Science.gov

Sample records for emitting estrogen receptor-directed

  1. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    DeSombre, E.R.; Mease, R.C.; Hughes, A.; Harper, P.V.; DeJesus, O.T.; Friedman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17..cap alpha..- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE/sub 2/, were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the (p,n) reaction with /sup 80/Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE/sub 2/ showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE/sub 2/ were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of (/sup 80m/Br)BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The Drosophila estrogen-related receptor directs a metabolic switch that supports developmental growth.

    PubMed

    Tennessen, Jason M; Baker, Keith D; Lam, Geanette; Evans, Janelle; Thummel, Carl S

    2011-02-02

    Metabolism must be coordinated with development to provide the appropriate energetic needs for each stage in the life cycle. Little is known, however, about how this temporal control is achieved. Here, we show that the Drosophila ortholog of the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) family of nuclear receptors directs a critical metabolic transition during development. dERR mutants die as larvae with low ATP levels and elevated levels of circulating sugars. The expression of active dERR protein in mid-embryogenesis triggers a coordinate switch in gene expression that drives a metabolic program normally associated with proliferating cells, supporting the dramatic growth that occurs during larval development. This study shows that dERR plays a central role in carbohydrate metabolism, demonstrates that a proliferative metabolic program is used in normal developmental growth, and provides a molecular context to understand the close association between mammalian ERR family members and cancer.

  3. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  4. Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    ligands which bind to EGFR, including EGF, TGF- 4 a a a, amphiregulin, and cripto - 1, and by the capability of EGFR to transactivate other type-I tyrosine...amplification in breast cancer was recently reported by Watson et al. (69). In this analysis, encompassing over 5,000 breast tumors, the amplification rate was...activation of c-myc oncogene expression. Oncogene 7: 1587-1594. 58. Shiu, R., Watson , P. and Dubik, D. (1993) C-myc oncogene expression in estrogen

  5. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting estrogen

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2006-08-15

    Bioelectronic devices for the detection of estrogen include a collection of eukaryotic cells which harbor a recombinant lux gene from a high temperature microorganism wherein the gene is operably linked with a heterologous promoter gene. A detectable light-emitting lux gene product is expressed in the presence of the estrogen and detected by the device.

  6. Interleukin-2 receptor-directed therapies for cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2003-12-01

    Our emerging understanding of the IL-2/IL-2R system opens the possibility for more specific immunotherapy of CTCL. This understanding, taken in conjunction with the ability to produce humanized antibodies to the IL-2R subunit by genetic engineering; to arm these antibodies, as well as IL-2 itself with toxins or with alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides; and to modulate IL-2R subunits to optimize targeting of these agents provides a rational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IL-2R-expressing CTCL. Although most of these studies were conducted in HTLV-1-associated T-cell lymphomas or CTCL, it is likely that these agents may be applicable to other T-cell lymphomas, including the anaplastic large cell lymphomas, peripheral T-cell lymphomas, and the natural killer lymphomas, because these cells express the IL-2 receptor.

  7. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  8. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  9. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen that controls your symptoms and only taking estrogen as long as needed can help reduce these risks. Talk to your doctor from time to time to decide if you should take a lower dose of estrogen or should stop taking the medication.Talk to ...

  10. Postmenopausal skin and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Archer, David F

    2012-10-01

    The aging global population continues to drive increasing demand for cosmaceuticals and cosmetic surgery among older men and women. Since the discovery in the 1990s that estrogen receptors are present in skin cells and decline in number from the onset of menopause in women, researchers have explored a number of ways in which estrogen can improve skin condition. Skin is estrogen responsive, and several studies now exist to support the antiaging properties of estrogen replacement therapies in postmenopausal women. Both systemic and topical estrogens appear to have positive effects on hormonal aging, increasing skin collagen content, thickness, elasticity and hydration. Estrogen therapies may also improve wound healing and reduce the incidence of wound complications. This review explores the potential for targeted estrogen replacement as a therapeutic option for long-term skin management in postmenopausal women.

  11. The Measurement of Estrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Geoff; Makin, Hugh L. J.; Bradlow, H. Leon

    Biologists use the word ‘estrogen' when referring to molecules which have the ability to induce uterine growth or vaginal cornification in the immature or ovariectomized rodent. The word estrogen was derived from two Greek words - oistros meaning frenzy and gennein - to beget. Chemists and biochemists, however, often restrict their use of this term to molecules that contain a characteristic 18-carbon steroid nucleus with an aromatic (phenolic) A-ring, both those that are biologically active estrogens and those without biologic activity but which are of intrinsic interest, such as the estrogen conjugates. This chapter is concerned only with these steroid compounds. The structure and inter-relationship of some common estrogens are given in Fig. 8.1. In addition to the biological estrogens, there are a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds which have estrogenic activity when measured by one or another parameter. While many of the assay procedures described in this review are applicable to these compounds, their application to non C18-steroids will not be discussed here. Methodology for these non-steroidal compounds can be found in reviews by Wang et al. (2002), Wu et al. (2004), Muir (2006), and Delmonte and Rader (2006). While not wishing to downgrade the importance of previous work in the estrogen field, the authors have taken a deliberate decision to exclude most publications prior to 1975, not because these do not have value but simply because space is not unlimited and readers of the present chapter might be expected to be seeking information about methodology which is less than 30 years old. Readers seeking pre-1975 information in this area can find it in Oakey and Holder (1995).

  12. Estrogen and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, A A; Lee, A R

    2012-07-01

    Estrogen is a potent steroid with pleiotropic effects, which have yet to be fully elucidated. Estrogen has both nuclear and non-nuclear effects. The rapid response to estrogen, which involves a membrane associated estrogen receptor(ER) and is protective, involves signaling through PI3K, Akt, and ERK 1/2. The nuclear response is much slower, as the ER-estrogen complex moves to the nucleus, where it functions as a transcription factor, both activating and repressing gene expression. Several different ERs regulate the specificity of response to estrogen, and appear to have specific effects in cardiac remodeling and the response to injury. However, much remains to be understood about the selectivity of these receptors and their specific effects on gene expression. Basic studies have demonstrated that estrogen treatment prevents apoptosis and necrosis of cardiac and endothelial cells. Estrogen also attenuates pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. Estrogen may have great benefit in aging as an anti-inflammatory agent. However, clinical investigations of estrogen have had mixed results, and not shown the clear-cut benefit of more basic investigations. This can be explained in part by differences in study design: in basic studies estrogen treatment was used immediately or shortly after ovariectomy, while in some key clinical trials, estrogen was given years after menopause. Further basic research into the underlying molecular mechanisms of estrogen's actions is essential to provide a better comprehension of the many properties of this powerful hormone.

  13. Radiobrominated triphenylethylenes as estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Seevers, R.H.; Meese, R.C.; Friedman, A.M.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals have potential for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers of the female reproductive system. Tamoxifen is an antiestrogen derived from the triphenylethylene skeleton which is used in the treatment of mammary carcinoma. Hydroxytamoxifen is a metabolite of tamoxifen which binds tightly to the estrogen receptor. Two triphenylethylene derivatives based on the structure of hydroxytamoxifen have been prepared: 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2- (2-dimethylamino)-4-ethoxyphenyl -2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (1) where the ethyl group of hydroxytamoxifen has been replaced by a bromine, and 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2,2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (2) with a similar substitution and also lacking the aminoethoxy side chain believed to confer antiestrogenicity. Both 1 and 2 bind strongly to the estrogen receptor. 2 has been labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide Br-80m in moderate yields in high specific activity using either N-bromosuccinimide or N-bromophthalimide and shows promise as a potential radiotherapy agent.

  14. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  15. Estrogen supplements in menopause.

    PubMed

    Booher, D L

    1990-01-01

    The number of women aged 65 and older is expected to double by the year 2000, increasing the need for effective management of symptoms related to menopause. Contemporary management of menopause addresses the continuum of events associated with the effects of estrogen deprivation on quality and duration of life, including neuroendocrine changes, urogenital atrophy, sexual dysfunction, skin and hair changes, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. The risks and benefits of management strategies, including hormone replacement therapy, must be weighted carefully by both physician and patient. The use of estrogens and progestins, alterative compounds, dosages, routes of administration, and their advantages and disadvantages must be analyzed.

  16. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by {sup 123}I-estrogen in CHO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Mustafi, R.; Hughes, A.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope I-123, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the {sup 123}I-estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.2. The corresponding ratio with {sup 60}Co gamma rays was 15.6. The dose-response was biphasic suggesting that either receptor sites are saturated at high does, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the {sup 123}I-estrogen. The {sup 123}I-estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1,000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of {sup 123}I-estrogen for these cells suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that {sup 123}I-estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F-ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 {plus_minus} 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high LET radiations. Their results suggest that I-123 bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, that the cytotoxic damage produced by I-123 bound to estrogen is very like high LET-induced damage, and the I-123 in the estrogen-receptor-DNA complex is probably in close proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA.

  17. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by iodine-123-labeled estrogen in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Mustafi, R.; Hughes, A.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope {sup 123}I, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen receptor-positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.8. The corresponding ratio with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays was 15.6. The dose response was biphasic, suggesting either that receptor sites are saturated at high doses, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen. The {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen for these cells, suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 {+-} 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high-LET radiations. Our results suggest that {sup 123}I bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, the cytotoxic damage produced by {sup 123}I bound to estrogen is very like damage induced by high-LET radiation, and the {sup 123}I in the estrogen receptor-DNA complex is probably in proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  18. RNA Regulation of Estrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision...Estrogen 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0353 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) J. Andrew...ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Oregon Eugene OR 97403-5295

  19. Estrogenic effects from household stoves.

    PubMed

    Wu, W Z; Chen, J; Rehmann, K; Schramm, K W; Kettrup

    2002-09-01

    With the application of a genetically modified yeast, estrogen receptor-activating compounds were detected in the soot and emission gas of a wood-burning household stove. The EC50 value of 17beta-estradiol was divided by the EC50 value of soot, and the obtained relative estrogenic value for raw soot was 2.37E-5, indicating that soot was about 100,000 times less estrogenic than 17beta-estradiol. Chemical analysis revealed that alkyl phenol, benzonic acid, and PAHs represented the major constituents in the most potent fractions of the soot. Along with PAHs, other constituents might also contribute to the estrogenicity of soot.

  20. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  1. Light-emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Opel, Daniel R.; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K.; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A.; Desai, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. Study design: A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. Results: The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors’ clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters. PMID:26155326

  2. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  3. Estrogen receptors in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huaman, A

    1979-11-01

    On the basis of estrogen receptor assays, breast carcinomas are presently classified as estrogen-dependent tumors, which respond to endocrine therapy, and autonomous tumors, for which endocrine therapy is useless. This paper presents a short review of the biochemical principles of estrogen dependence, the procedures used to determine estrogen receptors, and the clinical applications of the findings of these assay procedures. Biobhemically, the estroogen dependence of normal breast cells is explained as a biochemical reaction occurring between the circulating estradiol and the breast cell, which occurs in 3 steps: 1) circulating estradiol penetrates the cellular membrane by passive diffusion, followed by 2) combining of estradiol with the estrogen-binding protein (estrophilin) and formation of an estrogen receptor complex which undergoes activation and translocation into the nucleus, to result in 3) the activated steroid receptor which combines with the nuclear charomatin and stimulates ribonucleic acid synthesis for the formation of estradiol binding proteins or estradiol receptors. The cytosol method of Wittliff et al. is described in brief and entails radioactive competitive analysis; the other available laboratory procedure is immunofluorescence of tumor sections. Quantification of estrogen receptor content can be used clinically to decide on ablative endocrine therapy, to determine the effectiveness of anti-estrogen administration, to determine the primary site of metastatic carcinoma, and as a screenng device.

  4. Estrogen therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Lorraine A

    2006-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a worldwide problem that results in fractures that lead to disability and high costs to society. Estrogen therapy is frequently utilized for postmenopausal symptoms, but also has proven protective effects on the skeleton. The main action of estrogen at the cellular level is to inhibit the osteoclast by increasing levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG). OPG binds to the receptor activator of NFkB and prevents osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival. Numerous trials have demonstrated the positive effect estrogen has on the improvement of bone mineral density, and lower doses have also proven efficacious with fewer side effects. Both observational and randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the ability of estrogen treatment to prevent fractures. Topics that remain controversial include the appropriate length of estrogen treatment for postmenopausal women and the appropriate follow-up after treatment discontinuation.

  5. Risks of estrogens and progestogens.

    PubMed

    L'Hermite, M

    1990-09-01

    The risks and benefits of specific types of postmenopausal estrogens and progestogens are explored: those affecting serum lipids, clotting elements, hepatic proteins synthesis, blood pressure, glucose tolerance, endometrial, breast and cervical cancer. Ethinyl estradiol taken orally is the only estrogen likely to cause gall bladder disease. It also induces liver protein synthesis when taken orally or vaginally. Natural estrogens do not heighten coagulation factors, and may shift towards fibrinolysis. Both ethinyl estradiol and equine estrogens may increase blood pressure, while natural estrogens may decrease it. Similarly natural estrogens induce prostacyclin synthesis, while ethinyl estradiol activates both prostacyclin and thromboxanes. Progestagens, especially so the norprogestins, disturb carbohydrate metabolism and tend to reverse the beneficial effects of estrogens on serum lipids, a 40-70% reduction in risk of mortality from coronary heart disease. A meta- analysis of 23 studies concluded that menopausal estrogens do not increase the risk of breast cancer by a measurable degree, except in high doses and in those predisposed by family history. There is an increased risk of endometrial carcinoma for those taking unopposed estrogens for more than 3-6 years. This can be attenuated by taking combined estrogen-progestins, which will eventually result in absence of bleeding, or a 12-day progestogen course every 4-6 cycles. Oral micronized progesterone decreases blood pressure. The relative androgenic effects of progestins other than the norprogesterone derivatives are less significant. As an alternative to taking a progestogen, a woman could have regular endometrial sampling or abdominal or vaginal sonograms to detect endometrial cancer.

  6. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  7. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  8. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  9. The epigenetics of estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Fan, Lu

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic processes have been implicated in everything from cell proliferation to maternal behavior. Epigenetic alterations, including histone alterations and DNA methylation, have also been shown to play critical roles in the formation of some types of memory, and in the modulatory effects that factors, such as stress, drugs of abuse and environmental stimulation, have on the brain and memory function. Recently, we demonstrated that the ability of the sex-steroid hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance memory formation is dependent on histone acetylation and DNA methylation, a finding that has important implications for understanding how hormones influence cognition in adulthood and aging. In this article, we provide an overview of the literature demonstrating that epigenetic processes and E2 influence memory, describe our findings indicating that epigenetic alterations regulate E2-induced memory enhancement, and discuss directions for future work on the epigenetics of estrogen. PMID:21593594

  10. Light-Emitting Pickles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  11. Red Emitting VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetter, Michael; Roßbach, Robert; Michler, Peter

    This chapter describes the progress in development of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) emitting in the red spectral region around 650 nm for data transmission over polymer optical fibers (POF). First, growth issues of red VCSEL using two different material systems, namely AlGaAs and AlGaInP, are introduced. In particular, the optical and electrical state-of-the-art characteristics as low threshold currents ({≤} 1 mA) and high output powers (several mW) are presented with a special focus on emission wavelength. Also the thermal budget and heat removal in the devices are pointed out with regard to the geometry of the VCSEL. Small-signal modulation response in terms of maximum resonance frequency in dependance on temperature behavior are discussed. Applications of these devices in optical interconnects are described and digital data transmission at data rates up to 2.1 Gbit/s over step-index POF is reported. These properties make red emitting VCSEL perfectly suited for high-speed low power consuming light sources for optical data communication via POF. By introducing InP quantum dots as gain material in red emitting VCSEL nearly temperature independent record low threshold current densities of around 10 A/cm2 could be observed.

  12. [Uterine estrogen sulfotransferase and estrogen sulfatase in embryo implantation].

    PubMed

    Loza Arredondo, M C; González Juarez, N A

    1994-11-01

    The relation conjugated/unconjugated estrogens associated with reproductive processes has brought about the interest to study the biological role and regulation of the estrogen sulfotransferase and estrogen sulfatase which participate in the formation and hydrolysis of estrogen 3-sulfates, respectively. In this paper, both activities were measured through the reciprocal conversion of 3H-estrone sulfate and 3H-unconjugated estrogen during in vitro incubation with implantation sites (SI) and non-implanted sites (SNI) from the rat uterus, during the process of embryo implantation. Contrasting enzyme activities were found in these tissues. While sulfotransferase activity was higher in SI than in SNI (0.205 vs 0.144 pmol of E1S formed/mg protein/h, the inverse was found for the sulfatase (1.470 vs 1.977 pmol of E1 formed/mg protein/h). These results indicate the presence of both enzymes in the rat uterus and suggest the existence of a mechanism in SI that locally regulate the concentration of free and sulfoconjugated estrogens in which these enzymes participate.

  13. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Claus

    2014-02-10

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance.

  14. White light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

  15. Estrogenic flavonoids: structural requirements for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1995-01-01

    A systematic survey of polycyclic phenols has been performed to identify members of this chemical group with estrogenic activity. Twelve compounds were found to be able to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the human estrogen receptor expressed in cultured cells by transient transfection. These natural estrogens belong to several distinct, but chemically related classes including chalcones, flavanones, flavones, flavonols, and isoflavones. Selected examples of estrogenic flavonoids were further analyzed to determine their biological potencies and their relative affinities for binding to the estrogen receptor. These data are interpreted with respect to the molecular structure of polycyclic phenols required for hormonal activity as nonsteroidal estrogens.

  16. VASCULAR ACTIONS OF ESTROGENS: FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Duckles, Sue P.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of estrogen exposure in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease is controversial. But it is clear that estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology, with potential therapeutic implications. Therefore, it is the goal of this review to summarize, using an integrated approach, current knowledge of the vascular effects of estrogen, both in humans and in experimental animals. Aspects of estrogen synthesis and receptors, as well as general mechanisms of estrogenic action are reviewed with an emphasis on issues particularly relevant to the vascular system. Recent understanding of the impact of estrogen on mitochondrial function suggests that the longer lifespan of women compared to men may depend in part on the ability of estrogen to decrease production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Mechanisms by which estrogen increases endothelial vasodilator function, promotes angiogenesis and modulates autonomic function are summarized. Key aspects of the relevant pathophysiology of inflammation, atherosclerosis, stroke, migraine and thrombosis are reviewed concerning current knowledge of estrogenic effects. A number of emerging concepts are addressed throughout. These include the importance of estrogenic formulation and route of administration and the impact of genetic polymorphisms, either in estrogen receptors or in enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism, on responsiveness to hormone treatment. The importance of local metabolism of estrogenic precursors and the impact of timing for initiation of treatment and its duration are also considered. While consensus opinions are emphasized, controversial views are presented in order to stimulate future research. PMID:18579753

  17. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  18. Estrogen actions in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M E

    2009-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the current state of the field for estrogen receptor actions in the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It is organized into three parts: a short Introduction and overview of the current view of how estrogen works on blood vessels; a summary of the current status of clinical information regarding HRT and cardiovascular effects; and an update on state-of-the-art mouse models of estrogen action using estrogen receptor knockout mice.

  19. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/12/1 PMID:24512617

  20. Melasma Associated with Topical Estrogen Cream

    PubMed Central

    Schiechert, Rachel A.; Zaiac, Martin N.

    2017-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with hyperpigmented patches on her upper extremities. The patient had begun using a topical estrogen cream in the affected areas prior to noticing the hyperpigmentation. A diagnosis of melasma secondary to topical estrogen cream was made. While systemic hormones are a well-documented trigger for the development of melasma, this case represents the first report of melasma associated with topical estrogens. Topical estrogens are frequently prescribed to postmenopausal women for skin rejuvenation. Melasma should be discussed as a potential side effect of systemic as well as topical estrogen preparations. PMID:28367263

  1. P450 enzymes of estrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C P; Fishman, J

    1993-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous estrogens undergo extensive oxidative metabolism by specific cytochrome P450 enzymes. Certain drugs and xenobiotics have been found to be potent inducers of estrogen hydroxylating enzymes with C-2 hydroxylase induction being greater than that of C-16 hydroxylase. Oxygenated estrogen metabolites have different biological activities, with C-2 metabolites having limited or no activity and C-4 and C-16 metabolites having similar potency to estradiol. Pathophysiological roles for some of the oxygenated estrogen metabolites have been proposed, e.g. 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone. These reactive estrogens are capable of damaging cellular proteins and DNA and may be carcinogenic in specific cells.

  2. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  3. Commonly occurring plant flavonoids have estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1993-07-01

    A remarkable diversity of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds have been shown to mimic the biological effects of 17 beta-estradiol by virtue of their ability to bind to and activate the nuclear estrogen receptor. This report extends the family of nonsteroidal estrogens to include several multiply hydroxylated chalcones, flavanones, and flavones. The hormone-like activity of these natural plant products is indicated by their ability to stimulate an estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional response and to promote growth of estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells in culture. The transcriptional response can be inhibited by the steroidal estrogen antagonist ICI-164,384 and is specific for the estrogen receptor. Evidence is presented to show that selected hydroxylated flavonoids interact directly with the estrogen receptor, based on their ability to compete for the binding of 17 beta-[3H]estradiol to the receptor in cell-free extracts. These compounds are less active, on a molar basis, than 17 beta-estradiol or the synthetic dihydroxystilbene estrogens, but they have potencies comparable to those of other known phytoestrogens. Together, these findings broaden our understanding of the structure-activity relationships for nonsteroidal estrogens and present a series of new chemical prototypes for the future development of potentially useful agonists and antagonists for this nuclear receptor. The wide distribution of weakly estrogenic flavonoid pigments in food crops and medicinal plants raises additional questions about the possible health risks and benefits of these compounds, meriting closer examination of their presence in the human diet.

  4. The role of environmental estrogens and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, Cecilia; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the recent years. It has been proposed that this epidemiological evidence could be in part attributable to environmental estrogens, compounds that display estrogen-like activity and are ubiquitously present in the environment. Environmental estrogens can be found in a wide variety of foods: phytoestrogens occur in plants such as clover and soy, while mycoestrogens are food contaminants produced by fungi. Meat, eggs and dairy products from animals given exogenous hormones contain relatively high concentration of estrogens. Among xenoestrogens, industrial estrogens are synthetic chemicals produced for specific purposes (pesticides, plastics, surfactants and detergents) while metalloestrogens are found in heavy metals. Estrogens can be also administered through medications (contraceptive pill, hormone replacement therapy, genistein, cimetidine, creams). There is a considerable burden of evidence in vitro and in animal models that these compounds may exert immunotoxic effects. However, to date there is no convincing data that exposure to environmental estrogens can be regarded as a risk for human health. In particular, there is no consensus whether prolonged exposure to relatively low concentrations of different estrogenic chemicals can affect the human immune system and induce clinically evident diseases in real-life scenario. Moreover, the effects on human health of the synergistic interactions between natural, medical, dietary and environmental estrogens have not been fully elucidated yet. Here we provide an extensive review of the in vivo and in vitro effects of environmental estrogens on the immune system, focusing on the evidences of association between exposure and autoimmune disorders.

  5. Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0400 TITLE: Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...estrogen- receptor positive breast cancer, estrogen receptor negative breast cancer, epigenetics , nuclear hormone receptor, estrogen Overall

  6. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  7. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  8. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  9. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  10. [Transdermal estrogenic therapy in menopause].

    PubMed

    Nencioni, T; Polvani, F; Penotti, M; Porcaro, E; Barbieri Carones, M

    1989-01-01

    The availability of percutaneous estrogenic preparations capable of directly entering the bloodstream, avoiding the liver, has opened new prospects in the treatment of the climacteric syndrome. The purpose of our work has been to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of a percutaneous 17-beta-estradiol-oral progestin association with an all oral association of conjugated estrogens and progestins and to evaluate the ability to control menopausal symptoms and biohumoral characteristics. 42 (1 to 7 years postmenopausal) heavily symptomatic patients were selected at the "Centro per lo studio e la terapia del climaterio" in Milan and divided in two equally sized groups. One group was treated using the percutaneous therapy, the other with the all-oral one. The results show that percutaneous administration leads to a quicker control of vasomotor symptomatology and metabolic effects similar to oral administration.

  11. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  12. Estrogen turns down "the AIRE".

    PubMed

    Bakhru, Pearl; Su, Maureen A

    2016-04-01

    Genetic alterations are known drivers of autoimmune disease; however, there is a much higher incidence of autoimmunity in women, implicating sex-specific factors in disease development. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene contributes to the maintenance of central tolerance, and complete loss of AIRE function results in the development of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1. In this issue of the JCI, Dragin and colleagues demonstrate that AIRE expression is downregulated in females as the result of estrogen-mediated alterations at the AIRE promoter. The association between estrogen and reduction of AIRE may at least partially account for the elevated incidence of autoimmune disease in women and has potential implications for sex hormone therapy.

  13. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  14. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  15. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Hall, James B.; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.

    2013-01-01

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  16. Estrogens and Cognition: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Korol, Donna L.; Pisani, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings that show the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. PMID:26149525

  17. Parabens inhibit human skin estrogen sulfotransferase activity: possible link to paraben estrogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Harville, Heather M; Zhang, Yanhua; Ackermann, Chrisita; Voorman, Richard L

    2007-04-11

    Parabens (p-hydroxybenzoate esters) are a group of widely used preservatives in topically applied cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Parabens display weak associations with the estrogen receptors in vitro or in cell based models, but do exhibit estrogenic effects in animal models. It is our hypothesis that parabens exert their estrogenic effects, in part, by elevating levels of estrogens through inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferases (SULTs) in skin. We report here the results of a structure-activity-relationship of parabens as inhibitors of estrogen sulfation in human skin cytosolic fractions and normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Similar to reports of paraben estrogenicity and estrogen receptor affinity, the potency of SULT inhibition increased as the paraben ester chain length increased. Butylparaben was found to be the most potent of the parabens in skin cytosol, yielding an IC(50) value of 37+/-5 microM. Butylparaben blocked the skin cytosol sulfation of estradiol and estrone, but not the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone. The parabens were also tested as inhibitors of SULT activity in a cellular system, with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. The potency of butylparaben increased three-fold in these cells relative to the IC(50) value from skin cytosol. Overall, these results suggest chronic topical application of parabens may lead to prolonged estrogenic effects in skin as a result of inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Accordingly, the skin anti-aging benefits of many topical cosmetics and pharmaceuticals could be derived, in part, from the estrogenicity of parabens.

  18. Estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1975-01-01

    The estrogen potencies of 9 oral contraceptive pills, Enovid-E, Enovid-5, Ovulen, Demulen, Norinyl+80, Norinyl+50, Ovral, Norlestrin 1 mg. and Norlestrin 2.5 mg., were determined by bioassay. Relative estrogen potency was determined by analysis of variance. Enovid-5, the most estrogenic compound, had a potency of 4.88 compared to ethinyl estradiol, 50 mcg. equal 1.00; Ovral, the least estrogenic compound, had a potency of 0.81, a sixfold difference. Estrogen potencies at a fractional dose of 0.00155 correlate with reports of the incidence of minor side effects and thromboembolic disease. The effect of progestins on estrogen potency was purely additive (norgestrel and norethynodrel), purely antagonistic, or additive at low concentrations and antagonistic at high concentrations (norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, and ethynodiol diacetate). These results suggest that pills with a greater margin of safety might be developed by utilizing greater ratios of progestin to estrogen. In addition, differences in relative estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills may be used as a basis for better clinical selection.

