL) imaging microtiter plates with high-throughput, low-cost, and simple operation for detection of four biomarkers related to Down's syndrome screening were developed and evaluated. To enhance the sensitivity of CL immunosensing, soybean peroxidase (SBP) was used instead of horseradish peroxide (HRP) as a label enzyme. The microtiter plates were fabricated by simultaneously immobilizing four capture monoclonal antibodies, anti-inhibin-A, anti-unconjugated oestriol (anti-uE3), anti-alpha-fetoprotein (anti-AFP), and beta anti-HCG (anti-β-HCG), on nitrocellulose (NC) membrane to form immunosensing microtiter wells. Under a sandwiched immunoassay, the CL signals on each sensing site of the microtiter plates were collected by a charge-coupled device (CCD), presenting an array-based chemiluminescence imaging method for detection of four target antigens in a well at the same time. The linear response to the analyte concentration ranged from 0.1 to 40 ng/mL for inhibin-A, 0.075 to 40 ng/mL for uE3, 0.2 to 400 ng/mL for AFP, and 0.4 to 220 ng/mL for β-HCG. The proposed microtiter plates possessed high-throughput, good stability, and acceptable accuracy for detection of four antigens in clinical serum samples and demonstrated potential for practical applicability of the proposed method to Down's syndrome screening. Graphical Abstract Schematic evaluation of the microtiter plater for simultaneous detection of the four biomarkers.

  20. Effect of enzyme therapy and prognostic factors in 69 adults with Pompe disease: an open-label single-center study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in adults with Pompe disease, a progressive neuromuscular disorder, is of promising but variable efficacy. We investigated whether it alters the course of disease, and also identified potential prognostic factors. Methods Patients in this open-label single-center study were treated biweekly with 20 mg/kg alglucosidase alfa. Muscle strength, muscle function, and pulmonary function were assessed every 3–6 months and analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Sixty-nine patients (median age 52.1 years) were followed for a median of 23 months. Muscle strength increased after start of ERT (manual muscle testing 1.4 percentage points per year (pp/y); hand-held dynamometry 4.0 pp/y; both p < 0.001). Forced vital capacity (FVC) remained stable when measured in upright, but declined in supine position (−1.1 pp/y; p = 0.03). Muscle function did not improve in all patients (quick motor function test 0.7 pp/y; p = 0.14), but increased significantly in wheelchair-independent patients and those with mild and moderate muscle weakness. Relative to the pre-treatment period (49 patients with 14 months pre-ERT and 22 months ERT median follow-up), ERT affected muscle strength positively (manual muscle testing +3.3 pp/y, p < 0.001 and hand-held dynamometry +7.9 pp/y, p < 0.001). Its effect on upright FVC was +1.8 pp/y (p = 0.08) and on supine FVC +0.8 (p = 0.38). Favorable prognostic factors were female gender for muscle strength, and younger age and better clinical status for supine FVC. Conclusions We conclude that ERT positively alters the natural course of Pompe disease in adult patients; muscle strength increased and upright FVC stabilized. Functional outcome is probably best when ERT intervention is timely. PMID:23013746

  1. Label-free and enzyme-free platform for the construction of advanced DNA logic devices based on the assembly of graphene oxide and DNA-templated AgNCs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Jinbo; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-02-14

    DNA-based molecular logic computation has drawn extensive attention in bioanalysis, intelligent diagnostics of diseases and other nanotechnology areas. Herein, taking 2-to-1 and 4-to-2 encoders and a 1-to-2 decoder as model molecular logic devices, we for the first time combined the quenching ability of GO (graphene oxide) to DNA-templated AgNCs with G-quadruplex-enhanced fluorescence intensity of porphyrin dyes for the construction of label-free and enzyme-free dual-output advanced DNA molecular logic devices. Also, through the application of negative logic conversion to an XOR logic gate and combined with an INHIBIT logic gate, we also operated a label-free and enzyme-free comparator.

  2. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  3. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  4. Label-free and enzyme-free platform for the construction of advanced DNA logic devices based on the assembly of graphene oxide and DNA-templated AgNCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Jinbo; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-02-01

    DNA-based molecular logic computation has drawn extensive attention in bioanalysis, intelligent diagnostics of diseases and other nanotechnology areas. Herein, taking 2-to-1 and 4-to-2 encoders and a 1-to-2 decoder as model molecular logic devices, we for the first time combined the quenching ability of GO (graphene oxide) to DNA-templated AgNCs with G-quadruplex-enhanced fluorescence intensity of porphyrin dyes for the construction of label-free and enzyme-free dual-output advanced DNA molecular logic devices. Also, through the application of negative logic conversion to an XOR logic gate and combined with an INHIBIT logic gate, we also operated a label-free and enzyme-free comparator.DNA-based molecular logic computation has drawn extensive attention in bioanalysis, intelligent diagnostics of diseases and other nanotechnology areas. Herein, taking 2-to-1 and 4-to-2 encoders and a 1-to-2 decoder as model molecular logic devices, we for the first time combined the quenching ability of GO (graphene oxide) to DNA-templated AgNCs with G-quadruplex-enhanced fluorescence intensity of porphyrin dyes for the construction of label-free and enzyme-free dual-output advanced DNA molecular logic devices. Also, through the application of negative logic conversion to an XOR logic gate and combined with an INHIBIT logic gate, we also operated a label-free and enzyme-free comparator. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Optimization experiments, Table S1, Fig. S1-S5 in ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00032k

  5. Automatic emittance measurement at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Malone, R.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-07-01

    An automatic emittance measurement system to characterize the transverse emittance of the electron beam produced by the BNL photocathode electron gun is described. The system utilize a VAX workstation and a Spiricon beam analyzer. A operator window (created through the Vista control software package) controls the emittance measurement system and the graphic presentation of the results. Quadrupole variation method is used for the ATF automatic emittance measurement system. A simple emittance formula was derived to study the performance of the quadrupole variation method, and compared with the ATF experimental data is also presented.

  6. High-Throughput and Reliable Isotope Label-free Approach for Profiling 24 Metabolic Enzymes in FVB Mice and Sex Differences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiamei; Zhu, Lijun; Li, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Haihui; Yan, Tongmeng; Xie, Cong; Zeng, Sijing; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Huangyu; Lu, Linlin; Qi, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Ying; Hu, Ming; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2017-06-01

    FVB mice are extensively used in transgenic and pharmacokinetic research. In this study, a validated isotope label-free method was constructed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) to quantify 24 drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) in FVB mice. The DMEs include cytochrome P450s (CYP450s/Cyp450s), UDP-glucuronsyltransferases (UGTs/Ugts), and sulfotransferases (SULTs/Sults), which catalyze a variety of reactions to detoxify xenobiotics and endobiotics. The proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method exhibited good range and high sensitivity for signature peptides, as well as acceptable accuracy, precision, and recovery. The protein expression profiles of the DMEs were determined in male and female mice. Overall, the major Cyps, Ugts, and Sults were expressed in male mice followed the rank order: Cyp2c29 > 2e1 > 3a11 > 1a2 > 2d22 > 27a1 > 2c39; Ugt2b5 > 2b1 > 1a6a > 1a9 > 1a1 > 2a3 > 1a2 > 1a5; and Sult1a1 > 3a > 1d1. In contrast, the rank order in female mice was Cyp2c29 > 2e1 > 2c39 > 2d22 > 3a11 > 1a2 > 27a1; Ugt1a6a > 2b5 > 1a1 > 2b1 > 2a3 > 1a9 > 1a5 > 1a2; and Sult1a1 > 3a1 > 1d1. Cyp2c29, Cyp1a2, Cyp27a1, Ugt2b1, Ugt2b5 and Ugt2b36 were male predominant, whereas Cyp2c39, Cyp2d22, Cyp7a1, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a5, Sult1a1, Sult3a1, and Sult1d1 were female predominant. This work could serve as a useful reference for the metabolic study of new drugs and for elucidating the effectiveness and toxicity of drugs. The method is stable, simple, and rapid for determining the expression of DMEs in animals. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Carbon nanotubes as field emitter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing; Song, Yuelin; Wang, Na; Chen, Huihui; Chen, Haihua; Wu, Jianghong; Sun, Yangang; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as a promising material of electron field emitters. They exhibit extraordinary field emission properties because of their high electrical conductivity, high aspect ratio "needle like" shape for optimum geometrical field enhancement, and remarkable thermal stability. In this Review, we emphasize the estimation and influencing factors of CNTs' emission properties, and discuss in detail the emission properties of macroscopic CNT cathodes, especially fabricated by transplant methods, and describe recent progress on understanding of CNT field emitters and analyze issues related to applications of CNT based cold cathodes in field emission display (FED). We foresee that CNT-FED will take an important place in display technologies in the near future.

  8. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  9. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  10. EMITTANCE CONTROL FOR VERY SHORT BUNCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K

    2004-07-20

    Many recent accelerator projects call for the production of high energy bunches of electrons or positrons that are simultaneously short, intense, and have small emittances. Examples of such projects are the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL's, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A major challenge is keeping in check forces that increase beam emittances in accelerator components, such as: wakefields of accelerator structures and surface roughness, and coherent synchrotron radiation. We describe such forces and discuss emittance control.

  11. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  12. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  13. An ESS system for ECRIS Emittance Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Sun, L.T.; He, W.; Ma, L.; Zhang, Z.M.; Zhao, H.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhang, X.Z.; Guo, X.H.; Ma, B.H.; Li, J.; Wang, H.; Li, J.Y.; Li, X.X.; Feng, Y.C.; Lu, W.

    2005-03-15

    An emittance scanner named Electric-Sweep Scanner had been designed and fabricated in IMP. And it has been set up on the LECR3 beam line for the ion beam quality study. With some development, the ESS system has become a relatively dependable and reliable emittance scanner. Its experiment error is about 10 percent. We have done a lot of experiments of emittance measurement on LECR3 ion source, and have researched the relations between ion beam emittance and the major parameters of ECR ion source. The reliability and accuracy test results are presented in this paper. And the performance analysis is also discussed.

  14. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  15. Chemical regeneration of emitter surface increases thermionic diode life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breiteieser, R.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical regeneration of sublimated emitter electrode increases the operating efficiency and life of thermionic diodes. A gas which forms chemical compounds with the sublimated emitter material is introduced into the space between the emitter and the collector. The compounds migrate to the emitter where they decompose and redeposit the emitter material.

  16. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  17. Emittance growth in rippled solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Emittance growth results due to accelerating gaps, and magnetic field gaps in induction accelerators. The analytic technique previously used to study electric field induced emittance growth for immersed source beams is extended to include solenoid fringing field effects in the present work. These results have application to industrial induction accelerators and to high brightness Free Electron Laser drivers. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  18. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  19. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  20. New approach to obtain boron selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlecke, A.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    Selective emitters, used in high efficiency solar cells, need a series of oxidations and photolithographic steps that render the process more expensive. In this paper, a new way to make selective emitters using boron is presented. The main feature of this approach is to save oxide growths and photolithographic processes and it is based on the property of boron doped silicon surfaces to be resistant to anisotropic etchings like the one performed during the texturization. Using this characteristic of boron emitter surfaces, the authors can obtain a highly doped emitter under metal grid and simultaneously a shield to avoid texture on these surfaces. First cells were processed and short wavelength response of p{sup +}nn{sup +} solar cells was enhanced by using lightly doped boron emitters in the uncovered area.

  1. TPV Systems with Solar Powered Tungsten Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A. S.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Khvostikova, O. A.; Gazaryan, P. Y.; Sorokina, S. V.; Andreev, V. M.

    2007-02-22

    A solar TPV generator development and characterization are presented. A double stage sunlight concentrator ensures 4600x concentration ratio. TPV modules based on tungsten emitters and GaSb cells were designed, fabricated and tested at indoor and outdoor conditions. The performance of tungsten emitter under concentrated solar radiation was analyzed. Emitter temperatures in the range of 1400-2000 K were measured, depending on the emitter size. The light distribution in the module has been characterized, 1x1 cm GaSb TPV cells were fabricated with the use of the Zn-diffusion and LPE technologies. The cell efficiency of 19% under illumination by a tungsten emitter (27% under spectra cut-off at {lambda} > 1820 nm) heated up to 1900-2000 K had been derived from experimentally measured PV parameters. The series connection of PV cells was ensured by the use of BeO ceramics. The possibilities of system performance improvement are discussed.

  2. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  3. Direct, rapid, and label-free detection of enzyme-substrate interactions in physiological buffers using CMOS-compatible nanoribbon sensors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Luye; Droujinine, Ilia A; Rajan, Nitin K; Sawtelle, Sonya D; Reed, Mark A

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the versatility of Al2O3-passivated Si nanowire devices ("nanoribbons") in the analysis of enzyme-substrate interactions via the monitoring of pH change. Our approach is shown to be effective through the detection of urea in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and penicillinase in PBS and urine, at limits of detection of <200 μM and 0.02 units/mL, respectively. The ability to extract accurate enzyme kinetics and the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) from the acetylcholine-acetylcholinesterase reaction is also demonstrated.

  4. Microlensless interdigitated photoconductive terahertz emitters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Prabhu, S S

    2015-01-26

    We report here fabrication of interdigitated photoconductive antenna (iPCA) terahertz (THz) emitters based on plasmonic electrode design. Novel design of this iPCA enables it to work without microlens array focusing, which is otherwise required for photo excitation of selective photoconductive regions to avoid the destructive interference of emitted THz radiation from oppositely biased regions. Benefit of iPCA over single active region PCA is, photo excitation can be done at larger area hence avoiding the saturation effect at higher optical excitation density. The emitted THz radiation power from plasmonic-iPCAs is ~2 times more than the single active region plasmonic PCA at 200 mW optical excitation, which will further increase at higher optical powers. This design is expected to reduce fabrication cost of photoconductive THz sources and detectors.

  5. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  6. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  7. Alpha-emitters for immuno-therapy: a review of recent developments from chemistry to clinics.

    PubMed

    Huclier-Markai, Sandrine; Alliot, Cyrille; Varmenot, Nicolas; Cutler, Cathy S; Barbet, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-particles are of considerable growing interest for Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT). TAT gains more attention as new targets, chemical labeling techniques and α-particle emitters are developed but translation of TAT into the clinic has been slow, in part because of the limited availability and the short physical half-lives of some of the available α-particle emitters. This article is an up-to-date overview of the literature concerning α-emitters used for TAT of cancer. It briefly describes the nuclear characteristics, the production parameters (targets, extraction and purification), the complexation properties of these radionuclides to chelates and biological vectors and finally draws-upon the preclinical and clinical studies that have been performed over the past two decades. Radiobiology and dosimetry aspects are also presented in this paper.

  8. Portable infrared reflectometer for evaluating emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Optical methods are frequently used to evaluate the emittance of candidate spacecraft thermal control materials. One new optical method utilizes a portable infrared reflectometer capable of obtaining spectral reflectance of an opaque surface in the range of 2 to 25 microns using a Michelson-Type FTIR interferometer. This miniature interferometer collects many infrared spectra over a short period of time. It also allows the size of the instrument to be small such that spectra can be collected in the laboratory or in the field. Infrared spectra are averaged and integrated with respect to the room temperature black body spectrum to yield emittance at 300 K. Integrating with respect to other black body spectra yields emittance values at other temperatures. Absorption bands in the spectra may also be used for chemical species identification. The emittance of several samples was evaluated using this portable infrared reflectometer, an old infrared reflectometer equipped with dual rotating black body cavities, and a bench top thermal vacuum chamber. Samples for evaluation were purposely selected such that a range of emittance values and thermal control material types would be represented, including polished aluminum, Kapton®, silvered Teflon®, and the inorganic paint Z-93-P. Results indicate an excellent linear relationship between the room temperature emittance calculated from infrared spectral data and the emittance obtained from the dual rotating black body cavities and thermal vacuum chamber. The prospect of using the infrared spectral data for chemical species identification will also be discussed. .

  9. The preservation of low emittance flat beams

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1993-04-01

    Many future linear collider designs require beams with very small transverse emittances and large emittance ratios {epsilon}{sub x} {much_gt} {epsilon}{sub y}. In this paper, we will discuss issues associated with the preservation of these small emittances during the acceleration of the beams. The primary sources of transverse emittance dilution in a high energy linear accelerator are the transverse wakefields, the dispersive errors, RF deflections, and betatron coupling. We will discuss the estimation of these effects and the calculation of tolerances that will limit the emittance dilution with a high degree of confidence. Since the six-dimensional emittance is conserved and only the projected emittances are increased, these dilutions can be corrected if the beam has not filamented (phase mixed). We discuss methods of correcting the dilutions and easing the tolerances with beam-based alignment and steering techniques, and non-local trajectory bumps. Finally, we discuss another important source of luminosity degradation, namely, pulse-to-pulse jitter.

  10. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  11. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  12. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the Km changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed.

  13. Narrowband terahertz emitters using metamaterial films.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fabio; Kearney, Brian; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2012-09-10

    In this article we report on metamaterial-based narrowband thermal terahertz (THz) emitters with a bandwidth of about 1 THz. Single band emitters designed to radiate in the 4 to 8 THz range were found to emit as high as 36 W/m(2) when operated at 400 °C. Emission into two well-separated THz bands was also demonstrated by using metamaterial structures featuring more complex unit cells. Imaging of heated emitters using a microbolometer camera fitted with THz optics clearly showed the expected higher emissivity from the metamaterial structure compared to low-emissivity of the surrounding aluminum.

  14. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  15. Thermophotovoltaic emitter material selection and design

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, P.C.; Moran, A.L.; Harper, M.J.; Lindler, K.W.

    1997-07-01

    Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is a potentially attractive direct energy conversion technology. It reduces the need for complex machinery with moving parts and maintenance. TPV generators can be run from a variety of heat sources including waste heat for smaller scale operations. The US Naval Academy`s goal was to build a small experimental thermophotovoltaic generator powered by combustion gases from a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine. The design of the generator imposes material limitations that directly affect emitter and structural materials selection. This paper details emitter material goals and requirements, and the methods used to select suitable candidate emitter materials for further testing.

  16. Online clustering algorithms for radar emitter classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lee, Jim P Y; Senior; Li, Lingjie; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Wong, K Max

    2005-08-01

    Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters from received radar pulse samples. The main challenges of this task are the high dimensionality of radar pulse samples, small sample group size, and closely located radar pulse clusters. In this paper, two new online clustering algorithms are developed for radar emitter classification: One is model-based using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) criterion and the other is based on competitive learning. Computational complexity is analyzed for each algorithm and then compared. Simulation results show the superior performance of the model-based algorithm over competitive learning in terms of better classification accuracy, flexibility, and stability.

  17. Effects of polyacrylamide, biopolymer, and biochar on decomposition of soil organic matter and 14C-labeled plant residues as determined by enzyme activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Awad, Yasser; Ok, Young Sik; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Application of polymers for the improvement of aggregate structure and reduction of soil erosion may alter the availability and decomposition of plant residues. In this study, we assessed the effects of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), synthesized biopolymer (BP), and biochar (BC) on the decomposition of 14C-labeled maize residue in sandy and sandy loam soils. Specifically, PAM and BP with or without 14C-labeled plant residue were applied at 400 kg ha-1, whereas BC was applied at 5000 kg ha-1, after which the soils were incubated for 80 days at 22 oC. Initially, plant residue decomposition was much higher in untreated sandy loam soil than in sandy soil. Nevertheless, the stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were more pronounced in sandy soil, where it accounted for 13.4% and 23.4% of 14C input, respectively, whereas in sandy loam soil, the acceleration of plant residue decomposition by BP and BC did not exceed 2.6% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to untreated soil with plant residue. The stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were confirmed based on activities of β-cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and chitinase in both soils. In contrast to BC and BP, PAM did not increase the decomposition of native or added C in both soils.

  18. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  19. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeri Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-21

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  20. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K. N.; Perkins, L. T.; Pickard, D. S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M. D.

    1996-03-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of a rf-generated plasma.