  19. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  20. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many endocrine disruptors are estrogenic and affect the normal estrogen signaling pathways. However, ERs can also serve as therapeutic targets for various medical conditions, such as menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, and ER-positive breast cancer. Because of the decades-long interest in the safety and therapeutic utility of estrogenic chemicals, a large number of chemicals have been assayed for estrogenic activity, but these data exist in various sources and different formats that restrict the ability of regulatory and industry scientists to utilize them fully for assessing risk-benefit. To address this issue, we have developed an Estrogenic Activity Database (EADB; http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/ BioinformaticsTools/EstrogenicActivityDatabaseEADB/default. htm) and made it freely available to the public. EADB contains 18,114 estrogenic activity data points collected for 8212 chemicals tested in 1284 binding, reporter gene, cell proliferation, and in vivo assays in 11 different species. The chemicals cover a broad chemical structure space and the data span a wide range of activities. A set of tools allow users to access EADB and evaluate potential endocrine activity of

  1. Androgen, Estrogen and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have accomplished the following: 1) Characterized androgen responsive genes in mouse bone marrow (BM) via...castration (androgen ablation) and estrogen stimulation. 2) Measurements of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and of genes that regulate the local... gene expression in the bone marrow. In males, the main source of estrogen is through conversion of androgen by aromatase. We postulate that gene

  2. Estrogenic activity of naturally occurring anthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E; Stopper, H

    2001-01-01

    Anthocyanins, which are natural plant pigments from the flavonoid family, represent substantial constituents of the human diet. Because some other bioflavonoids are known to have estrogenic activity, the aim of this study was to determine the estrogenic activity of the anthocyanine aglycones. Binding affinity to the estrogen receptor-alpha was 10,000- to 20,000-fold lower than that of the endogenous estrogen estradiol. In the estrogen receptor-positive cell line MCF-7, the anthocyanidins induced expression of a reporter gene. The tested anthocyanidins showed estrogen-inducible cell proliferation in two cell lines (MCF-7 and BG-1), but not in the receptor-negative human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The phytoestrogen-induced cell proliferation could be blocked by addition of the receptor antagonist 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Combination treatments with the endogenous estrogen estradiol resulted in a reduction of estradiol-induced cell proliferation. Overall, the tested anthocyanidins exert estrogenic activity, which might play a role in altering the development of hormone-dependent adverse effects.

  3. [Estrogen receptors and the mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Barrón, A; Bermejo, L; Castro, I

    1997-01-01

    For several decades it has been known that steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, regulate some genes involved in the growth, proliferation and differentiation of the mammary-gland in animals and humans. In the last years, the presence or absence of the nuclear estrogen receptor has been used by clinicians as a marker for tumor malignancy, as a prognostic index or as an important parameter for hormonal therapy with anti-estrogenic compounds of some hormone-dependent breast cancers. This review shows some advances in the knowledge of the structure, function, molecular mechanisms of estrogenic activity, and interaction with proteins like protooncogenes and growth factors. Also, we refer to the role of the estrogen receptor in the physiophatology of breast cancer.

  4. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Howard, Arnold J.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

  5. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  6. High performance light emitting transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdas, Ebinazar B.; Ledochowitsch, Peter; Yuen, Jonathan D.; Moses, Daniel; Heeger, Alan J.

    2008-05-01

    Solution processed light emitting field-effect transistors (LEFETs) with peak brightness exceeding 2500cd/m2 and external quantum efficiency of 0.15% are demonstrated. The devices utilized a bilayer film comprising a hole transporting polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b] thiophene) and a light emitting polymer, Super Yellow, a polyphenylenevinylene derivative. The LEFETs were fabricated in the bottom gate architecture with top-contact Ca /Ag as source/drain electrodes. Light emission was controlled by the gate voltage which controls the hole current. These results indicate that high brightness LEFETs can be made by using the bilayer film (hole transporting layer and a light emitting polymer).

  7. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  8. Criteria for successful estrogen therapy in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, R

    1993-01-01

    Estrogens are well established as agents that stabilize the skeleton and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures among postmenopausal women. For maximum benefit, preventive therapy should begin as early as possible after ovarian failure begins to occur. Efforts to prevent bone loss are likely to achieve the best results when initiated prior to significant loss of bone tissue and trabecular penetration. An effect on skeletal bone mass can be obtained by any route of administration and transdermal estrogen use is an alternative to oral estrogen. Long-term therapy may reduce the risk of hip fracture by 50% and of vertebral fracture by a greater amount. The minimum effective dose is probably that which achieves circulating estrogen levels in the mid-follicular range. For women with a uterus in place, a progestin usually is provided to protect the endometrium; it is given cyclically in younger women but may be given continuously in women several years past menopause. Progestins do not interfere with the effects of estrogen on the skeleton, and it is possible that some progestins enhance the skeletal effects of estrogen. For patients with osteoporosis, estrogens can be used as first-line therapy since in these patients they have the same skeletal stabilizing effect and reduce the risk of recurrent fracture.

  9. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginal dryness, itching, or burning, or to prevent osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin ... to treat vaginal dryness or only to prevent osteoporosis should consider a different treatment. Some brands of ...

  10. Vaginal Estrogen for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, David D.; Carberry, Cassandra; Sanses, Tatiana V.; Mamik, Mamta M.; Ward, Renée M.; Meriwether, Kate V.; Olivera, Cedric K.; Abed, Husam; Balk, Ethan M.; Murphy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To comprehensively review and critically assess the literature on vaginal estrogen and its alternatives for women with genitourinary syndrome of menopause and to provide clinical practice guidelines. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched from inception to April 2013. We included randomized controlled trials and prospective comparative studies. Interventions and comparators included all commercially available vaginal estrogen products. Placebo, no treatment, systemic estrogen (all routes), and nonhormonal moisturizers and lubricants were included as comparators. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION We double-screened 1,805 abstracts, identifying 44 eligible studies. Discrepancies were adjudicated by a third reviewer. Studies were individually and collectively assessed for methodologic quality and strength of evidence. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS Studies were extracted for participant, intervention, comparator, and outcomes data, including patient-reported atrophy symptoms (eg, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, dysuria, urgency, frequency, recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and urinary incontinence), objective signs of atrophy, urodynamic measures, endometrial effects, serum estradiol changes, and adverse events. Compared with placebo, vaginal estrogens improved dryness, dyspareunia, urinary urgency, frequency, and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). Urinary tract infection rates decreased. The various estrogen preparations had similar efficacy and safety; serum estradiol levels remained within postmenopausal norms for all except high-dose conjugated equine estrogen cream. Endometrial hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma were extremely rare among those receiving vaginal estrogen. Comparing vaginal estrogen with nonhormonal moisturizers, patients with two or more symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy were substantially more improved using vaginal estrogens, but those with one or minor complaints had similar

  11. Associations of the Fecal Microbiome With Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, Barbara J.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Flores, Roberto; Gail, Mitchell H.; Xu, Xia; Ravel, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Context: The gut microbiota may influence the risk of breast cancer through effects on endogenous estrogens. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites are associated with the diversity and composition of the fecal microbiome. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study among women enrolled in Kaiser Permanente of Colorado. Participants: A total of 60 women drawn from a random sample of healthy postmenopausal women (aged 55–69 y), without current or recent use of antibiotics or hormone therapy and no history of cancer or gastrointestinal disease participated in the study. Outcome Measures and Methods: Creatinine-standardized urinary estrogens (estrone and estradiol) and 13 hydroxylated estrogen metabolites were measured in spot urines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiome was assessed using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. General linear models were used to test for associations of diversity and composition of the fecal microbiome with parent estrogen (estrone + estradiol), total estrogens, and estrogen metabolites and the ratio of estrogen metabolites to parent estrogen, which has been predictive of postmenopausal breast cancer risk in previous studies. Results: The ratio of metabolites to parents was directly associated with whole-tree phylogenetic diversity (R = 0.35, P = .01). Relative abundances of the order Clostridiales (R = 0.32, P = .02) and the genus Bacteroides (R = −0.30, P = .03) were also correlated with the ratio of metabolites to parents. Associations were independent of age, body mass index, and study design factors. Conclusions: Our data suggest that women with a more diverse gut microbiome exhibit an elevated urinary ratio of hydroxylated estrogen metabolites to parent estrogen. Further research is warranted to confirm and relate these findings to clinical disease. PMID:25211668

  12. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

    1998-07-14

    A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

  13. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Klem, John F.; Hafich, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

  14. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

    1997-04-29

    The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

  15. Raloxifene. Not better than estrogen.

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Raloxifene is marketed in France for prevention of nontraumatic vertebral fracture in postmenopausal women. In animal pharmacology studies, it was found to both agonize and antagonize estrogen. The assessment file is methodologically sound but fails to answer many practical questions. A placebo-controlled trial showed that raloxifene reduced the risk of vertebral collapse after 2 years of treatment, in both primary and secondary prevention, but demonstrated no effect on nonvertebral fractures. In this trial, raloxifene also reduced the risk of breast cancer. Two trials versus combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) showed HRT had a more favourable effect on surrogate end points reflecting the risk of fracture and cardiovascular risk (changes in bone mineral density and lipid profile). Compared with combined HRT, raloxifene reduced the incidence of menorrhagia and mastodynia, but did not relieve symptoms linked to menopause. Results of animal studies call for close clinical monitoring to detect a possible increase in the incidence of ovarian cancer. PMID:10955178

  16. In Vivo Imaging of Activated Estrogen Receptors in Utero by Estrogens and Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Lemmen, Josephine G.; Arends, Roel J.; van der Saag, Paul T.; van der Burg, Bart

    2004-01-01

    Environmental estrogens are of particular concern when exposure occurs during embryonic development. Although there are good models to study estrogenic activity of chemicals in adult animals, developmental exposure is much more difficult to test. The weak estrogenic activity of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) in embryos is controversial. We have recently generated transgenic mice that carry a reporter construct with estrogen-responsive elements coupled to luciferase. We show that, using this in vivo model in combination with the IVIS imaging system, activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by maternally applied BPA and other estrogens can be detected in living embryos in utero. Eight hours after exposure to 1 mg/kg BPA, ER transactivation could be significantly induced in the embryos. This was more potent than would be estimated from in vitro assays, although its intrinsic activity is still lower than that of diethylstilbestrol and 17β-estradiol dipropionate. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the estrogenic potency of BPA estimated using in vitro assays might underestimate its estrogenic potential in embryos. PMID:15531440

  17. In vivo imaging of activated estrogen receptors in utero by estrogens and bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Lemmen, Josephine G; Arends, Roel J; van der Saag, Paul T; van der Burg, Bart

    2004-11-01

    Environmental estrogens are of particular concern when exposure occurs during embryonic development. Although there are good models to study estrogenic activity of chemicals in adult animals, developmental exposure is much more difficult to test. The weak estrogenic activity of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) in embryos is controversial. We have recently generated transgenic mice that carry a reporter construct with estrogen-responsive elements coupled to luciferase. We show that, using this in vivo model in combination with the IVIS imaging system, activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by maternally applied BPA and other estrogens can be detected in living embryos in utero. Eight hours after exposure to 1 mg/kg BPA, ER transactivation could be significantly induced in the embryos. This was more potent than would be estimated from in vitro assays, although its intrinsic activity is still lower than that of diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol dipropionate. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the estrogenic potency of BPA estimated using in vitro assays might underestimate its estrogenic potential in embryos.

  18. Comparison of estrogens and estrogen metabolites in human breast tissue and urine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important aspect of the link between estrogen and breast cancer is whether urinary estrogen levels are representative of the intra-tissue levels of bioavailable estrogens. Methods This study compares 15 estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in breast tissue and urine of 9 women with primary breast cancer using a quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Results The average levels of estrogens (estrone, 17 beta-estradiol) were significantly higher in breast tissue than in urine. Both the 2 and the 16-hydroxylation pathways were less represented in breast tissue than urine; no components of the 4-hydroxypathway were detected in breast tissue, while 4-hydroxyestrone was measured in urine. However, the 2/16 ratio was similar in urine and breast tissue. Women carrying the variant CYP1B1 genotype (Leu/Val and Val/Val) showed significantly lower overall estrogen metabolite, estrogen, and 16-hydroxylation pathway levels in breast tissue in comparison to women carrying the wild type genotype. No effect of the CYP1B1 polymorphism was observed in urinary metabolites. Conclusions The urinary 2/16 ratio seems a good approximation of the ratio observed in breast tissue. Metabolic genes may have an important role in the estrogen metabolism locally in tissues where the gene is expressed, a role that is not readily observable when urinary measurements are performed. PMID:20678202

  19. Concentration of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Increasing evidence also supports their involvement in the development of certain lung, colon and prostate cancers. Methods In this study we systemically surveyed endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in each of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, which include human breast, central nerve system, colon, ovarian, prostate, kidney and non-small cell lung cancers, as well as melanomas and leukemia. The absolute abundances of these metabolites were measured using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method that has been previously utilized for biological fluids such as serum and urine. Results Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites were found in all NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and some were substantially elevated and exceeded the levels found in well known estrogen-dependent and estrogen receptor-positive tumor cells such as MCF-7 and T-47D. While estrogens were expected to be present at high levels in cell lines representing the female reproductive system (that is, breast and ovarian), other cell lines, such as leukemia and colon, also contained very high levels of these steroid hormones. The leukemia cell line RMPI-8226 contained the highest levels of estrone (182.06 pg/106 cells) and 17β-estradiol (753.45 pg/106 cells). In comparison, the ovarian cancer cell line with the highest levels of these estrogens contained only 19.79 and 139.32 pg/106 cells of estrone and 17β-estradiol, respectively. The highest levels of estrone and 17β-estradiol in breast cancer cell lines were only 8.45 and 87.37 pg/106 cells in BT-549 and T-47D cells, respectively. Conclusions The data provided evidence for the presence of significant amounts of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in cell lines not commonly associated with these steroid hormones. This broad discovery of

  20. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  1. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-05

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment.

  2. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    6219 TITLE: Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew R. Yudt CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of...Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation ~DAMD17-96-1-6219 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Yudt 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME11S) AND AODRESS(ES...this model, tyrosine 537 (Y537) phosphorylation of one monomer interacts with another tyrosine phosphorylated monomer to constitute an hER dimer

  3. Estrogenic activity in Finnish municipal wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Välitalo, Pia; Perkola, Noora; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Sillanpää, Markus; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Mikola, Anna; Hollert, Henner; Schultz, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a major source of estrogenic compounds to the aquatic environment. In the present work, estrogenic activities of effluents from eight municipal WWTPs in Finland were studied. The main objectives of the study were to quantify the concentrations of selected estrogenic compounds, to evaluate their contribution to estrogenic potency and to test the feasibility of the commercial bioassays for wastewater analysis. The effluent samples were analyzed by two in vitro tests, i.e. ERα-CALUX(®) and ELISA-E2, and by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for six estrogenic compounds: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17α-estradiol and bisphenol A (BPA). Estrogenic effects were found in all of the effluent samples with both of the bioassays. The concentrations measured with ELISA-E2 (8.6-61.6 ng/L) were clearly higher but exhibited a similar pattern than those with chemical analysis (E2 estrogenic potency was possible only for E1 and BPA, which contributed less than 10% to the observed effects, except in one sample with a high BPA contribution (17%). The contribution of E2 was significant in two samples where it was detected (28% and 67%). The results demonstrated that more comprehensive information on potential estrogenic activity of wastewater effluents can be achieved by using in vitro biotests in addition to chemical analysis and their use would be beneficial in monitoring and screening purposes.

  4. The Molecular, Cellular and Clinical Consequences of Targeting the Estrogen Receptor Following Estrogen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y.; Curpan, Ramona F.; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V. Craig

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed “morning after pill”, was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite “antiestrogen” resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER Modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women’s health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells. PMID:26052034

  5. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta - regulation by selective estrogen receptor modulators and importance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    S Katzenellenbogen, Benita; A Katzenellenbogen, John

    2000-01-01

    Estrogens display intriguing tissue-selective action that is of great biomedical importance in the development of optimal therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, for menopausal hormone replacement, and for fertility regulation. Certain compounds that act through the estrogen receptor (ER), now referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), can demonstrate remarkable differences in activity in the various estrogen target tissues, functioning as agonists in some tissues but as antagonists in others. Recent advances elucidating the tripartite nature of the biochemical and molecular actions of estrogens provide a good basis for understanding these tissue-selective actions. As discussed in this thematic review, the development of optimal SERMs should now be viewed in the context of two estrogen receptor subtypes, ERα and ERβ, that have differing affinities and responsiveness to various SERMs, and differing tissue distribution and effectiveness at various gene regulatory sites. Cellular, biochemical, and structural approaches have also shown that the nature of the ligand affects the conformation assumed by the ER-ligand complex, thereby regulating its state of phosphorylation and the recruitment of different coregulator proteins. Growth factors and protein kinases that control the phosphorylation state of the complex also regulate the bioactivity of the ER. These interactions and changes determine the magnitude of the transcriptional response and the potency of different SERMs. As these critical components are becoming increasingly well defined, they provide a sound basis for the development of novel SERMs with optimal profiles of tissue selectivity as medical therapeutic agents. PMID:11250726

  6. Assessment of estrogen receptor--histone interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kallos, J; Fasy, T M; Hollander, V P

    1981-01-01

    Several different in vitro binding assays show that the estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus interacts selectively with purified histones from calf thymus. The estrogen receptor binds strongly to histones H2B and H2A, moderately to histones H3 and H4, and poorly to histone H1. In the presence of histones H2B or H2A, the position at which the estrogen receptor focuses in an isoelectric gradient is shifted to a more basic zone. Kinetic experiments show that, if histone H2B is bound to a DNA, the estrogen receptor dissociates more slowly from that DNA. The portion of the estrogen receptor molecule required for binding to histone H2B is relatively stable to tryptic digestion; in contrast, the portion of the receptor molecule responsible for DNA binding is promptly lost during limited tryptic digestion. These in vitro findings suggest that the mechanism by which the estrogen receptor selectively alters gene expression may involve specific contacts with histone molecules. PMID:6942408

  7. Porous light-emitting compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Bauer, Eve; Mueller, Alexander H

    2012-04-17

    Light-emitting devices are prepared by coating a porous substrate using a polymer-assisted deposition process. Solutions of metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for metal precursor were coated onto porous substrates. The coated substrates were heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere. The result was a substrate with a conformal coating that did not substantially block the pores of the substrate.

  8. White light-emitting organic electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Parthasarathy, Gautam

    2006-06-20

    A light-emitting device comprises a light-emitting member, which comprises two electrodes, at least two organic electroluminescent ("EL") materials disposed between the electrodes, a charge blocking material disposed between the electrodes, and at least one photoluminescent ("PL") material. The light-emitting member emits electromagnetic ("EM") radiation having a first spectrum in response to a voltage applied across the two electrodes. The PL material absorbs a portion of the EM radiation emitted by the light-emitting member and emits EM radiation having second spectrum different than the first spectrum. Each of the organic EL materials emits EM radiation having a wavelength range selected from the group consisting of blue and red wavelength ranges.

  9. Effects of Estrogens and Estrogenic Disrupting Compounds on Fish Mineralized Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patricia I. S.; Estêvão, Maria D.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities. PMID:25196834

  10. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  11. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  12. Effects of estrogens and estrogenic disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia I S; Estêvão, Maria D; Power, Deborah M

    2014-08-15

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities.

  13. SCREENING CHEMICALS FOR ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is considering the use high-throughput and computational methods for regulatory applications in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). To use these new tools for regulatory decision making, computational methods must be appropriately validated. Traditional validations of toxicity tests are time intensive, evaluate a relatively small number of chemicals, and are not well-suited to high-throughput methods. Here we describe a multi-step, performance-based validation establishing scientific confidence in new computational methods and demonstrating these tools are sufficiently robust to be used in a regulatory context. Results from 18 estrogen receptor (ER) ToxCast high-throughput screening assays, measuring different points along the signaling pathway with different assay technologies, were integrated into a computational model. The resulting ToxCast ER model scores range from 0 (no activity) to 1 (bioactivity of the native ligand, 17β-estradiol) and can discriminate ER bioactivity from assay-specific interference and cytotoxicity. ToxCast ER model performance was evaluated for 40 in vitro and 43 in vivo reference chemicals. ToxCast ER model results were also compared to EDSP Tier 1 screening assays in current regulatory practice for a diverse set of more than 100 chemicals. ToxCast ER model accuracy was 95% when compared to the large set of in vitro and in vivo reference chemicals. In addition, the T

  14. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  15. Effect of vaginal estrogen on pessary use

    PubMed Central

    Dessie, Sybil G.; Armstrong, Katherine; Modest, Anna M.; Hacker, Michele R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Many providers recommend concurrent estrogen therapy with pessary use to limit complications; however, limited data exist to support this practice. We hypothesized that vaginal estrogen supplementation decreases incidence of pessary-related complications and discontinuation. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent a pessary fitting from 1 January 2007 through 1 September 2013 at one institution; participants were identified by billing code and were eligible if they were post-menopausal and had at least 3 months of pessary use and 6 months of follow-up. All tests were two sided, and P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Data from 199 women were included; 134 used vaginal estrogen and 65 did not. Women who used vaginal estrogen had a longer median follow-up time (29.5 months) compared with women who did not (15.4 months) and were more likely to have at least one pessary check (98.5 % vs 86.2 %, P < 0.001). Those in the estrogen group were less likely to discontinue using their pessary (30.6 % vs 58.5 %, P < 0.001) and less likely to develop increased vaginal discharge than women who did not [hazard ratio (HR) 0.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.17–0.58]. Vaginal estrogen was not protective against erosions (HR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.54–1.6) or vaginal bleeding (HR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.36–1.7). Conclusions Women who used vaginal estrogen exhibited a higher incidence of continued pessary use and lower incidence of increased vaginal discharge than women who did not. PMID:26992727

  16. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Dewundara, Samantha; Wiggs, Janey; Sullivan, David A.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the association between estrogen and glaucoma. Methods A literature synthesis of articles published in peer review journals screened through May 05, 2015 using the PubMed database. Key words used were “estrogen and glaucoma,” “reproductive factors and glaucoma,” “estrogen, nitric oxide and eye.” Forty three journal articles were included. Results Markers for lifetime estrogen exposure have been measured by several studies and show that the age of menarche onset, oral contraceptive (OC) use, bilateral oophorectomy, age of menopause onset and duration between menarche to menopause are associated with primary open angle (POAG) risk. The Blue Mountain Eye Study found a significantly increased POAG risk with later (>13 years) compared with earlier (≤12 years) age of menarche. Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) investigators found that OC use of greater than 5 years was associated with a 25% increased risk of POAG. The Mayo Clinic Cohort Study of Oophorectomy and Aging found that women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 43 had an increased risk of glaucoma. The Rotterdam Study found that women who went through menopause before reaching the age of 45 years had a higher risk of open-angle glaucoma (2.6-fold increased risk) while the NHS showed a reduced risk of POAG among women older than 65 who entered menopause after age ≥ 54 years. Increased estrogen states may confer a reduced risk of glaucoma or glaucoma related traits such as reduced intraocular pressure (IOP). Pregnancy, a hyperestrogenemic state, is associated with decreased IOP during the third trimester. Though the role of post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use in the reduction of IOP is not fully conclusive, PMH use may reduce the risk of POAG. From a genetic epidemiologic perspective, estrogen metabolic pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with POAG in women and polymorphisms in endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to

  17. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Robert P.; Olbright, Gregory R.; Lott, James A.; Schneider, Jr., Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  18. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  19. Estrogenicity of Glabridin in Ishikawa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su Wei Poh, Melissa; Viseswaran, Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2. PMID:25816349

  20. Estrogen therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Askanase, Anca D

    2004-01-01

    Given the female preponderance of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in humans, the adverse effects of female gender and sex hormones in murine lupus, and numerous reports (retrospective, often anecdotal and uncontrolled) that describe a temporal association between estrogen exposure and development or exacerbation of SLE, it is tempting to accept that estrogens and SLE simply do not mix. While there are valid concerns regarding the use of exogenous estrogens in women with SLE, there are also potential health benefits to be considered. Oral contraceptives (OCs) offer effective birth control and may be bone protective in corticosteroid-treated patients. Recent studies, albeit retrospective, suggest that OCs are well tolerated in patients with SLE. Several salutary effects of postmenopausal estrogens assume particular importance in SLE where the risks of osteoporosis, exaggerated by menopause (natural or cyclophosphamide-induced) and corticosteroids, are substantial. However, the results of the Women's Health Initiative trial significantly limit the use of hormone replacement therapy in the general population, and raise particular concern for SLE patients. Other exogenous hormones (clomifene, gonadotropins, gonadotropin-releasing hormones) may be used to elevate levels of endogenous estrogen and to stimulate ovulation in patients with diminished fertility. Patients with inactive or stable/moderate disease and at low risk for thrombosis may benefit from OCs and other hormonal therapies without a change in lupus activity. Large prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies inclusive of all ethnic groups should provide the basis for more definitive recommendations.

  1. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  2. Synergistic activation of estrogen receptor with combinations of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.F.; Klotz, D.M.; Collins, B.M.

    1996-06-07

    Certain chemicals in the environment are estrogenic. The low potencies of the compounds, when studied singly, suggest that they may have little effect on biological systems. The estrogenic potencies of combinations of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen potencies of combination of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen systems (YES) containing human estrogen receptor (hER). Combinations of two weak environmental estrogens, such as dieldrin, endosulfan, or toxaphene, were 100 times as potent in hER-mediated transactivation as any chemical alone. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls shown previously to synergistically alter sexual development in turtles also synergized in the YES. The synergistic interaction of chemical mixtures with the estrogen receptor may have profound environmental implications. These results may represent a previously uncharacterized level of regulation of estrogen-associated responses. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  4. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides.

    PubMed

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 -lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu-lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  5. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides

    PubMed Central

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 –lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu–lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:26730945

  6. Functional associations between two estrogen receptors, environmental estrogens, and sexual disruption in the roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Lange, Anke; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Rie; Paull, Gregory C; Cahill, Laura L; Jobling, Susan; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2007-05-01

    Wild male roach (Rutilus rutilus) living in U.K. rivers contaminated with estrogenic effluents from wastewater treatment works show feminized responses and have a reduced reproductive capability, but the chemical causation of sexual disruption in the roach has not been established. Feminized responses were induced in male roach exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of the pharmaceutical estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, EE2 (up to 4 ng/ L), during early life (from fertilization to 84 days posthatch, dph), and these effects were signaled by altered patterns of expression of two cloned roach estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERalpha. and ERbeta, in the brain and gonad/ liver. Transactivation assays were developed for both roach ER subtypes and the estrogenic potencies of steroidal estrogens differed markedly at the different ER subtypes. EE2 was by far the most potent chemical, and estrone (E1, the most prevalent environmental steroid in wastewater discharges) was equipotent with estradiol (E2) in activating the ERs. Comparison of the EC50 values for the compounds tested showed that ERbeta was 3-21-fold more sensitive to natural steroidal estrogens and 54-fold more sensitive to EE2 as compared to ERalpha. These findings add substantial support to the hypothesis that steroidal estrogens play a significant role in the induction of intersex in roach populations in U.K. rivers and that the molecular approach described could be usefully applied to understand interspecies sensitivity to xenoestrogens.

  7. Survey of estrogenic activity in fish feed by yeast estrogen-screen assay.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeru; Kobayashi, Makito; Moriwaki, Toshihisa; Kawai, Shin'ichiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2004-10-01

    Fishes have been used as laboratory animal for research of estrogenic endocrine disrupters by many researchers. However, much less attention was paid to the possibility that compounds with estrogenic activity are present in fish diets. In order to examine this possibility, we measured the estrogenic activity in commercial fish feed by in vitro yeast estrogen-screen (YES) assay based on the binding ability of tested compounds to estrogen receptors. Estrogenic activity was detected in all the commercial fish feed examined (0.2-6.2 ng estradiol equivalent/g fish feed), some phytoestrogens (genistein, formononetin, equol and coumestrol; relative activity to estradiol, 8.6 x 10(-6)-1.1 x 10(-4) by giving a value of 1.0 to estradiol) and some androgens (testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone; relative activity to estradiol, 3.0 x 10(-6)-1.2 x 10(-4)). Therefore, it is possible that these compounds could affect the results of in vivo estrogen assay, such as vitellogenin production in male fish, especially when fish are fed commercial feed.

  8. Effect of Estrogen on Mutagenesis in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    estrogen signaling through the estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) may induce a mutator phenotype by suppressing DNA repair activity in ERa positive mammary...measure DNA MMR activity in live cells. We have also developed a method to measure mutation rate as a function of estrogen/ER signaling . Our goals were to...whether 1713-estradiol signaling through ER inhibits DNA MMR activity, we developed a method that can quantitatively assess MMR efficiency in live

  9. MEMBRANE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor (ER) function has evolved. Today we are confronted by at least two nuclear ERs: ERα and ERβ; and a number of putative membrane ERs, including ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 and Gq-mER. These receptors all bind estrogens or at least estrogenic compounds and activate intracellular signaling pathways. In some cases, a well-defined pharmacology, and physiology has been discovered. In other cases, the identity or the function remains to be elucidated. This mini-review attempts to synthesize our understanding of 17β-estradiol membrane signaling within hypothalamic circuits involved in homeostatic functions focusing on reproduction and energy balance. PMID:22538318

  10. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOS) FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which ...

  11. Cumulative Estrogen Exposure and Prospective Memory in Older Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesson, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at cumulative lifetime estrogen exposure, as estimated with a mathematical index (Index of Cumulative Estrogen Exposure (ICEE)) that included variables (length of time on estrogen therapy, age at menarche and menopause, postmenopausal body mass index, time since menopause, nulliparity and duration of breastfeeding) known to…

  12. Estrogen Abolishes Latent Inhibition in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nofrey, Barbara S.; Ben-Shahar, Osnat M.; Brake, Wayne G.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is frequently prescribed as a method of birth control and as hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women with varied effects on cognition. Here the effects of estrogen on attention were examined using the latent inhibition (LI) behavioral paradigm. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were given either estrogen benzoate (EB, 10 or…

  13. Estrogens in the daily diet: in vitro analysis indicates that estrogenic activity is omnipresent in foodstuff and infant formula.

    PubMed

    Behr, Maximilian; Oehlmann, Jörg; Wagner, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Food is a main source of exposure to endocrine active compounds, many of which have been linked to adverse health effects. Phytoestrogens, especially from soy, are the major dietary source of estrogenicity. However, foodstuff contains a variety of estrogen-like compounds that might not be detected analytically. To assess the total estrogenic activity of foodstuff, we employed the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES). We analyzed 18 food samples and five milk-based infant formulas. Soy-based products contained potent estrogenicity of 100-1500ng estradiol equivalents per kilogram (EEQ/kg). The estrogenicity in soy-free products was far lower (10-40ng EEQ/kg). We also detected significant estrogenic activity in three infant formulas (14-22ng EEQ/kg). Furthermore, we found soy lecithin to be strongly estrogenic. It might, therefore, be a major contributor to total estrogenicity. We conclude that dietary estrogens are omnipresent and not limited to soy-based food. In an exposure assessment we calculated a total dietary intake of 27.5 and 34.0ng EEQ/d for adults and 1.46ng EEQ/d for infants. While the dietary exposure to estrogenic activity is lower than previously estimated, our results demonstrate that many food types are a source of unidentified estrogen-like compounds still awaiting toxicological evaluation.

  14. Delayed puberty and estrogen resistance in a woman with estrogen receptor α variant.

    PubMed

    Quaynor, Samuel D; Stradtman, Earl W; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Shen, Yiping; Chorich, Lynn P; Schreihofer, Derek A; Layman, Lawrence C

    2013-07-11

    Although androgen resistance has been characterized in men with a normal chromosome complement and mutations in the androgen-receptor gene, a mutation in the gene encoding estrogen receptor α (ESR1) was previously described only in one man and not, to our knowledge, in a woman. We now describe an 18-year-old woman without breast development and with markedly elevated serum levels of estrogens and bilateral multicystic ovaries. She was found to have a homozygous loss-of-function ESR1 mutation in a completely conserved residue that interferes with estrogen signaling. Her clinical presentation was similar to that in the mouse orthologue knockout. This case shows that disruption of ESR1 causes profound estrogen resistance in women. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

  15. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  16. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD.

  17. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  18. Examples of Radiation-Emitting Products

    MedlinePlus

    Examples of Radiation-Emitting Electronic Products Radiation Use Medical: Diagnostic Medical: Therapeutic Medical: Surgical Medical: Other Scientific, Other Industrial Business, Commercial, Security Consumer (household, entertainment, ...

  19. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-12-28

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen.

  20. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ERα mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most notably with the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen. Selectively targeting ERs occurs at two levels: tissue selectivity and receptor subtype selectivity. SERMs have been developed with emphasis on tissue selectivity to target ER signaling for breast cancer treatment. Additionally, new approaches to selectively target the action of ERα going beyond ligand-dependent activity are under current investigation. As evidence of the anti-proliferative role of ERβ accumulates, selectively targeting ERβ is an attractive approach for designing new cancer therapies with the emphasis shifted to designing ligands with subtype selectivity. This review will present the mechanistic and structural features of ERs that determine tissue and subtype selectivity with an emphasis on current approaches to selectively target ERα and ERβ for cancer treatment. PMID:20708050

  1. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    phosphotyrosyl peptide that blocks dimerization of the human estrogen receptor. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America... Vivat , V., Chambon, P., Moras, D., and Gronemeyer, H. (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 87-94 8. Shiau, A. K., Barstad, D., Loria, P. M., Cheng, L

  2. Estrogen receptor expert system overview and examples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogen receptor expert system (ERES) is a rule-based system developed to prioritize chemicals based upon their potential for binding to the ER. The ERES was initially developed to predict ER affinity of chemicals from two specific EPA chemical inventories, antimicrobial pe...

  3. Characterizing the Estrogenic Potential of 1060 Environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to detect environmental chemicals that pose a risk of endocrine disruption, high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals are needed. Alteration of estrogen signaling has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including cancer promotion, reproductive deficits, and vascular effects. Here we investigate the estrogenic potential of 1060 chemicals of environmental relevance using a real-time measure of growth kinetics by electrode impedance in the estrogen-responsive human ductal carcinoma, T47D cell line. Cells were treated in concentration response and measurements of cellular impedance were recorded every hour for six days. Progestens, androgens, and mineralocortocoids (progesterone, dihydrotestosterone, aldosterone) invoked a biphasic impedance signature that contrasted with the anticipated exponential impedance observed in response to known estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genestein, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol-A, and genestein caused impedance comparable to that of 17β-estradiol, although at much higher concentrations. Additionally, trenbolone and cyproterone acetate invoked the characteristic biphasic signature observed with other endogenous steroid hormones. The continuous real-time nature of this assay allows for the rapid detection of differential growth characteristics not easily detected by traditional cell prol

  4. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    localization of the receptors, ligand binding, DNA binding, transcriptional activation, and receptor turnover ( LeGoff et al. 1994; Lahooti et al. 1994...1040-1049 (1995). LeGoff P., M.M. Montano, D.J. Schodin, and B. Katzenellenbogen. Phosphorylation of the Human Estrogen Receptor. J. Biol. Chem

  5. Estrogens and Antiestrogens in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    vitamin E, and lycopene protect against prostate cancer. The project will determine the magnitude of the protective activity of these antioxidants...in particular estrogen- induced animal model, the efficacies of three dietary antioxidants (vitamin E, selenium and lycopene ), singularly or in

  6. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS.

    Robert J. Kavlock, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.

    Over the past several decades a hypothesis has been put forth that a numb...

  7. Histopathologic Effects of Estrogens on Marine Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as estrogens estradiol (E2) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) have been reported to affect fish reproduction. This study histologically compared and evaluated effects of EDCs in two species of treated fish. Juvenile male summer flounder (Paral...

  8. In vitro estrogenicity of polybrominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Nakari, Tarja; Pessala, Piia

    2005-09-10

    Estrogenicity of five brominated flame retardants (BFRs), namely BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-205, PBB-153 and technical Firemaster BP-6, were assessed by in vitro assays developed to detect chemicals with estrogenic properties. Recombinant yeast cells containing a human estrogen receptor gene failed to give any response to the chemicals tested. However, the positive control compound, estradiol-17beta, showed that the yeast cell assays had worked properly. The freshly separated fish hepatocyte assay based on the synthesis and secretion of vitellogenin from the isolated liver cells produced a clear dose-response curve in the presence of all tested flame retardants except Firemaster BP-6. The toxicity of the BFRs was detected by determining the cell ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD). The BFRs tested induced hepatic EROD activity at low test concentrations, but started to inhibit activity at higher concentrations. The decreased detoxification capacity of the hepatocytes resulted in a decrease in the vitellogenin production of the cells. The capability of in vitro assays to detect estrogenic properties of chemicals seems to vary. Thus, further work is needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for these reactions.

  9. Estrogen increases renal oxytocin receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, N L; Young, W S; Lolait, S J

    1995-04-01

    Estrogens have been implicated in the sodium and fluid imbalances associated with the menstrual cycle and late pregnancy. An estrogen-dependent role for renal oxytocin receptors in fluid homeostasis is suggested by the present findings which demonstrate that estradiol benzoate treatment increases the expression of the oxytocin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and 125I-OTA binding to oxytocin receptors in the renal cortex and medullary collecting ducts of ovariectomized female rats. Moreover, estradiol induced high levels of oxytocin receptor expression in outer stripe proximal tubules of ovariectomized female and adrenalectomized male rats. Proximal tubule induction was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the antiestrogen tamoxifen, but cortical expression of oxytocin receptors in macula densa cells was unaffected by tamoxifen. These data demonstrate cell-specific regulation of oxytocin receptor expression in macula densa and proximal tubule cells, and suggest a important role for these receptors in mediating estrogen-induced alterations in renal fluid dynamics by possibly affecting glomerular filtration and water and solute reabsorption during high estrogen states.

  10. Breast cancer survivors who use estrogenic botanical supplements have lower serum estrogen levels than non users

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Sharon J; Neuhouser, Marian L; Koprowski, Carol; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiggins, Charles; Gilliland, Frank; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Baumgartner, Richard N; McTiernan, Anne; Bernstein, Leslie; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the association between use of estrogenic botanical supplements and serum sex hormones in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Methods 502 postmenopausal women were queried 2-3 years after breast cancer diagnosis about their use of botanical supplements, and supplements were categorized according to their estrogenic properties. Concurrently, a fasting blood sample was obtained for assay of estrone, estradiol, free estradiol, testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and sex hormone-binding globulin. Adjusted means of the serum hormones were calculated by use of estrogenic supplements. Results Women reporting use of any estrogenic botanical supplement had significantly lower levels of estrone (20.8 v 23.6 pg/mL), estradiol (12.8 v 14.7 pg/mL), free estradiol (0.29 v 0.35 pg/mL), and DHEAS (47.7 v 56.2 ug/dL) compared to women reporting no use. Conclusion Data from this cross-sectional study suggest the use of estrogenic botanical supplements may be associated with sex hormone concentrations in breast cancer survivors. Considering the high use of these supplements among breast cancer patients, further research is needed to clarify the relative estrogenicity/antiestrogenicity of these compounds and their relation with prognosis. PMID:18931907

  11. [Equine estrogens vs. esterified estrogens in the climacteric and menopause. The controversy arrives in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Velasco-Murillo, V

    2001-01-01

    It exists controversies about if the effects and benefits of the esterified estrogens could be similar to those informed for equines, because its chemical composition and bioavailability are different. Esterified estrogens has not delta 8,9 dehydroestrone, and its absorption and level of maximum plasmatic concentrations are reached very fast. In United States of America and another countries, esterified estrogens has been marketed and using for treatment of climacteric syndrome and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis, based on the pharmacopoiea of that country, but the Food and Drug administration (FDA) has not yet authorized up today, a generic version of conjugated estrogens. In Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) and another institutions of health sector in Mexico, starting in year 2000, it has been used esterified estrogens for medical treatment of climacteric and menopausal conditions. For this reason, in this paper we revised the most recent information about pharmacology, chemical composition, clinical use and costs of the conjugated estrogens with the purpose to guide the decisions to purchase this kind of drugs in Mexican heath institutions.

  12. Brain sex matters: estrogen in cognition and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Rena; Cui, Jie; Shen, Yong

    2014-05-25

    Estrogens are the primary female sex hormones and play important roles in both reproductive and non-reproductive systems. Estrogens can be synthesized in non-reproductive tissues such as liver, heart, muscle, bone and the brain. During the past decade, increasing evidence suggests that brain estrogen can not only be synthesized by neurons, but also by astrocytes. Brain estrogen also works locally at the site of synthesis in paracrine and/or intracrine fashion to maintain important tissue-specific functions. Here, we will focus on the biology of brain estrogen and its impact on cognitive function and Alzheimer's disease. This comprehensive review provides new insights into brain estrogens by presenting a better understanding of the tissue-specific estrogen effects and their roles in healthy ageing and cognitive function.

  13. Estrogen signaling crosstalk: implications for endocrine resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Jennifer R.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to anti-estrogen therapies is a prominent challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Tumors develop endocrine resistance by acquiring adaptations that help them rely on alternative oncogenic signaling cascades, which crosstalk with estrogen signaling pathways. An understanding of estrogen signaling crosstalk with these growth promoting cascades is essential in order to maximize efficacy of anti-estrogen treatments in ovarian cancer. Herein, we provide an overview of estrogen signaling in ovarian cancer and discuss the major challenges associated with anti-estrogen therapies. We also review what is currently known about how genomic and non-genomic estrogen signaling pathways crosstalk with several major oncogenic signaling cascades. The insights provided here illustrate existing strategies for targeting endocrine resistant ovarian tumors and may help identify new strategies to improve the treatment of this disease. PMID:24565562

  14. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen facilitation of baroreflex heart rate responses in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Xue, Baojian; Newton, Leslie G; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen facilitates baroreflex heart rate responses evoked by intravenous infusion of ANG II and phenylephrine (PE) in ovariectomized female mice. The present study aims to identify the estrogen receptor subtype involved in mediating these effects of estrogen. Baroreflex responses to PE, ANG II, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were tested in intact and ovariectomized estrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) with (OvxE+) or without (OvxE-) estrogen replacement. Wild-type (WT) females homozygous for the ERalpha(+/+) were used as controls. Basal mean arterial pressures (MAP) and heart rates were comparable in all the groups except the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. This group had significantly smaller resting MAP, suggesting an effect of estrogen on resting vascular tone possibly mediated by the ERbeta subtype. Unlike the WT females, estrogen did not facilitate baroreflex heart rate responses to either PE or ANG II in the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. The slope of the line relating baroreflex heart rate decreases with increases in MAP evoked by PE was comparable in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-6.97 +/- 1.4 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1)) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+ (-6.18 +/- 1.3) mice. Likewise, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardic responses to ANG II was similar in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-3.87 +/- 0.5) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+(-2.60 +/- 0.5) females. Data suggest that estrogen facilitation of baroreflex responses to PE and ANG II is predominantly mediated by ERalpha subtype. A second important observation in the present study is that the slope of ANG II-induced baroreflex bradycardia is significantly blunted compared with PE in the intact as well as the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ females. We have previously reported that this ANG II-mediated blunting of cardiac baroreflexes is observed only in WT males and not in ovariectomized WT females independent of their estrogen replacement status. The present data suggest that in females lacking ERalpha, ANG II causes blunting of cardiac baroreflexes similar to males and may be

  15. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  16. Green emitting phosphors and blends thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Siclovan, Oltea Puica; Nammalwar, Prasanth Kumar; Sathyanarayan, Ramesh Rao; Porob, Digamber G.; Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi; Heward, William Jordan; Radkov, Emil Vergilov; Briel, Linda Jane Valyou

    2010-12-28

    Phosphor compositions, blends thereof and light emitting devices including white light emitting LED based devices, and backlights, based on such phosphor compositions. The devices include a light source and a phosphor material as described. Also disclosed are phosphor blends including such a phosphor and devices made therefrom.

  17. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  18. Short-wavelength bottom-emitting VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquette, Kent D.; Barton, Jonathon S.; Geib, Kent M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Hindi, Jana J.

    1999-04-01

    The fabrication and performance of selectively oxidized 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes which emit through transparent GaP substrates is reported. Emission through the substrate is advantageous for many VCSEL configurations, such as for the incorporation of optical elements in the substrate or flip-chip integration to microelectronic circuitry. The short wavelength bottom- emitting VCSELs are fabricated by wafer fusion using an inert gas low temperature annealing process. The electrical characteristics of n- and p-type GaAs/GaAs and GaAs/GaP wafer bonded interfaces have been examined to optimize the annealing temperature. A significant reduction of the current-voltage characteristics of the VCSELs bonded to GaP substrates has been achieved whereby the bottom-emitting VCSELs show similar threshold voltage as compared to top- emitting lasers.

  19. Rapid signaling mechanisms of estrogens in the developing cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Scott M

    2008-03-01

    The steroid hormone 17beta-estradiol regulates the normal function and development of the mammalian nervous system. Many of estradiol's effects are mediated via the nuclear hormone estrogen receptors ERalpha and ERbeta. In addition to regulating estrogen-responsive gene expression, estradiol also acts in an immediate and cell-specific fashion to regulate various intracellular signal transduction pathways. The goal of this review is to develop a contextual framework to understand the generalized function of estrogen during development of brain regions not known to be sexually specialized. However, it is first important to build this framework on the more well-developed foundation of estrogen's gonad-driven sex-specific actions. As a result, a discussion of known and proposed mechanisms of estrogen actions in reproductive and other tissues will be presented. Building upon this information, a review of our research group's recent in vitro and in vivo studies that have focused on elucidating the mechanisms of estrogen actions in neurons of the non-sexually specialized cerebellum will be presented. While the full spectrum of estrogen action during normal cerebellar development remains unresolved, results of recent studies have revealed a pathologic role for estrogen and estrogen receptors in medulloblastoma, common pediatric brain tumors that arise from cerebellar granule cell-like precursors. The potential use of anti-estrogen signaling agents as adjuvant therapy for medulloblastoma is proposed based on those finding.

  20. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Guzmán, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women. PMID:24734243

  1. The Interplay between Estrogen and Fetal Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Ward, Wendy E.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that regulates embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation, organogenesis, the timing of parturition, and fetal imprinting by carrying chemical messages from glands to cells within tissues or organs in the body. During development, placenta is the primary source of estrogen production but estrogen can only be produced if the fetus or the mother supplies dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the estrogen prohormone. Studies show that the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal cortex supplies 60% of DHEA for placental estrogen production, and that placental estrogen in turn modulates the morphological and functional development of the fetal adrenal cortex. As such, in developed countries where humans are exposed daily to environmental estrogens, there is concern that the development of fetal adrenal cortex, and in turn, placental estrogen production may be disrupted. This paper discusses fetal adrenal gland development, how endogenous estrogen regulates the structure and function of the fetal adrenal cortex, and highlights the potential role that early life exposure to environmental estrogens may have on the development and endocrinology of the fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:22536492

  2. Extra-gonadal sites of estrogen biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Radwa; Oakley, Oliver; Kim, Heehyen; Jin, Jooyoung; Ko, CheMyong Jay

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are the key hormones regulating the development and function of reproductive organs in all vertebrates. Recent evidence indicates that estrogens play important roles in the immune system, cancer development, and other critical biological processes related to human well-being. Obviously, the gonads (ovary and testis) are the primary sites of estrogen synthesis, but estrogens synthesized in extra- gonadal sites play an equally important role in controlling biological activities. Understanding non-gonadal sites of estrogen synthesis and function is crucial and will lead to therapeutic interventions targeting estrogen signaling in disease prevention and treatment. Developing a rationale targeting strategy remains challenging because knowledge of extra-gonadal biosynthesis of estrogens, and the mechanism by which estrogen activity is exerted, is very limited. In this review, we will summarize recent discoveries of extra-gonadal sites of estrogen biosynthesis and their local functions and discuss the significance of the most recent novel discovery of intestinal estrogen biosynthesis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 488-496] PMID:27530684

  3. Estrogen modulates cognitive and cholinergic processes in surgically menopausal monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tinkler, Gregory Paul; Voytko, Mary Lou

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal women is associated with changes in physiological processes. The extent to which estrogen loss is associated with cognitive changes noted by postmenopausal women has been more difficult to determine for a variety of reasons. Primate models of menopause are now being used to determine the effects of estrogen loss and replacement on cognitive abilities and to investigate the neural mechanisms by which estrogen may influence cognitive function. The present report presents data from cognitive and neurobiological studies in surgically menopausal monkeys that have examined how estrogen loss and replacement may be affecting cognitive abilities and the cholinergic system; a neural system that is known to influence memory and attention function. These studies are indicating that visuospatial attention function is especially sensitive to estrogen states in young monkeys, but that multiple cognitive domains are sensitive to estrogen states in middle-aged monkeys. In addition, anatomical and functional imaging studies indicate that the primate cholinergic system is modulated by estrogen, and pharmacological studies demonstrate that estrogen uses cholinergic muscarinic receptors to influence visuospatial attention. These studies demonstrate that estrogen influences cognitive abilities in monkey models of menopause and the cholinergic system may be one of the mechanisms by which estrogen modulates cognitive function. Given the current unknowns and concerns regarding the use of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, continued studies in monkey models of menopause are especially needed to further elucidate the effects of estrogen on cognitive and neurobiological processes, with particular emphasis on studies in middle-aged monkeys, determining the optimal aspects of ERT regimens, and identifying the relationships between estrogen effects on cognitive and neurobiological function.

  4. Estrogen therapy in gynecological cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Guidozzi, F

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer has significant impact on a woman's quality of life because it commonly includes removal of the uterus and ovaries, both being the core of a woman's femininity, whilst irradiation and chemotherapy, be they as primary therapy or when indicated as postoperative adjuvant therapy, will lead to ablation of ovarian function if the ovaries had not been removed. This will lead to an acute onset of menopausal symptoms, which may be more debilitating than those occurring as a result of natural aging, and of which hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, mood swings, vaginal dryness, decreased libido, malaise and a general feeling of apathy are the most common. About 25% of gynecological cancers will occur in pre- and perimenopausal women, a large percentage of whom will become menopausal as a result of their treatment. There are also the gynecological cancer survivors who are not rendered menopausal as a result of the treatment strategy but who will become menopausal because of natural aging. Concern among the medical attendants of these women is whether use of estrogen therapy or estrogen and progestogens for their menopausal symptoms will reactivate tumor deposits and therefore increase the rate of recurrence and, as a result, decrease overall survival among these women. Yet the data that are available do not support this concern. There are eight retrospective studies and only one randomized study that have analyzed outcome in endometrial cancer survivors who used hormone therapy after their surgery, whilst, among ovarian cancer survivors, there are four retrospective studies and one randomized study. The studies do suffer from small numbers and, although the studies pertaining to endometrial cancer analyze mostly women with early-stage disease, a number of the studies in both the endometrial and ovarian cancer survivors do have a sizeable follow-up. These studies seem to support that estrogen therapy after the treatment for gynecological

  5. Estrogen Accelerates Cell Proliferation through Estrogen Receptor α during Rat Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Batmunkh, Baatarsuren; Choijookhuu, Narantsog; Srisowanna, Naparee; Byambatsogt, Uugantsetseg; Synn Oo, Phyu; Noor Ali, Mohmand; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Although estrogen is implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation in many organs, the exact mechanism for liver regeneration is not completely understood. We investigated the effect of estrogen on liver regeneration in male and female Wistar rats after 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx) and performed immunohistochemistry, western blotting and Southwestern histochemistry. 17β-estradiol (E2) and ICI 182,780 were injected into male rats on the day before PHx. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling index reached a maximum at 48 hr after PHx in males, and at 36 hr in females and E2-treated male rats. Estrogen receptor α (ERα) was expressed in zones 1 and 2 in male rats, but was found in all zones in female rats. Interestingly, ERα was not detected at 6–12 hr after PHx but was found at 24–168 hr in male rats. However, ERα expression was found at all sampling time-points in female and E2-treated male rats. The activity of estrogen responsive element binding proteins was detected from 12 hr after PHx in male rats but was found from 6 hr in female and E2-treated male rats. ERα was co-expressed with PCNA during liver regeneration. These results indicate that estrogen may play an important role in liver regeneration through ERα. PMID:28386149

  6. Construction of a Bacterial Assay for Estrogen Detection Based on an Estrogen-Sensitive Intein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rubing; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain DIER was constructed for estrogen detection by inserting an estrogen-sensitive intein (VMAER intein) into the specific site of the constitutively expressed chromosomal lacZ gene. This VMAER intein was generated by replacing the endonuclease region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VMA intein with the estrogen binding region of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα). When there were estrogens or analogs, the splicing of the VMAER intein was induced to produce the mature LacZ protein, which was detected through a β-galactosidase colorimetric assay. Eight typical chemicals (17-β-estradiol, bisphenol A, chrysene, 6-OH-chrysene, benz[a]anthracene, pyrene, progesterone, and testosterone) were detected using this DIER strain, and the whole detection procedure was accomplished in 2 h. Their 50% effective concentrations (EC50), relative estrogenic activities, and estradiol equivalency factors were calculated and were quite consistent with those detected with the yeast estrogen screening (YES) system. Furthermore, the estrogenic activities of the synthetic musk samples extracted from the wastewater and waste sludge of a sewage treatment plant of Shanghai (China) were detected, and their results were comparable to those obtained from the YES system and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In conclusion, the DIER bioassay could fill a niche for the efficient, rapid, high-throughput screening of estrogenic compounds and has potential for the remote, near-real-time monitoring of environmental estrogens. PMID:21317264

  7. Delay in post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement negates estrogen-induced augmentation of post-exercise muscle satellite cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Gary; Iqbal, Sobia; Hubbard, Andrew; Hamilton, Victoria; Bombardier, Eric; Tiidus, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effects of a delay in post-ovariectomy replacement of 17β-estradiol (estrogen) on the post-exercise proliferation of muscle satellite cells. Nine-week-old, ovariectomized, female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 64) were distributed among 8 groups based on estrogen status (0.25 mg estrogen pellet or sham), exercise status (90 min run at 17 m·min(-1) and a grade of -13.5° or unexercised), and estrogen replacement ("proximal", estrogen replacement within 2 weeks; or "delayed", estrogen replacement at 11 weeks following ovariectomy). Significant increases in satellite cells were found in the soleus and white gastrocnemius muscle (immunofluorescent colocalization of nuclei with Pax7) 72 h following eccentric exercise (p < 0.05) in all exercised groups. Proximal E2 replacement resulted in a further augmentation of muscle satellite cells in exercised rats (p < 0.05) relative to the delayed estrogen replacement group. Expression of PI3K was unaltered and phosphorylation of Akt relative to total Akt increased following estrogen supplementation and exercise. Exercise alone did not alter the expression levels of Akt. An 11 week delay in post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement negated the augmenting influence seen with proximal (2 week delay) post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement on post-exercise muscle satellite cell proliferation. This effect appears to be independent of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway.