  1. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  2. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  3. An improved method for the synthesis of mercurated dUTP. Enzymic synthesis of Hg-labelled DNA of high molecular weight suitable for use in an image based DNA sequencing strategy.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, A J; Petersen, G B

    1996-01-01

    The development of high-resolution scanning-probe microscopes has reawakened interest in the possibility of sequencing large nucleic acid molecules by direct imaging. Such an approach would be facilitated by the availability of effective methods for increasing contrast by labelling specific nucleotides, and the utility of introducing mercury atoms into complete DNA molecules through the enzymic polymerisation of mercurated pyrimidine deoxynucleoside triphosphates has been re-investigated. A simplified and improved method for the synthesis of a heat- and thiol-stable, mercurated derivative of deoxyuridine triphosphate in high yield and the incorporation of this precursor into full-length copies of a single-stranded phage M13 template are described. The DNA product has been fully characterised and the quantitative and specific replacement of thymidylic acid residues by the mercurated analogue demonstrated.

  4. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  5. Enhanced Light Emitters Based on Metamaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    Enhanced Light Emitters based on Metamaterials We report the development of light emitters based on hyperbolic metamaterials . During the 18 month...layer, use of a high refractive index contrast grating to out-couple light from active hyperbolic metamaterials . We also successfully demonstrated for...the first time simultaneous enhancement in spontaneous emission ad light extraction from active metamaterial structures. The views, opinions and/or

  6. Coaxial inverted geometry transistor having buried emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Cress, S. B.; Dunn, W. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to an inverted geometry transistor wherein the emitter is buried within the substrate. The transistor can be fabricated as a part of a monolithic integrated circuit and is particularly suited for use in applications where it is desired to employ low actuating voltages. The transistor may employ the same doping levels in the collector and emitter, so these connections can be reversed.

  7. Charge neutrality in heavily doped emitters

    SciTech Connect

    del Alamo, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The applicability of the quasineutrality approximation to modern emitters of solar cells is analytically reviewed. It is shown that this approximation is fulfilled in more than 80% of the depth of a typical solar-cell emitter, being particularly excellent in the heavily doped regions beneath the surface where most of the heavy doping effects arise. Our conclusions are in conflict with Redfield's recent affirmations.

  8. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  9. Preferential labeling of alpha-amino N-terminal groups in peptides by biotin: application to the detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies by enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Sélo, I; Négroni, L; Créminon, C; Grassi, J; Wal, J M

    1996-12-15

    Experimental conditions (pH 6.5, 24 h reaction, peptide:biotin ratio 1:5) were defined for preferential incorporation of the biotin molecule in the N-terminal alpha-amino group of peptides. This strategy could be helpful in numerous applications when an entire peptide chain must remain accessible for antibody or receptor binding. We illustrate this advantage in a solid-phase enzyme immunoassay designed to detect antibodies specific for bovine beta-lactoglobulin present in rabbit or human sera. This test involves synthetic peptides biotinylated in different positions and immobilized on a solid phase. The use of biotin/streptavidin interactions permitted more efficient detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies than solid phases prepared using conventional passive-adsorption techniques. The highest levels of antibody binding were measured when biotinylation occurred at the N-terminal extremity of immobilized peptides.

  10. A multicenter open-label treatment protocol (HGT-GCB-058) of velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease type 1: safety and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Rosenbloom, Barry; Weinreb, Neal; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Grabowski, Gregory; Cohn, Gabriel M; Zahrieh, David

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the safety of velaglucerase alfa in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease who received velaglucerase alfa in the US treatment protocol HGT-GCB-058 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00954460) during a global supply shortage of imiglucerase. This multicenter open-label treatment protocol enrolled patients who were either treatment naïve or had been receiving imiglucerase. Patients received intravenous velaglucerase alfa every other week at a dose of 60 U/kg (treatment naïve) or 15-60 U/kg (previously treated). A total of 211 (including six treatment-naïve) patients were enrolled. Among the 205 previously treated patients, 35 (17.1%) experienced an adverse event considered related to study drug. Among the six treatment-naïve patients, one had an adverse event considered related to study drug. Infusion-related adverse events occurred in 28 (13.3%) of the 211 patients and usually occurred during the first three infusions. De novo, nonneutralizing, anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies developed during treatment in one (<1.0%) previously treated patient and none of the treatment-naïve patients. The currently observed safety profile was consistent with those previously reported for imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa phase III clinical trials. These results support the safety of initiating treatment with velaglucerase alfa or transitioning patients from imiglucerase therapy to velaglucerase alfa therapy.

  11. Electrochemical detection of synthetic DNA and native 16S rRNA fragments on a microarray using a biotinylated intercalator as coupling site for an enzyme label.

    PubMed

    Zimdars, Andreas; Gebala, Magdalena; Hartwich, Gerhard; Neugebauer, Sebastian; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    The direct electrochemical detection of synthetic DNA and native 16S rRNA fragments isolated from Escherichia coli is described. Oligonucleotides are detected via selective post-labeling of double stranded DNA and DNA-RNA duplexes with a biotinylated intercalator that enables high-specific binding of a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase conjugate. The alkaline phosphatase catalyzes formation of p-aminophenol that is subsequently oxidized at the underlying gold electrode and hence enables the detection of complementary hybridization of the DNA capture strands due to the enzymatic signal amplification. The hybridization assay was performed on microarrays consisting of 32 individually addressable gold microelectrodes. Synthetic DNA strands with sequences representing six different pathogens which are important for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections could be detected at concentrations of 60 nM. Native 16S rRNA isolated from the different pathogens could be detected at a concentration of 30 fM. Optimization of the sensing surface is described and influences on the assay performance are discussed.

  12. A multicenter open-label treatment protocol (HGT-GCB-058) of velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease type 1: safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Pastores, Gregory M.; Rosenbloom, Barry; Weinreb, Neal; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Grabowski, Gregory; Cohn, Gabriel M.; Zahrieh, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of velaglucerase alfa in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease who received velaglucerase alfa in the US treatment protocol HGT-GCB-058 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00954460) during a global supply shortage of imiglucerase. Methods: This multicenter open-label treatment protocol enrolled patients who were either treatment naïve or had been receiving imiglucerase. Patients received intravenous velaglucerase alfa every other week at a dose of 60 U/kg (treatment naïve) or 15–60 U/kg (previously treated). Results: A total of 211 (including six treatment-naïve) patients were enrolled. Among the 205 previously treated patients, 35 (17.1%) experienced an adverse event considered related to study drug. Among the six treatment-naïve patients, one had an adverse event considered related to study drug. Infusion-related adverse events occurred in 28 (13.3%) of the 211 patients and usually occurred during the first three infusions. De novo, nonneutralizing, anti–velaglucerase alfa antibodies developed during treatment in one (<1.0%) previously treated patient and none of the treatment-naïve patients. Conclusion: The currently observed safety profile was consistent with those previously reported for imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa phase III clinical trials. These results support the safety of initiating treatment with velaglucerase alfa or transitioning patients from imiglucerase therapy to velaglucerase alfa therapy. PMID:24263462

  13. Enzyme-regulated activation of DNAzyme: a novel strategy for a label-free colorimetric DNA ligase assay and ligase-based biosensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiyu; Li, Wang; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhuoliang; Nie, Lihua; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-03-26

    The DNA nick repair catalyzed by DNA ligase is significant for fundamental life processes, such as the replication, repair, and recombination of nucleic acids. Here, we have employed ligase to regulate DNAzyme activity and developed a homogeneous, colorimetric, label-free and DNAzyme-based strategy to detect DNA ligase activity. This novel strategy relies on the ligation-trigged activation or production of horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme that catalyzes the generation of a color change signal; this results in a colorimetric assay of DNA ligase activity. Using T4 DNA ligase as a model, we have proposed two approaches to demonstrate the validity of the DNAzyme strategy. The first approach utilizes an allosteric hairpin-DNAzyme probe specifically responsive to DNA ligation; this approach has a wide detection range from 0.2 to 40 U mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.2 U mL(-1). Furthermore, the approach was adapted to probe nucleic acid phosphorylation and single nucleotide mismatch. The second approach employs a "split DNA machine" to produce numerous DNAzymes after being reassembled by DNA ligase; this greatly enhances the detection sensitivity by a signal amplification cascade to achieve a detection limit of 0.01 U mL(-1).

  14. Enhanced Fluorescence ELISA Based on HAT Triggering Fluorescence "Turn-on" with Enzyme-Antibody Dual Labeled AuNP Probes for Ultrasensitive Detection of AFP and HBsAg.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yudong; Guo, Weisheng; Peng, Weipan; Zhao, Qian; Piao, Jiafang; Zhang, Bo; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Hanjie; Gong, Xiaoqun; Chang, Jin

    2017-03-22

    At present, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is considered to be the most appropriate approach in clinical biomarker detection, with good specificity, low cost, and straightforward readout. However, unsatisfactory sensitivity severely hampers its wide application in clinical diagnosis. Herein, we designed a new kind of enhanced fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (FELISA) based on the human alpha-thrombin (HAT) triggering fluorescence "turn-on" signals. In this system, detection antibodies (Ab2) and HAT were labeled on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form the detection probes, and a bisamide derivative of Rhodamine110 with fluorescence quenched served as the substrate of HAT. After the sandwich immunoreaction, HAT on the sandwich structure could catalyze the cleavage of the fluorescence-quenched substrate, leading to a strong fluorescence signal for sensing ultralow levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg). Under the optimized reaction conditions, AFP and HBsAg were detected at the ultralow concentrations of 10(-8) ng mL(-1) and 5 × 10(-4) IU mL(-1), respectively, which were at least 10(4) times lower than those of the conventional fluorescence assay and 10(6) times lower than those of the conventional ELISA. In addition, we further discussed the efficiency of the sensitive FELISA in clinical serum samples, showing great potential in practical applications.

  15. [A study on the appropriate fixation for the procedures for the better preservation of cellular antigenicity and morphology of the blood smear in immunocytochemistry: an improvement of the immunostain technique using alkaline-phosphatase (ALP) as a labeling enzyme].

    PubMed

    Aoki, J; Sasaki, N; Hino, N; Nanba, K

    1991-01-01

    The authors previously reported a new coloration method which utilized hexazotized newfuchsin as a coupler for the immuno-enzyme-cytochemistry. This procedure used alkaline-phosphatase (ALP) as the labeling enzyme. The insolubility of the reaction product to organic solvents made it possible to prepare permanent slides. However, this suffered from several drawbacks, due to the fixation procedures, in the preservation of better morphology and antigenicity of the cell. The present study was undertaken to overcome such problems by modifying the fixation procedure. The study utilized twenty monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies commonly used in immunohematological staining. Various fixative solutions and timing of fixation were evaluated. The results indicated that; 1) the best fixative solution was a mixture of buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA) and acetone (10 ml 40% PFA solution, 10 ml pH 6.6 0.02 M phosphate buffer, 20 ml distilled water, 60 ml acetone, with pH adjusted to 6.6-7.4 with HCl) and 2) the fixation should be performed just before the immunostain. The results further showed that unstained smear slides, when freshly air dried and stored in a desicator, could maintain various differentiation antigens (CD2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, 14, 15, 16, 19, 25, L26, HLA-DR) for at least 4 weeks without any change in the immuno-reactivity. Thus, we conclude that this improved fixation procedure is an optimum fixative and should be used in routine application of the immunostain method for blood smears.

  16. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics of Mouse Cerebrospinal Fluid Detects β-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme (BACE1) Protease Substrates In Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Dislich, Bastian; Wohlrab, Felix; Bachhuber, Teresa; Müller, Stephan A.; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Hogl, Sebastian; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of murine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by quantitative mass spectrometry is challenging because of low CSF volume, low total protein concentration, and the presence of highly abundant proteins such as albumin. We demonstrate that the CSF proteome of individual mice can be analyzed in a quantitative manner to a depth of several hundred proteins in a robust and simple workflow consisting of single ultra HPLC runs on a benchtop mass spectrometer. The workflow is validated by a comparative analysis of BACE1−/− and wild-type mice using label-free quantification. The protease BACE1 cleaves the amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as several other substrates and is a major drug target in Alzheimer's disease. We identified a total of 715 proteins with at least 2 unique peptides and quantified 522 of those proteins in CSF from BACE1−/− and wild-type mice. Several proteins, including the known BACE1 substrates APP, APLP1, CHL1 and contactin-2 showed lower abundance in the CSF of BACE1−/− mice, demonstrating that BACE1 substrate identification is possible from CSF. Additionally, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase 5 was identified as a novel BACE1 substrate and validated in cells using immunoblots and by an in vitro BACE1 protease assay. Likewise, receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase N2 and plexin domain-containing 2 were confirmed as BACE1 substrates by in vitro assays. Taken together, our study shows the deepest characterization of the mouse CSF proteome to date and the first quantitative analysis of the CSF proteome of individual mice. The BACE1 substrates identified in CSF may serve as biomarkers to monitor BACE1 activity in Alzheimer patients treated with BACE inhibitors. PMID:26139848

  17. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  18. Variable emittance behavior of smart radiative coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Fan, Desong; Li, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Smart radiative coating on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was prepared by the sol-gel La{}1-xSr x MnO3 (x = 0.125, 0.175 and 0.2) nanoparticles and the binder composed of terpineol and ethyl cellulose. The crystallized structure, grain size, chemical compositions, magnetization and the surface morphology were characterized. The thermal radiative properties of coating in the infrared range was evaluated from infrared reflectance spectra at various temperatures. A single perovskite structure is detected in sol-gel nanoparticles with size 200 nm. Magnetization measurement reveals that room temperature phase transition samples can be obtained by appropriate Sr substitution. The influence of surface conditions and sintering temperature on the emittance of coating was observed. For rough coatings with root-mean-square roughness 640 nm (x = 0.125) and 800 nm (x = 0.175) , its emittance increment is 0.24 and 0.26 in in the temperature range of 173-373 K. Increasing sintering temperature to 1673 K, coating emittance variation improves to 0.3 and 0.302 respectively. After mechanical polishing treatment, the emittance increment of coatings are enhanced to 0.31 and 0.3, respectively. The results suggested that the emittance variation can be enhanced by reducing surface roughness and increasing sintering temperature of coating.

  19. Emittance control in Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Chiu, C.; Breitling, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we summarize our recent effort and results in theoretical study of the emittance issues of multistaged Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in TeV energy range. In such an energy regime the luminosity and therefore the emittance requirements become very stringent and tantamount to the success or failure of such an accelerator. The system of such a machine is very sensitive to jitters due to misalignment between the beam and the wakefield. In particular, the effect of jitters in the presence of a strong focusing wakefield and initial longitudinal phase space spread of the beam leads to severe transverse emittance degradation of the beam. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration in a superunit setup, the "horn" model based on exactly synchronous acceleration achieved through plasma density variation and lastly an algorithm based on minimization of the final beam emittance to actively control the stage displacement of such an accelerator.

  20. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  1. Detection of Type A, B, E, and F Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins in Foods by Using an Amplified Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with Digoxigenin-Labeled Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shashi K.; Ferreira, Joseph. L.; Eblen, Brian S.; Whiting, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    An amplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Clostridium botulinum complex neurotoxins was evaluated for its ability to detect these toxins in food. The assay was found to be suitable for detecting type A, B, E, and F botulinum neurotoxins in a variety of food matrices representing liquids, solid, and semisolid food. Specific foods included broccoli, orange juice, bottled water, cola soft drinks, vanilla extract, oregano, potato salad, apple juice, meat products, and dairy foods. The detection sensitivity of the test for these botulinum complex serotypes was found to be 60 pg/ml (1.9 50% lethal dose [LD50]) for botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), 176 pg/ml (1.58 LD50) for BoNT/B, 163 pg/ml for BoNT/E (4.5 LD50), and 117 pg/ml for BoNT/F (less than 1 LD50) in casein buffer. The test could also readily detect 2 ng/ml of neurotoxins type A, B, E, and F in a variety of food samples. For specificity studies, the assay was also used to test a large panel of type A C. botulinum, a smaller panel of proteolytic and nonproteolytic type B, E, and F neurotoxin-producing Clostridia, and nontoxigenic organisms using an overnight incubation of toxin production medium. The assay appears to be an effective tool for large-scale screening of the food supply in the event of a botulinum neurotoxin contamination event. PMID:16461671

  2. Quantitative deconvolution of human thermal infrared emittance.

    PubMed

    Arthur, D T J; Khan, M M

    2013-01-01

    The bioheat transfer models conventionally employed in etiology of human thermal infrared (TIR) emittance rely upon two assumptions; universal graybody emissivity and significant transmission of heat from subsurface tissue layers. In this work, a series of clinical and laboratory experiments were designed and carried out to conclusively evaluate the validity of the two assumptions. Results obtained from the objective analyses of TIR images of human facial and tibial regions demonstrated significant variations in spectral thermophysical properties at different anatomic locations on human body. The limited validity of the two assumptions signifies need for quantitative deconvolution of human TIR emittance in clinical, psychophysiological and critical applications. A novel approach to joint inversion of the bioheat transfer model is also introduced, levering the deterministic temperature-dependency of proton resonance frequency in low-lipid human soft tissue for characterizing the relationship between subsurface 3D tissue temperature profiles and corresponding TIR emittance.

  3. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  4. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  5. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  6. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R.J. Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence. PMID:28008918

  7. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  8. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  9. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  10. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  11. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  12. A label-free and enzyme-free system for operating various logic devices using poly(thymine)-templated CuNPs and SYBR Green I as signal transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Changtong; Zhou, Chunyang; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-07-01

    For the first time by integrating fluorescent polyT-templated CuNPs and SYBR Green I, a basic INHIBIT gate and four advanced logic circuits (2-to-1 encoder, 4-to-2 encoder, 1-to-2 decoder and 1-to-2 demultiplexer) have been conceptually realized under label-free and enzyme-free conditions. Taking advantage of the selective formation of CuNPs on ss-DNA, the implementation of these advanced logic devices were achieved without any usage of dye quenching groups or other nanomaterials like graphene oxide or AuNPs since polyA strands not only worked as an input but also acted as effective inhibitors towards polyT templates, meeting the aim of developing bio-computing with cost-effective and operationally simple methods. In short, polyT-templated CuNPs, as promising fluorescent signal reporters, are successfully applied to fabricate advanced logic devices, which may present a potential path for future development of molecular computations.For the first time by integrating fluorescent polyT-templated CuNPs and SYBR Green I, a basic INHIBIT gate and four advanced logic circuits (2-to-1 encoder, 4-to-2 encoder, 1-to-2 decoder and 1-to-2 demultiplexer) have been conceptually realized under label-free and enzyme-free conditions. Taking advantage of the selective formation of CuNPs on ss-DNA, the implementation of these advanced logic devices were achieved without any usage of dye quenching groups or other nanomaterials like graphene oxide or AuNPs since polyA strands not only worked as an input but also acted as effective inhibitors towards polyT templates, meeting the aim of developing bio-computing with cost-effective and operationally simple methods. In short, polyT-templated CuNPs, as promising fluorescent signal reporters, are successfully applied to fabricate advanced logic devices, which may present a potential path for future development of molecular computations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04069a

  13. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. From the theory of remote sensing of surface temperatures, an equation of the upper bound of absolute error of emittance was determined. It showed that the absolute error decreased with an increase in contact temperature, whereas, it increased with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. Change in emittance had little effect on the absolute error. A plot of the difference between temperature and band radiance temperature vs. emittance was provided for the wavelength intervals: 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns, and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  14. Optimization of SERS Tag Intensity, Binding Footprint, and Emittance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags have attracted interest as labels for use in a variety of applications, including biomolecular assays. An obstacle to progress in this area is a lack of standardized approaches to compare the brightness of different SERS tags within and between laboratories. Here we present an approach based on binding of SERS tags to beads with known binding capacities that allows evaluation of the average intensity, the relative binding footprint of particles in a SERS tag preparation, and the size-normalized intensity or emittance. We tested this on four different SERS tag compositions and show that aggregated gold nanorods produce SERS tags that are 2–4 times brighter than relatively more monodisperse nanorods, but that the aggregated nanorods are also correspondingly larger, which may negate the intensity if steric hindrance limits the number of tags bound to a target. By contrast, SERS tags prepared from smaller gold nanorods coated with a silver shell produce SERS tags that are 2–3 times brighter, on a size-normalized basis, than the Au nanorod-based tags, resulting in labels with improved performance in SERS-based image and flow cytometry assays. SERS tags based on red-resonant Ag plates showed similarly bright signals and small footprint. This approach to evaluating SERS tag brightness is general, uses readily available reagents and instruments, and should be suitable for interlab comparisons of SERS tag brightness. PMID:24892497

  15. Optimization of SERS tag intensity, binding footprint, and emittance.

    PubMed

    Nolan, John P; Duggan, Erika; Condello, Danilo

    2014-07-16

    Nanoparticle surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags have attracted interest as labels for use in a variety of applications, including biomolecular assays. An obstacle to progress in this area is a lack of standardized approaches to compare the brightness of different SERS tags within and between laboratories. Here we present an approach based on binding of SERS tags to beads with known binding capacities that allows evaluation of the average intensity, the relative binding footprint of particles in a SERS tag preparation, and the size-normalized intensity or emittance. We tested this on four different SERS tag compositions and show that aggregated gold nanorods produce SERS tags that are 2-4 times brighter than relatively more monodisperse nanorods, but that the aggregated nanorods are also correspondingly larger, which may negate the intensity if steric hindrance limits the number of tags bound to a target. By contrast, SERS tags prepared from smaller gold nanorods coated with a silver shell produce SERS tags that are 2-3 times brighter, on a size-normalized basis, than the Au nanorod-based tags, resulting in labels with improved performance in SERS-based image and flow cytometry assays. SERS tags based on red-resonant Ag plates showed similarly bright signals and small footprint. This approach to evaluating SERS tag brightness is general, uses readily available reagents and instruments, and should be suitable for interlab comparisons of SERS tag brightness.

  16. A study of emittance growth in the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswamy Gounder et al.

    2001-07-20

    We investigate processes contributing to emittance growth in the Fermilab Recycler Ring. In addition to beam-gas multiple scattering, we also examine other external factors such as Main Injector ramping affecting the emittance growth.

  17. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  18. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  19. Emittance growth rates for displaced beams

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.A. |

    1993-05-01

    Emittance growth rates have been previously analyzed for nonuniform beams in linear channels and for initially uniform mismatched beams in nonlinear channels. These studies were for centered beams. Additional emittance growth can arise in cases where the beam is initially displaced. The purpose of this study is to obtain growth rates for displaced beams. This work differs from studies involving random displacement of electrodes. Our analysis assumes instead that the focusing system is perfectly aligned but that the beam is initially displaced with respect to the equilibrium axis. If the focusing force is slightly nonlinear, we find a gradual transfer of the potential energy of beam displacement into kinetic energy associated with emittance growth. We present explicit results for the emittance growth distance as a function of the nonlinearity of the channel. These results will have practical importance for designers of accelerators and transport systems when setting realistic tolerances for initial beam alignment. These tolerances will depend on the nonlinearity and the length of the system.

  20. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  1. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus_minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus_minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  2. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  3. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  4. Simple-to-prepare multipoint field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Mishin, M. V.; Kornishin, S. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate multitip field emitters prepared by electroerosion treatment of the surface of molybdenum samples. Their characteristics are determined for operation with a protecting activated fullerene coating. Our experiments indicate that such cathodes are promising for high-voltage electron devices operating in technical vacuum.

  5. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  6. Optical transition radiation beam emittance diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1994-10-10

    We have developed several analytic and experimental techniques to measure the divergence and emittance of charged particle beams, which employ optical transition radiation (OTR) produced from thin intercepting foils. OTR`s directionality, promptness, linearity, polarization, and the sensitivity of its angular distribution to energy and divergence, can be all exploited to diagnose the spatial distribution, energy, and emittance of a charged particle beam. We describe the techniques we have developed to separately determine the {ital x} and {ital y} emittances of a beam at an {ital x} or {ital y} waist using OTR from a single foil or a two foil OTR interferometer. These methods have proven to be especially valuable for diagnosing low emittance electron beams produced by FEL accelerators, which range in energy from 17 to 110 Mev. However, we have shown that there is no inherent theoretical limit to the utility of these methods for much higher energy lepton or hadron beams. The advantages of OTR methods over those commonly used to diagnose beam properties are described.

  7. Emittance growth from space-charge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1991-01-01

    Space-charge-induced emittance growth has become a topic of much recent interest for designing the low-velocity sections of high- intensity, high-brightness accelerators and beam-transport channels. In this paper we review the properties of the space-charge force, and discuss the concepts of matching, space-charge and emittance-dominated beams, and equilibrium beams and their characteristics. This is followed by a survey of some of the work over the past 25 years to identify the mechanisms of this emittance growth in both ion and electron accelerators. We summarize the overall results in terms of four distinct mechanisms whose characteristics we describe. Finally, we show numerical simulation results for the evolution of initial rms-mismatched laminar beams. The examples show that for space-charge dominated beams, the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a highly choatic filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. In the examples we have studied the halo contains only a few percent of the particles, but contributes about half of the emittance growth. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A label-free and enzyme-free system for operating various logic devices using poly(thymine)-templated CuNPs and SYBR Green I as signal transducers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changtong; Zhou, Chunyang; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-08-07

    For the first time by integrating fluorescent polyT-templated CuNPs and SYBR Green I, a basic INHIBIT gate and four advanced logic circuits (2-to-1 encoder, 4-to-2 encoder, 1-to-2 decoder and 1-to-2 demultiplexer) have been conceptually realized under label-free and enzyme-free conditions. Taking advantage of the selective formation of CuNPs on ss-DNA, the implementation of these advanced logic devices were achieved without any usage of dye quenching groups or other nanomaterials like graphene oxide or AuNPs since polyA strands not only worked as an input but also acted as effective inhibitors towards polyT templates, meeting the aim of developing bio-computing with cost-effective and operationally simple methods. In short, polyT-templated CuNPs, as promising fluorescent signal reporters, are successfully applied to fabricate advanced logic devices, which may present a potential path for future development of molecular computations.

  9. Self-powered radiation detector with conductive emitter support

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.F.; Goldstein, N.P.; Playfoot, K.C.

    1981-05-12

    A more reliable self-powered radiation detector structure and method of manufacture is provided by a detector structure in which a relatively ductile centrally disposed conductive emitter wire supports and is in electrical contact with a generally tubular emitter electrode. The detector is fabricated by swaging and the ductile center wire insures that electrical discontinuities of the emitter are minimized.

  10. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection

  11. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  12. Spectral and Total Normal Emittance of Reusable Surface Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Edwards, S. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of spectral and total normal emittance have been made on three types of reusable external insulation materials proposed for space shuttles. Emittances were measured in the spectral range 1 to 15 micrometer at temperatures of 800 K and 1100 K using a radiometric measurement technique. Results indicated that the total normal emittance of these materials was less than 0.8 between 800 K and 1300 K. The total normal emittance decreased with increasing temperature. The three ceramic coating candidate materials exhibited a similar spectral emittance distribution.

  13. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as and which decay by the emission of -particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of and -particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the -particles emitted by radionuclides such as and , -particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with - and -labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of -emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by [DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  14. EMITTANCE GROWTH IN THE FEL RF-GUN

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2002-08-20

    A high brightness and low emittance is of crucial importance for the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility. Therefore a Photo-RF-Gun has been installed as particle source. Numerical simulations with codes like ASTRA [1] and MAFIA [2] show that the space charge dominated processes inside the RF-Gun contribute significantly to the emittance. In this paper we present the results of detailed studies with MAFIA TS2 which clarify the effects resulting in emittance growth for space charge dominated beams. It is shown that the resulting emittance can be minimized by changing the laser parameters like pulse length and spot size on the cathode. Additionally we present the concept of slice emittances which allows a more precise prediction of the real transverse emittance achievable with an emittance compensation scheme.

  15. Edge enhancement control in linear arrays of ungated field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    In arrays of ungated field emitters, the field enhancement factor of each emitter decreases as the distance between the emitters decreases, an effect known as screening. At the edge of these arrays, emitters experience reduced screening, leading to higher field enhancement factors than emitters at the array center, causing nonuniform emission across the array. Here, we consider this effect in linear arrays of ungated field emitters spaced at distances comparable to their heights, which is the regime that generally maximizes their average current density. A Line Charge Model is used to assess the degree to which these edge effects propagate into the array interior, and to study the impact of varying the height, location, and tip radius of emitters at the ends of an array on the edge enhancement. It is shown that each of these techniques can accomplish this edge enhancement control, but each has advantages and disadvantages that will be discussed.

  16. Integrated compact optical vortex beam emitters.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinlun; Wang, Jianwei; Strain, Michael J; Johnson-Morris, Benjamin; Zhu, Jiangbo; Sorel, Marc; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G; Yu, Siyuan

    2012-10-19

    Emerging applications based on optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) will probably require photonic integrated devices and circuits for miniaturization, improved performance, and enhanced functionality. We demonstrate silicon-integrated optical vortex emitters, using angular gratings to extract light confined in whispering gallery modes with high OAM into free-space beams with well-controlled amounts of OAM. The smallest device has a radius of 3.9 micrometers. Experimental characterization confirms the theoretical prediction that the emitted beams carry exactly defined and adjustable OAM. Fabrication of integrated arrays and demonstration of simultaneous emission of multiple identical optical vortices provide the potential for large-scale integration of optical vortex emitters on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible silicon chips for wide-ranging applications.

  17. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  18. Photonic Crystal Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, Veronika; Chan, Walker R.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of 2D photonic crystal (PhC) thermal emitters for a millimeter-scale hydrocarbon TPV microgenerator as a possible replacement for batteries in portable microelectronics, robotics, etc. In our TPV system, combustion heats a PhC emitter to incandescence and the resulting radiation is converted by a low-bandgap TPV cell. The PhC tailors the photonic density of states to produce spectrally confined thermal emission that matches the bandgap of the TPV cell, enabling high heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The work builds on a previously developed fabrication process to produce a square array of cylindrical cavities in a metal substrate. We will present ongoing incremental improvements in the optical and thermo-mechanical properties, the fabrication process, and the system integration, as recently combined with fabrication using novel materials, such as sputtered coatings, to enable a monolithic system.

  19. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  1. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device.

  2. Development of arrayed microcolumns and field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Seob; Bok Lee, Young; Choi, Sung Woong; Kim, Hyung Woo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Ahn, Seung Joon; Oh, Tae Sik; Song, Yoon-Ho; Chon Park, Byong; Jong Lim, Sun

    2017-06-01

    Electron beam devices have been widely used for inspection or lithography processes. The multibeam technology based on arrayed microcolumns has been developed to overcome the low throughput issue. However, the multicolumn system has some drawbacks such as complexity, electron optics, and electron source. The first drawback is the difficulty in multicolumn assembly. In particular, the alignment process of a source lens and a tip requires sophisticated techniques. The second drawback is that the e-beam characteristics of microcolumns constituting the multicolumn differ from column to column. To solve the first drawback, a sub-5-nm-resolution probe beam optic design with a simple structure and a two-dimensional carbon nanotube (2D-CNT) electron emitter instead of the widely used tungsten field emitter tip have been studied.

  3. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  4. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  5. Is there life after thermal emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V.

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we examine whether photonic IR emitters are able to compete with advanced thermal microemitter technology in testing and stimulating IR sensors, including forward-looking IR missile warning systems, IR search-and-track devices, and missile seekers. We consider fundamentals, technology, and parameters of photonic devices as well as their pros and cons in respect to thermal emitters. In particular, we show that photonic devices can from platform for next generation of multi-spectral and hyper-spectral dynamic scene simulation devices operating inside MWIR and LWIR bands with high spectral output density and able to simulate dynamically cold scenes (without cryogenic cooling) and low observable with very high frame rate.

  6. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  7. RF Emitter Tracking and Intent Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    the US Navy. The paper communicated that the Navy requires accurate detecting , locating and tracking of mobile RF emitters. The system design used...x3 are voltage readings taken from different locations in the substation . PA and PB represent the probabilities of a real fault and fake fault...Borghetti, “A Review of Anomaly Detection in Automated Surveillance,” IEEE Transactions on Systems , Man, and Cybernetics, Part C: Applications and Reviews

  8. Controlled emittance blow up in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Steimel, J.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We have designed and commissioned a system which blows up the transverse emittance of the anti-proton beam without affecting the proton beam. It consists of a bandwidth limited noise source centered around the betatron tune, a power amplifier and a directional stripline kicker. The amount of blow up is controlled by the amount of energy delivered to the anti-protons betatron bands.

  9. Complementary methods of transverse emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, James; Hu, Martin; Jansson, Andreas; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yan, Ming-Jen; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Several complementary transverse emittance monitors have been developed and used at the Fermilab accelerator complex. These include Ionization profile Monitors (IPM), Flying Wires, Schottky detectors and a Synchrotron Light Monitor (Synchlite). Mechanical scrapers have also been used for calibration purposes. This paper describes the various measurement devices by examining their basic features, calibration requirements, systematic uncertainties, and applications to collider operation. A comparison of results from different kinds of measurements is also presented.

  10. Emittance of a Field Emission Electron Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    mode within the wiggler in order for the laser threshold to be reached. The mode is characterized by a waist radius w and a divergence , the product...the field line red or curved compared to a massive particle trajectory blue or straight. The field lines originate on the surface at s ,zs and...emitter surface s ,zs and along the evalu- ation plane h ,zh. The equivalent sphere characterized by a , is also shown. The red curved line

  11. A label-free and enzyme-free ultra-sensitive transcription factors biosensor using DNA-templated copper nanoparticles as fluorescent indicator and hairpin DNA cascade reaction as signal amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sha, Liang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2016-08-15

    Detection and quantification of specific protein with ultralow concentration play a crucial role in biotechnological applications and biomedical diagnostics. In this paper, a label-free and enzyme-free amplified fluorescent biosensor has been developed for transcription factors detection based on AT-rich double-stranded DNA-templated copper nanoparticles (ds DNA/Cu NPs) and hairpin DNA cascade reaction. This strategy was demonstrated by using nuclear factor-kappa B p50 (NF-κB p50) and specific recognition sequences as a model case. In this assay, a triplex consists of double-stranded DNA containing NF-κB p50 specifically binding sequences and a special design single-stranded DNA (Trigger) which is able to activate the hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In the presence of NF-κB p50, the triplex became unstable since the target bound to the recognition sequences with strong affinity. The selective binding event confirmed that the Trigger was successfully released from the triplex and initiated HDCA to yield the product which could effectively template the formation of fluorescent Cu NPs. The experimental results revealed that the advanced strategy was ultra-sensitive for detecting NF-κB p50 in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 pM with a detection limit of 0.096 pM. In addition, the relative standard deviation was 4.08% in 3 repetitive assays of 500 pM NF-κB p50, which indicated that the reproducibility of this strategy was acceptable. Besides desirable sensitivity, the developed biosensor also showed high selectivity, cost-effective, and simplified operations. In addition, the proposed biosensing platform is versatile. By conjugating with various specific recognition units, it could hold considerable potential to sensitive and selective detect various DNA-binding proteins and might find wide applications in biomedical fields. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. ALMA deep field in SSA22: Blindly detected CO emitters and [C II] emitter candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, Natsuki H.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Umehata, Hideki; Yoshida, Naoki; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. Mark; Ivison, Rob; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Kubo, Mariko; Iono, Daisuke; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nagao, Tohru; Inoue, Akio K.; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Lee, Minju; Ao, Yiping; Fujimoto, Seiji; Izumi, Takuma; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Ikarashi, Soh; Yamada, Toru

    2017-06-01

    We report the identification of four millimeter line-emitting galaxies with the Atacama Large Milli/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in SSA22 Field (ADF22). We analyze the ALMA 1.1-mm survey data, with an effective survey area of 5 arcmin2, frequency ranges of 253.1-256.8 and 269.1-272.8 GHz, angular resolution of 0{^''.}7 and rms noise of 0.8 mJy beam-1 at 36 km s-1 velocity resolution. We detect four line-emitter candidates with significance levels above 6σ. We identify one of the four sources as a CO(9-8) emitter at z = 3.1 in a member of the proto-cluster known in this field. Another line emitter with an optical counterpart is likely a CO(4-3) emitter at z = 0.7. The other two sources without any millimeter continuum or optical/near-infrared counterpart are likely to be [C II] emitter candidates at z = 6.0 and 6.5. The equivalent widths of the [C II] candidates are consistent with those of confirmed high-redshift [C II] emitters and candidates, and are a factor of 10 times larger than that of the CO(9-8) emitter detected in this search. The [C II] luminosity of the candidates are 4-7 × 108 L⊙. The star formation rates (SFRs) of these sources are estimated to be 10-20 M⊙ yr-1 if we adopt an empirical [C II] luminosity-SFR relation. One of them has a relatively low S/N ratio, but shows features characteristic of emission lines. Assuming that at least one of the two candidates is a [C II] emitter, we derive a lower limit of [C II]-based star formation rate density (SFRD) at z ∼ 6. The resulting value of >10-2 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 is consistent with the dust-uncorrected UV-based SFRD. Future millimeter/submillimeter surveys can be used to detect a number of high-redshift line emitters, with which to study the star formation history in the early universe.

  13. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  14. Recombination processes in passivated boron-implanted black silicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gastrow, Guillaume; Ortega, Pablo; Alcubilla, Ramon; Husein, Sebastian; Nietzold, Tara; Bertoni, Mariana; Savin, Hele

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we study the recombination mechanisms in ion-implanted black silicon (bSi) emitters and discuss their advantages over diffused emitters. In the case of diffusion, the large bSi surface area increases emitter doping and consequently Auger recombination compared to a planar surface. The total doping dose is on the contrary independent of the surface area in implanted emitters, and as a result, we show that ion implantation allows control of emitter doping without compromise in the surface aspect ratio. The possibility to control surface doping via implantation anneal becomes highly advantageous in bSi emitters, where surface passivation becomes critical due to the increased surface area. We extract fundamental surface recombination velocities Sn through numerical simulations and obtain the lowest values at the highest anneal temperatures. With these conditions, an excellent emitter saturation current (J0e) is obtained in implanted bSi emitters, reaching 20 fA/cm2 ± 5 fA/cm2 at a sheet resistance of 170 Ω/sq. Finally, we identify the different regimes of recombination in planar and bSi emitters as a function of implantation anneal temperature. Based on experimental data and numerical simulations, we show that surface recombination can be reduced to a negligible contribution in implanted bSi emitters, which explains the low J0e obtained.

  15. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  16. Delay modeling of bipolar ECL/EFL (Emitter-Coupled Logic/Emitter-Follower-Logic) circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Andrew T.

    1986-08-01

    This report deals with the development of a delay-time model for timing simulation of large circuits consisting of Bipolar ECL(Emitter-Coupled Logic) and EFL (Emitter-Follower-Logic) networks. This model can provide adequate information on the performance of the circuits with a minimum expenditure of computation time. This goal is achieved by the use of proper circuit transient models on which analytical delay expressions can be derived with accurate results. The delay-model developed in this report is general enough to handle complex digital circuits with multiple inputs or/and multiple levels. The important effects of input slew rate are also included in the model.

  17. Recent advances in the chemistry of positron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    With the increasing active interest in PET as a method for studying biochemistry in normal and pathological states in humans we can expect to see the development of new techniques for precursor preparation and synthesis. We have seen a doubling of the publication rate in the past three to four years over the previous three to four year period. As the need for these compounds, especially in the tumor and receptor areas, in a purely clinical setting, increases the trend towards true automation of production of the most needeed compounds will accelerate. The cyclotron manufacturers all offer ''black boxes'' for synthesis but the optimum approach to user friendly automation yet needs to be defined. I would note that this paper was not intended as a comprehensive review but rather my goal was to highlight just some of the exciting developments of the past several years. We are entering what may well be the most extensive and active period of research in the synthesis of positron emitter labeled compounds. If 1984 to 1985 is any gauge, many new methods and compounds will appear in the next several years. 37 refs.