  8. Sensing Estrogen with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Byung Kun; Im, Ji-Eun; Choi, Han Nim; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Cho, Seong In

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application feasibility of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in measuring estrogen (17β-estradiol) in gas phase. The present biosensor gives a linear response (R2 = 0.999) for 17β-estradiol vapor concentration from 3.7 ng/L to 3.7 × 10−4 ng/L with a limit of detection (3.7 × 10−4 ng/L). The results show that the fabricated biosensor demonstrates better detection limit of 17β-estradiol in gas phase than the previous report with GC-MS method. This estrogen biosensor has many potential applications for on-site detection of a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the gas phase. PMID:27803838

  9. Estrogen binding by leukocytes during phagocytosis,

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Estradiol binds covalently to normal leukocytes during phagocytosis. The binding involves three cell types, neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes and at least two reaction mechanisms, one involving the peroxidase of neutrophils and monocytes (myeloperoxidase [MPO]) and possibly the eosinophil peroxidase, and the second involving catalase. Binding is markedly reduced when leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), severe leukocytic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and familial lipochrome histiocytosis are employed and two populations of neutrophils, one which binds estradiol and one which does not, can be demonstrated in the blood of a CGD carrier. Leukocytes from patients with hereditary MPO deficiency also bind estradiol poorly although the defect is not as severe as in CGD. These findings are discussed in relation to the inactivation of estrogens during infection and the possible role of estrogens in neutrophil function. PMID:858996

  10. Estrogens as Antioxidant Modulators in Human Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, A.; Raimondo, S.; Persano, M.; Di Segni, C.; Cammarano, M.; Gadotti, G.; Silvestrini, A.; Pontecorvi, A.; Meucci, E.

    2013-01-01

    Among treatments proposed for idiopathic male infertility, antiestrogens, like tamoxifen, play a possible role. On the other hand, oxidative stress is a mechanism well recognized for deleterious effects on spermatozoa function. After reviewing the literature on the effects of estrogens in modulation of antioxidant systems, in both sexes, and in different in vivo and in vitro models, we suggest, also on the basis of personal data, that a tamoxifen treatment could be active via an increase in seminal antioxidants. PMID:24363671

  11. Immunosuppression Following Exposure to Exogenous Estrogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    by severe depletion of cortical lymphocytes in DES or estradiol treated mice. Tnterestingly, this atrophy is histologically reversible since a normal...al., 1982). 91 ?Pf TABLE 1. THYMIC ATROPHY AND PROLIFERATIVE RESPONSES OF SPLENIC LYMPHOCYTES IN HORMONE TREATED MICE TREATMENTa THYMIC ATROPHY 3 H...1980). As summarized in Table 3, administration of either Tamoxiphen or Nafox- idine had a significant effect on estrogen-induced thymic atrophy . However

  12. Local Effects of Vaginally Administered Estrogen Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Megan; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Snyder, Thomas E.; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    The results of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) led to a distinct decline in the routine use of estrogen as preventive therapy for vasomotor symptoms, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Without estrogen replacement, one third of women experience symptoms of atrophic vaginitis including dryness, irritation, itching and or dyspareunia. Local application of estrogen has been shown to relieve these symptoms and improve quality of life for these women. In addition, local estrogen therapy may have a favorable effect on sexuality, urinary tract infections, vaginal surgery, and incontinence. This review examines the effects of vaginally applied estrogen on the vaginal epithelium, urethra and endometrium. An accompanying review examines the systemic effects of vaginally applied estrogen. PMID:22229022

  13. Brain estrogen production and the encoding of recent experience

    PubMed Central

    Vahaba, Daniel M.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate central nervous system integrates cognition and behavior, and it also acts as both a source and target for steroid hormones like estrogens. Recent exploration of brain estrogen production in the context of learning and memory has revealed several common themes. First, across vertebrates, the enzyme that synthesizes estrogens is expressed in brain regions that are characterized by elevated neural plasticity and is also integral to the acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval of recent experiences. Second, measurement and manipulation of estrogens reveal that the period following recent sensory experience is linked to estrogenic signaling in brain circuits underlying both spatial and vocal learning. Local brain estrogen production within cognitive circuits may therefore be important for the acquisition and/or consolidation of memories, and new directions testing these ideas will be discussed. PMID:27453921

  14. Estrogenic activity of isoflavonoids from Onobrychis ebenoides.

    PubMed

    Halabalaki, Maria; Alexi, Xanthippi; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Lambrinidis, George; Pratsinis, Harris; Florentin, Ida; Mitakou, Sofia; Mikros, Emmanuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Alexis, Michael N

    2006-05-01

    Fractionation of the neutral extract of Onobrychis ebenoides (Leguminosae) yielded a new isoflavone, named ebenosin (1), in addition to the known ones, afrormosin (2), formononetin (3) and daidzein (4). Although the relative binding affinities of 1 - 4 for estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) were nearly comparable and matched those of 1-3 for ERbeta, that of 4 for the latter receptor was significantly higher than any of the other. Compounds 1 - 4 induced cell proliferation and gene expression in breast and endometrial cancer cells in an ER-dependent manner. Nonetheless, the rank order of induction potencies ( 4 > 3 >or= 2 >or= 1) matched better that of affinities for ERbeta ( 4 > 3 >or= 2 >or= 1) rather than ERalpha ( 4 >or= 3 >or= 2 >or= 1). While the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 could inhibit the induction of proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells by 1-4, it could not prevent 1 from exhibiting significant ER-independent cytotoxicity at 10 microM. By contrast, 1 was much less cytotoxic and only weakly estrogenic for ER-positive endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the C-8 isoprenyl substituent of 1 renders it cytotoxic and/or estrogenic in a cell-dependent manner.

  15. Estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary gland to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pisera, D; Candolfi, M; Navarra, S; Ferraris, J; Zaldivar, V; Jaita, G; Castro, M G; Seilicovich, A

    2004-10-01

    Tissue homeostasis results from a balance between cell proliferation and cell death by apoptosis. Estradiol affects proliferation as well as apoptosis in hormone-dependent tissues. In the present study, we investigated the apoptotic response of the anterior pituitary gland to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cycling female rats, and the influence of estradiol in this response in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The OVX rats were chronically estrogenized with implanted Silastic capsules containing 1 mg of 17beta-estradiol (E2). Cycling or OVX and E2-treated rats were injected with LPS (250 microg/rat ip). Apoptosis was determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method in sections of the anterior pituitary gland and spleen. Chronic estrogenization induced apoptosis in the anterior pituitary gland. Acute endotoxemia triggered apoptosis of cells in the anterior pituitary gland of E2-treated rats but not of OVX rats. No differences were observed in the apoptotic response to LPS in spleen between OVX and E2-treated rats. The apoptotic response of the anterior pituitary to LPS was variable along the estrous cycle, being higher at proestrus than at estrus or diestrus I. Approximately 75% of the apoptotic cells were identified as lactotropes by immunofluorescence. In conclusion, our results indicate that estradiol induces apoptosis and enables the proapoptotic action of LPS in the anterior pituitary gland. Also, our study suggests that estrogens may be involved in anterior pituitary cell renewal during the estrous cycle, sensitizing lactotropes to proapoptotic stimuli.

  16. Estrogen Regulation of Apoptosis in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Peter G; Gerace, Ken V; Roland, Renée L; Chrzan, Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulated apoptosis is a critical failure associated with prominent degenerative diseases including osteoporosis. In bone, estrogen deficiency has been associated with accelerated osteoblast apoptosis and susceptibility to osteoporotic fractures. Hormone therapy continues to be an effective option for preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures. Induction of apoptosis in G-292 human osteoblastic cells by exposure to etoposide or the inflammatory cytokine TNFα promoted acute caspase-3/7 activity and this increased activity was inhibited by pretreatment with estradiol. Etoposide also increased the expression of a battery of apoptosis-promoting genes and this expression was also inhibited by estradiol. Among the apoptotic genes whose expression was inhibited by estradiol was ITPR1, which encodes the type 1 InsP3R. InsP3Rs are intracellular calcium channels and key proapoptotic mediators. Estradiol via estrogen receptor β1 suppresses ITPR1 gene transcription in G-292 cells. These analyses suggest that an underlying basis of the beneficial activity of estrogens in combating osteoporosis may involve the prevention of apoptosis in osteoblasts and that a key event in this process is the repression of apoptotic gene expression and inhibition of caspase-3/7. PMID:19426747

  17. Characterizing the Growth Kinetics in Estrogen Responsive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a need to develop high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals for endocrine disrupting potential. The estrogen signaling pathway is a known xenobiotic target that has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including reproductive deficits and cancer promotion. Using real-time measurements of growth kinetics by electrode impedance, the estrogen-responsive human ductal carcinoma cell line, T47D, was treated with 2000 chemicals of environmental relevance. Cells were treated in concentration response and measurements of cellular impedance were recorded every hour for six days. Exponential impedance, signifying increased proliferation, was observed by prototypical estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genestein, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol-A and genestein, induced cell proliferation at comparable levels to 17β-estradiol, although at much higher concentrations. Progestins, and mineralocortocoids (progesterone, dihydrotestosterone, aldosterone) invoked a biphasic impedance signature. In conclusion, the real-time nature of this assay allows for rapid detection of differential growth characteristics shows potential, in combination with other ToxCast HTS assays, to detect environmental chemicals with potential endocrine activity. [This abstract does not necessarily reflect Agency policy]. Several compounds, including bisphenol-A and

  18. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  19. The role of estrogen in intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Chervonsky, Liza; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Intrusive memories are highly vivid, emotional and involuntary recollections which cause significant distress across psychological disorders including posttraumatic disorder (PTSD). Recent evidence has potentially extended our understanding of the development of intrusive memories by identifying biological factors which significantly impact on memories for emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigated the role of stress on the development of intrusions for negative and neutral images, and indexed the potential contributions of sex (estrogen and progesterone) and stress (noradrenaline and cortisol) hormones. Whilst viewing the images, half the participants underwent a cold pressor stress (CPS) procedure to induce stress while the control participants immersed their hands in warm water. Saliva samples were collected to index estrogen, progesterone and noradrenergic and cortisol response. Participants (55 university students, 26 men, 29 women) viewed a series of negatively arousing and neutral images. Participants completed recall and intrusions measures 2 days later. Negative images resulted in greater recall and more intrusions than neutral images. In the cold water condition females recalled fewer neutral memories than males. Cortisol increase predicted decreased recall of negative memories in males, and estrogen predicted increased intrusions of negative images in women. These findings are consistent with evidence that circulating levels of ovarian hormones influence memory for emotionally arousing events, and provides the first evidence of the influence of sex hormones on intrusive memories. These results provide one possible explanation for the higher incidence of anxiety disorders in women.

  20. Cell Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Estrogen and Androgen Receptor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Elisabeth D. Martinez CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgetown University Medical Center...Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen DAMD17-99-1-9199 Receptor 6. AUTHOR(S) Elisabeth D. Martinez 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...with androgens. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES breast cancer, cell cycle, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, non- 66 steroidal activators, L

  1. Cell Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    EC50 . "* It has been established that the estrogen receptor shows highest activity when the cells are treated by serum starvation and are mainly in GO...of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Elisabeth D. Martinez CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgetown University Medical Center... Estrogen and Androgen Receptor DAMD 17-99-1- 9199 6. AUTHOR(S) Elisabeth D. Martinez 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING

  2. Insights into Rapid Modulation of Neuroplasticity by Brain Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Penzes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence from cellular, electrophysiological, anatomic, and behavioral studies suggests that the remodeling of synapse structure and function is a critical component of cognition. This modulation of neuroplasticity can be achieved through the actions of numerous extracellular signals. Moreover, it is thought that it is the integration of different extracellular signals regulation of neuroplasticity that greatly influences cognitive function. One group of signals that exerts powerful effects on multiple neurologic processes is estrogens. Classically, estrogens have been described to exert their effects over a period of hours to days. However, there is now increasing evidence that estrogens can rapidly influence multiple behaviors, including those that require forebrain neural circuitry. Moreover, these effects are found in both sexes. Critically, it is now emerging that the modulation of cognition by rapid estrogenic signaling is achieved by activation of specific signaling cascades and regulation of synapse structure and function, cumulating in the rewiring of neural circuits. The importance of understanding the rapid effects of estrogens on forebrain function and circuitry is further emphasized as investigations continue to consider the potential of estrogenic-based therapies for neuropathologies. This review focuses on how estrogens can rapidly influence cognition and the emerging mechanisms that underlie these effects. We discuss the potential sources and the biosynthesis of estrogens within the brain and the consequences of rapid estrogenic-signaling on the remodeling of neural circuits. Furthermore, we argue that estrogens act via distinct signaling pathways to modulate synapse structure and function in a manner that may vary with cell type, developmental stage, and sex. Finally, we present a model in which the coordination of rapid estrogenic-signaling and activity-dependent stimuli can result in long-lasting changes in neural circuits

  3. Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    response to endogenous estrogens. These female estrogen non-responsive ERα knock-in (ENERKI) mice had immature and hypoplastic uterine and vaginal ...developing mice as well as in adult animals with genetically induced mammary cancers through PPT administration or withdrawal. 15. SUBJECT TERMS estrogen...is a crucial therapeutic target for hormone dependent breast cancers . More effective treatment and prevention strategies are likely to emerge from

  4. Estrogens and Prostate Cancer: Etiology, Mediators, Prevention, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lee, Ming-tsung; Lam, Hung-Ming; Leung, Yuet-Kin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between hormones and the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) has been studied extensively. All the mainstay targets for hormonal PCa therapies are based on negating androgen action. Recent epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly pinpointed the key roles of estrogens in PCa development and progression. Racial and geographical differences, as well as age-associated changes, in estrogen synthesis and metabolism contribute significantly to the etiology by increasing the ratio of circulating estrogen to androgen, sex hormone binding globulin synthesis, and aromatase activity and reducing androgen glucuronidation and tissue bioactivation. Promotion of aberrant cell growth, evasion of apoptosis, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and gains in adiposity and bioactivation to genotoxic carcinogens during adulthood are probable mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenicity, while “estrogen imprinting” via epigenetics in early-life also determines PCa risk. Although the effects of estrogens are known to be mediated by genomic actions of the two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes (ERα and ERβ), other non-canonical mediators, including the different ERβ isoforms, membrane and mitochondrial ERs, and G protein-coupled receptor 30, may have major actions diverging from classical ER actions. These new discoveries have led to renewed interest among the public and the medicinal field in estrogens and antiestrogens as singular and adjuvant PCa treatment and prevention regimens. This review summarizes current knowledge on how different estrogens/antiestrogens/estrogen mimics contribute to prostate carcinogenesis, the roles of the different mediators of estrogen in the process, and the potentials of new estrogenic/antiestrogenic compounds as targeted therapies for prevention and treatment of PCa. PMID:21889723

  5. Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In-Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Padilla-Banks E, Clark G, Newbold RR. Assessing estrogenic activity of phytochemicals using transcriptional activation and immature mouse...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0347 TITLE: Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In Mice 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0347 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  6. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    Susceptibility to Estrogen -Induced Mammary Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. James D. Shull CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha...DATES COVERED blank) November 2001 Final (01 Oct 98 - 01 Oct 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen -Induced...Street, Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Estrogens are important in the etiology of breast cancer. We have developed

  7. Organic light emitting devices for illumination

    DOEpatents

    Hack, Michael [Lambertville, NJ; Lu, Min-Hao Michael [Lawrenceville, NJ; Weaver, Michael S [Princeton, NJ

    2012-01-24

    An organic light emitting device an a method of obtaining illumination from such a device is provided. The device has a plurality of regions, each region having an organic emissive layer adapted to emit a different spectrum of light. The regions in combination emit light suitable for illumination purposes. The area of each region may be selected such that the device is more efficient than an otherwise equivalent device having regions of equal size. The regions may have an aspect ratio of at least about four. All parts of any given region may be driven at the same current.

  8. Organic light emitting devices for illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Michael; Lu, Min-Hao Michael; Weaver, Michael S.

    2010-02-16

    An organic light emitting device is provided. The device has a plurality of regions, each region having an organic emissive layer adapted to emit a different spectrum of light. The regions in combination emit light suitable for illumination purposes. The area of each region may be selected such that the device is more efficient that an otherwise equivalent device having regions of equal size. The regions may have an aspect ratio of at least about four. All parts of any given region may be driven at the same current.

  9. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  10. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  11. Estrogen contributes to regulating iron metabolism through governing ferroportin signaling via an estrogen response element.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; Yin, Chunyang; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shuping; Jiang, Li; Wang, Fudi; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Sijin

    2015-05-01

    Ferroportin (FPN) is the only known iron exporter in mammalian cells, and is universally expressed in most types of cells. FPN signaling plays a crucial role in maintaining iron homeostasis through governing the level of intracellular iron. Serum iron storage is conversely related with the estrogen level in the female bodies, and women in post-menopause are possibly subjected to iron retention. However, the potential effects of estrogen on iron metabolism are not clearly understood. Here, FPN mRNA transcription in all selected estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cells was significantly reduced upon 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment; and this inhibitory effect could be attenuated by ER antagonist tamoxifen. Likewise, in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), FPN reduction with elevated intracellular iron (reflected by increased ferritin) was observed in response to E2; however, ferritin level barely responded to E2 in FPN-null BMDMs. The observation of inhibition of FPN mRNA expression was not replicated in ER(-) cells upon E2. A functional estrogen response element (ERE) was identified within the promoter of FPN, and this ERE was responsible for the suppressive effect of E2 on FPN expression. Moreover, ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SHAM) mice were used to further confirm the in vitro finding. The expression of hepatic FPN was induced in OVX mice, compared to that in the SHAM mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that estrogen is involved in regulating FPN expression through a functional ERE on its promoter, providing additional insights into a vital role of estrogen in iron metabolism.

  12. Neonatal oxytocin alters subsequent estrogen receptor alpha protein expression and estrogen sensitivity in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adam N; Paramadilok, Auratip; Cushing, Bruce S

    2009-12-14

    In most species, the effects of oxytocin (OT) on female reproductive behavior are dependent upon estrogen, which increases both OT and OT receptor expression. It is also becoming apparent that OT neurotransmission can influence estrogen signaling, especially during development, as neonatal OT manipulations in prairie voles alter ERalpha expression and estrogen-dependent behaviors. We tested the hypothesis that OT developmentally programs ERalpha expression and estrogen sensitivity in female Sprague-Dawley rats, a species previously used to establish the estrogen-dependence of OT signaling in adulthood. OT treatment for the first postnatal week significantly increased ERalpha-immunoreactivity in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), but not in the medial preoptic area (MPOA). Conversely, neonatal OT antagonist (OTA) treatment significantly reduced ERalpha-immunoreactivity in the MPOA, but not in the VMH. Both treatments increased OT-immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and reduced estrogen sensitivity, indicated by reduced sexual receptivity following chronic estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. Behavioral deficits in OTA-treated females were apparent during both paced and non-paced tests with 0.5 microg EB (but not 5.0 or 10.0 microg EB), whereas deficits in OT-treated females were only observed during the initial paced test with 0.5 and 5.0 microg EB (but not 10.0 microg EB). The current results demonstrate that OT can positively regulate ERalpha expression within the MPOA and VMH during development; however, endogenous OT selectively programs ERalpha expression within the MPOA. Thus, exogenous OT or OTA exposure during development may have long-term consequences on behavior through stable changes in ERalpha and OT expression.

  13. Melatonin affects the dynamic steady-state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by regulating the balance between estrogen sulfatase and sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is known to reduce the growth of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with estrogen signaling pathways. Estrogens play an important role in breast cancer, but also in various types of tissues, including vascular tissue. Estrogen sulfatase (STS) converts inactive estrogen sulfates into active estrogens, whereas estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) sulfonates estrogens to estrogen sulfates. Therefore, STS and EST are considered to be involved in the regulation of local estrogen levels in hormone‑dependent tumors and in non-pathologic tissues, such as those of the vascular system. Estrogens have a major impact on the vasculature, influencing vascular function, the expression of adhesion proteins, angiogenesis and the inflammatory state. In this study, we investigated the status of STS and EST in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the modulatory effects of melatonin. Both STS and EST were highly expressed in the HUVECs. The enzymatic activity correlated with the expression levels in these cells. Our findings also demonstrated that melatonin, at physiological concentrations, modulated the synthesis and transformation of biologically active estrogens in HUVECs through the inhibition of STS activity and expression, and the stimulation of EST activity and expression. Since melatonin decreased the STS levels and increased the EST levels, it modified the dynamic steady‑state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates by increasing the inactive estrogen levels and decreasing the active estrogen levels. Therefore, melatonin may modulate the known different biological actions of estrogens in endothelial cells, as well as in estrogen-dependent tumors and non-pathologic tissues.

  14. Transformation of the rat uterine estrogen receptor after partial purification.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S; Notides, A C

    1975-02-13

    Warming crude ratuterine cytosol after the addition of [3H] estradiol accelerates the association of the 4-S estrogen-binding protein with a second macromolecule, resulting in the formation of the 5-S estrogen-binding protein. To determine whether the 5-S estrogen-binding protein consists of two similar or dissimilar subunits, uterine cytosol was subjected to a number of fractionation procedures that separate macromolecules by solubility, molecular gel sieving, sedimentation rate, ionic charge, and heat lability. Following each of these methods, the fraction containing the 4-S estrogen-binding protein was incubated at 28 degrees C; each of the these 4-S estrogen-binding protein-containing fractions retained its capacity to completely transform to the 5-S estrogen-binding protein. In samples subjected to partial purification procedures, it was necessary that the buffer contain 40 mM Tris, 60 mM Tris, 60 mM KC1, 1-10 MM dithiothreitol, and 1 M urea at pH 7.4, in order to accomplish the 4-S to 5-S estrogen-binding protein transformation at 25 degrees C. Formation of the 5-S estrogen-binding protein requires association of the 4-Estrogen-binding protein with a molecule identical to or very similar to itself.

  15. Estrogen regulates pulmonary alveolar formation, loss, and regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2004-12-01

    Lung tissue elastic recoil and the dimension and number of pulmonary gas-exchange units (alveoli) are major determinants of gas-exchange function. Loss of gas-exchange function accelerates after menopause in the healthy aged and is progressively lost in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The latter, a disease of midlife and later, though more common in men than in women, is a disease to which women smokers and never smokers may be more susceptible than men; it is characterized by diminished lung tissue elastic recoil and presently irremediable alveolar loss. Ovariectomy in sexually immature rats diminishes the formation of alveoli, and estrogen prevents the diminution. In the present work, we found that estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta, the only recognized mammalian estrogen receptors, are required for the formation of a full complement of alveoli in female mice. However, only the absence of estrogen receptor-beta diminishes lung elastic tissue recoil. Furthermore, ovariectomy in adult mice results, within 3 wk, in loss of alveoli and of alveolar surface area without a change of lung volume. Estrogen replacement, after alveolar loss, induces alveolar regeneration, reversing the architectural effects of ovariectomy. These studies 1) reveal estrogen receptors regulate alveolar size and number in a nonredundant manner, 2) show estrogen is required for maintenance of already formed alveoli and induces alveolar regeneration after their loss in adult ovariectomized mice, and 3) offer the possibility estrogen can slow alveolar loss and induce alveolar regeneration in women with COPD.

  16. Structure and estrogenic activity of new lignans from Iryanthera lancifolia.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Siverio, Dulce; Machín, Rubén P; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Ravelo, Angel G; Lock, Olga

    2008-03-15

    Five new dibenzylbutane type lignans (1-5) were isolated from the stem bark of Iryanthera lancifolia. Their structures were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies and chemical evidence. Seventeen of the isolated compounds were tested for their estrogenic activities in the estrogen responsive human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 BUS using the E-Screen proliferation assay. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the SRB assay to calculate the estrogenic parameters. The majority of the compounds induced a mitogenic response. This effect, given as Relative Proliferative Effect (RPE) to reference estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), ranged between 14% and 84%.

  17. Insights from the Study of Animals Lacking Functional Estrogen Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korach, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Estrogen hormones produce physiological actions within a variety of target sites in the body and during development by activating a specific receptor protein. Hormone responsiveness for the estrogen receptor protein was investigated at different stages of development with the use of gene knockout techniques because no natural genetic mutants have been described. A mutant mouse line without a functional estrogen receptor was created and is being used to assess estrogen responsiveness. Both sexes of these mutant animals are infertile and show a variety of phenotypic changes, some of which are associated with the gonads, mammary glands, reproductive tracts, and skeletal tissues.

  18. Visualization of Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Marnie E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens regulate a diverse range of physiological processes and affect multiple tissues. Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate transcription by binding to DNA at conserved estrogen response elements, and such elements have been used to report ER activity in cultured cells and in transgenic mice. We generated stable, transgenic zebrafish containing five consecutive elements upstream of a c-fos minimal promoter and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize and quantify transcriptional activation in live larvae. Transgenic larvae show robust, dose-dependent estrogen-dependent fluorescent labeling in the liver, consistent with er gene expression, whereas ER antagonists inhibit GFP expression. The nonestrogenic steroids dexamethasone and progesterone fail to activate GFP, confirming ER selectivity. Natural and synthetic estrogens activated the transgene with varying potency, and two chemicals, genistein and bisphenol A, preferentially induce GFP expression in the heart. In adult fish, fluorescence was observed in estrogenic tissues such as the liver, ovary, pituitary gland, and brain. Individual estrogen-responsive neurons and their projections were visualized in the adult brain, and GFP-positive neurons increased in number after 17β-estradiol exposure. The transgenic estrogen-responsive zebrafish allow ER signaling to be monitored visually and serve as in vivo sentinels for detection of estrogenic compounds. PMID:21540282

  19. Molecular biology of beta-estradiol-estrogen receptor complex binding to estrogen response element and the effect on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Krizkova, Sona; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    Group of estrogen pollutants, where the highest estrogen activity is reported at estradiol, is characterized by the fact that even at very low concentrations have potential to cause xenoestrogenic effects. During exposure of excessive amounts of estradiols may be produced undesirable effects resulting in the feminization of males of water organisms. The presence of estradiols in drinking water implies also a risk for the human population in the form of cancers of endocrine systems, abnormalities in reproduction or dysfunctions of neuronal and immune system. Currently, the research is focused mainly to uncover the relationship between the estrogen receptors binding affinity with an estrogen response element and estradiol. In this review we summarized facts about molecular biological principles of β estradiol-estrogen receptor complex binding with estrogen response element and its successive effect on cancer genes expression.

  20. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Caroline; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Pakdel, Farzad; Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Bourguet, William; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; and others

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  1. Expression profiles of estrogen-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Katchy, Anne; Williams, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular signaling through both estrogen and microRNAs are critical for breast cancer development and growth. The activity of estrogen is mediated by transcription factors, the estrogen receptors. Here we describe a method for robust characterization of estrogen-regulated microRNA profiles. The method details how to prepare cells for optimal estrogen response, directions for estrogen treatment, RNA extraction, microRNA large-scale profiling and subsequent confirmations. PMID:26585151

  2. Organic emitters: Light-emitting fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortí, Enrique; Bolink, Henk J.

    2015-04-01

    Light-emitting fibres that suit integration with textiles are prepared by dip-coating a steel wire with an electroluminescent material and then cleverly wrapping the structure with a carbon nanotube sheet that functions as a transparent electrode.

  3. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, M R; Sgouros, G; Finn, R D; Humm, J L; Jurcic, J G; Larson, S M; Scheinberg, D A

    1998-09-01

    This review discusses the application of alpha particle-emitting radionuclides in targeted radioimmunotherapy. It will outline the production and chemistry of astatine-211, bismuth-212, lead-212, actinium-225, bismuth-213, fermium-255, radium-223 and terbium-149, which at present are the most promising alpha-emitting isotopes available for human clinical use. The selective cytotoxicity offered by alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconstructs is due to the high linear energy transfer and short particle path length of these radionuclides. Based upon the pharmacokinetics of alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconstructs, both stochastic and conventional dosimetric methodology is discussed, as is the preclinical and initial clinical use of these radionuclides conjugated to monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of human neoplasia.