  18. Iodine-124: a promising positron emitter for organic PET chemistry.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Lena; Gagnon, Katherine; McQuarrie, Steve; Wuest, Frank

    2010-04-13

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in vivo has evolved into an important diagnostic tool in modern nuclear medicine and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently the most sophisticated molecular imaging methodology, mainly due to the unrivalled high sensitivity which allows for the studying of biochemistry in vivo on the molecular level. The most frequently used radionuclides for PET have relatively short half-lives (e.g. 11C: 20.4 min; 18F: 109.8 min) which may limit both the synthesis procedures and the time frame of PET studies. Iodine-124 (124I, t1/2 = 4.2 d) is an alternative long-lived PET radionuclide attracting increasing interest for long term clinical and small animal PET studies. The present review gives a survey on the use of 124I as promising PET radionuclide for molecular imaging. The first part describes the production of 124I. The second part covers basic radiochemistry with 124I focused on the synthesis of 124I-labeled compounds for molecular imaging purposes. The review concludes with a summary and an outlook on the future prospective of using the long-lived positron emitter 124I in the field of organic PET chemistry and molecular imaging.

  19. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  20. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  1. Emittance measurements of Space Shuttle orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Jose M.; Bouslog, Stanley A.; Cunnington, George R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral and total normal emittance of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) used on Space Shuttle nose cap and wing leading edges has been measured at room temperature and at surface temperatures of 1200 to 2100 K. These measurements were made on virgin and two flown RCC samples. Room temperature directional emittance data were also obtained and were used to determine the total hemispherical emittance of RCC as a function of temperature. Results of the total normal emittance for the virgin samples showed good agreement with the current RCC emittance design curve; however, the data from the flown samples showed an increase in the emittance at high temperature possibly due to exposure from flight environments.

  2. Characterization of radiant emitters used in food processing.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, B J; Farkas, B E; Keener, K M

    2003-01-01

    Radiant emissions from short, medium, and long wavelength thermal radiant emitter systems typically used for food processing applications were quantified. Measurements included heat flux intensity, emitter surface temperature, and spectral wavelength distribution. Heat flux measurements were found highly dependent on the incident angle and the distance from the emitter facing. The maximum flux measured was 5.4 W/cm2. Emitter surface temperature measurements showed that short wavelength radiant systems had the highest surface temperature and greatest thermal efficiency. The emitter spectral distributions showed that radiant emitter systems had large amounts of far infrared energy emission greater than 3 microm when compared to theoretical blackbody curves. The longer wavelength energy would likely cause increased surface heating for most high moisture content food materials.

  3. Plasmonic superradiance of two emitters near a metal nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protsenko, I. E.; Uskov, A. V.; Chen, Xue-Wen; Xu, Hongxing

    2017-06-01

    Quantum emitters, such as quantum dots or dye molecules, pumped and situated close to plasmonic nanostructures resonantly excite surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs). Excitation efficiency increases with the number of emitters because the SPP field synchronizes dipole oscillations of emitters, in analogy with superradiance (SR) in free space. Using a fully quantum mechanical model for two emitters coupled to a single metal nanorod, we predict that plasmonic SR increases the SPP generation yield of a single emitter by up to 15%. Such ‘plasmonic SR’ enhancement of SPP generation is stationary and takes place even at strong dissipation, dephasing and under incoherent pumping. Solid-state quantum emitters with blinking behaviors may be used to demonstrate plasmonic SR. Plasmonic SR may be useful for excitation of non-radiative SPP modes in plasmonic waveguides and lowering the threshold of plasmonic nanolasers.

  4. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  5. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  6. Separation of temperature and emittance in remotely sensed radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.; Alley, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    The remote determination of surface temperature and surface spectral emittance by use of airborne or satellite-borne thermal infrared instruments is not straightforward. The radiance measured is a function of surface temperature, the unknown surface spectral emittance, and absorption and emission in the intervening atmosphere. With a single measurement, the solution for temperature and spectral emittance is undedetermined. This article reviews two of the early approximate methods which have been fairly widely used to approach this problem.

  7. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-05-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56±0.03 mm mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  8. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  9. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  10. Environmental awareness for sensor and emitter employment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kenneth K.; Wilson, D. Keith

    2010-04-01

    Environmental Awareness for Sensor and Emitter Employment (EASEE) is a flexible, object-oriented software design for predicting environmental effects on the performance of battlefield sensors and detectability of signal emitters. Its decision-support framework facilitates many sensor and emitter modalities and can be incorporated into battlespace command and control (C2) systems. Other potential applications include immersive simulation, force-on-force simulation, and virtual prototyping of sensor systems and signal-processing algorithms. By identifying and encoding common characteristics of Army problems involving multimodal signal transmission and sensing into a flexible software architecture in the Java programming language, EASEE seeks to provide an application interface enabling rapid integration of diverse signal-generation, propagation, and sensor models that can be implemented in many client-server environments. Its explicit probabilistic modeling of signals, systematic consideration of many complex environmental and mission-related factors affecting signal generation and propagation, and computation of statistical metrics characterizing sensor performance facilitate a highly flexible approach to signal modeling and simulation. EASEE aims to integrate many disparate statistical formulations for modeling and processing many types of signals, including infrared, acoustic, seismic, radiofrequency, and chemical/biological. EASEE includes objects for representing sensor data, inferences for target detection and/or direction, signal transmission and processing, and state information (such as time and place). Various transmission and processing objects are further grouped into platform objects, which fuse data to make various probabilistic predictions of interest. Objects representing atmospheric and terrain environments with varying degrees of fidelity enable modeling of signal generation and propagation in diverse and complex environments.

  11. Infrared spectral normal emittance/emissivity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Filtz, J.-R.; Hameury, J.; Girard, F.; Battuello, M.; Ishii, J.; Hollandt, J.; Monte, C.

    2016-01-01

    The National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) of the United States, Germany, France, Italy and Japan, have joined in an inter-laboratory comparison of their infrared spectral emittance scales. This action is part of a series of supplementary inter-laboratory comparisons (including thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity) sponsored by the Consultative Committee on Thermometry (CCT) Task Group on Thermophysical Quantities (TG-ThQ). The objective of this collaborative work is to strengthen the major operative National Measurement Institutes' infrared spectral emittance scales and consequently the consistency of radiative properties measurements carried out worldwide. The comparison has been performed over a spectral range of 2 μm to 14 μm, and a temperature range from 23 °C to 800 °C. Artefacts included in the comparison are potential standards: oxidized Inconel, boron nitride, and silicon carbide. The measurement instrumentation and techniques used for emittance scales are unique for each NMI, including the temperature ranges covered as well as the artefact sizes required. For example, all three common types of spectral instruments are represented: dispersive grating monochromator, Fourier transform and filter-based spectrometers. More than 2000 data points (combinations of material, wavelength and temperature) were compared. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of the data points were in agreement, with differences to weighted mean values less than the expanded uncertainties calculated from the individual NMI uncertainties and uncertainties related to the comparison process. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Emittance and energy control in the NLC main linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Kubo, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Zimmermann, F.

    1995-06-01

    The authors discuss tolerances and correction schemes needed to control single- and multi-bunch emittance in the NLC main linacs. Specifications and design of emittance diagnostic stations will be presented. Trajectory correction schemes appropriate to simultaneously controlling the emittance of a multibunch train and the emittance of individual bunches within the train will be discussed. The authors discuss control of bunch-to-bunch energy spread using a ramped RF pulse generated by phase-modulating the SLED-II input. Tolerances on ions, wake fields, quadrupole alignment, and accelerating structure alignment will be given.

  13. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  14. Theoretical study of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H; Davidson, R C; Chung, M; Barnard, J J; Wang, T F

    2011-04-14

    The effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions is investigated using the generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. Recently, the concept and technique of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling have been proposed for applications in the Linac Coherent Light Source and other free-electron lasers to reduce the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Such techniques can also be applied to the driver beams for the heavy ion fusion and beam-driven high energy density physics, where the transverse emittance budget is typically tighter than the longitudinal emittance. The proposed methods consist of one or several coupling components which completely swap the emittances of one of the transverse directions and the longitudinal direction at the exit of the coupling components. The complete emittance exchange is realized in one pass through the coupling components. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions. A weak coupling component is introduced at every focusing lattice, and we would like to determine if such a lattice can realize the function of emittance exchange.

  15. Efficient low-temperature thermophotovoltaic emitters from metallic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Han, Sang Eon; Stein, Andreas; Norris, David J

    2008-10-01

    We examine the use of metallic photonic crystals as thermophotovoltaic emitters. We coat silica woodpile structures, created using direct laser writing, with tungsten or molybdenum. Optical reflectivity and thermal emission measurements near 650 degrees C demonstrate that the resulting structures should provide efficient emitters at relatively low temperatures. When matched to InGaAsSb photocells, our structures should generate over ten times more power than solid emitters while having an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency above 32%. At such low temperatures, these emitters have promise not only in solar energy but also in harnessing geothermal and industrial waste heat.

  16. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  17. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

    2013-07-16

    A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

  18. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  19. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad

    2014-02-24

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  20. Multiple emitter location and signal parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. O.

    1986-03-01

    Multiple signal classification (MUSIC) techniques involved in determining the parameters of multiple wavefronts arriving at an antenna array are discussed. A MUSIC algorithm is described, which provides asymptotically unbiased estimates of (1) the number of signals, (2) directions of arrival (or emitter locations), (3) strengths and cross correlations among the incident waveforms, and (4) the strength of noise/interference. The example of the use of the algorithm as a multiple frequency estimator operating on time series is examined. Comparisons of this method with methods based on maximum likelihood and maximum entropy, as well as conventional beamforming, are presented.

  1. Emittance growth from transient coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Li, R.; Bisognano, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    If the energies of individual particles in a bunch change as the bunch traverses a bending system, even if it is achromatic, betatron oscillations can be excited. Consequently, the transverse emittance of the bunch will grow as it moves downstream. Short bunches may be particularly susceptible to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation which can act back on the particles to change their energies and trajectories. Because a bend spans a well-defined length and angle, the bunch-excited wakefield and its effect back on the bunch are inherently transient. We outline a recently developed theory of this effect and apply it to example bending systems.

  2. Monitoring airborne alpha-emitter contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Koster, J.E.; Conaway, J.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Whitley, C.W.; Steadman, P.A.

    1998-02-01

    Facilities that may produce airborne alpha emitter contamination require a continuous air monitoring (CAM) system. However, these traditional CAMs have difficulty in environments with large quantities of non-radioactive particulates such as dust and salt. Los Alamos has developed an airborne plutonium sensor (APS) for the REBOUND experiment at the Nevada Test Site which detects alpha contamination directly in the air, and so is less vulnerable to the problems associated with counting activity on a filter. In addition, radon compensation is built into the detector by the use of two measurement chambers.

  3. Food labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed making changes to the food labels that may correct these problems. AMOUNTS PER SERVING The total calories and the calories from fat are listed. These numbers help consumers make decisions about fat intake. The list of nutrients includes ...

  4. Enzyme immunoassay for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Kuroiwa, Y

    1983-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay for methamphetamine with alkaline phosphatase labeled methamphetamine, Sepharose-antibody and p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrate was developed. The anti-methamphetamine antisera produced in rabbits by immunization with N-(4-aminobutyl) methamphetamine-BSA conjugate were specific for methamphetamine and showed low cross-reactivities with p-OH methamphetamine and amphetamine (metabolites of methamphetamine). The range of methamphetamine measurable by the enzyme immunoassay was 1 to 300 ng/tube. According to the assay, methamphetamine could be detected from urine and extract of hair.

  5. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  6. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  7. Micro-electrospray with stainless steel emitters.

    PubMed

    Shui, Wenqing; Yu, Yanling; Xu, Xuejiao; Huang, Zhenyu; Xu, Guobing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2003-01-01

    The physical processes underlying micro-electrospray (micro-ES) performance were investigated using a stainless steel (SS) emitter with a blunt tip. Sheathless micro-ES could be generated at a blunt SS tip without any tapering or sanding if ESI conditions were optimized. The Taylor cone was found to shrink around the inner diameter of the SS tubing, which permitted a low flow rate of 150 nL/min for sheathless microspray on the blunt tip (100 microm i.d. x 400 microm o.d.). It is believed that the wettability and/or hydrophobicity of SS tips are responsible for their micro-ES performance. The outlet orifice was further nipped to reduce the size of the spray cone and limit the flow rate to 50-150 nL/min, resulting in peptide detection down to attomole quantities consumed per spectrum. The SS emitter was also integrated into a polymethylmethacrylate microchip and demonstrated satisfactory performance in the analysis and identification of a myoglobin digest.

  8. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  9. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  10. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  11. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  12. Chemotactic separation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Das, Sambeeta; Poyton, Matthew F; Sengupta, Samudra; Butler, Peter J; Cremer, Paul S; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate a procedure for the separation of enzymes based on their chemotactic response toward an imposed substrate concentration gradient. The separation is observed within a two-inlet, five-outlet microfluidic network, designed to allow mixtures of active (ones that catalyze substrate turnover) and inactive (ones that do not catalyze substrate turnover) enzymes, labeled with different fluorophores, to flow through one of the inlets. Substrate solution prepared in phosphate buffer was introduced through the other inlet of the device at the same flow rate. The steady-state concentration profiles of the enzymes were obtained at specific positions within the outlets of the microchannel using fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of a substrate concentration gradient, active enzyme molecules migrated preferentially toward the substrate channel. The excess migration of the active enzyme molecules was quantified in terms of an enrichment coefficient. Experiments were carried out with different pairs of enzymes. Coupling the physics of laminar flow of liquid and molecular diffusion, multiphysics simulations were carried out to estimate the extent of the chemotactic separation. Our results show that, with appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis leads to spontaneous separation of active enzyme molecules from their inactive counterparts of similar charge and size.

  13. Emittance growth due to negative-mass instability above transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1994-08-01

    Due to space-charge effect, there is a growth of bunch emittance across transition as a result of negative-mass instability. The models of growth at cutoff frequency and growth from high-frequency Schottky noise are reviewed. The difficulties of performing reliable simulations are discussed. An intuitive self-bunching model for estimating emittance growth is presented.

  14. Emittance growth due to dipole ripple and sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-05-01

    Ripple in the power supplies for storage ring magnets can have adverse effects on the circulating beams: orbit distortion and emittance growth from dipole ripple, tune modulation and dynamic aperture reduction from quadrupole ripple, etc. In this paper, we study the effects of ripple in the horizontal bending field of the SSC in the presence of nonlinearity, in particular, the growth in beam emittance.

  15. Close proximity electrostatic effect from small clusters of emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall’Agnol, Fernando F.; de Assis, Thiago A.

    2017-10-01

    Using a numerical simulation based on the finite-element technique, this work investigates the field emission properties from clusters of a few emitters at close proximity, by analyzing the properties of the maximum local field enhancement factor (γm ) and the corresponding emission current. At short distances between the emitters, we show the existence of a nonintuitive behavior, which consists of the increasing of γm as the distance c between the emitters decreases. Here we investigate this phenomenon for clusters with 2, 3, 4 and 7 identical emitters and study the influence of the proximity effect in the emission current, considering the role of the aspect ratio of the individual emitters. Importantly, our results show that peripheral emitters with high aspect-ratios in large clusters can, in principle, significantly increase the emitted current as a consequence only of the close proximity electrostatic effect (CPEE). This phenomenon can be seen as a physical mechanism to produce self-oscillations of individual emitters. We discuss new insights for understanding the nature of self-oscillations in emitters based on the CPEE, including applications to nanometric oscillators.

  16. Surface Coatings for Low Emittance in the Thermal Surveillance Band

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    transparent but conducting coatings on glass [4] and (3) the solar energy industry , where surface coatings are required for solar collectors which...increase in coating emittance [10]. 0 Research into low emittance paint is mainly carried out in the solar energy industry [11, 12] and can be

  17. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  18. Experimental Results of a Single Emittance Compensation Solenoidal Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 300 pC electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ɛ_n,rms = 0.7 π mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane Bz <= 10 gauss for a peak magnetic field of B_z,max = 3 KG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces a initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance ɛ_mag,n,rms scales as 0.01 π mm mrad per gauss at the cathode. Which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that show spot size and emittance as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory and simulations.

  19. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  20. Microfabricated emitter array for an ionic liquid electrospray thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kaito; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Takao, Yoshinori

    2017-06-01

    We have fabricated needle-shaped emitters on a Si wafer by a MEMS process, and measured the voltage-current characteristics and the frequency dependence of a bipolar pulse voltage for ionic liquid electrospray thrusters, which can be mounted on nanosatellites ( ≲ 10 kg). Although the extracted current did not increase with increasing number of emitters, probably owing to the lack of uniformity of the emitters fabricated, we have demonstrated that the emitted current depends on the gap distance between the emitter and the extractor grid electrode, and low frequencies of the bipolar pulse voltage are desirable for thruster operation. Moreover, the Bosch process is required for fabricating a reservoir of ionic liquid, which prevents undesirable electrical short circuits, and the minimum emitter pitch to prevent loss of ion beams to the extractor is estimated to be about 400 µm.

  1. Power flow from a dipole emitter near an optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kevin C Y; Jun, Young Chul; Seo, Min-Kyo; Brongersma, Mark L

    2011-09-26

    Current methods to calculate the emission enhancement of a quantum emitter coupled to an optical antenna of arbitrary geometry rely on analyzing the total Poynting vector power flow out of the emitter or the dyadic Green functions from full-field numerical simulations. Unfortunately, these methods do not provide information regarding the nature of the dominant energy decay pathways. We present a new approach that allows for a rigorous separation, quantification, and visualization of the emitter output power flow captured by an antenna and the subsequent reradiation power flow to the far field. Such analysis reveals unprecedented details of the emitter/antenna coupling mechanisms and thus opens up new design strategies for strongly interacting emitter/antenna systems used in sensing, active plasmonics and metamaterials, and quantum optics.

  2. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  3. Radiative performance of rare earth garnet thin film selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.A.; Chubb, D.L.; Good, B.S.

    1994-08-01

    In this paper the authors present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I[sub 15/2]-(4)I[sub 13/2] at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I[sub 7]-(5)I[sub 8] at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  4. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  5. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  6. Radiative Performance of Rare Earth Garnet Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I(sub 15/2)-(4)I(sub 13/2) at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I(sub 7)-(5)I(sub 8) at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  7. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  8. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  9. Powerful ultrawideband rf emitters: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, Forrest J.; Scholfield, David W.; Prather, William D.; Burger, Jeffrey W.

    1995-09-01

    Ultra-wideband emitters are of interest for a variety of potential applications that range from radar transmitters to communications applications. This technology is of current interest to the USAF Phillips Laboratory where theoretical and experimental efforts have been underway for a number of years. Research into the production of ultra-wideband sources at the Phillips Laboratory has been accomplished along several different technology lines. The approaches include three main thrusts: 1) very powerful hydrogen spark gap pulsers, 2) compact hydrogen gas switches in conjunction with high gain ultra-wideband antennas and, 3) solid state switched array antennas. This paper reviews the progress-to-date along these lines and identifies some pacing research obastacles that limit further improvements.

  10. Odd-odd deformed proton emitters.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L S; Maglione, E

    2001-02-26

    Proton decay from odd-odd deformed nuclei is a long-standing unsolved problem. We present for the first time an exact solution using single particle Nilsson resonances. The lifetime is found to depend strongly on the single particle level occupied by the unpaired neutron, allowing a clear assignment of its Nilsson level. The emitters 112Cs, 140Ho, 150Lu, and 150Lu(m) are considered. The agreement with the experimental data is very good with deformations 0.1

  11. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  12. Gamma emitters in Hong Kong water

    SciTech Connect

    Shun-Yin, L.; Chung-Keung, M.; Wai-Kwok, N.; Shiu-Chun, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Radioactivity in water originates from natural and artificial sources. The development of a nuclear powerplant near Hong Kong necessitates that attention be given to formulating techniques to assess the possible resultant environmental radioactive contamination. Water samples collected from various sites in Hong Kong in the spring and summer of 1987, representing seawater, river water, reservoir water, drinking water, and underground water were studied through gamma-ray spectral analysis. Only gamma emitters in the U238 and Th232 series and K40 were detected. No fission product was detected with specific activity above 0.1 Bq/kg. The data could be the baseline for future monitoring of the radioactivity released from a nuclear plant being built at a 50-km distance from Hong Kong. The variation of detected specific activities may be due to geological differences and the effect of plants. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  13. New strongly deformed proton emitter: 117La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Stroe, L.; Müller, L.; Bonetti, R.; Poli, G. L.; Malerba, F.; Bianchi, E.; Andrighetto, A.; Guo, J. Y.; Li, Z. C.; Maglione, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Signorini, C.; Liu, Z. H.; Ruan, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Broude, C.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2001-03-01

    The decay by proton emission of the 117La nucleus has been studied via the 310 MeV 58Ni+64Zn reaction. The nucleus has two levels that decay to the ground state of 116Ba with Ep=783(6) keV (T1/2=22(5) ms] and Ep=933(10) keV [T1/2=10(5) ms]. Calculations performed for a deformed proton emitter reproduce quite well the experimental results confirming that 117La is strongly deformed (β2~0.3). Spin and parity of the two p-decaying levels have been determined as well: 3/2+ for the ground state and 9/2+ for the Ex=151(12) keV excited state.

  14. Lyman Alpha Emitters and Galaxy Formation Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.; Kovac, K.; Somerville, R.; Moustakas, L.; Rhoads, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey has successfully identified the population of young Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies predicted about 35 years ago. High equivalent widths of the Lyman-alpha line in these sources suggest that they are a very young (age < 107 years), metal poor, population of stars at redshifts 4.5 and 5.7, making them very interesting objects to study in the context of galaxy formation scenarios. We have begun to do exactly this using the correlation function of LALA galaxies. While the strong correlation function indicates massive halos, the volume density of Lyman-alpha sources and the faint continuum levels indicate low-mass stellar systems. This discrepancy can be resolved by postulating multiple emitters in a single halo.

  15. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  16. Detectability of a Direct Sequence Emitter within a Network of Direct Sequence Emitters,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    interception over 1/R propagation paths requires very large, ground-based antennas in order to achieve a usable intercept Signal-to- Noise Ratio (SNR). On...the other hand, free space, 1/R 2 propagation paths provide intercept receivers with signal power levels well above tne thermal noise power even when...large enough to resolve individual emitters are too large to put on aircraft as required to achieve the necessary free space propagation. Hence, the

  17. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  18. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing. [of leaves, soil and plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental determinations of the emittance of soils and leaves are reviewed, and an error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements is developed as an aid to remote sensing applications. In particular, an equation for the upper bound of the absolute error in an emittance determination is derived. The absolute error is found to decrease with an increase in contact temperature and to increase with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. The difference between temperature and band radiance temperature is plotted as a function of emittance for the wavelength intervals 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  19. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  20. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  1. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  2. A MEMS-based infrared emitter array for combat identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San, Haisheng; Chen, Xuyuan; Xu, Peng; Li, Fangqiang; Cheng, Meiying

    2008-04-01

    The silicon-based MEMS (MEMS: microelectromechanical systems) Infrared (IR) emitter arrays of 1x2, 2x2 and 3x3 elements are presented. The MEMS infrared emitters were fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The resistively heated poly-silicon membrane fabricated by using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process on backside of SOI wafer make a low thermal mass structure, thus this IR-emitter can be modulated at high frequency. A heavily boron doping technology enable the supporting silicon layer to absorb the infrared radiation. As a result, the self-heating effect will reduce the power loss. By using the SOI wafer, the fabrication processes are simplified, and the production costs are decreased. In experiment, the surface temperature distribution of IR emitter arrays were measured by thermal imaging system, and the optical spectrum and modulation characteristics were measured by spectroradiometer. The measured results show that the IR emitter arrays exhibit a strong emission in middle infrared range, and the modulation frequency at 0.5 modulation depth is about 30Hz. The emitter arrays are expected to improve performance by using suspended membrane and sealed package structure. It is expected that the IR emitter arrays can be used for increasing the visible intensity and distance in the application of infrared Combat Identification.

  3. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  4. Stimulated longitudinal emittance growth in the Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.; Ieiri, T.

    1989-03-01

    During fixed target operations -- beam intensity is limited by coherent instabilities in both the Main Ring and Tevatron. The growth rates for instabilities are generally inversely proportional to the proton bunch length. Since fixed target operations are insensitive to the longitudinal emittance of the beams, bunch spreaders are employed to increase the emittance, and hence the bunch length. Emittance growth is stimulated by injecting noise onto either the RF phase or amplitude control voltages. Test results of the efficiency of various stimulation schemes are reported. The design of a bunch length monitor, used to measure the effect of the bunch spreader, is also presented. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  6. Thermal limit to the intrinsic emittance from metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun Nasiatka, J.; Wan, Weishi; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard A.; Smedley, John

    2015-09-28

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and transverse momentum distributions obtained from a metal (antimony thin film) photocathode near and below the photoemission threshold are presented. Measurements show that the intrinsic emittance is limited by the lattice temperature of the cathode as the incident photon energy approaches the photoemission threshold. A theoretical model to calculate the transverse momentum distributions near this photoemission threshold is presented. An excellent match between the experimental measurements and the theoretical calculations is demonstrated. These measurements are relevant to low emittance electron sources for Free Electron Lasers and Ultrafast Electron Diffraction experiments.

  7. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  8. Longitudinal emittance growth due to nonlinear space charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Yu, Simon S.; Barnard, John J.; Seidl, Peter A.

    2012-03-01

    Emittance posts limits on the key requirements of final pulse length and spot size on target in heavy ion fusion drivers. In this paper, we show studies on the effect of nonlinear space charge on longitudinal emittance growth in the drift compression section. We perform simulations, using the 3D PIC code WARP, for a high current beam under conditions of bends and longitudinal compression. The linear growth rate for longitudinal emittance turns out to depend only on the peak line charge density, and is independent of pulse length, velocity tilt, and/or the pipe and beam size. This surprisingly simple result is confirmed by simulations and analytic calculations.

  9. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  10. Method and apparatus for multispray emitter for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Lin, Yuehe

    2004-12-14

    A method and apparatus that utilizes two or more emitters simultaneously to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer, thereby increasing the total ion current introduced into an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer, given a liquid flow rate of a sample. The method and apparatus are most conveniently constructed as an array of spray emitters fabricated on a single chip, however, the present invention encompasses any apparatus wherein two or more emitters are simultaneously utilized to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer.

  11. Observation of picometer vertical emittance with a vertical undulator.

    PubMed

    Wootton, K P; Boland, M J; Dowd, R; Tan, Y-R E; Cowie, B C C; Papaphilippou, Y; Taylor, G N; Rassool, R P

    2012-11-09

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  12. Emittance Compensation in a Flat Beam RF Photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S.; Colby, E.; Serafini, L.

    1997-05-01

    The beam dynamics of a flat beam rf photoinjector, which is intended to produce asymmetric emittances for linear collider applications, are analyzed, by both analytical and computational methods. The analytical model is a generalization of the recently developed theory of emittance compensation in round beams(L.Serafini, and J.B. Rosenzweig, submitted to Physical Review E.), in which a new mode of laminar flow beam dynamics, the invariant envelope, is found to give the ideal conditions for emittance minimization. Three-dimensional rf and beam dynamics simulations are used to iluminate the analytical results. abstract.

  13. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  14. Design of a minimum emittance nBA lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    1998-04-01

    An attempt to design a minimum emittance n-bend achromat (nBA) lattice has been made. One distinct feature is that dipoles with two different lengths were used. As a multiple bend achromat, five bend achromat lattices with six superperiod were designed. The obtained emittace is three times larger than the theoretical minimum. Tunes were chosen to avoid third order resonances. In order to correct first and second order chromaticities, eight family sextupoles were placed. The obtained emittance of five bend achromat lattices is almost equal to the minimum emittance of five bend achromat lattice consisting of dipoles with equal length.

  15. Plasmonic enhancement engineering of semiconductor light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, John Timothy Irvine

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources of great technological importance because of their wide spectral tunability, long lifetimes, and potentially high energy efficiency. It is widely observed, however, that LEDs based on all relevant material platforms exhibit degraded internal quantum efficiency as the emission wavelength is shifted into the green part of the visible spectrum. Increasing device efficiency in this spectral region has therefore become the focus of intense research. In this work we study the use of plasmonic metallic nanostructures as a method for enhancing LED efficiency. Electromagnetic fields are known to exhibit resonances near metallic nanostructures originating from collective oscillations of the electron gas on the metal surface. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) confined to the surface of a planar metal film, and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) confined to the surface of a nanostructure, feature unique optical properties such as large near optical fields and large modal densities. These spatial and spectral properties are highly dependent on the material and geometric properties of the nanostructure, allowing for extensive engineering of the plasmonic system to meet application needs. Plasmonic nanostructures are currently being studied for use in a wide range of applications such as waveguiding, bio-sensing, surface-enhanced spectroscopy, solid state light emission, and solar cells. Coupling into both SPP and LSP modes can enhance the spontaneous emission rate of a nearby radiating dipole, by virtue of their large associated local optical fields and high density of modes. Effective scattering of the excited plasmonic resonances into the radiation continuum can then lead to large enhancements in radiated field intensity. In this work, we have studied the application of various metallic nanostructures to nitride semiconductor light emitters to enhance their emission efficiency. Numerical investigations have been conducted to

  16. Engineered Emitters for Improved Silicon Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Ronak A.

    In 2014, installation of 5.3GW of new Photovoltaic (PV) systems occurred in the United States, raising the total installed capacity to 16.36GW. Strong growth is predicted for the domestic PV market with analysts reporting goals of 696GW by 2020. Conventional single crystalline silicon cells are the technology of choice, accounting for 90% of the installations in the global commercial market. Cells made of GaAs offer higher efficiencies, but at a substantially higher cost. Thin film technologies such as CIGS and CdTe compete favorably with multi-crystalline Si (u-Si), but at 20% efficiency, still lag the c-Si cell in performance. The c-Si cell can be fabricated to operate at approximately 25% efficiency, but commercially the efficiencies are in the 18-21% range, which is a direct result of cost trade-offs between process complexity and rapid throughput. With the current cost of c-Si cell modules at nearly 0.60/W. The technology is well below the historic metric of 1/W for economic viability. The result is that more complex processes, once cost-prohibitive, may now be viable. An example is Panasonic's HIT cell which operates in the 22-24% efficiency range. To facilitate research and development of novel PV materials and techniques, RIT has developed a basic solar cell fabrication process. Student projects prior to this work had produced cells with 12.8% efficiency using p type substrates. This thesis reports on recent work to improve cell efficiencies while simultaneously expanding the capability of the rapid prototyping process. In addition to the p-Si substrates, cells have been produced using n-Si substrates. The cell emitter, which is often done with a single diffusion or implant has been re-engineered using a dual implant of the same dose. This dual-implanted emitter has been shown to lower contact resistance, increase Voc, and increase the efficiency. A p-Si substrate cell has been fabricated with an efficiency of 14.6% and n-Si substrate cell with a 13

  17. Red surface emitters: powerful and fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Heinz; Ballmann, Tabitha; Butendeich, Rainer; Rossbach, Robert; Raabe, Bernd; Jetter, Michael; Scholz, Ferdinand

    2003-12-01

    Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) in the GaInP/AlGaInP material system have experienced a rapid development in their short history. In general lasers from that material system are suitable for a huge number of applications beginning with TV lasers and high power lasers for edge emitters, continuing with optical data storage, medical applications as well as data communication in cars, air planes, offices and between computers as application field for VCSELs. Especially automotive applications show the highest requirements on a laser with respect to operation temperature and power. In this talk we draw out the problems of the material system AlGaInP and its implications for laser applications. We discuss the epitaxial and technological solutions to overcome at least a part of these inherent problems. We will discuss the possible power that we can expect from VCSELs emitting in the range between 650 nm to 670 nm. We got from our lasers 5 mW, CW @ RT, 670nm and 2.5mW, CW@RT, 650 nm. We emphasize the role of doping, Bragg mirror grading, suitable detuning of cavity mode and gain, and optimisation of the contact layer and control of the oxide aperture in the VCSEL structure to get improved operation characteristics at higher temperatures. From the analysis of high frequency measurements, we could evaluate modulation bandwidths between 4 GHz and 10 GHz. The application of polyimide as a dielectric isolation material shows the potential to obtain modulation bandwidths beyond 10 GHz. For the intrinsic modulation bandwidth we get a value of 25 GHz, which is near the value edge emitters show. A more detailed discussion on photon lifetimes and carrier transport times will be given in the talk. Red light emitting VCSELS driven with short current pulses showed laser emission up to + 160°C case temperature. Thus, a CW operation up to +120°C can be expected after further improvement of power generation (decrease of series resistance) and heat spreading (optimized

  18. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  19. Enzyme Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  20. Vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy with the alpha-particle emitter 211At.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S; Eckelman, W C; Waldmann, T A; Garmestani, K; Yordanov, A T; Stabin, M G; Brechbiel, M W

    2002-06-01

    Astatine-211, an alpha-particle emitter, was employed in a model system for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy of small tumors in mouse lung to compare its performance relative to other radioisotopes in the same system. Astatine-211 was coupled to the lung blood vessel-targeting monoclonal antibody 201B with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl) succinamate linker. Biodistribution data showed that the conjugate delivered 211At to the lung (260-418% ID/g), where it remained with a biological half-time of about 30 h. BALB/c mice bearing about 100 lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 cells, each about 2000 cells in size, were treated with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B. The administered activity of 185 kBq per animal extended the life span of treated mice over untreated controls. Injections of 370 kBq, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 25-40 Gy, were necessary to eradicate all of the lung tumors. Mice receiving 740 kBq of 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B developed pulmonary fibrosis 3-4 months after treatment, as did mice treated with 3700 kBq of the alpha-particle emitter 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B in previous work. Animals that were injected with 211At bound to untargeted IgG or to glycine, as control agents, also demonstrated therapeutic effects relative to untreated controls. Control groups that received untargeted 211At required about twice as much administered activity for effective therapy as did groups with lung-targeted radioisotope. These results were not consistent with radioisotope biodistribution and dosimetry calculations that indicated that lung-targeted 211At should be at least 10-fold more efficient for lung colony therapy than 211At bound to nontargeting controls. The data showed that 211At is useful for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy because lung tumor colonies were eradicated in the mice. Work in this model system demonstrates that vascular targeting of alpha-particle emitters is an efficient therapy for small

  1. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Connolly, R; Liu, C.; Summers, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  2. Single-knob beam line for transverse emittance partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottländer, P.

    2013-04-01

    Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the transverse rms Twiss parameters (αx,y and βx,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field strength.

  3. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward Van Der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2016-02-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  4. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; ...

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters,more » do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.« less

  5. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  6. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  7. Single-photon emitters in GaSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonndorf, Philipp; Schwarz, Stefan; Kern, Johannes; Niehues, Iris; Del Pozo-Zamudio, Osvaldo; Dmitriev, Alexander I.; Bakhtinov, Anatoly P.; Borisenko, Dmitry N.; Kolesnikov, Nikolai N.; Tartakovskii, Alexander I.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2017-06-01

    Single-photon sources are important building blocks for quantum information technology. Emitters based on solid-state systems provide a viable route to integration in photonic devices. Here, we report on single-photon emitters in the layered semiconductor GaSe. We identify the exciton and biexciton transition of the quantum emitters with power-dependent photoluminescence and photon statistics measurements. We find evidence that the localization of the excitons is related to deformations of the GaSe crystal, caused by nanoscale selenium inclusions, which are incorporated in the crystal. These deformations give rise to local strain fields, which induce confinement potentials for the excitons. This mechanism lights the way for the controlled positioning of single-photon emitters in GaSe on the nanoscale.

  8. Emittance of TD-NiCr after simulated reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of simulated reentry heating on the emittance of TD-NiCr were investigated. Groups of specimens with three different preconditioning treatments were exposed to 6, 24, and 30 half-hour simulated reentry exposure cycles in a supersonic arc tunnel at each of three conditions intended to produce surface temperatures of 1255, 1365, and 1475 K. Emittance was determined at 1300 K on specimens which were preconditioned only and specimens after completion of reentry simulation exposure. Oxide morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. A consistent relationship was established between oxide morphology and total normal emittance. Specimens with coarser textured oxides tended to have lower emittances than specimens with finer textured oxides.

  9. Localization of Narrowband Single Photon Emitters in Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Kerem; Sandstrom, Russell; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-03-23

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bioimaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work, we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  10. Nanobubble induced formation of quantum emitters in monolayer semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Gabriella D.; Ajayi, Obafunso A.; Li, Xiangzhi; Zhu, X.-Y.; Hone, James; Strauf, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of exciton quantum emitters in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) has triggered renewed interest of localized excitons in low-dimensional systems. Open questions remain about the microscopic origin previously attributed to dopants and/or defects as well as strain potentials. Here we show that the quantum emitters can be deliberately induced by nanobubble formation in WSe2 and BN/WSe2 heterostructures. Correlations of atomic-force microscope and hyperspectral photoluminescence images reveal that the origin of quantum emitters and trion disorder is extrinsic and related to 10 nm tall nanobubbles and 70 nm tall wrinkles, respectively. We further demonstrate that ‘hot stamping’ results in the absence of 0D quantum emitters and trion disorder. The demonstrated technique is useful for advances in nanolasers and deterministic formation of cavity-QED systems in monolayer materials.

  11. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  12. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  13. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  14. Plasmonic nanochannel structure for narrow-band selective thermal emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyu; Clark, J. Kenji; Huang, Li-Chung; Ho, Ya-Lun; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2017-06-01

    A plasmonic structure consisting of a periodic arrangement of vertical silicon nanochannels connected by U-shaped gold layers is demonstrated as a spectrally selective thermal emitter. The plasmonic nanochannel structure sustains a coupled mode between a surface plasmon polariton and a stationary surface plasmon resonance, which induces a strong and sharp resonance observed in the form of a reflectance dip in the far field. Upon heating the structure, a strong and narrow-bandwidth thermal emittance peak is observed with a maximum emittance value of 0.72 and a full-width-at-half-maximum of 248 nm at a wavelength of 5.66 μm, which corresponds to the reflectance dip wavelength. Moreover, we demonstrate the control of the emission peak wavelength by varying the period of the structure. The plasmonic nanochannel structure realizes a small-size and selective infrared thermal emitter, which is expected to be applicable as an infrared light source.

  15. Progress on the emitter wrap-through silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. M.; Buck, M. E.; Schubert, W. K.; Basore, P. A.

    The Emitter Wrap-Through (EWT) solar cell is a back-contacted solar cell with a carrier-collection junction (emitter) on the front surface. Elimination of grids from the front surface allows for higher performance by eliminating grid-obscuration losses and reducing series resistance, while keeping an emitter on the front surface maintains high collection efficiency in solar-grade materials with modest diffusion lengths. The EWT cell uses laser-drilled vias to wrap the emitter diffusion on the front surface to interdigitated contacts on the back surface. We report on progress towards demonstration of two concepts for the EWT cell. The first EWT concept uses a fabrication sequence based on heavily diffused grooves and plated metallizations, and the second EWT concept uses a single furnace step and screen-printed metallizations. We also report on demonstration of double-sided carrier collection in the EWT cell.

  16. The emittance of space radiator materials measured at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Difilippo, Frank; Barry, Jennifer; Kussmaul, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The spectral emittances of textured space radiator materials between 1.7 and 14.7 micrometer have been evaluated at room temperature and elevated temperature (630 C) in air. Heating in air caused a permanent increase in spectral emittance for all materials tested: HCl/ion beam textured 304 stainless steel, untextured Ti (6 percent Al, 4 percent V), and sandblasted Ti (6 percent Al, 4 percent V). Changes in the surface chemistry and/or surface morphology of these materials were also observed. Elevated temperature spectral emittance was measured in an argon atmosphere and compared to the measurements in air. Similarity between the room temperature and elevated temperature spectral emittance measurements was also investigated, and limited agreement was found.

  17. Recent Developments of Low-emittance Electron Gun for Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriki, Masao

    Recent developments of low-emittance electron guns for accelerator are reviewed. In the accelerator field, DC biased triode thermionic gun (Pierce type gun) has been widely used and is still conventional. On the other hand, because of strong demands on the high brightness electron beam by FEL and other advanced accelerator concepts based on linear accelerator, the low emittance beam generation becomes one of the most important issue in the accelerator science. The R&D effort is “accelerated” by two technological innovations, photo-cathode and RF gun. They made a large improvement on the beam emittance. After the explanations on the technical and physical aspects of the low emittance electron beam generation, advanced electron sources for accelerators are reviewed.