  4. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  5. Bioluminescent yeast estrogen assay (BLYES) as a sensitive tool to monitor surface and drinking water for estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bergamasco, Ana Marcela Di Dea; Eldridge, Melanie; Sanseverino, John; Sodré, Fernando Fabriz; Montagner, Cassiana Carolina; Pescara, Igor Cardoso; Jardim, Wilson Figueiredo; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de Aragão

    2011-11-01

    Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) are a concern due to their ubiquity and recognized adverse effects to humans and wildlife. Methods to assess exposure to and associated risks of their presence in aquatic environment are still under development. The aim of this work is to assess estrogenicity of raw and treated waters with different degrees of pollution. Chemical analyses of selected EDCs were performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and estrogenic activity was evaluated using in vitro bioluminescent yeast estrogen assay (BLYES). Most raw water samples (18/20) presented at least one EDC and 16 rendered positive in BLYES. When EDCs were detected, the bioassay usually provided a positive response, except when only bisphenol A was detected at low concentrations. The highest values of estrogenic activity were detected in the most polluted sites. The maximum estrogenic activity observed was 8.7 ng equiv. of E2 L(-1). We compared potencies observed in the bioassay to the relative potency of target compounds and their concentrations failed to fully explain the biological response. This indicates that bioassay is more sensitive than the chemical approach either detecting estrogenic target compounds at lower concentrations, other non-target compounds or even synergistic effects, which should be considered on further investigations. We have not detected either estrogenic activity or estrogenic compounds in drinking water. BLYES showed good sensitivity with a detection limit of 0.1 ng equiv. E2 L(-1) and it seems to be a suitable tool for water monitoring.

  6. Estrogens and cognition: Friends or foes?: An evaluation of the opposing effects of estrogens on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Korol, Donna L; Pisani, Samantha L

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings showing that the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions.

  7. Comparative analysis of the interaction of various estrogens with the estrogen-receptor system of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchenko, N.D.; Alekseeva, M.L.; Minina, L.S.; Novikov, E.A.; Khel'mun, D.K.

    1986-05-20

    The binding of various labeled estrogens under conditions of equilibrium in the cytosol of the uterus of sexually immature Wistar rats was studied. An analysis of the data obtained, as well as the kinetics of the dissociation of the complexes of the ligands used with specific high-affinity estrogen-binding sites of the cytosol, suggested that the population of estrogen receptors in the rat uterus is homogeneous. The possibility of intracellular regulation of the action of estrogens in the target cell in the presence of a homogeneous population of receptors, both at the receptor and at the post-receptor stages, is suggested.

  8. Effect of estrogens on boar sperm capacitation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mammalian sperm must undergo a series of controlled molecular processes in the female reproductive tract called capacitation before they are capable of penetrating and fertilizing the egg. Capacitation, as a complex biological process, is influenced by many molecular factors, among which steroidal hormone estrogens play their role. Estrogens, present in a high concentration in the female reproductive tract are generally considered as primarily female hormones. However, there is increasing evidence of their important impact on male reproductive parameters. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of three natural estrogens such as estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) as well as the synthetical one, 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) on boar sperm capacitation in vitro. Methods Boar sperm were capacitated in vitro in presence of estrogens. Capacitation progress in control and experimental samples was analyzed by flow cytometry with the anti-acrosin monoclonal antibody (ACR.2) at selected times of incubation. Sperm samples were analyzed at 120 min of capacitation by CTC (chlortetracycline) assay, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry with anti-acrosin ACR.2 antibody. Furthermore, sperm samples and capacitating media were analyzed by immunocytochemistry, ELISA with the ACR.2 antibody, and the acrosin activity assay after induced acrosomal reaction (AR). Results Estrogens stimulate sperm capacitation of boar sperm collected from different individuals. The stimulatory effect depends on capacitation time and is highly influenced by differences in the response to estrogens such as E2 by individual animals. Individual estrogens have relatively same effect on capacitation progress. In the boar samples with high estrogen responsiveness, estrogens stimulate the capacitation progress in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, estrogens significantly increase the number of acrosome-reacted sperm after zona pellucida- induced acrosomal

  9. Estrogen Receptor Ligands: A Review (2013–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Shabnam; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of compounds named for their importance in both menstrual and estrous reproductive cycles. They are involved in the regulation of various processes ranging from tissue growth maintenance to reproduction. Their action is mediated through ER nuclear receptors. Two subtypes of the estrogen receptor, ERα and ERβ, exist and exhibit distinct cellular and tissue distribution patterns. In humans, both receptor subtypes are expressed in many cells and tissues, and they control key physiological functions in various organ systems. Estrogens attract great attention due to their wide applications in female reproductive functions and treatment of some estrogen-dependent cancers and osteoporosis. This paper provides a general review of ER ligands published in international journals patented between 2013 and 2015. The broad physiological profile of estrogens has attracted the attention of many researchers to develop new estrogen ligands as therapeutic molecules for various clinical purposes. After the discovery of the ERβ receptor, subtype-selective ligands could be used to elicit beneficial estrogen-like activities and reduce adverse side effects, based on the different distributions and relative levels of the two ER subtypes in different estrogen target tissues. Therefore, recent literature has focused on selective estrogen ligands as highly promising agents for the treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Estrogen receptors are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological functions in humans. Selective estrogen ligands are highly promising targets for treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies of ER ligands based on small molecules indicate that many different structural scaffolds may provide high

  10. Association of Active and Sedentary Behaviors with Postmenopausal Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Matthews, Charles E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Falk, Roni T.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may reduce endogenous estrogens but few studies have assessed effects on estrogen metabolism and none have evaluated sedentary behavior in relation to estrogen metabolism. We assessed relationships between accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior and 15 urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among postmenopausal controls from a population-based breast cancer case-control study conducted in Poland (2000-2003). Methods Postmenopausal women (N=542) were ages 40 to 72 years and not currently using hormone therapy. Accelerometers, worn for seven days, were used to derive measures of average activity (counts/day) and sedentary behavior (<100 counts/min/day). EM were measured in 12-hour urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. EM were analyzed individually, in metabolic pathways (C-2, -4, or -16), and as ratios relative to parent estrogens. Geometric means of EM by tertiles of accelerometer-measures, adjusted for age and body mass, were computed using linear models. Results High activity was associated with lower levels of estrone and estradiol (p-trend=0.01) while increased sedentary time was positively associated with these parent estrogens (p-trend=0.04). Inverse associations were observed between high activity and 2-methoxyestradiol, 4-methoxyestradiol, 17-epiestriol and 16-epiestriol (p-trend=0.03). Sedentary time was positively associated with methylated catechols in the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways (p-trend≤0.04). Women in the highest tertile of activity had increased hydroxylation at the C-2, -4, and -16 sites relative to parent estrogens (p-trend≤0.02) while increased sedentary time was associated with a lower 16-pathway:parent estrogen ratio (p-trend=0.01). Conclusions Higher activity was associated with lower urinary estrogens, possibly through increased estrogen hydroxylation and subsequent metabolism, while sedentary behavior may reduce metabolism. PMID:26460631

  11. Estrogenic followed by anti-estrogenic effects of PCBs exposure in juvenil fish (Spaurus aurata).

    PubMed

    Calò, M; Alberghina, D; Bitto, A; Lauriano, E R; Lo Cascio, P

    2010-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a phospho-lipo-glycoprotein produced by oviparous animals in response to estrogen receptor (ER) binding. The presence of Vtg in juvenile and male fish liver and plasma has been used as biomarker to evaluate levels of environmental contaminants as dioxin and PCBs. Interaction of dioxins and PCBs with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) may affect reproduction by recruitment of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PCB-126, a co-planar PCB prototypical AhR agonist, and of PCB-153, a non-coplanar PCB lacking dioxine-like activity, on Vtg expression in young fish (Spaurus aurata) after a 12 or 24h exposure to PCBs as well as 48h following PCBs removal. Vtg expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and by Western-blot analysis. Our results showed an increased Vtg expression following PCBs administration, with a maximum level after 12h of exposure to either PCB-126, PCB-153 or a mixture of both PCBs. Following this estrogenic activity, an anti-estrogenic activity was detected after 24h of incubation with PCB-126 (alone or mixed with PCB-153), suggested by a decrease in Vtg expression likely through AhR, as a consequence of a hypothetic defence mechanism to endogenous or exogenous ligands.

  12. The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin.

    PubMed

    Brander, Susanne M; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L; Denison, Michael S; Cherr, Gary N

    2012-12-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. The authors evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Menidia beryllina, a fish species known to reside in pyrethroid-contaminated aquatic habitats. The authors then compared the in vivo response with an in vitro assay--chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX). Juvenile M. beryllina exposed to bifenthrin (1, 10, 100 ng/L), permethrin (0.1, 1, 10 µg/L), and ethinylestradiol (1, 10, 50 ng/L) had significantly higher ng/mL choriogenin (Chg) measured in whole body homogenate than controls. Though Chg expression in fish exposed to ethinylestradiol (EE2) exhibited a traditional sigmoidal concentration response, curves fit to Chg expressed in fish exposed to pyrethroids suggest a unimodal response, decreasing slightly as concentration increases. Whereas the in vivo response indicated that bifenthrin and permethrin or their metabolites act as estrogen agonists, the CALUX assay demonstrated estrogen antagonism by the pyrethroids. The results, supported by evidence from previous studies, suggest that bifenthrin and permethrin, or their metabolites, appear to act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in vivo, and that the unmetabolized pyrethroids, particularly bifenthrin, act as an ER antagonists in cultured mammalian cells.

  13. The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin

    PubMed Central

    Brander, Susanne M.; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L.; Denison, Michael S.; Cherr, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. We evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Menidia beryllina, a fish species known to reside in pyrethroid contaminated aquatic habitats. We then compared the in vivo response to an in vitro assay: CALUX (Chemical Activated Luciferase Gene Expression). Juvenile Menidia beryllina exposed to bifenthrin (1, 10, 100 ng/L), permethrin (0.1, 1, 10 µg/L), and ethinylestradiol (1, 10, 50 ng/L) had significantly higher ng/mL choriogenin (Chg) measured in whole body homogenate than controls. While Chg expression in fish exposed to ethinylestradiol (EE2) exhibited a traditional sigmoidal concentration-response, curves fit to Chg expressed in fish exposed to pyrethroids suggest a unimodal response, decreasing slightly as concentration increases. While the in vivo response indicated that bifenthrin and permethrin or their metabolites act as estrogen agonists, the CALUX assay demonstrated estrogen antagonism by the pyrethroids. Our results, supported by evidence from previous studies, suggest that bifenthrin and permethrin, and/or their metabolites, appear to act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in vivo, and that the unmetabolized pyrethroids, particularly bifenthrin, act as an ER antagonists in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:23007834

  14. Estrogen receptor genes in gastropods: phylogenetic divergence and gene expression responses to a synthetic estrogen.

    PubMed

    Hultin, Cecilia L; Hallgren, Per; Hansson, Maria C

    2016-11-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to affect development and reproduction in gastropods. However, one is today lacking basic understanding of the Molluscan endocrine system and one can therefore not fully explain these EDC-induced affects. Furthermore, only a few genes that potentially may be connected to the endocrine system have been sequenced in gastropods. An example is the estrogen receptor gene (er) that have been identified in a restricted number of freshwater and marine gastropods. Here, we have identified a new partial coding sequence of an estrogen receptor gene (er) in the European common heterobranch Radix balthica. The following phylogenetic analysis divided the ers of heterobranchs and ceanogastropods in two branches. Furthermore, exposure to the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) showed that exposure could significantly affect er expression level in the heterobranch R. balthica. This paper is the first that phylogenetically compares gastropods' er, basal er expression profiles, and transcriptional estrogenic responses in gastropods from two different evolutionary groups.

  15. Is Soy Estrogenic? Hepatic Gene Expression in the Presence or Absence of Endogenous Estrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to address the question of soy's estrogenicity by studying the hepatic gene expression (HGE) signature of diets made with soy protein isolate (SPI) fed in the presence or absence of estradiol (E2). Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX) at PND50, infused with E...

  16. Sex Hormones and Cardiometabolic Health: Role of Estrogen and Estrogen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Deborah; Hevener, Andrea L; Moreau, Kerrie L; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Van Pelt, Rachael E; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J

    2017-02-17

    With increased life expectancy, women will spend over three decades of life post-menopause. The menopausal transition increases susceptibility to metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Thus, it is more important than ever to develop effective hormonal treatment strategies to protect aging women. Understanding the role of estrogens, and their biological actions mediated by estrogen receptors (ERs), in the regulation of cardiometabolic health is of paramount importance to discover novel targeted therapeutics. In this brief review, we provide a detailed overview of the literature, from basic science findings to human clinical trial evidence, supporting a protective role of estrogens and their receptors, specifically ERα, in maintenance of cardiometabolic health. In so doing, we provide a concise mechanistic discussion of some of the major tissue-specific roles of estrogens signaling through ERα. Taken together, evidence suggests that targeted, perhaps receptor-specific, hormonal therapies can and should be used to optimize the health of women as they transition through menopause, while reducing the undesired complications that have limited the efficacy and use of traditional hormone replacement interventions.

  17. Comparative responses of molluscs and fish to environmental estrogens and an estrogenic effluent.

    PubMed

    Jobling, S; Casey, D; Rodgers-Gray, T; Oehlmann, J; Schulte-Oehlmann, U; Pawlowski, S; Baunbeck, T; Turner, A P; Tyler, C R

    2003-10-29

    It is now well established that there is a diverse array of chemicals discharged into the environment that can mimic or antagonise the action of hormones. These endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can thus interact with physiological systems and cause alterations in development, growth and reproduction in wildlife that are exposed to them. As yet, however, there is little information on the relative sensitivities of different wildlife groups to these chemicals and/or mixtures of them (e.g. estrogenic effluents) and hence, there are fundamental shortfalls in our knowledge of the ecological importance of endocrine disruption in wildlife. In this study, the effects of exposure to individual estrogenic chemicals (17alpha-ethinylestradiol; EE2, bisphenol-A, and 4-tert octylphenol) and a mixture containing these chemicals (treated sewage effluent) on embryo production in the prosobranch mollusc, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, were studied and compared with the effects of EE2 and the same estrogenic effluent on vitellogenin induction and/or egg production in various species of freshwater fish (fathead minnow; Pimaphales promelas, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss); Cyprinus carpio, carp; Cyprinus carpio). The lab-based studies demonstrated that all of the tested chemicals (known to be estrogenic and to cause reproductive effects in fish) also affected embryo production in P. antipodarum. Furthermore, exposure to EE2 induced similar reproductive responses in the snails as in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), stimulating egg/embryo production at low doses (up to 1 ng/l in the minnow and 25 ng/l in the snail) and causing inhibitory effects at higher doses. A similar pattern of embryo production occurred in P. antipodarum when it was exposed to a graded concentration of treated sewage effluent containing mixtures of estrogenic EDCs and hence, the total number of new embryos produced by the snails increased steadily over the 9 weeks exposure period in treated snails

  18. Dietary Estrogens Act through Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Processes and Show No Antiestrogenicity in Cultured Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Makela, S; Davis, VL; Tally, WC; Korkman, J; Salo, L; Vihko, R; Santti, R; Korach, KS

    1994-01-01

    Dietary estrogens are believed to exert their estrogenic or antiestrogenic (chemopreventive) action in estrogen responsive cells by interacting with the estrogen receptor (ER). The present study was undertaken to evaluate a direct role of ER in estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities of three dietary estrogens (coumestrol, genistein and zearalenone). HeLa cells were transiently co-transfected with an expression vector for ER and an estrogen-responsive reporter gene construct. Coumestrol, genistein, and zearalenone all increased the activity of the reporter gene, only in the presence of the ER, and the activation was blocked with the ER antagonist ICI 164,384, demonstrating an ER-specific, agonist response. In addition, in MCF-7 cells, coumestrol and zearalenone increased the expression of the estrogen-responsive pS2 gene. Coumestrol and genistein inhibited the purified estrogen-specific 17ß-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase enzyme and the conversion of estrone to 17ß-estradiol in T-47D cells, which contain this enzyme. However, they did not inhibit the estrone-induced proliferation of T-47D cells. In conclusion, coumestrol, genistein, and zearalenone are all potent estrogens in vitro, and they act through ER mediated mechanism. Our findings give no evidence to support the idea that these compounds act as antiestrogens through competition for the binding sites of ER or by inhibition of the conversion of estrone to 17ß-estradiol in breast cancer cells, since this effect was nullified by their agonist action on cell proliferation. Therefore, their suggested chemopreventive action in estrogen-related cancers must be mediated through other mechanisms. Images Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 2. E Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 4. D Figure 4. E Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. A Figure 9. B Figure 9. C PMID:9679118

  19. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Fent, Karl

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hERalpha agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 beta estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hERalpha agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hERalpha agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  20. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y. . E-mail: petra.kunz@fhnw.ch; Fent, Karl . E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hER{alpha} agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 {beta} estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (Canada) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hER{alpha} agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hER{alpha} agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  1. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  2. Estrogen synthesis and signaling pathways during ageing: from periphery to brain

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Shen, Yong; Li, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are the primary female sex hormones and play important roles in both reproductive and non-reproductive systems. Estrogens can be synthesized in non-reproductive tissue as liver, heart, muscle, bone and brain. The tissue-specific estrogen synthesis is consistent with a diversity of estrogen actions. Here, we will focus on tissue and cell-specific estrogen synthesis and estrogen receptor signaling. This review will include three parts: (I) tissue and cell-specific estrogen synthesis and metabolism, (II) tissue and cell-specific distribution of estrogen receptors and signaling and (III) tissue-specific estrogen function and related disorders, including cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson disease. This comprehensive review provides new insights into estrogens by giving a better understanding of the tissue-specific estrogen effects and their roles in various diseases. PMID:23348042

  3. Estrogen receptor polymorphisms: significance to human physiology, disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Figtree, Gemma A; Noonan, Jonathon E; Bhindi, Ravinay; Collins, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Other than its well-recognized effects on reproductive physiology, estrogen has important actions in a wide variety of other body systems with important examples including bone, blood vessels and the heart. These effects are seen in both females and males. Investigators have hypothesized those genetic variants in the genes coding for estrogen signaling proteins may cause variable sensitivity to the hormone and influence an individual's estrogen-sensitive phenotypes. The most obvious candidate genes are the estrogen receptors alpha and (ERalpha and beta). However, the regulation of these genes is complex and not well understood. Furthermore, their coding exons, and regulatory sequences are dispersed across large segments of the genome. A number of common polymorphisms have been identified in both ERalpha and ERbeta, with variable degrees of evidence of their direct biological significance and their association with human disease. The identification of genetic variations associated with altered estrogen response is of potential public health importance. Insights may be gained into the pathogenesis of estrogen sensitive diseases such as osteoporosis, breast cancer and cardiovascular disease contributing to the development and application of newer therapies for these disorders. Furthermore, genetic variants that alter sensitivity to estrogen may affect both therapeutic and harmful responses to exogenous estrogen administered in the form of the oral contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy. This clinical significance has led to the publication of a number of patents which will be reviewed.

  4. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515 Section 310.515 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.515 Patient package inserts for estrogens....

  5. Modulation of estrogenic effects by environmental temperature and food availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in combination with environmental influences, interfere with endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Estrogens are a type of EDC that may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. The impact of estrogens on P...

  6. EADB: an estrogenic activity database for assessing potential endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xu, Lei; Fang, Hong; Richard, Ann M; Bray, Jeffrey D; Judson, Richard S; Zhou, Guangxu; Colatsky, Thomas J; Aungst, Jason L; Teng, Christina; Harris, Steve C; Ge, Weigong; Dai, Susie Y; Su, Zhenqiang; Jacobs, Abigail C; Harrouk, Wafa; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2013-10-01

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body's endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many endocrine disruptors are estrogenic and affect the normal estrogen signaling pathways. However, ERs can also serve as therapeutic targets for various medical conditions, such as menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, and ER-positive breast cancer. Because of the decades-long interest in the safety and therapeutic utility of estrogenic chemicals, a large number of chemicals have been assayed for estrogenic activity, but these data exist in various sources and different formats that restrict the ability of regulatory and industry scientists to utilize them fully for assessing risk-benefit. To address this issue, we have developed an Estrogenic Activity Database (EADB; http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/BioinformaticsTools/EstrogenicActivityDatabaseEADB/default.htm) and made it freely available to the public. EADB contains 18,114 estrogenic activity data points collected for 8212 chemicals tested in 1284 binding, reporter gene, cell proliferation, and in vivo assays in 11 different species. The chemicals cover a broad chemical structure space and the data span a wide range of activities. A set of tools allow users to access EADB and evaluate potential endocrine activity of chemicals. As a case study, a classification model was developed using EADB for predicting ER binding of chemicals.

  7. Bioassay- versus analytically-derived estrogen equivalents: Ramifications for monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern for possible endocrine-related effects on aquatic vertebrates, environmental estrogens (EEs) are a growing focus of surface water contaminant monitoring programs. Some efforts utilize measurement of a targeted set of chemicals known to act as estrogen receptor (ER)...

  8. Anti-estrogenic activity of lignans from Acanthopanax chiisanensis root.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyun; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Piao, Xiang Lan; Kim, Ju Sun; Kang, Sam Sik; Shin, Kuk Hyun

    2005-02-01

    Anti-estrogenic activity of (-)-sesamin (1), helioxanthin (2), savinin (3), taiwanin C (4), and 3-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl)butyrolactone (5) isolated from the root of Acanthopanax chiisanensis was tested using Ishikawa cells. Among them, compound 3 exhibited anti-estrogenic activity (IC50 = 4.86 microM).

  9. Evaluation of the estrogenic activity of Leguminosae plants.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hye Hyun; Kim, Taehyeong; Ahn, Soyun; Kim, Yoon Jung; Kim, Hyun Young; Piao, Xiang Lan; Park, Jeong Hill

    2005-03-01

    The plant extracts of the Leguminosae family were screened for their estrogenic activity with the Ishikawa cell system. Of the tested plants, Desmodium oxyphyllum, Dunbaria villosa, Kummerowia striata, Lespedeza bicolor, Maackia amurensis, Maackia fauriei, Pueraria thunbergiana, and Sophora flavescens were highly estrogenic with EC50 values of less than 10 microg/ml.

  10. The emerging role of estrogen in B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ladikou, Eleni-Eirini; Kassi, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence implicates a role of estrogens in hematological malignancies. We reviewed current knowledge on the emerging role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in normal B-cell function, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B-cell lymphoma. Data support that (1) normal human peripheral blood cells (mononuclear cells, total lymphocytes, T as well as B lymphocytes, and NK cells) express both estrogen receptor subtypes (ERα and ERβ), (2) B-cell malignancies express mainly ERβ while selective ERβ agonists inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis, (3) estrogens regulate, via an ER-mediated pathway, gene expression of cyclins, kinases, bcl-2 proto-oncogene, activation-induced deaminase (AID), and transcription factors, associated with changes in BCR signaling and B cell tumorigenesis. In conclusion, estrogen receptors play an important role in normal B-cell function and B-cell tumorigenesis; however, further investigations are required to delineate the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in the etiopathogenesis and therapy of B-cell malignancies.

  11. Vascular Aging in Women: is Estrogen the Fountain of Youth?

    PubMed Central

    Novella, Susana; Dantas, Ana Paula; Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular risk is similar for older men and women, but lower in women during their fertile years. This age- and sex-related difference points to estrogen as a protective factor because menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Experimental and some clinical studies have attributed most of the protective effects of estrogen to its modulatory action on vascular endothelium. Estrogen promotes endothelial-derived NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 release. The thromboxane A2 pathway is key to regulating vascular tone in females. Despite all the experimental evidence, some clinical trials have reported no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in older postmenopausal women. The “Timing Hypothesis,” which states that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature, offers a possible explanation for these discrepancies. Nevertheless, a gap remains in current knowledge of cardiovascular aging mechanisms in women. This review comprises clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens, and hormone replacement therapy on vascular function of females. We aim to clarify how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates vascular response at different ages. PMID:22685434

  12. Tamoxifen inhibits estrogen-induced hepatic injury in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Coe, J E; Ross, M J

    1988-01-01

    Estrogens have an unusual toxic effect on the liver of two hamster species, the Armenian and the Chinese hamster. The hepatotoxicity was detectable clinically by hyperbilirubinemia and confirmed histologically by the presence of hepatic degenerative-regenerative changes. Administration of tamoxifen with estrogen [either ethynyl estradiol or diethylstilbestrol (DES)] completely abrogated the hepatotoxic effects, suggesting that estrogen receptor (ER) was necessary for estrogen to damage liver. In Armenian hamsters, estrogens decreased hepatic synthesis of female protein (FP); tamoxifen also abolished this DES effect and resulted in a net increase in serum FP levels. DES administration produced higher serum bilirubin levels and lower serum FP levels in females than in males. Paradoxically, tamoxifen blocked these DES effects more effectively and efficiently in females than in males. Estrogens did not injure uteri of Armenian and Chinese hamsters and were nontoxic to livers of other hamsters species, such as Syrian and Turkish. This model provides another perspective of the acute cellular derangement that can be effected by estrogen-ER complex and may indicate a yet unknown mode of ER action.

  13. Assaying estrogenicity by quantitating the expression levels of endogenous estrogen-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, M; Vendelbo, B; Skakkebaek, N E; Leffers, H

    2000-05-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that humans and wildlife species may experience adverse health consequences from exposure to environmental chemicals that interact with the endocrine system. Reliable short-term assays are needed to identify hormone-disrupting chemicals. In this study we demonstrate that the estrogenic activity of a chemical can be evaluated by assaying induction or repression of endogenous estrogen-regulated "marker genes" in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. We included four marker genes in the assay--pS2, transforming growth factor beta3 (TGFbeta3), monoamine oxidase A, and [alpha]1-antichymotrypsin--and we evaluated estrogenic activity for 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), diethylstilbestrol, [alpha]-zearalanol, nonylphenol, genistein, methoxychlor, endosulphan, o,p-DDE, bisphenol A, dibutylphthalate, 4-hydroxy tamoxifen, and ICI 182.780. All four marker genes responded strongly to the three high-potency estrogens (E(2), diethylstilbestrol, and [alpha]-zearalanol), whereas the potency of the other chemicals was 10(3)- to 10(6)-fold lower than that of E(2). There were some marker gene-dependent differences in the relative potencies of the tested chemicals. TGFbeta3 was equally sensitive to the three high-potency estrogens, whereas the sensitivity to [alpha]-zearalanol was approximately 10-fold lower than the sensitivity to E(2) and diethylstilbestrol when assayed with the other three marker genes. The potency of nonylphenol was equal to that of genistein when assayed with pS2 and TGFbeta3, but 10- to 100-fold higher/lower with monoamine oxidase A and [alpha]1-antichymotrypsin, respectively. The results are in agreement with results obtained by other methods and suggest that an assay based on endogenous gene expression may offer an attractive alternative to other E-SCREEN methods.

  14. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Pakdel, Farzad; Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Bourguet, William; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Bondesson, Maria; Balaguer, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28°C as compared to 37°C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology.

  15. Alcohol Consumption and Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Julia S.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Xu, Xia; Eliassen, A. Heather; Ziegler, Regina

    2016-01-01

    In a cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the associations of usual total alcohol and wine intake with a comprehensive profile of mid-luteal phase urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (referred to jointly as EM) in a sample of 603 premenopausal women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII). A total of 15 individual EM (pmol/mg creatinine) were measured by a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with high accuracy and reproducibility. We used linear mixed models to calculate the adjusted geometric means of individual EM, EM grouped by metabolic pathways, and pathway ratios by category of alcohol intake with non-drinkers of alcohol as the referent. Total alcohol intake was not associated with total EM but was positively associated with estradiol (26 % higher among women consuming >15 g/day vs. non-drinkers; P trend=0.03). Wine consumption was positively associated with a number of EM measures including estradiol (22 % higher among women consuming ≥5 drinks/week vs. non-drinkers, P trend < 0.0001). In conclusion, the total alcohol intake was positively and significantly associated with urinary estradiol levels. Some differences in urinary estrogen metabolites were observed with wine drinking, when compared with non-drinkers. This study strengthens the evidence that alcohol consumption might play a role in breast cancer and other estrogen-related conditions. Additional studies of premenopausal women are needed to further explore the association of alcohol, particularly the specific types of alcohol, on patterns of estrogen metabolism in blood, urine, and tissue. PMID:26728472

  16. Alcohol Consumption and Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites in Premenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Terryl J; Sisti, Julia S; Hankinson, Susan E; Xu, Xia; Eliassen, A Heather; Ziegler, Regina

    2016-02-01

    In a cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the associations of usual total alcohol and wine intake with a comprehensive profile of mid-luteal phase urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (referred to jointly as EM) in a sample of 603 premenopausal women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII). A total of 15 individual EM (pmol/mg creatinine) were measured by a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with high accuracy and reproducibility. We used linear mixed models to calculate the adjusted geometric means of individual EM, EM grouped by metabolic pathways, and pathway ratios by category of alcohol intake with non-drinkers of alcohol as the referent. Total alcohol intake was not associated with total EM but was positively associated with estradiol (26% higher among women consuming >15 g/day vs. non-drinkers; P trend = 0.03). Wine consumption was positively associated with a number of EM measures including estradiol (22% higher among women consuming ≥ 5 drinks/week vs. non-drinkers, P trend < 0.0001). In conclusion, the total alcohol intake was positively and significantly associated with urinary estradiol levels. Some differences in urinary estrogen metabolites were observed with wine drinking, when compared with non-drinkers. This study strengthens the evidence that alcohol consumption might play a role in breast cancer and other estrogen-related conditions. Additional studies of premenopausal women are needed to further explore the association of alcohol, particularly the specific types of alcohol, on patterns of estrogen metabolism in blood, urine, and tissue.

  17. Evolution of estrogen receptors in ray-finned fish and their comparative responses to estrogenic substances.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Saki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Lange, Anke; Ogino, Yukiko; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ihara, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Kobayashi, Tohru; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens play fundamental roles in regulating reproductive activities through estrogen receptors (ESRs), and disruption of estrogen signaling is now of global concern for both wildlife and human health. To date, ESRs of only a limited number of species have been characterized. We investigated the functional diversity and molecular basis or ligand sensitivity of ESRs among ray-finned fish species (Actinopterygii), the most variable group within vertebrates. We cloned and characterized ESRs from several key species in the evolution of ray-finned fish including bichir (Polypteriformes, ESR1 and ESR2) at the basal lineage of ray-finned fish, and arowana (Osteoglossiformes, ESR1 and ESR2b) and eel (Anguilliformes, ESR1, ESR2a and ESR2b) both belonging to ancient early-branching lineages of teleosts, and suggest that ESR2a and ESR2b emerged through teleost-specific whole genome duplication, but an ESR1 paralogue has been lost in the early lineage of euteleost fish species. All cloned ESR isoforms showed similar responses to endogenous and synthetic steroidal estrogens, but they responded differently to non-steroidal estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) (e.g., ESR2a exhibits a weaker reporter activity compared with ESR2b). We show that variation in ligand sensitivity of ESRs can be attributed to phylogeny among species of different taxonomic groups in ray-finned fish. The molecular information provided contributes both to understanding of the comparative role of ESRs in the reproductive biology of fish and their comparative responses to EDCs.

  18. Effect of estrogenic binary mixtures in the yeast estrogen screen (YES).

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Buechse, Andreas; Dammann, Martina; Melching-Kollmuß, Stephanie; Woitkowiak, Claudia; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2014-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) of natural or synthetic origin can interfere with the balance of the hormonal system, either by altering hormone production, secretion, transport, or their binding and consequently lead to an adverse outcome in intact animals. An important aspect is the prediction of effects of combined exposure to two or more EDCs at the same time. The yeast estrogen assay (YES) is a broadly used method to assess estrogenic potential of chemicals. Besides exhibiting good predictivity to identify compounds which interfere with the estrogen receptor, it is easy to handle, rapid and therefore allows screening of a large number of single compounds and varying mixtures. Herein, we applied the YES assay to determine the potential combination effects of binary mixtures of two estrogenic compounds, bisphenol A and genistein, as well as one classical androgen that in vitro also exhibits estrogenic activity, trenbolone. In addition to generating data from combined exposure, we fitted these to a four-parametric logistic dose-response model. As all compounds tested share the same mode of action dose additivity was expected. To assess this, the Loewe model was utilized. Deviations between the Loewe additivity model and the observed responses were always small and global tests based on the whole dose-response data set indicated in general a good fit of the Loewe additivity model. At low concentrations concentration additivity was observed, while at high concentrations, the observed effect was lower than additivity, most likely reflecting receptor saturation. In conclusion, our results suggest that binary combinations of genistein, bisphenol A and trenbolone in the YES assay do not deviate from expected additivity.

  19. Science Signaling podcast for 24 May 2016: Designer estrogens.

    PubMed

    Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-05-24

    This Podcast features an interview with Zeynep Madak-Erdogan, Benita Katzenellenbogen, and John Katzenellenbogen, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 24 May 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about designer estrogens that have the therapeutic benefits of natural estrogens, but less cancer risk. In addition to controlling female reproduction and secondary sex characteristics, estrogen is also an important regulator of metabolism, the vasculature, and bone. Estrogen production decreases as women enter menopause, leading to changes in metabolism, a reduced ability to repair blood vessels, and decreased bone density. Although hormone replacement therapy can alleviate these symptoms, it can also promote the growth of uterine and breast cancers. Madak-Erdogan et al engineered synthetic forms of estrogen that activate the cytosolic signaling pathways that are associated with the beneficial effects of this hormone without also activating the nuclear signaling events associated with cancer growth.Listen to Podcast.

  20. Of mice and men: the many guises of estrogens.

    PubMed

    Simpson, E R; Jones, M E

    2006-01-01

    Models of estrogen insufficiency have revealed new and unexpected roles for estrogens in males as well as females. These models include natural mutations in the aromatase gene in humans, as well as mouse knock-outs of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, and one man with a mutation in the ERa gene. These mutations, both natural and experimental, have revealed that estrogen deficiency results in a spectrum of symptoms. These include loss of fertility and libido in both males and females; loss of bone in both males and females; a cardiovascular and cerebrovascular phenotype; development of a metabolic syndrome in both males and females, with truncal adiposity and male-specific hepatic steatosis. Most of these symptoms can be reversed or attenuated by estradiol therapy. Thus estrogen is involved in the maintenance of general physiological homeostasis in both sexes.

  1. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  2. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  3. Prediction of Estrogenic Bioactivity of Environmental Chemical Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline L; Mansouri, Kamel; Judson, Richard; Browne, Patience

    2016-09-19

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is using in vitro data generated from ToxCast/Tox21 high-throughput screening assays to assess the endocrine activity of environmental chemicals. Considering that in vitro assays may have limited metabolic capacity, inactive chemicals that are biotransformed into metabolites with endocrine bioactivity may be missed for further screening and testing. Therefore, there is a value in developing novel approaches to account for metabolism and endocrine activity of both parent chemicals and their associated metabolites. We used commercially available software to predict metabolites of 50 parent compounds, out of which 38 chemicals are known to have estrogenic metabolites, and 12 compounds and their metabolites are negative for estrogenic activity. Three ER QSAR models were used to determine potential estrogen bioactivity of the parent compounds and predicted metabolites, the outputs of the models were averaged, and the chemicals were then ranked based on the total estrogenicity of the parent chemical and metabolites. The metabolite prediction software correctly identified known estrogenic metabolites for 26 out of 27 parent chemicals with associated metabolite data, and 39 out of 46 estrogenic metabolites were predicted as potential biotransformation products derived from the parent chemical. The QSAR models estimated stronger estrogenic activity for the majority of the known estrogenic metabolites compared to their parent chemicals. Finally, the three models identified a similar set of parent compounds as top ranked chemicals based on the estrogenicity of putative metabolites. This proposed in silico approach is an inexpensive and rapid strategy for the detection of chemicals with estrogenic metabolites and may reduce potential false negative results from in vitro assays.

  4. Window Of Opportunity: Estrogen As A Treatment For Ischemic Stroke✰

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ran; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The neuroprotection research in the last 2 decades has witnessed a growing interest in the functions of estrogens as neuroprotectants against neurodegenerative diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective action of estrogens has been well demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. However, the major conducted clinical trials so far have raised concern for the protective effect of estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. The discrepancy could be partly due to the mistranslation between the experimental stroke research and clinical trials. While predominant experimental studies tested the protective action of estrogens on ischemic stroke using acute treatment paradigm, the clinical trials have mainly focused on the effect of estrogen replacement therapy on the primary and secondary stroke prevention which has not been adequately addressed in the experimental stroke study. Although the major conducted clinical trials have indicated that estrogen replacement therapy has an adverse effect and raise concern for long term estrogen replacement therapy for stroke prevention, these are not appropriate for assessing the potential effects of acute estrogen treatment on stroke protection. The well established action of estrogen in the neurovascular unit and its potential interaction with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) makes it a candidate for the combined therapy with rtPA for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke. On the other hand, the “critical period” and newly emerged “biomarkers window” hypotheses have indicated that many clinical relevant factors have been underestimated in the experimental ischemic stroke research. The development and application of ischemic stroke models that replicate the clinical condition is essential for further evaluation of acute estrogen treatment on ischemic stroke which might provide critical information for future clinical trials. PMID:23340160

  5. Gender and cataract--the role of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine; Celojevic, Dragana

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence from epidemiologic data that cataract is more common in women than men. This is not solely due to a higher rate of cataract extraction in women, as is the case in the western world, but several population-based studies show that females have a higher prevalence of lens opacities, especially cortical. There is no firm evidence that lifestyle-related factors are the cause of this gender discrepancy. Focus has therefore been directed towards the role of estrogen in cataract formation. Although data on endogenous and exogenous estrogen involvement in cataractogenesis are conflicting, some studies have indicated that hormone therapy may decrease the risk of cataract and thus be protective. It has been hypothesized that the decrease in estrogen at menopause cause increased risk of cataract in women, i.e. not strictly the concentration of estrogen, but more the withdrawal effect. Estrogens are known to exert several anti-aging effects that may explain the longer lifespan in women, including metabolically beneficial effects, neuroprotection, preservation of telomeres and anti-oxidative properties. Since oxidative stress is considered important in cataractogenesis, studies have investigated the effects of estrogens on lens epithelial cells in culture or in animal models. Several investigators have found protection by physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in cultured lens epithelial cells. Although both main types of estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, have been demonstrated in lens epithelium, most studies so far indicate that the estrogen-mediated protection in the lens is exerted through non-genomic, i.e. receptor-independent mechanisms, possibly through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/ERK2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling pathway. Further studies are needed, both epidemiologic as to the role of hormone therapies, and laboratory studies

  6. Licorice Root Components in Dietary Supplements are Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators with a Spectrum of Estrogenic and Anti-Estrogenic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Boonmuen, Nittaya; Gong, Ping; Ali, Zulfiqar; Chittiboyina, Amar G.; Khan, Ikhlas; Doerge, Daniel R.; Helferich, William G.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Martin, Teresa; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2016-01-01

    Licorice root extracts are often consumed as botanical dietary supplements by menopausal women as a natural alternative to pharmaceutical hormone replacement therapy. In addition to their components liquiritigenin (Liq) and isoliquiritigenin (Iso-Liq), known to have estrogenic activity, licorice root extracts also contain a number of other flavonoids, isoflavonoids, and chalcones. We have investigated the estrogenic activity of 7 of these components, obtained from an extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra powder, namely Glabridin (L1), Calycosin (L2), Methoxychalcone (L3), Vestitol (L4), Glyasperin C (L5), Glycycoumarin (L6), and Glicoricone (L7), and compared them with Liq, Iso-Liq, and estradiol (E2). All components, including Liq and Iso-Liq, have low binding affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). Their potency and efficacy in stimulating the expression of estrogen-regulated genes reveal that Liq and Iso-Liq and L2, L3, L4, and L6 are estrogen agonists. Interestingly, L3 and L4 have an efficacy nearly equivalent to E2 but with a potency ca. 10,000-fold less. The other components, L1, L5 and L7, acted as partial estrogen antagonists. All agonist activities were reversed by the antiestrogen, ICI 182,780, or by knockdown of ERα with siRNA, indicating that they are ER dependent. In HepG2 hepatoma cells stably expressing ERα, only Liq, Iso-Liq, and L3 stimulated estrogen-regulated gene expression, and in all cases gene stimulation did not occur in HepG2 cells lacking ERα. Collectively, these findings classify the components of licorice root extracts as low potency, mixed ER agonists and antagonists, having a character akin to that of selective estrogen receptor modulators or SERMs. PMID:26631549

  7. Bioassays for estrogenic activity: development and validation of estrogen receptor (ERalpha/ERbeta) and breast cancer proliferation bioassays to measure serum estrogenic activity in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Lee, L; Gong, Y; Shen, P; Wong, S P; Wise, Stephen D; Yong, E L

    2009-02-01

    Standard estrogenic prodrugs such as estradiol valerate (E2V) and increasingly popular phytoestrogen formulations are commonly prescribed to improve menopausal health. These drugs are metabolized to numerous bioactive compounds, known or unknown, which may exert combinatorial estrogenic effects in vivo. The aim of this study is to develop and validate estrogen receptor (ER) alpha/ERbeta reporter gene and MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation bioassays to quantify serum estrogenic activities in a clinical trial setting. We measured changes in serum estrogenicity following ingestion of E2V and compared this to mass spectrometric measurements of its bioactive metabolites, estrone and 17beta-stradiol. ERalpha bioactivity of the 192 serum samples correlated well (R = 79%) with 17beta-estradiol levels, and adding estrone improved R to 0.83 (likelihood ratio test, P < 0.0001), suggesting that the ERalpha assay reflects summated activity of compounds in serum. ERbeta correlated moderately (R = 0.52) with estrone and 17beta-estradiol, with an estrone/17beta-estradiol coefficient ratio that was twice that of ERalpha, indicating estrone was more active on a molar basis in the ERbeta assay. Unlike the ERalpha and ERbeta bioassays, MCF-7 cell proliferation was driven by 17beta-estradiol, and addition of estrone did not increase the predictive value of the model, suggesting that the driver or drivers for breast cancer cell proliferation were not the same as for ERalpha and ERbeta transactivation. In contrast, a decoction of the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Epimedium pubescens did not induce significant changes in estrogenic bioactivity over baseline. These data indicate that ERalpha/ERbeta reporter gene and MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation bioassays reflect different aspects of estrogenic activity and that these assays suggest that the Epimedium formulation tested is unlikely to exert significant estrogenic effects in humans.

  8. Contemporary Alternatives to Plant Estrogens for Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Stacie E.; Studee, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Every year, millions of women begin the peri-menopause and may experience a number of symptoms related to this transition. Many women are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for treatment of menopausal symptoms and are turning to botanical and dietary supplements (BDS) for relief. This paper reviews the literature on alternatives to plant estrogens for relief of menopausal symptoms. Methods The MEDLINE database was searched for clinical trials of non-estrogenic plant extracts for menopausal symptoms. To be included, studies had to include peri- or postmenopausal women as subjects. All clinical trials (randomized-controlled trials, open trials, and comparison group studies) were included for this review. Results Black Cohosh appears to be one of the most effective botanicals for relief of vasomotor symptoms, while St. John’s wort can improve mood disorders related to the menopausal transition. Many other botanicals have limited evidence to demonstrate safety and efficacy for relief of symptoms related to menopause. Conclusions A growing body of evidence suggests that some botanicals and dietary supplements could result in improved clinical outcomes. Health care providers should discuss these issues with their patients so they can assist them in managing these alternative therapies through an evidence-based approach. PMID:16884867

  9. Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Circuits Controling Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Qiu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. Yet, it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons that modulate GnRH neuronal excitability. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in hypothalamic neurons critical for reproductive function. PMID:20807512

  10. Epigenetic regulation of estrogen-dependent memory

    PubMed Central

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal memory formation is highly regulated by post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation. Accordingly, these epigenetic processes play a major role in the effects of modulatory factors, such as sex steroid hormones, on hippocampal memory. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the ability of the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal-dependent novel object recognition memory in ovariectomized female mice requires ERK-dependent histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Although these data provide valuable insight into the chromatin modifications that mediate the memory-enhancing effects of E2, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is enormously complex. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand how E2 and other hormones employ epigenetic alterations to shape behavior. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations shown thus far to regulate hippocampal memory, briefly reviews the effects of E2 on hippocampal function, and describes in detail our work on epigenetic regulation of estrogenic memory enhancement. PMID:24878494

  11. Epigenetic regulation of estrogen-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Fortress, Ashley M; Frick, Karyn M

    2014-10-01

    Hippocampal memory formation is highly regulated by post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation. Accordingly, these epigenetic processes play a major role in the effects of modulatory factors, such as sex steroid hormones, on hippocampal memory. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the ability of the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal-dependent novel object recognition memory in ovariectomized female mice requires ERK-dependent histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Although these data provide valuable insight into the chromatin modifications that mediate the memory-enhancing effects of E2, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is enormously complex. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand how E2 and other hormones employ epigenetic alterations to shape behavior. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations shown thus far to regulate hippocampal memory, briefly reviews the effects of E2 on hippocampal function, and describes in detail our work on epigenetic regulation of estrogenic memory enhancement.

  12. The role of estrogens and estrogen receptor signaling pathways in cancer and infertility: the case of schistosomes.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Mónica C; Alves, Helena; Barros, Alberto; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J; Sousa, Mário

    2015-06-01

    Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic flatworm that infects more than 100 million people, mostly in the developing world, is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis, and is associated with a high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder. Schistosomiasis haematobia also appears to negatively influence fertility, and is particularly associated with female infertility. Given that estrogens and estrogen receptors are key players in human reproduction, we speculate that schistosome estrogen-like molecules may contribute to infertility through hormonal imbalances. Here, we review recent findings on the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors on both carcinogenesis and infertility associated with urogenital schistosomiasis and discuss the basic hormonal mechanisms that might be common in cancer and infertility.

  13. Highly efficient white top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes comprising laminated microlens films.

    PubMed

    Thomschke, Michael; Reineke, Sebastian; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2012-01-11

    White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) attract much attention, as they are optically independent from the substrate used. While monochrome top-emitting OLEDs can be designed easily to have high-emission efficiency, white light emission faces obstacles. The commonly used thin metal layers as top electrodes turn the device into a microresonator having detrimental narrow and angular dependent emission characteristics. Here we report on a novel concept to improve the color quality and efficiency of white top-emitting OLEDs. We laminate a refractive index-matched microlens film on the top-emitting device. The microlens film acts both as outcoupling-enhancing film and an integrating element, mixing the optical modes to a broadband spectrum.

  14. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOEpatents

    Olbright, Gregory R.; Jewell, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  15. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  16. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of carp, Cyprinus carpio, estrogen receptors and their differential activations by estrogens.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Lange, Anke; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Tatarazako, Norishisa; Kawashima, Yukio; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-01-01

    Sex-steroid hormones are essential for normal reproductive activity in both sexes. Estrogens are necessary for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage in vertebrates and promote the growth and differentiation of the female reproductive system. Importantly, environmental estrogens can influence the reproductive system and have been shown to disrupt gametogenesis in males. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen actions and to evaluate estrogen receptor ligand interactions in the carp, Cyprinus carpio, a species used widely for both field- and laboratory-based studies, we cloned all three carp estrogen receptors (ER; ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2) and applied an estrogen-responsive (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay system to characterize the interactions of these receptors with steroidal and synthetic estrogens. DNA fragments encoding all three ERs in carp, ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2, were obtained from the ovary using degenerate primer sets and PCR techniques, and full-length carp ER (cER) cDNAs were then obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of the cDNA end) techniques. Amino acid sequences of cERs showed overall homology of 46% (α vs β1), 49% (α vs β2) and 53% (β1 vs β2). In the transient transfection ERE-luciferase reporter assay system (using mammalian cells) the cER proteins displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription and cERβ2 showed a higher sensitivity to the natural steroid oestrogen, 17β-estradiol, than cERα. The assay system developed is a powerful assay for toxicology and provides a tool for future studies examining the receptor-environmental chemical interactions and estrogen-disrupting mechanisms in carp. The data presented also expand our knowledge of estrogen receptor evolution.

  17. Assessment of methods of detection of water estrogenicity for their use as monitoring tools in a process of estrogenicity removal.

    PubMed

    Blavier, J; Songulashvili, G; Simon, C; Penninckx, M; Flahaut, S; Scippo, M L; Debaste, F

    2016-12-01

    Methods of monitoring of estrogenicity in water were gathered, compared, and tested within the context of their practical use as measurement and design tools, in the development of a process of degradation of estrogenic endocrine disruptors. In this work, the focus was put on in vitro assays, with the use of analytical techniques as additional analysis when possible. Practically, from a literature review, four methods that seemed most suitable to practical use required in a process development were tested: the Yeast Estrogen Screen assay, the Lyticase-assisted Yeast Estrogen Screen assay (LYES), the MMV-LUC assay and the HPLC-UV analytical method. Dose-response curves in response to estrogenic standard 17β-estradiol were compared. Bisphenol A estrogenicity was measured by the methods as well. The model for the calculation of estradiol equivalents as measurements units was adapted. The methods were assessed in terms of ranges of detection, time of experiment, cost, ease of the experiment, reproducibility, etc. Based on that assessment, the LYES assay was selected and successfully applied to the monitoring of estrogenicity removal from 17β-estradiol and bisphenol A. More precisely, the bioassay allowed the acquisition of kinetic curves for a laboratory-scaled process of estrogenicity removal by immobilized enzymes in a continuous packed-bed reactor. The LYES assay was found to have a real methodological potential for scale-up and design of a treatment process. The HPLC-UV method showed good complementarity with the LYES assay for the monitoring of bisphenol A concentrations in parallel with estrogenicity, reporting no significant estrogenicity from degradation byproducts, among others.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1270 - Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.1270 Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system. (a) Identification. As estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system is a device intended to measure total estrogens in plasma, serum,...

  19. Estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of selected selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    POP, ANCA; LUPU, DIANA IOANA; CHERFAN, JULIEN; KISS, BELA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most prescribed classes of psychotropics. Even though the SSRI class consists of 6 molecules (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline), only fluoxetine was intensively studied for endocrine disruptive effects, while the other SSRIs received less attention. This study was designed to evaluate the estrogenic/antiestrogenic effect of fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine. Methods The in vitro (anti)estrogenic activity was assessed using a firefly luciferase reporter construct in the T47D-KBluc breast cancer cell line. These cells express nuclear estrogen receptors that can activate the transcription of the luciferase reporter gene upon binding of estrogen receptor agonists. Results All three compounds were found to interact with the estrogen receptor. Fluoxetine had dual properties, weak estrogenic at lower concentrations and antiestrogenic effect at higher concentrations. Sertraline shared the same properties with fluoxetine, but also increased the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Paroxetine presented only one type of effect, the ability to increase the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Conclusions Overall, our results indicate a possible interaction of SSRIs with the estrogen receptor. As SSRIs are being used by all categories of population, including pregnant women or children, establishing whether they can affect the endocrine mediated mechanisms should be a priority. PMID:26609273

  20. Estrogen Receptors and Their Implications in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Francesco; Ryan, Elizabeth J.; Doherty, Glen; Winter, Desmond C.; Sheahan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding their cognate receptors, ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2), estrogens activate intracellular signaling cascades that have important consequences for cellular behavior. Historically linked to carcinogenesis in reproductive organs, estrogens have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of different cancer types of non-reproductive tissues including the colon. ERβ is the predominant estrogen receptor expressed in both normal and malignant colonic epithelium. However, during colon cancer progression, ERβ expression is lost, suggesting that estrogen signaling may play a role in disease progression. Estrogens may in fact exert an anti-tumor effect through selective activation of pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by ERβ, inhibition of inflammatory signals and modulation of the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we analyze the estrogen pathway as a possible therapeutic avenue in colorectal cancer, we report the most recent experimental evidence to explain the cellular and molecular mechanisms of estrogen-mediated protection against colorectal tumorigenesis, and we discuss future challenges and potential avenues for targeted therapy. PMID:25699240

  1. Determination of estrogenic potential in waste water without sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Avberšek, Miha; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka; Uranjek-Ževart, Nataša; Heath, Ester

    2013-09-15

    This study describes the modification of the ER-Calux assay for testing water samples without sample extraction (NE-(ER-Calux) assay). The results are compared to those obtained with ER-Calux assay and a theoretical estrogenic potential obtained by GC-MSD. For spiked tap and waste water samples there was no statistical difference between estrogenic potentials obtained by the three methods. Application of NE-(ER-Calux) to "real" influent and effluents from municipal waste water treatment plants and receiving surface waters found that the NE-(ER-Calux) assay gave higher values compared to ER-Calux assay and GC-MSD. This is explained by the presence of water soluble endocrine agonists that are usually removed during extraction. Intraday dynamics of the estrogenic potential of a WWTP influent and effluent revealed an increase in the estrogenic potential of the influent from 12.9 ng(EEQ)/L in the morning to a peak value of 40.0 ng(EEQ)/L in the afternoon. The estrogenic potential of the effluent was estrogenic potential was 92-98%. Daytime estrogenic potential values varied significantly.

  2. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  3. Estrogen patient package insert: medication acceptance despite negative attitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, M.; Glickstein, S.; Lasagna, L.

    1981-08-01

    We surveyed 100 women receiving short courses of estrogen post partum to suppress lactation. Thirty six had significant apprehension about estrogens, but took them. These women were significantly older and better educated and 92% of them were married. In contrast, only one third of the ''nonapprehensive'' women were married and they had significantly lower family incomes. More of the apprehensive women read the estrogen patient package insert (PPI) and almost 30% developed negative attitudes toward estrogens. The major concerns of these women reflected information in the PPI about cancer and thromboembolism. The reasons given for taking estrogens despite apprehension included the lower risk of short courses, assurance from physicians, nurses, or family members, and the desired therapeutic effect. These women should not be given the current estrogen PPI, which was designed to warn women of the risks of long-term estrogen use; a PPI should be written specifically for patients receiving short courses. Similar problems will arise with the PPIs for other medications that have different risks for different therapeutic indications.