  18. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  19. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    PubMed Central

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  20. Design rules for core/shell nanowire resonant emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We study design principles to boost the extraction of light from core/shell GaN nanowire optical emitters. A full-vectorial electromagnetic simulation reveals that the extraction efficiency of an emitter within a nanowire cavity depends strongly on its position; the efficiency becomes maximized as the emitter's location approaches the center of the structure. The total extraction of light is sinusoidally modulated by the nanowire diameter, which is directly correlated with optical resonances. The introduction of a conformal dielectric coating on a nanowire leads to a dramatic enhancement in the extraction efficiency, which results from an increase in side emission owing to an optical antenna effect. A simple high-refractive-index dielectric coating approximately doubles the total extraction efficiency of a nanowire LED. These numerical findings will be valuable in providing strategies for high-efficiency nanowire-based optical emitters.

  1. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  2. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  3. Work functions of hafnium nitride thin films as emitter material for field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito Fujiwara, Sho; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-15

    The work functions of hafnium nitride thin films prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering were investigated in vacuum, before and after surface cleaning processes, with a view of improving the properties of as-fabricated field emitter arrays comprising hafnium nitride emitters. The measurement of the work function was first performed for the as-deposited films and then for films subjected to surface cleaning process, either thermal treatment or ion bombardment. Thermal treatment at a maximum temperature of 300 °C reduced the work function by 0.7 eV. Once the film was heated, the work function maintained the reduced value, even after cooling to room temperature. A little change in the work function was observed for the second and third thermal treatments. The ion bombardment was conducted by exposing the sample to a thin plasma for different sample bias conditions and processing times. When the sample was biased at −10 V, the work function decreased by 0.6 eV. The work function reduction became saturated in the early stage of the ion bombardment. When the sample was biased at −50 V, the work function exhibited different behaviors, that is, first it decreased rapidly and then increased in response to the increase in processing time. The lowest attainable work function was found to be 4.00 eV. It should be noted that none of the work function values reported in this paper were obtained using surfaces that were demonstrated to be free from oxygen contamination. The present results suggest that the current–voltage characteristics of a field emitter array can be improved by a factor of 25–50 by the examined postprocesses.

  4. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  5. HETDEX: Evolution of Lyman Alpha Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Gebhardt, K.; Hill, G. J.; Gronwall, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S.; Gawiser, E.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will produce a sample of 800,000 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) over the 1.9

  6. An electron transporting blue emitter for OLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Boyuan; Luo, Jiaxiu; Li, Suyue; Xiao, Lixin; Sun, Wenfang; Chen, Zhijian; Qu, Bo; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-11-01

    After the premier commercialization of OLED in 1997, OLED has been considered as the candidate for the next generation of flat panel display. In comparison to liquid crystal display (LCD) and plasma display panel (PDP), OLED exhibits promising merits for display, e.g., flexible, printable, micro-buildable and multiple designable. Although many efforts have been made on electroluminescent (EL) materials and devices, obtaining highly efficient and pure blue light is still a great challenge. In order to improve the emission efficiency and purity of the blue emission, a new bipolar blue light emitter, 2,7-di(2,2':6',2"-terpyridine)- 2,7-diethynyl-9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene (TPEF), was designed and synthesized. A blue OLED was obtained with the configuration of ITO/PEDOT/PVK:CBP:TPEF/LiF/Al. The device exhibits a turn-on voltage of 9 V and a maximum brightness of 12 cd/m2 at 15 V. The device gives a deep blue emission located at 420 nm with the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.17, 0.10). We also use TPEF as electron transporting material in the device of ITO/PPV/TPEF/LiF/Al, the turn-on voltage is 3 V. It is proved the current in the device was enhanced indeed by using the new material.

  7. Monolithic semiconductor light emitter and amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Nils W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A semiconductor light emitter comprising a substrate of a semiconductor material having a pair of opposed surfaces and a body of semiconductor material on one of the surfaces. The body includes a pair of clad layers of opposite conductivity types having an intermediate quantum well region therebetween. The clad layers are of a semiconductor material which forms a heterojunction with the material of the quantum well region. The clad layers and the quantum well region form a waveguide which extends along the body. A plurality of gain sections are formed in the body spaced along and optically coupled by the waveguide. Each of the gain sections is adapted to generate light therein when a voltage is placed thereacross. One of the gain section has gratings at each end thereof which are adapted to reflect light back into the one gain section and thereby create a beam of light. The grating between the one gain section and an adjacent gain section is adapted to allow some of the light generated in the one gain section to pass therethrough along the waveguide to the next gain section. Each of the other gain sections have gratings adjacent an end opposite the first gain sections. The periods of the grating are such that no self-oscillation of the light in the waveguide occurs so that each of the other gain sections serve as single pass amplifiers. The gratings also direct the amplified light from the other gain sections out of the body.

  8. Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan; Vucicevic, Biljana; Goricanec, Darko; Stevanovic, Zoran

    2009-11-15

    This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces

  9. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  10. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  11. Bulk molybdenum field emitters by inductively coupled plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningli; Cole, Matthew T; Milne, William I; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-07

    In this work we report on the fabrication of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched, diode-type, bulk molybdenum field emitter arrays. Emitter etching conditions as a function of etch mask geometry and process conditions were systematically investigated. For optimized uniformity, aspect ratios of >10 were achieved, with 25.5 nm-radius tips realised for masks consisting of aperture arrays some 4.45 μm in diameter and whose field electron emission performance has been herein assessed.

  12. Nanostructure TEM analysis of diamond cold cathode field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Travis S.; Ghosh, Nikkon; Wittig, James Edward; Kang, Weng; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Unocic, Kinga A; Davidson, James; Tolk, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond cold cathode devices have demonstrated significant potential as electron field emitters. Ultra-sharp diamond pyramidal tips (~5nm tip radius) have been fabricated and show improvement in emission when compared to conventional field emitters. However, the emission mechanisms in these complex diamond nanostructures are not well understood. Transmission electron microscopy performed in this study provides new insight into tip structure and composition with implications for field emission and diamond growth.

  13. A Smart Microwave Vacuum Electron Device (MVED) Using Field Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-31

    Stellar Lateral Emitters The original program was based on receiving lateral, nano -layer carbon emitters from Stellar Micro Devices (SMD). Stellar...Leakage current in the cathodes have been a very large problem. With an increased leakage both the heat of the cathode and voltage drop across...perfom1ance. The tleld emission arrays intended for the experiment did not meet specifications, so alternative field emission cathodes were used. While these

  14. Marine enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debashish, Ghosh; Malay, Saha; Barindra, Sana; Joydeep, Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Marine enzyme biotechnology can offer novel biocatalysts with properties like high salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity, cold adaptivity, and ease in large-scale cultivation. This review deals with the research and development work done on the occurrence, molecular biology, and bioprocessing of marine enzymes during the last decade. Exotic locations have been accessed for the search of novel enzymes. Scientists have isolated proteases and carbohydrases from deep sea hydrothermal vents. Cold active metabolic enzymes from psychrophilic marine microorganisms have received considerable research attention. Marine symbiont microorganisms growing in association with animals and plants were shown to produce enzymes of commercial interest. Microorganisms isolated from sediment and seawater have been the most widely studied, proteases, carbohydrases, and peroxidases being noteworthy. Enzymes from marine animals and plants were primarily studied for their metabolic roles, though proteases and peroxidases have found industrial applications. Novel techniques in molecular biology applied to assess the diversity of chitinases, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia-metabolizing, and pollutant-degrading enzymes are discussed. Genes encoding chitinases, proteases, and carbohydrases from microbial and animal sources have been cloned and characterized. Research on the bioprocessing of marine-derived enzymes, however, has been scanty, focusing mainly on the application of solid-state fermentation to the production of enzymes from microbial sources.

  15. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters. PMID:21658266

  16. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  17. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    PubMed

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  18. A thermionic energy converter with an electrolytically etched tungsten emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, G.H.M.; Metselaar, R. )

    1990-08-15

    The bare work functions of etched and unetched plasma-sprayed tungsten were found to be 4.8 and 4.5 eV, respectively. The electron emission of plasma-sprayed tungsten, both etched and unetched, was measured over a wide range of temperatures in a cesium atmosphere. Work functions were derived from the saturation current densities. In the ignited mode, current-voltage ({ital I}-{ital V}) characteristics were measured. The influence of the emitter, collector, and cesium reservoir temperatures on the {ital I}-{ital V} characteristics was investigated. Barrier indexes of 2.06 and 2.30 eV were found for etched and unetched tungsten emitters, respectively. At an emitter temperature of 1400 {degree}C, in the case of an unetched tungsten emitter a power density of 1.5 W/cm{sup 2} was found, while for an etched tungsten emitter it was 4.5 W/cm{sup 2}. This increased power density could be attributed to a lower collector work function. The lower cesiated collector work function resulted from the evaporation of oxygen, as WO{sub 3}, from the etched tungsten emitter.

  19. Treatment planning for internal emitter therapy: Methods, applications and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, G.

    1999-01-01

    Treatment planning involves three basic steps: (1) a procedure must be devised that will provide the most relevant information, (2) the procedure must be applied and (3) the resulting information must be translated into a definition of the optimum implementation. There are varying degrees of treatment planning that may be implemented in internal emitter therapy. As in chemotherapy, the information from a Phase 1 study may be used to treat patients based upon body surface area. If treatment planning is included on a patient-specific basis, a pretherapy, trace-labeled, administration of the radiopharmaceutical is generally required. The data collected following the tracer dose may range from time-activity curves of blood and whole-body for use in blood, marrow or total body absorbed dose estimation to patient imaging for three-dimensional internal emitter dosimetry. The most ambitious approach requires a three-dimensional set of images representing radionuclide distribution (SPECT or PET) and a corresponding set of images representing anatomy (CT or MRI). The absorbed dose (or dose-rate) distribution may be obtained by convolution of a point kernel with the radioactivity distribution or by direct Monte Carlo calculation. A critical requirement for both techniques is the development of an overall structure that makes it possible, in a routine manner, to input the images, to identify the structures of interest and to display the results of the dose calculations in a clinically relevant manner. 52 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Toward a Functional Definition of Methane Super-Emitters: Application to Natural Gas Production Sites.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Lyon, David; Alvarez, Ramón A; Palacios, Virginia; Harriss, Robert; Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Hamburg, Steven P

    2015-07-07

    Emissions from natural gas production sites are characterized by skewed distributions, where a small percentage of sites-commonly labeled super-emitters-account for a majority of emissions. A better characterization of super-emitters is needed to operationalize ways to identify them and reduce emissions. We designed a conceptual framework that functionally defines superemitting sites as those with the highest proportional loss rates (methane emitted relative to methane produced). Using this concept, we estimated total methane emissions from natural gas production sites in the Barnett Shale; functionally superemitting sites accounted for roughly three-fourths of total emissions. We discuss the potential to reduce emissions from these sites, under the assumption that sites with high proportional loss rates have excess emissions resulting from abnormal or otherwise avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment. Because the population of functionally superemitting sites is not expected to be static over time, continuous monitoring will likely be necessary to identify them and improve their operation. This work suggests that achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of production sites will require mitigation steps at a large fraction of sites.

  1. Understanding Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the way enzymes operate through reaction energetics, and explains that most of the catalytic power of enzymes lies in the strong noncovalent forces responsible for initial binding of substrate, which are only manifested at the transition state of the reaction. (Author/GA)

  2. Enzymes, Industrial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio- and stereo-specificity, p...

  3. Decoupling intensity radiated by the emitter in distance estimation from camera to IR emitter.

    PubMed

    Cano-García, Angel E; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Fernández, Pedro; Infante, Arturo Luis; Pompa-Chacón, Yamilet; Vázquez, Carlos Andrés Luna

    2013-05-31

    Various models using radiometric approach have been proposed to solve the problem of estimating the distance between a camera and an infrared emitter diode (IRED). They depend directly on the radiant intensity of the emitter, set by the IRED bias current. As is known, this current presents a drift with temperature, which will be transferred to the distance estimation method. This paper proposes an alternative approach to remove temperature drift in the distance estimation method by eliminating the dependence on radiant intensity. The main aim was to use the relative accumulated energy together with other defined models, such as the zeroth-frequency component of the FFT of the IRED image and the standard deviation of pixel gray level intensities in the region of interest containing the IRED image. By using the abovementioned models, an expression free of IRED radiant intensity was obtained. Furthermore, the final model permitted simultaneous estimation of the distance between the IRED and the camera and the IRED orientation angle. The alternative presented in this paper gave a 3% maximum relative error over a range of distances up to 3 m.

  4. Decoupling Intensity Radiated by the Emitter in Distance Estimation from Camera to IR Emitter

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Angel E.; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Fernández, Pedro; Infante, Arturo Luis; Pompa-Chacón, Yamilet; Vázquez, Carlos Andrés Luna

    2013-01-01

    Various models using radiometric approach have been proposed to solve the problem of estimating the distance between a camera and an infrared emitter diode (IRED). They depend directly on the radiant intensity of the emitter, set by the IRED bias current. As is known, this current presents a drift with temperature, which will be transferred to the distance estimation method. This paper proposes an alternative approach to remove temperature drift in the distance estimation method by eliminating the dependence on radiant intensity. The main aim was to use the relative accumulated energy together with other defined models, such as the zeroth-frequency component of the FFT of the IRED image and the standard deviation of pixel gray level intensities in the region of interest containing the IRED image. By using the abovementioned models, an expression free of IRED radiant intensity was obtained. Furthermore, the final model permitted simultaneous estimation of the distance between the IRED and the camera and the IRED orientation angle. The alternative presented in this paper gave a 3% maximum relative error over a range of distances up to 3 m. PMID:23727954

  5. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; ...

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  6. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  7. Novalike cataclysmic variables are significant radio emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Deanne L.; Körding, Elmar G.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Rupen, Michael P.; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Groot, Paul J.

    2015-08-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a Very Large Array pilot survey of four close and optically bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. TT Ari, RW Sex and the old nova V603 Aql were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a 3σ upper limit of 7.8 μ {Jy} {beam}^{-1}). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short (˜200 s) and longer term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization levels of up to 100 per cent. The spectral indices range from steep to inverted; TT Ari shows a spectral turnover at ˜6.5 GHz, while the spectral index of V603 Aql flattened from α = 0.54 ± 0.05 to 0.16 ± 0.08 (Fν ∝ να) in the week between observations. This range of properties suggests that more than one emission process can be responsible for the radio emission in non-magnetic CVs. In this sample we find that individual systems are consistent with optically thick synchrotron emission, gyrosynchrotron emission or cyclotron maser emission.

  8. Pesticide Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This training will help ensure that reviewers evaluate labels according to four core principles. It also will help pesticide registrants developing labels understand what EPA expects of pesticide labels, and what the Agency generally finds acceptable.

  9. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  10. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-14

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitter's far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Previous work has shown that these distortions can significantly degrade the imaging of the local density of states in metallic nanowires using polarization-resolved imaging. But unlike nanowires, nanoparticles do not have a well-defined axis of symmetry, which makes polarization-resolved imaging difficult to apply. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, which is in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter toward its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, subdiffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the

  11. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter towards its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, sub-diffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the complex near-field coupling between emitters and nanostructures, and open up new opportunities to perform super-resolution microscopy with higher accuracy.

  12. Vanadium Dioxide as a Natural Disordered Metamaterial: Perfect Thermal Emission and Large Broadband Negative Differential Thermal Emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Mikhail A.; Blanchard, Romain; Zhang, Shuyan; Genevet, Patrice; Ko, Changhyun; Ramanathan, Shriram; Capasso, Federico

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a thin (approximately 150-nm) film of vanadium dioxide (VO2) deposited on sapphire has an anomalous thermal emittance profile when heated, which arises because of the optical interaction between the film and the substrate when the VO2 is at an intermediate state of its insulator-metal transition (IMT). Within the IMT region, the VO2 film comprises nanoscale islands of the metal and dielectric phases and can thus be viewed as a natural, disordered metamaterial. This structure displays “perfect” blackbodylike thermal emissivity over a narrow wavelength range (approximately 40cm-1), surpassing the emissivity of our black-soot reference. We observe large broadband negative differential thermal emittance over a >10°C range: Upon heating, the VO2-sapphire structure emits less thermal radiation and appears colder on an infrared camera. Our experimental approach allows for a direct measurement and extraction of wavelength- and temperature-dependent thermal emittance. We anticipate that emissivity engineering with thin-film geometries comprising VO2 and other thermochromic materials will find applications in infrared camouflage, thermal regulation, and infrared tagging and labeling.

  13. Deep Label Distribution Learning With Label Ambiguity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin-Bin; Xing, Chao; Xie, Chen-Wei; Wu, Jianxin; Geng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) have achieved excellent recognition performance in various visual recognition tasks. A large labeled training set is one of the most important factors for its success. However, it is difficult to collect sufficient training images with precise labels in some domains such as apparent age estimation, head pose estimation, multi-label classification and semantic segmentation. Fortunately, there is ambiguous information among labels, which makes these tasks different from traditional classification. Based on this observation, we convert the label of each image into a discrete label distribution, and learn the label distribution by minimizing a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the predicted and ground-truth label distributions using deep ConvNets. The proposed DLDL (Deep Label Distribution Learning) method effectively utilizes the label ambiguity in both feature learning and classifier learning, which help prevent the network from over-fitting even when the training set is small. Experimental results show that the proposed approach produces significantly better results than state-of-the-art methods for age estimation and head pose estimation. At the same time, it also improves recognition performance for multi-label classification and semantic segmentation tasks.

  14. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon; Hoffstaetter, Georg H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the coupler region with

  15. Joint Lyman α emitters - quasars reionization constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.; Ferrara, A.; Semelin, B.

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel method to investigate c reionization, using joint spectral information on high-redshift Lyman α emitters (LAEs) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). Although LAEs have been proposed as reionization probes, their use is hampered by the fact their Lyα line is damped not only by intergalactic H I but also internally by dust. Our method allows us to overcome such degeneracy. First, we carefully calibrate a reionization simulation with QSO absorption line experiments. Then we identify LAEs (? and equivalent width >20 Å) in two simulation boxes at z= 5.7 and 6.6 and we build synthetic images/spectra of a prototypical LAE. The surface brightness maps show the presence of a scattering halo extending up to 150 kpc from the galaxye. For each LAE we then select a small box of (10 h-1 Mpc)3 around it and derive the optical depth τ along three viewing axes. At redshift 5.7, we find that the Lyα transmissivity ?, almost independent of the halo mass. This constancy arises from the conspiracy of two effects: (i) the intrinsic Lyα line width and (ii) the infall peculiar velocity. At higher redshift, z= 6.6, where ? the transmissivity is instead largely set by the local H I abundance and ? consequently increases with halo mass, Mh, from 0.15 to 0.3. Although outflows are present, they are efficiently pressure confined by infall in a small region around the LAE; hence they only marginally affect transmissivity. Finally, we cast line of sight originating from background QSOs passing through foreground LAEs at different impact parameters, and compute the quasar transmissivity (?). At small impact parameters, d < 1 cMpc, a positive correlation between ? and Mh is found at z= 5.7, which tends to become less pronounced (i.e. flatter) at larger distances. Quantitatively, a roughly 10× increase (from 5 × 10-3 to 6 × 10-2) of ? is observed in the range log Mh= (10.4-11.6). This correlation becomes even stronger at z= 6.6. By cross-correlating ? and ?, we can obtain a

  16. Modeling field emitter arrays using nonlinear line charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2016-09-01

    Modeling high aspect ratio field emitter arrays is a computational challenge due to the enormity of the resources involved. The line charge model (LCM) provides an alternate semi-analytical tool that has been used to model both infinite as well as finite sized arrays. It is shown that the linearly varying charge density used in the LCM generically mimics ellipsoidal emitters rather than a Cylindrical-Post-with-an-Ellipsoidal-Tip (CPET) that is typical of nanowires. Furthermore, generalizing the charge density beyond the linear regime allows for modeling shapes that are closer to a CPET. Emitters with a fixed base radius and a fixed apex radius are studied with a view to understanding the effect of nonlinearity on the tip enhancement factor and the emitter current in each case. Furthermore, an infinite square array of the CPET emitters is studied using the nonlinear line charge model, each having a height h =1500 μm and a base radius b =1.5 μm . It is found that for moderate external field strengths ( 0.3 -0.4 V /μm ), the array current density falls sharply for lattice spacings smaller than 4/3 h . Beyond this value, the maximal array current density can be observed over a range of lattice spacings and falls gradually thereafter.

  17. RF gun emittance correction using unsymmetrical RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, L.; Rivolta, R.; Terzoli, L.; Pagani, C.

    1992-07-01

    The beam dynamics in RF guns is characterized by an optimum injection phase which minimizes the RF-field-induced emittance blowup: such a condition corresponds to a vanishing first order term in the phase dependence of the exit transverse momentum. Away from the optimum phase, a sharp increase of the emittance is found. In this paper we analyze the possibility of compensating for both the first and second order terms, in order to recover the minimum emittance value even at phases different from the optimum one. Our scheme is based on the use of an unsymmetrical RF cavity, added downstream of the gun cavity and fully uncoupled from it, in order to be independently phased. At the exit of this cavity the minimum emittance value can be recovered, the injection phase being a free parameter to be independently optimized. In this way higher injection phases can be exploited, where the longitudinal rms emittance displays a minimum, and long bunches extracted from the gun can be magnetically compressed more efficiently, achieving a significant beam brightness increase with respect to conventionally optimized RF guns. An analytical study of the beam dynamics inside the unsymmetrical RF cavity is presented, together with the results of some numerical simulations performed with the PIC code ITACA [L. Serafini and C. Pagani, Proc. 1st EPAC, Rome, June 1988 (Word Scientific) p. 866].

  18. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; Kuroda, S.; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  19. Fabrication of VO2-based multilayer structure with variable emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Yunzhen; Zhang, Yuzhi; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying

    2015-07-01

    VO2 film holds promise for smart radiation device (SRD) use because of its infrared reflection change through the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT). In present study, a multilayer structure which consisted of VO2 layer, HfO2 layer and Ag layer was fabricated to achieve variable emittance based on the principle of reflection filter and SMT of VO2. It was found that with optimal 50 nm-thick VO2 layer, emittance of the multilayer structure could reversibly change from 0.13 at 30 °C to 0.68 at 80 °C with emittance variability of 0.55. Emittance hysteresis loop with transition temperature (Tc) of 58 °C and narrow width of 4 °C was obtained. Finally, multilayer structures with W-doped VO2 films were deposited and transition temperature decreased from 58 to 5 °C as W doping concentration increased from 0% to 3%, with Tc decreasing efficiency of -17.2 °C/at%. However, W doping also led to increased low temperature infrared absorption of VO2 film, which resulted in decreased emittance variability for the multilayer structure, from 0.55 to 0.37 as the W doping concentration in VO2 layer increase from 0% to 3%.

  20. Study of Lower Emittance Lattices for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    We study paths to significantly reduce the emittance of the SPEAR3 storage ring. Lattice possibilities are explored with the GLASS technique. New lattices are designed and optimized for practical dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. Various techniques are employed to optimize the nonlinear dynamics, including the Elegant-based genetic algorithm. Experimental studies are also carried out on the ring to validate the lattice design. The SPEAR3 storage ring is a third generation light source which has a racetrack layout with a circumference of 234.1 m. The requirement to maintain the photon beamline positions put a significant constraint on the lattice design. Consequently the emittance of SPEAR3 is not on par with some of the recently-built third generation light sources. The present operational lattice has an emittance of 10 nm. For the photon beam brightness of SSRL to remain competitive among the new or upgraded ring-based light sources, it is necessary to significantly reduce the emittance of SPEAR3. In this paper we report our ongoing effort to develop a lower emittance solution for SSRL. We first show the potential of the SPEAR3 lattice with results of the standard cell study using the GLASS technique. This is followed by a discussion of the design strategy for full-ring linear lattices. Several lattice options are compared. We then show the methods and results for dynamic aperture optimization. Experiments were also conducted on the SPEAR3 ring to implement the lattice and to measure the key lattice parameters.

  1. Tuning the Magnetic Transport of an Induction LINAC using Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Paul, A C; Wargo, P E; Zentler, J M

    2006-08-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Flash X-Ray (FXR) machine is a linear induction accelerator used to produce a nominal 18 MeV, 3 kA, 65 ns pulse width electron beam for hydrodynamic radiographs. A common figure of merit for this type of radiographic machine is the x-ray dose divided by the spot area on the bremsstrahlung converter where a higher FOM is desired. Several characteristics of the beam affect the minimum attainable x-ray spot size. The most significant are emittance (chaotic transverse energy), chromatic aberration (energy variation), and beam motion (transverse instabilities and corkscrew motion). FXR is in the midst of a multi-year optimization project to reduce the spot size. This paper describes the effort to reduce beam emittance by adjusting the fields of the transport solenoids and position of the cathode. If the magnetic transport is not correct, the beam will be mismatched and undergo envelope oscillations increasing the emittance. We measure the divergence and radius of the beam in a drift section after the accelerator by imaging the optical transition radiation (OTR) and beam envelope on a foil. These measurements are used to determine an emittance. Relative changes in the emittance can be quickly estimated from the foil measurements allowing for an efficient, real-time study. Once an optimized transport field is determined, the final focus can be adjusted and the new x-ray spot measured. A description of the diagnostics and analysis is presented.

  2. Method of images applied to driven solid-state emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Dale; Santana, Ted S.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Gauger, Erik M.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the collection efficiency from solid-state emitters is an important step towards achieving robust single-photon sources, as well as optically connecting different nodes of quantum hardware. A metallic substrate may be the most basic method of improving the collection of photons from quantum dots, with predicted collection efficiency increases of up to 50%. The established "method-of-images" approach models the effects of a reflective surface for atomic and molecular emitters by replacing the metal surface with a second fictitious emitter which ensures appropriate electromagnetic boundary conditions. Here, we extend the approach to the case of driven solid-state emitters, where exciton-phonon interactions play a key role in determining the optical properties of the system. We derive an intuitive polaron master equation and demonstrate its agreement with the complementary half-sided cavity formulation of the same problem. Our extended image approach offers a straightforward route towards studying the dynamics of multiple solid-state emitters near a metallic surface.

  3. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to <15 nm from the graphene sheet. These capabilities to dictate optical energy transfer processes through electrical control of the local density of optical states constitute a new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  4. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  5. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  6. Design and synthesis of a new class of fluorescent photoaffinity label with specific reference to 4-benzoyl-1-benzamidofluorescein: a new photolabel for adenine nucleotide binding domains on enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Jane E.

    1993-05-01

    Benzophenone was used as the photoreactive moiety in the synthesis of several water soluble, fluorescent photoaffinity labels. The following compounds were synthesized: 5-(2-(p- benzoylbenzamido)ethylamino-1-napthalenesulfonate (BzEDANS); 5-(2-(p- benzoylbenzamido)hexylamino-1-napthalenesulfonate (BzHDANS); and 4-benzoyl-1- benzamidofluorescein (BzAF). BzEDANS and BzHDANS were found to be unsuitable for use as photochemical probes. They were incapable of photoinduced covalent binding to methylene carbon due to intramolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer. BzAF was synthesized because its fluorescent moiety, fluorescein, is an inefficient acceptor for intramolecular quenching of the benzophenone triplet state diradical intermediate. BzAF was found to be a suitable and efficient photolabel and is presently a prototype for a new class of fluorescent photolabel.

  7. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  8. Hafnia-plugged microcavities for thermal stability of selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heon-Ju; Smyth, Katherine; Bathurst, Stephen; Chou, Jeffrey; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John; Saka, Nannaji; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2013-06-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of micro-cavities effectively control photon motion and selectively emit radiation tailored to the preferred bandgap of photovoltaic (PV) cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. At the high operating temperatures, however, the micro- and nano-patterned structures of the selective emitters quickly lose their integrity--obliterating the tight tolerances required for precise spectral control. Even if oxidation, recrystallization, and grain growth could be avoided with single-crystal tungsten (W) selective emitters with vacuum packaging, surface diffusion, evaporation, and re-condensation are not avoidable in long-term operation at high temperatures. The concept of a planar array of plugged micro-cavities to suppress the curvature-dependent thermal degradation modes is proposed and tested. Based on scale-accelerated failure tests of silicon devices, the lifetime of W selective emitters operating at 1100 K is estimated to be at least 30 yr.

  9. Lithium plasma emitter for collisionless magnetized plasma experiment.

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Huang, Yi-Jue; Syugu, Wun-Jheng; Song, Sung-Xuang; Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Cheng, C Z

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a newly developed lithium plasma emitter, which can provide quiescent and low-temperature collisionless conditions for magnetized plasma experiments. This plasma emitter generates thermal emissions of lithium ions and electrons to produce a lithium plasma. Lithium type beta-eucryptite and lanthanum-hexaboride (LaB(6)) powders were mixed and directly heated with a tungsten heater to synthesize ion and electron emissions. As a result, a plasma with a diameter of ~15 cm was obtained in a magnetic mirror configuration. The typical range of electron density was 10(12)-10(13) m(-3) and that of electron temperature was 0.1-0.8 eV with the emitter operation temperature of about 1500 K. The amplitude fluctuations for the plasma density were lower than 1%. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  10. Physics and simulation of photonic crystal Purcell light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzigmann, Bernd; Römer, Friedhard

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystal membrane microcavities (PCMC) exhibit modes with highest quality factors and ultrasmall volume at the same time. This makes them the ideal solid state implementation for studying cavity quantum electrodynamics, as a quantum emitter such as a quantum dot can be placed at an electric field maximum with only moderate technological effort. Ultimately, this shall lead to novel classes of light emitters, such as highe efficiency LEDs or devices for quantum information processing. This paper discusses PCMC's operating in the weak coupling regime, shows an efficient and realistic simulation method based on the finite element method, and the design trade-offs for cavities used as light emitters. Finally, a comparison to measured spectra illustrates technological aspects.

  11. Gaseous Ultraviolet-Radiation Source with Electron Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, Seishiro; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2001-03-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) source is proposed. It resembles a dc-type plasma display panel (PDP) but the applied voltage is well below the breakdown voltage and an electron emitter is used. The advantage of the new UV source is that it can reduce energy dissipation due to creation of ions. Numerical calculations with pure xenon show an efficiency of 11% for the applied voltage of 210 V@. The emitter current of 1.3 mA/cm2 was needed to realize an UV-radiation energy equal to that of a conventional PDP@. The efficiency increased with decreasing applied voltage while the emitter current increased to obtain the same amount of UV-radiation energy.

  12. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, D.T.

    1992-03-17

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  13. Fully tuneable, Purcell-enhanced solid-state quantum emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzella, M. Xia, T.; Pagliano, F.; Birindelli, S.; Zobenica, Z.; Fiore, A.; Midolo, L.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-10-05

    We report the full energy control over a semiconductor cavity-emitter system, consisting of single Stark-tunable quantum dots embedded in mechanically reconfigurable photonic crystal membranes. A reversible wavelength tuning of the emitter over 7.5 nm as well as an 8.5 nm mode shift are realized on the same device. Harnessing these two electrical tuning mechanisms, a single exciton transition is brought on resonance with the cavity mode at several wavelengths, demonstrating a ten-fold enhancement of its spontaneous emission. These results open the way to bring several cavity-enhanced emitters mutually into resonance and therefore represent a key step towards scalable quantum photonic circuits featuring multiple sources of indistinguishable single photons.

  14. Low Emittance Tuning Studies for SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, Simone; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Donald, Martin; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    SuperB[1] is an international project for an asymmetric 2 rings collider at the B mesons cm energy to be built in the Rome area in Italy. The two rings will have very small beam sizes at the Interaction Point and very small emittances, similar to the Linear Collider Damping Rings ones. In particular, the ultra low vertical emittances, 7 pm in the LER and 4 pm in the HER, need a careful study of the misalignment errors effects on the machine performances. Studies on the closed orbit, vertical dispersion and coupling corrections have been carried out in order to specify the maximum allowed errors and to provide a procedure for emittance tuning. A new tool which combines MADX and Matlab routines has been developed, allowing for both corrections and tuning. Results of these studies are presented.

  15. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  16. Biological treatment of clogged emitters in a drip irrigation system.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ustün; Anapali, Omer; Dönmez, Mesude Figen; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate microbial organisms that can be used for preventing clogging in drip irrigation systems caused by biological factors. A total of 25 fungi isolate and 121 bacterial strains were isolated from water samples collected from drip irrigation systems in tomato greenhouses in the eastern Anatolia region of Turkey in the spring season of 2001. Biological clogging of emitters in a model drip irrigation system was experimentally caused by application of the microorganisms (fungi and bacteria) isolated in the study. Three antagonistic bacterial strains in the genus Bacillus spp (ERZ, OSU-142) and Burkholdria spp (OSU-7) were used for treatment of biological clogging of the emitters. The results showed that the antagonistic bacterial strains tested have the potential to be used as anti-clogging agents for treatment of emitters in drip irrigation system. This is the first study that demonstrated that antagonistic microorganisms can be utilized for treatment of clogging in drip irrigation systems.

  17. Field Emission from Lateral Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guohai; Song, Yenan

    2016-10-01

    A field emission from a lateral emitter made by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) yarn was investigated. The lateral emitter showed an excellent field emission performance with a low turn-on electric field of 1.13 V/um at an emission current of 1 uA, high emission current of 0.2 mA at an applied voltage of 700 V, and long-time emission stability for over 20 h without any significant current decay under an initial emission current of about 0.10 mA. The lateral emitter also demonstrated a uniform line emission pattern. It is suggested that the field emission occurs from the outmost MWCNTs which are protruding out from the yarn surface.

  18. Study of narrowband single photon emitters in polycrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Russell G.; Shimoni, Olga; Martin, Aiden A.; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-11-03

    Quantum information processing and integrated nanophotonics require robust generation of single photon emitters on demand. In this work, we demonstrate that diamond films grown on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition can host bright, narrowband single photon emitters in the visible—near infra-red spectral range. The emitters possess fast lifetime (∼several ns), absolute photostability, and exhibit full polarization at excitation and emission. Pulsed and continuous laser excitations confirm their quantum behaviour at room temperature, while low temperature spectroscopy is performed to investigate inhomogeneous broadening. Our results advance the knowledge of solid state single photon sources and open pathways for their practical implementation in quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  19. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1992-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  20. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  1. Intra-beam scattering studies for low emittance at BAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sai-Ke; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Xu, Gang; Jiao, Yi

    2015-06-01

    The target parameters of modern ultra-low emittance storage ring light sources are entering into a regime where intra-beam scattering (IBS) becomes important and, in the case of the Beijing Advanced Photon Source (BAPS), which is being designed at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), even a limitation for achieving the desired emittances in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for X-ray wavelengths (≈10 pm). Due to the low emittance, the IBS effect will be very strong. Accurate calculations are needed to check if the design goal (ɛh+ɛv = 20 pm) can be reached. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation studies of the IBS effect on a BAPS temporary design lattice.

  2. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August; Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  3. SiC IR emitter design for thermophotovoltaic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Ferguson, Luke; McCoy, Larry G.; Pernisz, Udo C.

    1996-02-01

    An improved ceramic spine disc burner/emitter for use in a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator is described. A columnar infrared (IR) emitter consisting of a stack of silicon carbide (SiC) spine discs provides for both high conductance for the combustion gases and efficient heat transfer from the hot combustion gases to the emitter. Herein, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of this SiC burner as well as the characterization of the IR spectrum it emits. We note that when the SiC column is surrounded with fused silica heat shields, these heat shields suppress the emitted power beyond 4 microns. Thus, a TPV generator using GaSb photovoltaic cells covered by simple dielectric filters can convert over 30% of the emitted IR radiation to DC electric power.

  4. Triple targeting of Auger emitters using octreotate conjugated to a DNA-binding ligand and a nuclear localizing signal.

    PubMed

    Violet, John A; Farrugia, Gabriella; Skene, Colin; White, Jonathan; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effect of incorporation of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) into a conjugate comprising the DNA binding ligand para-iodoHoechst (PIH) and octreotate on its DNA binding and affinity to the somatostatin receptor (SSTR). Confirmation of these properties would support development of similar conjugates labelled with Auger emitters for their potential in Auger endoradiotherapy. We synthesized conjugates of PIH and octreotate (PO) or PIH and NLS (PN) and a conjugate comprising PIH, NLS and octreotate (PNO). DNA-binding characteristics of PIH and conjugates were assessed using synthetic DNA oligonucleotides employing spectrophotometric titration of ligand solutions with DNA. We used membranes from the type 2 SSTR (SSTR2) overexpressing human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A427-7 to investigate the binding affinity of PNO. We demonstrated PN and PNO retain specific high affinity DNA-binding properties observed for PIH, and acquire an additional non-specific binding capacity. No DNA binding was observed for PO. PNO retains its binding affinity for SSTR. The DNA-binding properties of PNO and its affinity for SSTR suggests that it could potentially be used for tumour-specific delivery of PIH labelled with an Auger emitter in SSTR expressing tumours.

  5. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  6. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  7. Back-contacted emitter GaAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, G.L.; Marti, A.; Algora, C. )

    1990-06-25

    A new device structure to improve the performance of concentrator GaAs solar cells is described and the first experimental results are reported. The reason for such an improvement relies on a drastic reduction of the shadowing and series resistance losses based on the possibility of back contacting the emitter region of the solar cell. The experimental results obtained with devices of these types, with a simplified structure, fabricated by liquid phase epitaxy, demonstrate the feasibility and correct operation of the proposed back contact of the emitter of the cells.

  8. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  9. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  10. Distributed proximity sensor system having embedded light emitters and detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A distributed proximity sensor system is provided with multiple photosensitive devices and light emitters embedded on the surface of a robot hand or other moving member in a geometric pattern. By distributing sensors and emitters capable of detecting distances and angles to points on the surface of an object from known points in the geometric pattern, information is obtained for achieving noncontacting shape and distance perception, i.e., for automatic determination of the object's shape, direction and distance, as well as the orientation of the object relative to the robot hand or other moving member.

  11. Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yenan; Song, Yoon-Ho; Milne, William I.; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-04-21

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600 °C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600 °C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39 mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

  12. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  13. Emittance Measurements at the Langley Chemical Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1960-01-01

    Total hemispherical emittance measurements are made routinely for materials which may be heated by electrical resistance methods over the temperature range of 600 degrees to 2,000 F by using a black-body reference method. This employs a conical black body and a thermopile detector with a calcium fluoride lens. Emittance is obtained by measuring the radiant flux from the specimen strip and comparing it with the flux from an equal area of the black-body cone at the same temperature. The temperature measurements are made by use of thermocouples. It is planned to extend the temperature range of this type of measurement to temperatures above 2,000 F. Another technique has been investigated for measuring emittance of materials not amenable to electrical heating or thermocouple attachment. This method uses a black-body-cavity furnace similar to that used in reference 5 to measure emittance of transparent materials such as glass. The method employs a heated black-body cavity in which the semicircular specimen is allowed to come to the equilibrium temperature of the cavity and then is rotated in front of a water-cooled viewing port where a sensitive thermistor detector alternately views the specimen surface and the black-body cavity. The ratio of the two readings gives the specimen emittance directly, for the temperature of the black body. The detector output is recorded on a fast Brown self-balancing potentiometer. The furnace is provided with a water-cooled blackened shutter which may be inserted behind the specimen to eliminate any transmitted black-body radiation if the specimen is transparent. This apparatus is capable of measuring total normal emittance over the temperature range of 1,000 degrees to 2,000 F. Preliminary data for boron nitride specimens of two thicknesses are shown where total normal emittance is plotted against temperature for two experimental conditions: (1) black-body radiation incident on the back of the specimen and (2) no black-body radiation

  14. Improved brightness on broad-area single emitter (BASE) modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Susanne; Guarino, Andrea; Matuschek, Nicolai; Bättig, Rainer; Arlt, Sebastian; Lu, Denis; Zayer, Nadhum; Greatrex, Jeffery; Sverdlov, Boris; Valk, Bernd; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    In this communication we report on the approaches to increase the brightness of Bookham's latest generations of high power pump modules. Since the single-emitter laser diode is the essential building block in all module designs, the optimization of the device design towards higher wall-plug efficiency, higher brightness and better reliability is one focus of the ongoing development efforts at Bookham. By using an analytical simulation tool critical parameters for efficient emitter-fiber coupling as the beam divergence and coupling scheme could be identified.