  4. Proapoptotic protein Bim attenuates estrogen-enhanced survival in lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenggang; Li, Na; Liu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Erik Y.; Sun, Yang; Masuda, Kouhei; Li, Jing; Sun, Julia; Morrison, Tasha; Li, Xiangke; Chen, Yuanguang; Wang, Jiang; Karim, Nagla A.; Zhang, Yi; Blenis, John; Reginato, Mauricio J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Yu, Jane J.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a progressive lung disease that primarily affects young women. Genetic evidence suggests that LAM cells bearing TSC2 mutations migrate to the lungs, proliferate, and cause cystic remodeling. The female predominance indicates that estrogen plays a critical role in LAM pathogenesis, and we have proposed that estrogen promotes LAM cell metastasis by inhibition of anoikis. We report here that estrogen increased LAM patient–derived cells’ resistance to anoikis in vitro, accompanied by decreased accumulation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, an activator of anoikis. The resistance to anoikis was reversed by the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. Treatment of LAM patient–derived cells with estrogen plus bortezomib promoted anoikis compared with estrogen alone. Depletion of Bim by siRNA in TSC2-deficient cells resulted in anoikis resistance. Treatment of mice with bortezomib reduced estrogen-promoted lung colonization of TSC2-deficient cells. Importantly, molecular depletion of Bim by siRNA in Tsc2-deficient cells increased lung colonization in a mouse model. Collectively, these data indicate that Bim plays a key role in estrogen-enhanced survival of LAM patient–derived cells under detached conditions that occur with dissemination. Thus, targeting Bim may be a plausible future treatment strategy in patients with LAM. PMID:27882343

  5. Synthesis and Functional Analysis of Novel Bivalent Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Wendlandt, Alison E.; Yelton, Sharon M.; Lou, Dingyuan; Watt, David S.; Noonan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The steroid hormone estrogen plays a critical role in female development and homeostasis. Estrogen mediates its effects through binding and activation of specific estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), members of the steroid/nuclear receptor family of ligand-induced transcription factors. Due to their intimate roles in genomic and nongenomic signaling pathways, these hormones and their receptors have been also implicated in the pathologies of a variety of cancers and metabolic disorders, and have been the target of large therapeutic development efforts. The binding of estrogen to its respective receptors initiates a cascade of events that include receptor dimerization, nuclear localization, DNA binding and recruitment of co-regulatory protein complexes. In this manuscript, we investigate the potential for manipulating steroid receptor gene expression activity through the development of bivalent steroid hormones that are predicted to facilitate hormone receptor dimerization events. Data are presented for the development and testing of novel estrogen dimers, linked through their C-17 moiety, that can activate estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated transcription events with efficacy and potency equal to or greater than that of ERα’s cognate ligand, 17β-estradiol. These bivalent estrogen structures open the door to the development of a variety of steroid therapeutics that could dramatically impact future drug development in this area. PMID:20685325

  6. Tissue-selective estrogen complexes for postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Mirkin, Sebastian; Komm, Barry S

    2013-11-01

    Although hormone therapy using estrogens plus progestogens (EPT) is effective for the management of menopausal symptoms (e.g., vasomotor symptoms and vulvar/vaginal atrophy) and prevention/treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, EPT is associated with safety and tolerability concerns. A new alternative to EPT is the tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC), which partners a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) with one or more estrogens and is designed to treat menopausal symptoms and prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis without the tolerability concerns associated with EPT. The first TSEC to reach advanced clinical development is a combination of the SERM bazedoxifene (BZA) with conjugated estrogens (CE). BZA has been shown to inhibit the stimulatory activity of CE on uterine tissue and breast in vitro and in vivo. In clinical studies, BZA/CE treatment has been associated with significant improvements in menopausal symptoms including hot flushes and vulvar/vaginal atrophy and significant increases in bone mineral density, coupled with reductions in bone turnover marker levels and improvements in sleep and health-related quality of life. Additionally, BZA/CE has been shown to have a neutral effect on endometrial and breast tissue because BZA inhibits the stimulatory effects of estrogens in tissue-selective fashion in these 2 organs. Taken together, results of these preclinical and clinical studies indicate that the benefits of estrogens for treating menopausal symptoms are maintained with BZA/CE without endometrial or breast stimulation, resulting in a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic postmenopausal women.

  7. Developmental synergism of steroidal estrogens in sex determination.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J M; Willingham, E; Osborn, C T; Rhen, T; Crews, D

    1999-02-01

    Gonadal sex in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, is determined by incubation temperature during embryonic development. Evidence suggests that temperature determines sex by influencing steroid hormone metabolism and/or sensitivity: steroidogenic enzyme inhibitors or exogenous sex steroid hormones and their man-made analogs override (or enhance) temperature effects on sex determination. Specifically, nonaromatizable androgens and aromatase inhibitors induce testis differentiation at female-producing temperatures, whereas aromatizable androgens and estrogens induce ovary differentiation at male-producing temperatures. Moreover, natural estrogens and temperature synergize to produce more females than would be expected if estrogens and temperature had purely additive effects on sex determination. In this study, we use sex reversal of turtle embryos incubated at a male-producing temperature to examine synergism among steroidal estrogens: estrone, 17ss-estradiol, and estriol. A low dose of 17ss-estradiol (200 ng) showed significant synergism when administered with a single low dose of estriol (10 ng). Likewise, a single low dose of estrone (250 ng) had a synergistic effect when combined with the same low dose of estriol (10 ng). We conclude that the weak natural estrogens estrone and 17ss-estradiol synergize with a low dose of the more potent estriol to reverse gonadal sex during the critical period of sexual differentiation. These results suggest that weak environmental estrogens may also synergize with stronger natural estrogens.

  8. INTERACTION OF ESTROGEN AND PROGESTERONE IN CHICK OVIDUCT DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Takami; Schimke, Robert T.

    1969-01-01

    Daily administration of estrogen to immature female chicks results in marked oviduct growth and appearance of characteristic tubular gland cells which contain lysozyme. Although a rapid increase in total DNA and RNA content begins within 24 hr, cell specific protein, lysozyme, is first detectable after 3 days of estrogen. Progesterone administered concomitantly with estrogen antagonizes the estrogen-induced tissue growth as well as appearance of tubular gland cells and their specific products, lysozyme and ovalbumin. When the initiation of progesterone administration is delayed for progressively longer periods (days) during estrogen treatment, proportionally greater growth occurs with more lysozyme and tubular gland cells after 5 days of total treatment. Progesterone does not inhibit the estrogen-stimulated increase in uptake of α-aminoisobutyric acid and water by oviduct occurring within 24 hr or the estrogen-induced increase in total lipid, phospholipid, and phosphoprotein content of serum. The above results of progesterone antagonism can best be explained by the hypothesis that progesterone inhibits the initial proliferation of cells which become tubular gland cells but does not antagonize the subsequent cytodifferentiation leading to the synthesis of lysozyme and ovalbumin once such cell proliferation has occurred. PMID:5814004

  9. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study.

  10. In vitro estrogenic activity of Achillea millefolium L.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, G; Vegeto, E; Dall'Acqua, S; Ciana, P; Giorgetti, M; Agradi, E; Sozzi, A; Fico, G; Tomè, F

    2007-02-01

    Isolation and biological characterization of pure compounds was used to identify and characterize estrogenic activity and estrogen receptors (ER) preference in chemical components of Achillea millefolium. This medicinal plant is used in folk medicine as an emmenagogue. In vitro assay, based on recombinant MCF-7 cells, showed estrogenic activity in a crude extract of the aerial parts of A. millefolium. After fractionation of the crude extract with increasing polar solvents, estrogenic activity was found in the methanol/water fraction. Nine compounds were isolated and characterized by HR-MS spectra and 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. In particular, dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside - a glycosyl-neolignan - was isolated for the first time from the genus Achillea in addition to six flavone derivatives, apigenin, apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin, luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin-4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, rutin, and two caffeic acid derivatives, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and chlorogenic acid. Apigenin and luteolin, the most important estrogenic compounds among those tested, were studied for their ability to activate alpha or beta estrogen receptors (ERalpha, ERbeta) using transiently transfected cells. Our results suggest that isolation and biological characterization of estrogenic compounds in traditionally used medicinal plants could be a first step in better assessing further (e.g. in vivo) tests of nutraceutical and pharmacological strategies based on phytoestrogens.

  11. Proapoptotic protein Bim attenuates estrogen-enhanced survival in lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenggang; Li, Na; Liu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Erik Y; Sun, Yang; Masuda, Kouhei; Li, Jing; Sun, Julia; Morrison, Tasha; Li, Xiangke; Chen, Yuanguang; Wang, Jiang; Karim, Nagla A; Zhang, Yi; Blenis, John; Reginato, Mauricio J; Henske, Elizabeth P; Yu, Jane J

    2016-11-17

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a progressive lung disease that primarily affects young women. Genetic evidence suggests that LAM cells bearing TSC2 mutations migrate to the lungs, proliferate, and cause cystic remodeling. The female predominance indicates that estrogen plays a critical role in LAM pathogenesis, and we have proposed that estrogen promotes LAM cell metastasis by inhibition of anoikis. We report here that estrogen increased LAM patient-derived cells' resistance to anoikis in vitro, accompanied by decreased accumulation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, an activator of anoikis. The resistance to anoikis was reversed by the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. Treatment of LAM patient-derived cells with estrogen plus bortezomib promoted anoikis compared with estrogen alone. Depletion of Bim by siRNA in TSC2-deficient cells resulted in anoikis resistance. Treatment of mice with bortezomib reduced estrogen-promoted lung colonization of TSC2-deficient cells. Importantly, molecular depletion of Bim by siRNA in Tsc2-deficient cells increased lung colonization in a mouse model. Collectively, these data indicate that Bim plays a key role in estrogen-enhanced survival of LAM patient-derived cells under detached conditions that occur with dissemination. Thus, targeting Bim may be a plausible future treatment strategy in patients with LAM.

  12. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  13. p150/Glued Modifies Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jung; Chae, Christina; Wang, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen modulates gene expression through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) that bind chromosomal target genes. Recent studies have suggested an interaction between the cytoskeletal system and estrogen signaling; these have implicated a role of cytoplasmic microtubules in scaffolding ERα and enhancing nongenomic function; in addition, other experiments demonstrate that dynein light chain 1 may chaperone ERα to the nucleus, indirectly increasing transcriptional potency. Actin/myosin and dynein light chain 1 are also required for estrogen-mediated chromosomal movement that is required for transcriptional up-regulation of ERα targets. We present evidence that the dynactin component, p150/glued, directly influences the potency of nuclear ER function. Increasing the stoichiometric ratio of p150/glued and ERα by overexpression enhances estrogen responses. ERα enhancement by p150/glued does not appear to be influenced by shifts in subcellular localization because microtubule disruption fails to increase nuclear ERα. Rather, we find that modest amounts of p150/glued reside in the nucleus of cells, suggesting that it plays a direct role in nuclear transcription. Notably, p150/glued is recruited to the pS2 promoter in the presence of hormone, and, in MCF-7 cells, knockdown of p150/glued levels reduces estrogen-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that p150/glued modulates estrogen sensitivity in cells through nuclear mechanisms. PMID:19228793

  14. Estrogen binding and estrogen receptor activity in the human prostate: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Fondo, E Y; Menendez-Botet, C J; Schwartz, M K; Whitmore, W F

    1981-03-01

    Assay of estrogen receptor activity in prostates from patients who ranged in age from 22 to 78 years and had not received any previous hormonal therapy was carried out by incubation of cytosols with (3)H-estradiol in the presence and absence of excess, nonradioactive estradiol. Hyperplastic prostatic tissues were used in the study. The kinetics of each reaction were studied and analysis of the data revealed 3.4 to 35.7 femtomoles of receptor protein per mg of cytosol protein; the dissociation constants obtained from a Scatchard plot ranged from 1.1 × 10(-10) to 1.2 × 10(-8)M.The small number of patients prevents realistic quantitative assessment of the apparent estrogen binding activity demonstrated in these preliminary studies, but the qualitative identification of such activity provides possible grounds for further insight into the hormonal mechanisms in the pathophysiology of prostatic diseases and of their responses to endocrine therapy.

  15. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Tropsha, Alexander; Varnek, Alexandre; Zakharov, Alexey; Worth, Andrew; Richard, Ann M.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Fourches, Denis; Horvath, Dragos; Benfenati, Emilio; Muratov, Eugene; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Grisoni, Francesca; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Incisivo, Giuseppina M.; Hong, Huixiao; Ng, Hui W.; Tetko, Igor V.; Balabin, Ilya; Kancherla, Jayaram; Shen, Jie; Burton, Julien; Nicklaus, Marc; Cassotti, Matteo; Nikolov, Nikolai G.; Nicolotti, Orazio; Andersson, Patrik L.; Zang, Qingda; Politi, Regina; Beger, Richard D.; Todeschini, Roberto; Huang, Ruili; Farag, Sherif; Rosenberg, Sine A.; Slavov, Svetoslav; Hu, Xin; Judson, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Objectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure–activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were evaluated on a set of 7,522 chemicals curated from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built by weighting models on scores based on their evaluated accuracies. Results: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. Conclusion: This project demonstrated the possibility to screen large libraries of chemicals using a consensus of different in silico approaches. This concept will be applied in future projects related to other

  16. Determination of the Role of Estrogen Receptors and Estrogen Regulated Genes in B Cell Autoreactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Medical Research Manhasset, NY 11030 Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that occurs preferentially in women. We have developed a...Introduction: There is abundant clinical data that estrogen can increase risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and disease...crux of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is characterized by an array of antibodies against self-antigens (3,4). Anti–double-stranded (ds) DNA

  17. Determination of the Role of Estrogen Receptors and Estrogen Regulated Genes in B Cell Autoreactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that occurs preferentially in women. In murine models of SLE, it is... Systemic Lupus , Estrogen, BCR Signaling, B Cell Maturation, B Cell Selection 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...therefore, be important to test ERα antagonists in murine studies of B cell development and in murine models of lupus . This approach to therapy might

  18. Determination of the Role of Estrogen Receptors and Estrogen Regulated Genes in B cell Autoreactivity. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that occurs preferentially in women. We have developed a murine model...4 Introduction: There is abundant clinical data that estrogen can increase risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and disease...Kawabata, D., Pinto-Rodriguez, D., Grimaldi, C. and Diamond B. Hormonal regulator of B cell function and systemic lupus erythematosus . Lupus 17:528

  19. Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Pesticides at the Human Estrogen Receptor α and β

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Bettina; Klawonn, Frank; Nguema Bekale, Boris; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consumers of fruits and vegetables are frequently exposed to small amounts of hormonally active pesticides, some of them sharing a common mode of action such as the activation of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα) or β (hERβ). Therefore, it is of particular importance to evaluate risks emanating from chemical mixtures, in which the individual pesticides are present at human-relevant concentrations, below their corresponding maximum residue levels. Binary and ternary iso-effective mixtures of estrogenic pesticides at effect concentrations eliciting a 1 or 10% effect in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol were tested experimentally at the hERα in the yeast-based estrogen screen (YES) assay as well as in the human U2-OS cell-based ERα chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ERα CALUX) assay and at the hERβ in the ERβ CALUX assay. The outcome was then compared to predictions calculated by means of concentration addition. In most cases, additive effects were observed with the tested combinations in all three test systems, an observation that supports the need to expand the risk assessment of pesticides and consider cumulative risk assessment. An additional testing of mixture effects at the hERβ showed that most test substances being active at the hERα could also elicit additive effects at the hERβ, but the hERβ was less sensitive. In conclusion, effects of the same ligands at the hERα and the hERβ could influence the estrogenic outcome under physiological conditions. PMID:26812056

  20. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    SciTech Connect

    Steinemann, Anne C.; MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2011-04-15

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  1. Collection and Analysis of Aircraft Emitted Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1999-01-01

    The University of Denver Aerosol Group proposed to adapt an impactor system for the collection of particles emitted by aircraft. The collection substrates were electron microscope grids which were analyzed by Dr. Pat Sheridan using a transmission electron microscope. The impactor was flown in the SNIFF behind aircraft and engine emissions were sampled. This report details the results of that work.

  2. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  3. Light-Emitting Diodes: Solving Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the fourth paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide readers with the description of experiments and the pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper provided…

  4. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published…

  5. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general…

  6. Demonstrating the Light-Emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple inexpensive circuit which can be used to quickly demonstrate the basic function and versatility of the solid state diode. Can be used to demonstrate the light-emitting diode (LED) as a light emitter, temperature sensor, light detector with both a linear and logarithmic response, and charge storage device. (JRH)

  7. Optical Physics of Microcavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    in confinement factor balances the change in mirror reflectance. For TM and HEM modes, no minima exists since the mirror reflectance is approximately...Noble. "Model of Intra and Extracavity Photodetection for Planar Resonant Cavity Light Emitting Diodes." 24th International Symposium on Compound

  8. Neurobiology of estrogen status in deep craniofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Bereiter, David A; Okamoto, Keiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region often occurs with no overt signs of injury or inflammation. Although the etiology of TMJ-related pain may involve multiple factors, one likely risk factor is female gender or estrogen status. Evidence is reviewed from human and animal studies, supporting the proposition that estrogen status acts peripherally or centrally to influence TMJ nociceptive processing. A new model termed the "TMJ pain matrix" is proposed as critical for the initial integration of TMJ-related sensory signals in the lower brainstem that is both modified by estrogen status, and closely linked to endogenous pain and autonomic control pathways.

  9. Systemic Effects of Vaginally Administered Estrogen Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Megan; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Richter, Holly E.; Snyder, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone Therapy (HT) was considered the standard of care prior to the publication of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). After the study was published, the use of systemic HT dramatically decreased resulting in an increased incidence of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and dyspareunia experienced by women. Use of vaginal estrogen offers women a unique alternative for relief of these symptoms. This article reviews the systemic effects of vaginally administered estrogen. Effects on serum hormone levels, vasomotor symptoms, lipid profiles and use in women with breast cancer are reviewed. An accompanying review examines the local effects of vaginally administered estrogen. PMID:22453284

  10. Estrogen-DNA Adducts as Novel Biomarkers for Ovarian Cancer Risk and for Use in Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    the association between ovarian cancer and (1) imbalances in estrogen metabolism that lead to higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts in urine and/or (2...provides a measure of the imbalance 6 of estrogen metabolism in a person. A high ratio indicates that the person’s estrogen metabolism is...polymorphisms and risk of hormonal cancers. The estrogen quinone resulting from CYP1B1 activity may proceed to adduct formation in the presence of

  11. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity of off-the-shelf hair and skin care products

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Sharon L.; Yang, Chun Z.; Bittner, George D.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Baird, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Use of personal care products is widespread in the United States but tends to be greater among African Americans than whites. Of special concern is the possible hazard of absorption of chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) or anti-EA (AEA) in these products. Such exposure may have adverse health effects, especially when it occurs during developmental windows (e.g., prepubertally) when estrogen levels are low. We assessed the ethanol extracts of eight commonly used hair and skin products popular among African Americans for EA and AEA using a cell proliferation assay with the estrogen sensitive MCF-7:WS8 cell line derived from a human breast cancer. Four of the eight personal care products tested (Oil Hair Lotion, Extra-dry Skin Lotion, Intensive Skin Lotion, Petroleum Jelly) demonstrated detectable EA, whereas three (Placenta Hair Conditioner, Tea-Tree Hair Conditioner, Cocoa Butter Skin Cream) exhibited AEA. Our data indicate that hair and skin care products can have EA or AEA, and suggest that laboratory studies are warranted to investigate the in vivo activity of such products under chronic exposure conditions as well as epidemiologic studies to investigate potential adverse health effects that might be associated with use of such products. PMID:24849798

  12. Effect of combining in vitro estrogenicity data with kinetic characteristics of estrogenic compounds on the in vivo predictive value.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ans; Brand, Walter; Murk, Albertinka J; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Schriks, Merijn; Heringa, Minne B

    2013-02-01

    With the ultimate aim of increasing the utility of in vitro assays for toxicological risk assessment, a method was developed to calculate in vivo estrogenic potencies from in vitro estrogenic potencies of compounds by taking into account systemic availability. In vitro estrogenic potencies of three model compounds (bisphenol A, genistein, and 4-nonylphenol) relative to ethinylestradiol (EE2), determined with the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) transcriptional activation assay using hER-HeLa-9903 cells, were taken from literature and used to calculate the EE2 equivalent (EE2EQ) effect doses in the predominantly ERα-dependent rat uterotrophic assay. Compound-specific differences in hepatic clearance relative to the reference compound EE2 were determined in vitro to examine whether in vivo estrogenic potencies reported in literature could be more accurately estimated. The EE2EQ doses allowed to predict in vivo uterotrophic responses within a factor of 6-25 and the inclusion of the hepatic clearance further improved the prediction with a factor 1.6-2.1 for especially genistein and bisphenol A. Yet, the model compounds still were less potent in vivo than predicted based on their EE2 equivalent estrogenic potency and hepatic clearance. For further improvement of the in vitro to in vivo predictive value of in vitro assays, the relevance of other kinetic characteristics should be studied, including binding to carrier proteins, oral bioavailability and the formation of estrogenic metabolites.

  13. The removal of estrogenic activity with UV/chlorine technology and identification of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xu, Bi; Liungai, Zhiqi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chen, Chao; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-04-15

    As a recently developed disinfection technology, ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine treatment has received much attention. Many studies have evaluated its effects on pathogen inactivation, contaminant removal, and formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), but its potential for environmental estrogen removal and estrogenic DBP generation, which can also be a risk to both ecosystem and human health, have not been evaluated. In this study, UV/chlorine treatment resulted in a greater removal of estrogenic activity in synthetic effluent samples containing 17β-estradiol (E2) than did UV or chlorine treatment alone regardless of the water quality. For both the UV/chlorine and chlorine treatments, there was significant interference from NH3-N, although the UV/chlorine treatment was less affected. Estrogen receptor based affinity chromatography was used to isolate the specific estrogenic DBPs, and a novel product, with high estrogenic activity compared to E2, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, was identified. It was generated by all three treatments, and might be previously mistakenly recognized as estrone (E1). This study demonstrated that UV/chlorine is a better treatment for the removal of 17β-estradiol than chlorine and UV alone. The new identified estrogenic DBP, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography, could be an emerging concern in the future.

  14. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  15. The Immune System Is a Natural Target for Estrogen Action: Opposing Effects of Estrogen in Two Prototypical Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Deena; Ansar Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Analogous to other physiological systems, the immune system also demonstrates remarkable sex differences. Although the reasons for sex differences in immune responses are not precisely understood, it potentially involves differences in sex hormones (estrogens, androgens, and differential sex hormone receptor-mediated events), X-chromosomes, microbiome, epigenetics among others. Overall, females tend to have more responsive and robust immune system compared to their male counterparts. It is therefore not surprising that females respond more aggressively to self-antigens and are more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. Female hormone (estrogen or 17β-estradiol) can potentially act on all cellular subsets of the immune system through estrogen receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms. This minireview highlights differential expression of estrogen receptors on immune cells, major estrogen-mediated signaling pathways, and their effect on immune cells. Since estrogen has varied effects in female-predominant autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, we will mechanistically postulate the potential differential role of estrogen in these chronic debilitating diseases. PMID:26779182

  16. Validation and application of a robust yeast estrogen bioassay for the screening of estrogenic activity in animal feed.

    PubMed

    Bovee, Toine F H; Bor, Gerrit; Heskamp, Henri H; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; Nielen, Michel W F

    2006-06-01

    Previously we described the construction and properties of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to estrogens. In the present study this yeast estrogen assay was validated as a qualitative screening method for the determination of estrogenic activity in animal feed. This validation was performed according to EC Decision 2002/657. Twenty blank animal feed samples, including milk replacers and wet and dry feed samples, were spiked with 17beta-estradiol (E2beta) at 5 ng g(-1), 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) at 5 ng g(-1), diethylstilbestrol (DES) at 10 ng g(-1), zearalenone at 1.25 microg g(-1) or equal at 200 microg g(-1). All of these blank and low estrogen spiked feed samples fulfilled the CCalpha and CCbeta criterions, meaning that all 20 blank feed samples gave a signal below the determined decision limit CCalpha and were thus classified as compliant, and at least 19 out of the 20 spiked samples gave a signal above this CCalpha (beta = 5%) and were thus classified as suspect. The method was specific and estrogens in feed were stable for up to 98 days. In this study we also present long-term performance data and several examples of estrogens found in the routine screening of animal feed. This is the first successful example of a developed, validated and applied bioassay for the screening of hormonal substances in feed.

  17. Si-based blue light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavar, Fereydoon

    1994-05-01

    Phase 1 results demonstrated for the first time a strong, stable blue-green emission from C-implanted red-emitting porous silicon. The objective of Phase 1 was to obtain blue-green emission from porous Si structure either by increasing the bandgap of the substrate by growth of Si-C random alloys prior to forming nanostructures with quantum confined properties, or by increasing the confinement energy of red-emitting Si nanostructures. Porous structures fabricated from group 4 alloys epitaxially grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) resulted in an enhancement in light emission of about one order of magnitude after incorporation of a very small amount of carbon in the epitaxial grown films. Strong blue-green light emission was observed by the naked eye from C-implanted and annealed porous Si. Using AlGaAs as a reference, we observed that the intensity of blue-green emission was one order of magnitude higher than that of the original red-emitting porous Si. Catholuminescence measurements of our samples performed at the University of Colorado show blue emission at 1.80 eV and 2.80 eV. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of a blue-green emitting porous structure shows an IR absorption line identical to that of SiC and electron diffraction studies clearly show reflections corresponding to beta-SiC. Phase 1 results indicate that blue-green light is from SiC nanostructures with quantum confined properties. This material may be used to fabricate blue light-emitting Si-based devices which can be easily integrated into Si technology.

  18. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  19. Maternal Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Frances A.; Curley, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Advances in molecular biology have provided tools for studying the epigenetic factors which modulate gene expression. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification which can have sustained effects on transcription and is associated with long-term gene silencing. In this review, we focus on the regulation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression by hormonal and environmental cues, the consequences of these cues for female maternal and sexual behavior and recent studies which explore the role of DNA methylation in mediating these developmental effects, with particular focus on the mediating role of maternal care. The methylation status of ERα has implications for reproductive behavior, cancer susceptibility and recovery from ischemic injury suggesting an epigenetic basis for risk and resilience across the life span. PMID:18644464

  20. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D).

  1. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analyses of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.; Shappell, Nancy W.; Billey, L.O.; Bermudez, Dietrich S.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Perkins, Stephanie D.; Evans, Nicola; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; Shipitalo, J.M.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentrations of estrogens in streams from these manures also are of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. Streams associated with livestock operations were sampled by discrete samples (n = 38) or by time-integrated polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS,n = 19). Samples were analyzed for estrogens by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSM2) and estrogenic activity was assessed by three bioassays: Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES), T47D-KBluc Assay, MCF-7 Estrogenicity Screen (E-Screen). Samples were collected from 19 streams within small (∼1-30 km2) watersheds in 12 U.S. states representing a range of hydrogeologic conditions, dominated by: dairy (3), grazing beef (3), feedlot cattle (1); swine (5); poultry (3); and 4 areas where no livestock were raised or manure was applied. Water samples were consistently below the United Kingdom proposed Lowest Observable Effect Concentration for 17b-estradiol in fish (10 ng/L) in all watersheds, regardless of land use. Estrogenic activity was often higher in samples during runoff conditions following a period of manure application. Estrone was the most commonly detected estrogen (13 of 38 water samples, mean 1.9, maximum 8.3 ng/L). Because of the T47D-KBluc assay’s sensitivity towards estrone (1.4 times 17β-estradiol) it was the most sensitive method for detecting estrogens, followed by the E-Screen, GC-MS2, and YES. POCIS resulted in more frequent detections of estrogens than discrete water samples across all sites, even when applying the less-sensitive YES bioassay to the POCIS extracts.

  2. Estrogens Can Disrupt Amphibian Mating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L) can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L), alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline. PMID:22355410

  3. Modeling mixtures of environmental estrogens found in U.S. surface waters with an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptionai activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipa...

  4. BIOCHEMICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ESTROGENICALLY ACTIVE WASTEWATER: COMPARISON OF FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS TO THE MEASURED CONCENTRATION OF ESTROGENS IN SEWAGE EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenically active wastewater was observed at two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) utilizing caged male channel catfish in a previous study. The focus of this investigation was to identify and characterize the compound(s) responsible for this estrogenic response. ...