  15. Uncorrelated Energy Spread and Longitudinal Emittance of a Photoinjector Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Stupakov, G.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    Longitudinal phase space properties of a photoinjector beam are important in many areas of high-brightness beam applications such as bunch compression, transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange, and high-gain free-electron lasers. In this paper, we discuss both the rf and the space charge contributions to the uncorrelated energy spread of the beam generated from a laser-driven rf gun. We compare analytical expressions for the uncorrelated energy spread and the longitudinal emittance with numerical simulations and recent experimental results.

  16. An open-label, randomized, controlled, 4-week comparative clinical trial of barnidipine hydrochloride, a calcium-channel blocker, and benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, in Chinese patients with renal parenchymal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zheng, F; Chen, P; Tang, L; Wei, R; Yu, Y; Su, Y; Kikkawa, T; Yamamoto, M

    2006-01-01

    This study compared barnidipine, a calcium-channel blocker, and benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, in 85 Chinese patients with renal parenchymal hypertension (diastolic blood pressure range 95 - 110 mmHg). Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg barnidipine or 10 mg benazepril orally daily for 4 weeks. In patients with diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg after 2 weeks of treatment, the dose of barnidipine or benazepril was increased by 5 or 10 mg, respectively. Both the barnidipine-treated group (n = 43) and the benazepril-treated group (n = 42) showed significant mean reductions from baseline in sitting systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The decrease in diastolic blood pressure with benazepril was significantly greater than with barnidipine treatment. Sitting heart rate was not changed by either drug. There was no significant difference in adverse events between the two groups. Barnidipine is similar to benazepril for the treatment of renal parenchymal hypertension.

  17. A label-free ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of viable Salmonella enteritidis using enzyme-induced cascade two-stage toehold strand-displacement-driven assembly of G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Ma, Suzhen; Men, Shuai; Li, Qingzhou; Yang, Xin; Wang, Hongning; Zhang, Anyun

    2016-06-15

    The harm of Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis ) to public health mainly by contaminating fresh food and water emphasizes the urgent need for rapid detection techniques to help control the spread of the pathogen. In this assay, an newly designed capture probe complex that contained specific S. enteritidis-aptamer and hybridized signal target sequence was used for viable S. enteritidis recognition directly. In the presence of the target S. enteritidis, single-stranded target sequences were liberated and initiated the replication-cleavage reaction, producing numerous G-quadruplex structures with a linker on the 3'-end. And then, the sensing system took innovative advantage of quadratic linker-induced strand-displacement for the first time to release target sequence in succession, leading to the cyclic reuse of the target sequences and cascade signal amplification, thereby achieving the successive production of G-quadruplex structures. The fluorescent dye, N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX, binded to these G-quadruplex structures and generated significantly enhanced fluorescent signals to achieve highly sensitive detection of S. enteritidis down to 60 CFU/mL with a linear range from 10(2) to 10(7)CFU/mL. By coupling the cascade two-stage target sequences-recyclable toehold strand-displacement with aptamer-based target recognition successfully, it is the first report on a novel non-label, modification-free and DNA extraction-free ultrasensitive fluorescence biosensor for detecting viable S. enteritidis directly, which can discriminate from dead S. enteritidis.

  18. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  19. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  20. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  1. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  2. Engineering enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental research into bioinorganic catalysis of the kind presented at this Faraday Discussion has the potential to turn inspiration drawn from impressive natural energy and chemical transformations into artificial catalyst constructions useful to mankind. Creating bio-inspired artificial constructions requires a level of understanding well beyond simple description of structures and mechanisms of natural enzymes. To be useful, such description must be augmented by a practical sense of structural and energetic engineering tolerances of the mechanism. Significant barriers to achieving an engineering understanding of enzyme mechanisms arise from natural protein complexity. In certain cases we can surmount these barriers to understanding, such as natural electron tunneling, coupling of electron tunneling to light capture and proton exchange as well as simpler bond breaking redox catalysis. Hope for similar solutions of more complex bioinorganic enzymes is indicated in several papers presented in this Discussion. Armed with an engineering understanding of mechanism, the current serious frustrations to successful creation of functional artificial proteins that are rooted in protein complexity can fall away. Here we discuss the genetic and biological roots of protein complexity and show how to dodge and minimize the effects of complexity. In the best-understood cases, artificial enzymes can be designed from scratch using the simplest of protein scaffolds.

  3. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  4. Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Filter, Robert; Bösel, Christoph; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

  5. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes.

  6. Strong Coupling of Single Emitters to Surface Plasmons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    individual optical emitters and elec- tromagnetic excitations in conducting nanostructures. The excitations are optical plasmons that can be local- ized to...subwavelength dimensions. Under realistic conditions, the tight confinement causes optical emission to be almost entirely directed into the propagating...has been substantial interest in nanoscale optical devices based on the electromagnetic sur- face modes surface plasmons associated with subwave

  7. On the equivalent dose for Auger electron emitters.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Narra, V R; Sastry, K S; Rao, D V

    1993-04-01

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons are widely used in nuclear medicine (e.g., 99mTc, 123I, 201Tl) and biomedical research (e.g., 51Cr, 125I), and they are present in the environment (e.g., 40K, 55Fe). Depending on the subcellular distribution of the radionuclide, the biological effects caused by tissue-incorporated Auger emitters can be as severe as those from high-LET alpha particles. However, the recently adopted recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) provide no guidance with regard to calculating the equivalent dose for these radionuclides. The present work, using spermatogenesis in mouse testis as the experimental model, shows that the lethality of the prolific Auger emitter 125I is linearly dependent on the fraction of the radioactivity in the organ that is bound to DNA. This suggests that the equivalent dose for Auger emitters may have a similar linear dependence. Accordingly, a formalism for calculating the equivalent dose for Auger emitters is advanced within the ICRP framework.

  8. Limits to Electron Beam Emittance from Stochastic Coulomb Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Wan, Weishi

    2008-08-22

    Dense electron beams can now be generated on an ultrafast timescale using laser driven photo-cathodes and these are used for a range of applications from ultrafast electron defraction to free electron lasers. Here we determine a lower bound to the emittance of an electron beam limited by fundamental stochastic Coulomb interactions.

  9. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. High-absorptance high-emittance anodic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong Giang (Inventor); Chesterfield, John L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A colored anodic coating for use on surfaces of substrates, e.g. aluminum substrates in which it is desirable to maintain a high solar absorptance (a) and a high infrared emittance (e), particularly in low earth orbit space environments. This anodic coating is preferably a dark colored coating, and even more preferably a black coating. This coating allows a touch temperature within an acceptable design range to preclude burning of an astronaut in case of contact, but also allows a solar radiation absorption in an amount such that an a/e ratio of unity is achieved. The coating of the invention comprises a first layer in the form of an acid anodized colored anodic layer for achieving a high solar absorptance and a second or high emittance layer in the form of a clear acid anodized layer for achieving a high emittance. The entire coating is quite thin, e.g. 1-2 mils and is quite stable in a hostile space environment of the type encountered in a low earth orbit. The coating is obtained by first creating the high emittance clear anodized coating on the metal surface followed by anodizing using a colored anodizing process.

  11. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  12. What Exactly Is the Light Emitter of a Firefly?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-11-10

    Firefly bioluminescence attracts people by its glaring beauty and fascinating applications, but what is the light emitter of a firefly? The answer to this question has been explored since before the 1960s. The unanimously accepted answer is that excited-state oxyluciferin is the light emitter. The complexity of this question arises from the existence of six chemical forms (keto, enol, keto-1, enol-1, enol-1′, and enol-2) of oxyluciferin. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, a consistent conclusion was almost reached in 2011: excited-state keto-1 is the only light emitter in fireflies. However, the debate is raised again by the latest in vitro experimental results. This study will solve this contradiction via hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations combined with molecular dynamics (MD). The calculations were performed in the real protein for the six chemical forms of oxyluciferin and their corresponding analogues employed in the latest experiments. By considering the real environment, the pH value, and a possible equilibrium of the chemical forms of oxyluciferin in vivo, the calculated results indicate that the main emitter is still the excited-state keto-1 form.

  13. Low emittance injector design for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, S.; Pedrozzi, M.; Reiche, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several parameters determine the performance of free electron lasers: the slice and the projected emittance, the slice energy spread, and the peak current are the most crucial ones. The peak current is essentially obtained by magnetic compression stages along the machine or occasionally assisted by velocity bunching at low energy. The minimum emittance and the alignment of the slices along the bunch are mainly determined in the low energy part of the accelerator (injector). Variations at the per-mille level of several parameters in this section of the machine strongly influence these quantities with highly nonlinear dynamic. We developed a numerical tool to perform the optimization of the injector. We applied this code to optimize the SwissFEL injector, assuming different gun designs, initial bunch lengths and intrinsic emittances. We obtained an emittance along the bunch of 0.14 mm mrad and around 0.08 mm mrad for the maximum and the minimum SwissFEL charges (200 and 10 pC, respectively). We applied the same tool to a running injector, where we automatized the optimization of the machine.

  14. Selective solar absorber emittance measurement at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philémon; Braillon, Julien; Raccurt, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The characterization of a material in such condition is complicated and requires advanced apparatuses, and different measurement methods exist for the determination of the two quantities of relevance regarding an absorber, which are its emittance and its solar absorbance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for measure the emittance of this solar absorber at elevated temperature. In this paper, we present an optical bench developed for emittance measurement on absorbers is conditions of use. Results will be shown, with a discussion of some factors of influence over this measurement and how to control them.

  15. High-absorptance high-emittance anodic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong Giang (Inventor); Chesterfield, John L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A colored anodic coating for use on surfaces of substrates, e.g. aluminum substrates in which it is desirable to maintain a high solar absorptance (.alpha.) and a high infrared emittance (.epsilon.), particularly in low earth orbit space environments. This anodic coating is preferably a dark colored coating, and even more preferably a black coating. This coating allows a touch temperature within an acceptable design range to preclude burning of an astronaut in case of contact, but also allows a solar radiation absorption in an amount such that an .alpha./.epsilon. ratio of unity is achieved. The coating of the invention comprises a first layer in the form of an acid anodized colored anodic layer for achieving a high solar absorptance and a second or high emittance layer in the form of a clear acid anodized layer for achieving a high emittance. The entire coating is quite thin, e.g. 1-2 mils and is quite stable in a hostile space environment of the type encountered in a low earth orbit. The coating is obtained by first creating the high emittance clear anodized coating on the metal surface followed by anodizing using a colored anodizing process.

  16. On the Equivalent Dose for Auger Electron Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Narra, Venkat R.; Sastry, Kandula S. R.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons are widely used in nuclear medicine (e.g., 99mTc, 123I, 201T1) and biomedical research (e.g., 51Cr, 125I), and they are present in the environment (e.g., 40K, 55Fe). Depending on the subcellular distribution of the radionuclide, the biological effects caused by tissue-incorporated Auger emitters can be as severe as those from high-LET α particles. However, the recently adopted recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) provide no guidance with regard to calculating the equivalent dose for these radionuclides. The present work, using spermatogenesis in mouse testis as the experimental model, shows that the lethality of the prolific Auger emitter 125I is linearly dependent on the fraction of the radioactivity in the organ that is bound to DNA. This suggests that the equivalent dose for Auger emitters may have a similar linear dependence. Accordingly, a formalism for calculating the equivalent dose for Auger emitters is advanced within the ICRP framework. PMID:8475256

  17. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  18. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  19. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  20. Investigation of emittance growth in the White Horse beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lee, H.; Lemons, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium and stability of the neutral gas transport section of the White Horse beam accelerator is studied. It is found that the beam should be unstable from the two-stream instability and from beam-excited ion-acoustic waves, with the latter being a possible source of emittance growth in the beam. 11 references, 16 figures, 1 table.

  1. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV /= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher

  2. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  3. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  4. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao Sites, James R.; Kanevce, Ana

    2016-06-21

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C}. These

  5. Using antennas separated in flight direction to avoid effect of emitter clock drift in geolocation

    SciTech Connect

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Bickel, Douglas L

    2012-10-23

    The location of a land-based radio frequency (RF) emitter is determined from an airborne platform. RF signaling is received from the RF emitter via first and second antennas. In response to the received RF signaling, signal samples for both antennas are produced and processed to determine the location of the RF emitter.

  6. Spacecraft charging control by thermal, field emission with lanthanum-hexaboride emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal, field emitters of lanthanum (or perhaps cerium) hexaboride (LaB6) with temperature variability up to about 1500K are suggested for spacecraft charging control. Such emitters operate at much lower voltages with considerably more control and add plasma-diagnostic versatility. These gains should outweigh the additional complexity of providing heat for the LaB6 thermal, field emitter.

  7. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Asova, G.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Groß, M.; Hakobyan, L.; Isaev, I.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jachmann, L.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Köhler, W.; Mahgoub, M.; Malyutin, D.; Nozdrin, M.; Oppelt, A.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Rimjaem, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Vashchenko, G.; Weidinger, S.; Wenndorff, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Lederer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Templin, I.; Will, I.; Paramonov, V.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ). Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008-2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010-2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  8. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of ⩾200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while ⩾500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  9. Coherent polarization locking of a diode emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. P.; Phua, P. B.

    2010-02-01

    Coherent beam combining has been actively explored as a technique to increase the brightness of laser sources. Passive phase-locking of a diode array in a common resonator, in particular, is an attractive approach owing to its inherent simplicity and good beam quality. In this work, we present the coherent combining of an array of diode emitters in a conventional diode bar configuration using the coherent polarization locking technique. An external laser cavity is designed so that the diode emissions from several 976 nm diode emitters are spatially overlapped via a series of birefringent walk-off crystals and passively phase-locked by a polarizing beam splitter. The key optical element in this beam combining scheme is the novel YVO4 birefringent spatial beam combiner that not only provides spatial overlap, but also identical optical path lengths for the diode beams. This facilitates design of the cavity for achieving a close match between the mode size of the Gaussian beam and the asymmetric emitting area at the front facet of the diode emitters. The phase-locking technique, coupled with the required standard bulk optical crystals and standard diode bar configuration, yields a robust laser architecture which retains the advantages of diode lasers in terms of cost, size and wavelength tunability. With the coherent combining of four diode emitters, we achieved a nearly diffraction limited beam at 1030 mW, which represents a 50 times increase in brightness over the standard incoherent diode bar. The coherent locking approach is highly scalable. Further experiments to coherently combine eight to sixteen diode emitters are in progress.

  10. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  11. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  12. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  13. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  14. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  16. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  17. The Labelling of Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes the impact on chemistry laboratories and teachers in the United Kingdom of the Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Substances Regulations 1978. These regulations require suppliers to label containers in particular ways. (HM)

  18. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  19. Synthesis of Site-Specifically (13)C Labeled Linoleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Zhu, Hui; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-10-12

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) catalyzes the C-H abstraction from the reactive carbon (C-11) in linoleic acid as the first and rate-determining step in the formation of alkylhydroperoxides. While previous labeling strategies have focused on deuterium labeling to ascertain the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects for this reaction, there is an emerging interest and need for selectively enriched (13)C isotopologues. In this report, we present synthetic strategies for site-specific (13)C labeled linoleic acid substrates. We take advantage of a Corey-Fuchs formyl to terminal (13)C-labeled alkyne conversion, using (13)CBr4 as the labeling source, to reduce the number of steps from a previous fatty acid (13)C synthetic labeling approach. The labeled linoleic acid substrates are useful as nuclear tunneling markers and for extracting active site geometries of the enzyme-substrate complex in lipoxygenase.

  20. Self-regulation of discharge in non-compensating subsurface drip irrigation emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Juana, Luis; Castañón, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    While studying emitter discharge variability of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in the laboratory, the authors found out a possible self-regulation effect of non-compensating emitter discharge. This is due to the interaction between effects of emitter discharge and soil pressure. As known, under certain circumstances, a positive pressure hs develops at the discharge point of a buried emitter. The hydraulic gradient between the emitter interior and the soil would then decrease compared to the situation where the emitter is on the surface. Thus, the discharge reduces, following: q=k·(h_0-h_s)x, where q is the emitter flow rate, h0 is the working pressure head, and k and x are the emitter coefficient and exponent, respectively. The soil pressure would act as a regulator. The emitters with a greater flow rate in surface irrigation would generate a higher pressure in the soil. Therefore, the subsurface irrigation discharge would be reduced to a greater extent than in emitters with a lower flow rate. Consequently, the flow emitter variability would be smaller in buried emitters than in surface ones. The above interaction would not be observed in compensating emitters, even for the same or greater soil pressure variability. Their elastomers keep the flow rate constant within a compensation range, provided that the hydraulic gradient between the emitter interior and the soil pressure is higher than the lower limit of this range. To confirm this hypothesis, simulations were performed for both uniform and heterogeneous soils reproducing the laboratory conditions (working pressure head and emitter discharge). When the soil has a high heterogeneity, the self-regulation effect was very small as compared to the variability caused by the soil. Nevertheless, the authors consider that this effect is worth to be studied. The objective of the paper is to perform new simulations in order to determine under which circumstances self-regulation would be significant and find thresholds

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  13. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.E.-; Church, M.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2010-08-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchanger to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at A0 photoinjector.

  14. Emittance growth saturation effect in synchrotron machines due to point-like perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.; Chen, S.

    1993-11-01

    Analytical estimation of the transverse emittance growth due to a point-like perturbation is performed for a proton synchrotron machine. This emittance growth is caused by the tune spread within the bunch. However, the emittance growth suffers a saturation effect caused by the same tune spread. Computer simulations on the emittance growth due to resistive wall instabilities and feedback systems verify qualitatively this emittance growth saturation effect. These simulations were accomplished in the Medium Energy Booster of the Superconducting Super Collider using the TADIMMI computer code.

  15. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  16. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  17. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  18. Somatostatin receptor PET imaging with Gallium-68 labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Win, Z; Al-Nahhas, A; Rubello, D; Gross, M D

    2007-09-01

    Imaging somatostatin receptor status with 68Ga labeled peptides has progressed rapidly over the last several years. It has generated great interest, and stimulated further research into the development of DOTA-derivative peptides. It has expanded our knowledge of receptor imaging and enhanced our appreciation of the difference between receptor-based and metabolic imaging, as well as more in-depth evaluation of tumor biology. The availability of the 68Ge/68Ga generator provides an attractive alternative to cyclotron-based positron-emitters, especially if kit-based radiopharmaceutical formulations based upon 68Ga are developed in the future.

  19. Parallel nanomanufacturing via electrohydrodynamic jetting from microfabricated externally-fed emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, Philip J.; Hill, Frances A.; Heubel, Eric V.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of planar arrays of externally-fed silicon electrospinning emitters for high-throughput generation of polymer nanofibers. Arrays with as many as 225 emitters and with emitter density as large as 100 emitters cm-2 were characterized using a solution of dissolved PEO in water and ethanol. Devices with emitter density as high as 25 emitters cm-2 deposit uniform imprints comprising fibers with diameters on the order of a few hundred nanometers. Mass flux rates as high as 417 g hr-1 m-2 were measured, i.e., four times the reported production rate of the leading commercial free-surface electrospinning sources. Throughput increases with increasing array size at constant emitter density, suggesting the design can be scaled up with no loss of productivity. Devices with emitter density equal to 100 emitters cm-2 fail to generate fibers but uniformly generate electrosprayed droplets. For the arrays tested, the largest measured mass flux resulted from arrays with larger emitter separation operating at larger bias voltages, indicating the strong influence of electrical field enhancement on the performance of the devices. Incorporation of a ground electrode surrounding the array tips helps equalize the emitter field enhancement across the array as well as control the spread of the imprints over larger distances.

  20. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.