  5. Estrogen regulation of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene is mediated by ERE half sites without direct binding of estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Urvashi; Ganjam, Goutham K; Vasudevan, Nandini; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2005-02-28

    Estrogen is an important steroid hormone that mediates most of its effects on regulation of gene expression by binding to intracellular receptors. The consensus estrogen response element (ERE) is a 13bp palindromic inverted repeat with a three nucleotide spacer. However, several reports suggest that many estrogen target genes are regulated by diverse elements, such as imperfect EREs and ERE half sites (ERE 1/2), which are either the proximal or the distal half of the palindrome. To gain more insight into ERE half site-mediated gene regulation, we used a region from the estrogen-regulated chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) gene promoter that contains ERE half sites. Using moxestrol, an analogue of estrogen and transient transfection of deletion and mutation containing RCP promoter/reporter constructs in chicken hepatoma (LMH2A) cells, we identified an estrogen response unit (ERU) composed of two consensus ERE 1/2 sites and one non-consensus ERE 1/2 site. Mutation of any of these sites within this ERU abolishes moxestrol response. Further, the ERU is able to confer moxestrol responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, RCP promoter is regulated by moxestrol in estrogen responsive human MCF-7 cells, but not in other cell lines such as NIH3T3 and HepG2 despite estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) co transfection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with promoter regions encompassing the half sites and nuclear extracts from LMH2A cells show the presence of a moxestrol-induced complex that is abolished by a polyclonal anti-ERalpha antibody. Surprisingly, estrogen receptor cannot bind to these promoter elements in isolation. Thus, there appears to be a definite requirement for some other factor(s) in addition to estrogen receptor, for the generation of a suitable response of this promoter to estrogen. Our studies therefore suggest a novel mechanism of gene regulation by estrogen, involving ERE half sites without direct binding of ER to the

  6. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Gogos, Andrea; Sbisa, Alyssa M.; Sun, Jeehae; Gibbons, Andrew; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol's underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol's impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems. PMID:26491441

  7. Modeling environmental loading rates of municipal wastewater contaminants: steroidal estrogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds in municipal wastewater are of substantial interest because of suspicion that they may cause reproductive disruption in aquatic invertebrates, and because of their potential to contaminate human drinking water sources. Previous work suggests the primary contr...

  8. Comparison of estrogen mixtures in vitro vs. in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous sources contribute to widespread contamination of drinking water sources with both natural and synthetic estrogens, which isa concern for potential ecological and human health effects. In vitro screening assays are valuable tools for identifying mechanisms of toxicity bu...

  9. ROLE OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-α ON FOOD DEMAND ELASTICITY

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E.; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have an inhibitory effect on food intake under free-feeding conditions, yet the effects of estrogens on food-maintained operant responding have been studied to a much lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α, knockout of subtype β, and their wild type controls. The mice responded in a closed economy, and the price of food was increased by increasing the fixed-ratio response requirement every four sessions. Overall, we found that mice with the knockout of receptor subtype α had the most elastic demand functions. Therefore, under these conditions, estrogens increased food seeking via activation of the receptor subtype α. The results were inconsistent with those reported by previous studies that employed free-feeding conditions. PMID:25869426

  10. Role of estrogen receptor-α on food demand elasticity.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-05-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have an inhibitory effect on food intake under free-feeding conditions, yet the effects of estrogens on food-maintained operant responding have been studied to a much lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α, knockout of subtype β, and their wild type controls. The mice responded in a closed economy, and the price of food was increased by increasing the fixed-ratio response requirement every four sessions. Overall, we found that mice with the knockout of receptor subtype α had the most elastic demand functions. Therefore, under these conditions, estrogens increased food seeking via activation of the receptor subtype α. The results were inconsistent with those reported by previous studies that employed free-feeding conditions.

  11. Estrogen Intake and Copper Depositions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Amtage, Florian; Birnbaum, Dzelila; Reinhard, Thomas; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Weiller, Cornelius; Mader, Irina; Meyer, Philipp T.; Rijntjes, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with chronic postmenopausal estrogen intake with presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring in the cornea and Alzheimer's disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of estrogen intake and copper accumulation in various tissues, including the central nervous system. Sonography was compatible with copper accumulation in the basal ganglia, but the patient showed no clinical signs of Wilson's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography revealed a typical pattern for Alzheimer's disease. We propose increased copper levels as a direct effect of estrogen intake due to an augmented ATP7A-mRNA in the intestine. Moreover, we discuss the impact of elevated free serum copper on accompanying Alzheimer's disease, knowing that copper plays a crucial role in the formation of amyloid plaques and tau aggregation. This might offer a partial explanation for the observation that postmenopausal estrogen therapy is associated with a higher risk of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25076894

  12. Estrogenic involvement in social learning, social recognition and pathogen avoidance.

    PubMed

    Choleris, Elena; Clipperton-Allen, Amy E; Phan, Anna; Valsecchi, Paola; Kavaliers, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Sociality comes with specific cognitive skills that allow the proper processing of information about others (social recognition), as well as of information originating from others (social learning). Because sociality and social interactions can also facilitate the spread of infection among individuals the ability to recognize and avoid pathogen threat is also essential. We review here various studies primarily from the rodent literature supporting estrogenic involvement in the regulation of social recognition, social learning (socially acquired food preferences and mate choice copying) and the recognition and avoidance of infected and potentially infected individuals. We consider both genomic and rapid estrogenic effects involving estrogen receptors α and β, and G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1, along with their interactions with neuropeptide systems in the processing of social stimuli and the regulation and expression of these various socially relevant behaviors.

  13. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  14. The estrogenic activity of phthalate esters in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harris, C A; Henttu, P; Parker, M G; Sumpter, J P

    1997-08-01

    A large number of phthalate esters were screened for estrogenic activity using a recombinant yeast screen. a selection of these was also tested for mitogenic effect on estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cells. A small number of the commercially available phthalates tested showed extremely weak estrogenic activity. The relative potencies of these descended in the order butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) > dibutyl phthalate (DBP) > diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP) > diethyl phthalate (DEP) > diisiononyl phthalate (DINP). Potencies ranged from approximately 1 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(7) times less than 17beta-estradiol. The phthalates that were estrogenic in the yeast screen were also mitogenic on the human breast cancer cells. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) showed no estrogenic activity in these in vitro assays. A number of metabolites were tested, including mono-butyl phthalate, mono-benzyl phthalate, mono-ethylhexyl phthalate, mon-n-octyl phthalate; all were wound to be inactive. One of the phthalates, ditridecyl phthalate (DTDP), produced inconsistent results; one sample was weakly estrogenic, whereas another, obtained from a different source, was inactive. analysis by gel chromatography-mass spectometry showed that the preparation exhibiting estrogenic activity contained 0.5% of the ortho-isomer of bisphenol A. It is likely that the presence of this antioxidant in the phthalate standard was responsible for the generation of a dose-response curve--which was not observed with an alternative sample that had not been supplemented with o,p'-bisphenol A--in the yeast screen; hence, DTDP is probably not weakly estrogenic. The activities of simple mixtures of BBP, DBP, and 17beta-estradiol were assessed in the yeast screen. No synergism was observed, although the activities of the mixtures were approximately additive. In summary, a small number of phthalates are weakly estrogenic in vitro. No data has yet been published on whether these are also estrogenic in vitro. No data has

  15. Characterization and Consequences of Estrogen Receptor Exon Five Deletion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    adhesion belt (whose 127 contraction has been implicated in lumen formation during gland development) (17), and tight junctions (necessary for...G.G.J.M. Kuiper , J.-A. Gustafsson, and O.-K. Park-Sarge, Estrogen receptor-fl mRNA expression in rat ovary: down regulation by gonadotropins...Molecular Endocrinology, 1997. 11: p. 172-182. 87. Kuiper , G., E. Enmark, M. Pelto-Huikko, S. Nilsson, and J.-A. Gustafsson, Cloning of a novel estrogen

  16. Characterization and Consequences of Estrogen Receptor Exon Five Deletion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    the assembly of an adhesion belt (whose contraction has been implicated in lumen formation during gland development) [17], and tight junctions...down regulation by gonadotropins. Molecular Endocrinology, 1997. 11: p. 172-182. 87. Kuiper , G., et al., Cloning of a novel estrogen receptor...and K. Korach, Editorial: A new actor in the estrogen receptor drama - enter ER-B3. Endocrinology, 1997. 138(3): p. 861-862. 90. Kuiper , G.G.J.M., et

  17. Human colon microbiota transform polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to estrogenic metabolites.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Boeckaert, Charlotte; Peru, Kerry; Headley, John; Verstraete, Willy; Siciliano, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Ingestion is an important exposure route for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to enter the human body. Although the formation of hazardous PAH metabolites by human biotransformation enzymes is well documented, nothing is known about the PAH transformation potency of human intestinal microbiota. Using a gastrointestinal simulator, we show that human intestinal microbiota can also bioactivate PAHs, more in particular to estrogenic metabolites. PAH compounds are not estrogenic, and indeed, stomach and small intestine digestions of 62.5 nmol naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene showed no estrogenic effects in the human estrogen receptor bioassay. In contrast, colon digests of these PAH compounds displayed estrogenicity, equivalent to 0.31, 2.14, 2.70, and 1.48 nmol 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), respectively. Inactivating the colon microbiota eliminated these estrogenic effects. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the microbial PAH transformation by the detection of PAH metabolites 1-hydroxypyrene and 7-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene in colon digests of pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene. Furthermore, we show that colon digests of a PAH-contaminated soil (simulated ingestion dose of 5 g/day) displayed estrogenic activity equivalent to 0.58 nmol EE2, whereas stomach or small intestine digests did not. Although the matrix in which PAHs are ingested may result in lower exposure concentrations in the gut, our results imply that the PAH bioactivation potency of colon microbiota is not eliminated by the presence of soil. Moreover, because PAH toxicity is also linked to estrogenicity of the compounds, the PAH bioactivation potency of colon microbiota suggests that current risk assessment may underestimate the risk from ingested PAHs.

  18. Breast Cancer Lymphatic Dissemination-Influence of Estrogen and Progesterone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    and white. 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancers commonly spread to lymph nodes (LNs). If the primary tumors are estrogen receptor (ER) and/or...metastasis models using ZsGreen labeled MCF-7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Tumors are tracked in living mice by whole-body imaging, and...macrometastases or micrometastases are detected by intravital imaging or fluorescence microscopy. Tumor growth is estrogen dependent and required for

  19. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    PubMed

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  20. Antiestrogenicity and estrogenicity in leachates from solid waste deposits.

    PubMed

    Svenson, Anders; Sjöholm, Sofia; Allard, Ann-Sofie; Kaj, Lennart

    2011-06-01

    A great deal of effort has been devoted to developing new in vitro and in vivo methods to identify and classify endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been identified in environmental samples. In this study an in vitro test based on recombinant yeast strains transfected with genes for the human estrogen receptor α was adapted to examine the presence of estrogenic and antiestrogenic substances in six Swedish landfill leachates. Antiestrogenic effects were measured as inhibition of the estradiol induced response with the human estrogen receptor α, and quantified by comparison with the corresponding inhibitory effects of a known antiestrogen, hydroxytamoxifen. The estrogenicity was within the range of that determined in domestic sewage effluents, from below the limit of detection to 29 ng estradiol units L(-1). Antiestrogenicity was detected in some of the investigated landfill leachates, ranging between <38 and 3800 μg hydroxytamoxifen equivalents L(-1). There was no apparent relation between the type of waste deposited on the landfills and the antiestrogenic effect. Fractionation of a landfill leachate showed that estrogenic compounds were located in two dominant fractions. Three estrogenic compounds were found that accounted for the estrogenic activity in extracts of leachates: bisphenol A, estradiol, and ethinylestradiol. The bisphenol may have been released from decomposing plastic waste and the estrogenic steroids from earlier deposits of municipal sewage sludge and pharmaceutical waste. Fractionation of leachates from three parts of a landfill showed that the antiestrogenic activity was distributed in at least four fractions and somewhat different in different flows of leachate. This indicated a heterogeneous mixture of antiestrogenic substances.

  1. Circulatory Estrogen Level Protects Against Breast Cancer in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Literary data suggest apparently ambiguous interaction between menopausal status and obesity-associated breast cancer risk based on the principle of the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen. Before menopause, breast cancer incidence is relatively low and adiposity is erroneously regarded as a protective factor against this tumor conferred by the obesity associated defective estrogen-synthesis. By contrast, in postmenopausal cases, obesity presents a strong risk factor for breast cancer being mistakenly attributed to the presumed excessive estrogen-production of their adipose-tissue mass. Obesity is associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone-production and regular menstrual cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. At the same time, literary data support that anovulatory infertility is a very strong risk for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. In the majority of premenopausal women, obesity associated insulin resistance is moderate and may be counteracted by their preserved circulatory estrogen level. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen-level, which may be protective against breast cancer in young adult females. In obese older women, never using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) the breast cancer risk is high, which is associated with their continuous estrogen loss and increasing insulin-resistance. By contrast, obese postmenopausal women using HRT, have a decreased risk for breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen-substitution may counteract to their obesity associated systemic alterations. The revealed inverse correlation between circulatory estrogen-level and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures. New patents recommend various methods for the prevention and treatment of obesity

  2. Estrogen Effects on Cognitive and Synaptic Health Over the Lifecourse

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yuko; Waters, Elizabeth M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen facilitates higher cognitive functions by exerting effects on brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Estrogen induces spinogenesis and synaptogenesis in these two brain regions and also initiates a complex set of signal transduction pathways via estrogen receptors (ERs). Along with the classical genomic effects mediated by activation of ER α and ER β, there are membrane-bound ER α, ER β, and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) that can mediate rapid nongenomic effects. All key ERs present throughout the body are also present in synapses of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. This review summarizes estrogen actions in the brain from the standpoint of their effects on synapse structure and function, noting also the synergistic role of progesterone. We first begin with a review of ER subtypes in the brain and how their abundance and distributions are altered with aging and estrogen loss (e.g., ovariectomy or menopause) in the rodent, monkey, and human brain. As there is much evidence that estrogen loss induced by menopause can exacerbate the effects of aging on cognitive functions, we then review the clinical trials of hormone replacement therapies and their effectiveness on cognitive symptoms experienced by women. Finally, we summarize studies carried out in nonhuman primate models of age- and menopause-related cognitive decline that are highly relevant for developing effective interventions for menopausal women. Together, we highlight a new understanding of how estrogen affects higher cognitive functions and synaptic health that go well beyond its effects on reproduction. PMID:26109339

  3. Caffeine as an indicator of estrogenic activity in source water.

    PubMed

    Montagner, C C; Umbuzeiro, G A; Pasquini, C; Jardim, W F

    2014-08-01

    Caffeine has already been used as an indicator of anthropogenic impacts, especially the ones related to the disposal of sewage in water bodies. In this work, the presence of caffeine has been correlated with the estrogenic activity of water samples measured using the BLYES assay. After testing 96 surface water samples, it was concluded that caffeine can be used to prioritize samples to be tested for estrogenic activity in water quality programs evaluating emerging contaminants with endocrine disruptor activity.

  4. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  5. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  6. Fate and removal of estrogens in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Racz, LeeAnn; Goel, Ramesh K

    2010-01-01

    Natural and synthetic estrogens are some of the most potent endocrine disrupting compounds found in municipal wastewater. Much research has been conducted on the source and fate of estrogens in wastewater treatment plants. Sorption and biodegradation are the primary removal mechanisms for estrogens in activated sludge systems, which are widely used biological treatment techniques for municipal wastewater treatment. However, when removal of estrogens in a wastewater treatment plant is incomplete, these compounds enter the environment through wastewater discharges or waste activated sludge at concentrations that can cause endocrine-reproductive system alterations in birds, reptiles and mammals. Therefore, studies have also focused on potential advanced treatment technologies with the aim of removing the compounds before discharging wastewater effluent or disposing waste sludge. This review discusses the physiological effects of these estrogens and the degree of problems estrogens pose as they enter the wastewater stream. Thereafter, this review also analyzes their fate in wastewater treatment systems and how they may reach drinking water sources. Furthermore, this review includes a discussion on various treatment technologies being investigated and future research trends for this pressing environmental issue.

  7. Effects of estrogen on growth plate senescence and epiphyseal fusion.

    PubMed

    Weise, M; De-Levi, S; Barnes, K M; Gafni, R I; Abad, V; Baron, J

    2001-06-05

    Estrogen is critical for epiphyseal fusion in both young men and women. In this study, we explored the cellular mechanisms by which estrogen causes this phenomenon. Juvenile ovariectomized female rabbits received either 70 microg/kg estradiol cypionate or vehicle i.m. once a week. Growth plates from the proximal tibia, distal tibia, and distal femur were analyzed after 2, 4, 6, or 8 weeks of treatment. In vehicle-treated animals, there was a gradual senescent decline in tibial growth rate, rate of chondrocyte proliferation, growth plate height, number of proliferative chondrocytes, number of hypertrophic chondrocytes, size of terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes, and column density. Estrogen treatment accelerated the senescent decline in all of these parameters. In senescent growth plates, epiphyseal fusion was observed to be an abrupt event in which all remaining chondrocytes were rapidly replaced by bone elements. Fusion occurred when the rate of chondrocyte proliferation approached zero. Estrogen caused this proliferative exhaustion and fusion to occur earlier. Our data suggest that (i) epiphyseal fusion is triggered when the proliferative potential of growth plate chondrocytes is exhausted; and (ii) estrogen does not induce growth plate ossification directly; instead, estrogen accelerates the programmed senescence of the growth plate, thus causing earlier proliferative exhaustion and consequently earlier fusion.

  8. A novel mechanism of non-feminizing estrogens in neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B; Covey, Douglas F; Simpkins, James W

    2016-11-03

    Estrogens are potent and efficacious neuroprotectants both in vitro and in vivo in a variety of models of neurotoxicity. We determined the structural requirements for neuroprotection in an in vitro assay using a panel of >70 novel estratrienes, synthesized to reduce or eliminate estrogen receptor (ER) binding. We observed that neuroprotection could be enhanced by as much as 200-fold through modifications that positioned a large bulky group at the C2 or C4 position of the phenolic A ring of the estratriene. Further, substitutions on the B, C or D rings either reduced or did not markedly change neuroprotection. Collectively, there was a negative correlation between binding to ERs and neuroprotection with the more potent compounds showing no ER binding. In an in vivo model for neuroprotection, transient cerebral ischemia, efficacious compounds were active in protection of brain tissue from this pro-oxidant insult. We demonstrated that these non-feminizing estrogens engage in a redox cycle with glutathione, using the hexose monophosphate shunt to apply cytosolic reducing potential to cellular membranes. Together, these results demonstrate that non-feminizing estrogens are neuroprotective and protect brain from the induction of ischemic- and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology in an animal model. These features of non-feminizing estrogens make them attractive compounds for assessment of efficacy in AD and stroke, as they are not expected to show the side effects of chronic estrogen therapy that are mediated by ER actions in the liver, uterus and breast.

  9. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Chromosome Mapping of Reptilian Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Matsubara, Kazumi; Kohno, Satomi; Matsuda, Yoichi; Toriba, Michihisa; Oka, Kaori; Guillette, Louis J.; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Iguchi, Taisen

    2010-01-01

    In many vertebrates, steroid hormones are essential for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage as well as promoting the growth and differentiation of the adult female reproductive system. Although studies have been extensively conducted in mammals and a few fish, amphibians, and bird species, the molecular mechanisms of sex steroid hormone (estrogens) action have been poorly examined in reptiles. Here, we evaluate hormone receptor and ligand interactions in two species of snake, the Okinawa habu (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Viperidae) and the Japanese four-striped rat snake (Elaphe quadrivirgata, Colubridae) after the isolation of cDNAs encoding estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and estrogen receptor β (ESR2). Using a transient transfection assay with mammalian cells, the transcriptional activity of reptilian (Okinawa habu, Japanese four-striped rat snake, American alligator, and Florida red-belly freshwater turtle) ESR1 and ESR2 was examined. All ESR proteins displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription via an estrogen-response element-containing promoter; however, the responsiveness to various estrogens was different. Further, we determined the chromosomal locations of the snake steroid hormone receptor genes. ESR1 and ESR2 genes were localized to the short and long arms of chromosome 1, respectively, whereas androgen receptor was localized to a pair of microchromosomes in the two snake species examined. These data provide basic tools that allow future studies examining receptor-ligand interactions and steroid endocrinology in snakes and also expands our knowledge of sex steroid hormone receptor evolution. PMID:20926589

  10. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of legume extracts containing phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Boué, Stephen M; Wiese, Thomas E; Nehls, Suzanne; Burow, Matthew E; Elliott, Steven; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Shih, Betty Y; McLachlan, John A; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2003-04-09

    Seven legume extracts containing phytoestrogens were analyzed for estrogenic activity. Methanol extracts were prepared from soybean (Glycine max L.), green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), alfalfa sprout (Medicago sativa L.), mung bean sprout (Vigna radiata L.), kudzu root (Pueraria lobata L.), and red clover blossom and red clover sprout (Trifolium pratense L.). Extracts of kudzu root and red clover blossom showed significant competitive binding to estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Estrogenic activity was determined using an estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Kudzu root, red clover blossom and sprout, mung bean sprout, and alfalfa sprout extracts displayed increased cell proliferation above levels observed with estradiol. The pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suppressed cell proliferation induced by the extracts, suggesting an ER-related signaling pathway was involved. The ER subtype-selective activities of legume extracts were examined using transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. All seven of the extracts exhibited preferential agonist activity toward ERbeta. Using HPLC to collect fractions and MCF-7 cell proliferation, the active components in kudzu root extract were determined to be the isoflavones puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein. These results show that several legumes are a source of phytoestrogens with high levels of estrogenic activity.

  11. Phytoestrogens from Psoralea corylifolia reveal estrogen receptor-subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xin, D; Wang, H; Yang, J; Su, Y-F; Fan, G-W; Wang, Y-F; Zhu, Y; Gao, X-M

    2010-02-01

    The seed of Psoralea corylifolia L. (PCL), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been applied as a tonic or an aphrodisiac agent and commonly used as a remedy for bone fracture, osteomalacia and osteoporosis in China. In our study, the estrogen receptor subtype-selective activities of the extracts and compounds derived from PCL were analyzed using the HeLa cell assay. The different fractions including petroleum ether, CH(2)Cl(2) and EtOAc fractions of the EtOH extract of PCL showed significant activity in activating either ERalpha or ERbeta whereas the n-BuOH fraction showed no estrogenic activity. Further chromatographic purification of the active fractions yielded seven compounds including the two coumarins isopsoralen and psoralen, the four flavonoids isobavachalcone, bavachin, corylifol A and neobavaisoflavone, and the meroterpene phenol, bakuchiol. In reporter gene assay, the two coumarins (10(-8)-10(-5)M) acted as ERalpha-selective agonists while the other compounds (10(-9)-10(-6)M) activated both ERalpha and ERbeta. The estrogenic activities of all compounds could be completely suppressed by the pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suggesting that the compounds exert their activities through ER. Only psoralen and isopsoralen as ERalpha agonists promoted MCF-7 cell proliferation significantly. Although all the compounds have estrogenic activity, they may exert different biological effects. In conclusion, both ER subtype-selective and nonselective activities in compounds derived from PCL suggested that PCL could be a new source for selective estrogen-receptor modulators.

  12. Estrogen Biology: New Insights into GPER Function and Clinical Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Prossnitz, Eric R.; Barton, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in the regulation of normal physiology, aging and many disease states. Although the nuclear estrogen receptors have classically been described to function as ligand-activated transcription factors mediating genomic effects in hormonally regulated tissues, more recent studies reveal that estrogens also mediate rapid signaling events traditionally associated with G protein-coupled receptors. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER (formerly GPR30) has now become recognized as a major mediator of estrogen’s rapid cellular effects throughout the body. With the discovery of selective synthetic ligands for GPER, both agonists and antagonists, as well as the use of GPER knockout mice, significant advances have been made in our understanding of GPER function at the cellular, tissue and organismal levels. In many instances, the protective/beneficial effects of estrogen are mimicked by selective GPER agonism and are absent or reduced in GPER knockout mice, suggesting an essential or at least parallel role for GPER in the actions of estrogen. In this review, we will discuss recent advances and our current understanding of the role of GPER and certain drugs such as SERMs and SERDs in physiology and disease. We will also highlight novel opportunities for clinical development towards GPER-targeted therapeutics, for molecular imaging, as well as for theranostic approaches and personalized medicine. PMID:24530924

  13. Free and conjugated estrogens and androgens in stallion semen.

    PubMed

    Lemazurier, Emmanuel; Moslemi, Safa; Sourdaine, Pascal; Desjardins, Isabelle; Plainfosse, Bruno; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2002-02-01

    The steroid content of semen from a total of 11 mature fertile stallions was studied during two breeding seasons and one winter. The levels of free and conjugated substrates (testosterone and androstenedione), and products (estradiol and estrone), of aromatase were measured by radioimmunoassay with a validated method. The results were seasonally and monthly highly variable with characteristic peaks. The concentrations of free and conjugated estrogens were always higher in the gel-free ejaculate than in the gel except in one subfertile stallion used as comparison. Furthermore, the steroid production and the maximal resulting aromatase activity, estimated by the estrogens/androgens ratio, peaked in April-May and June. The breeding season (spring and summer) presents a clear estrogenic profile with estrogens/androgens ratios higher in contrast to the nonbreeding period (autumn and winter). The involvement of estrogens in the regulation of reproduction and equine spermatogenesis is discussed, and estrogens production and thus equine aromatase is proposed as a strong marker of testicular endocrine function.

  14. Evaluation of estrogenic activity in diets for experimental animals using in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideo; Iwata, Toshio; Katsu, Yoshinao; Watanabe, Hajime; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Iguchi, Taisen

    2004-03-10

    We used a modified yeast-based human estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) bioassay to determine the estrogenic activity in 22 kinds of diets for experimental animals. The estrogenic activity of each diet was reevaluated by comparison with a calibration curve of 17 beta-estradiol. Almost all of the diets had estrogenic activity. The diets for rabbits and guinea pigs had the highest estrogenic activity compared to any other diets, including those for rats and mice. Estrogenic activity was found in dried skim milk, fishmeal, soybean meal, and alfalfa meal. In the NIH-07 diet opened for the ingredients, estrogenic activity was nearly all derived from the alfalfa meal. Multiple assays were performed to evaluate potential seasonal variations in the estrogenic potency in the raw materials of the rat and mouse diets. We found that the estrogenic activity in these raw materials changed throughout the year.

  15. Histone methylase MLL1 and MLL3 coordinate with estrogen receptors in estrogen-mediated HOXB9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Shrestha, Bishakha; Hussain, Imran; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox gene HOXB9 is a critical player in development of mammary gland and sternum and in regulation of Renin which is closely linked with blood pressure control. Our studies demonstrated that HOXB9 gene is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXB9 promoter contains several estrogen-response elements (ERE). Reporter assay based experiments demonstrated that HOXB9 promoter EREs are estrogen-responsive. Estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ are essential for E2-mediated transcriptional activation of HOXB9. Chromatin immuno-precipitation assay demonstrated that ERs bind to HOXB9 EREs as a function of E2. Similarly, histone methylases MLL1 and MLL3 also bind to HOXB9 EREs and play critical role in E2-mediated transcriptional activation of HOXB9. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXB9 is an E2-responsive gene and ERs coordinate with MLL1 and MLL3 in E2-mediated transcriptional regulation of HOXB9. PMID:21428455

  16. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, S. D.; Kuehne, M.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.

    1992-01-01

    The experiment Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) is designed for the investigations of plasma flow characteristics, turbulence and wave motions, plasma densities and temperatures, structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity in the chromosphere, the transition zone and the corona. Specifically, SUMER will measure profiles and intensities of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lines emitted in the solar atmosphere ranging from the upper chromosphere to the lower corona; determine line broadenings, spectral positions and Doppler shifts with high accuracy, provide stigmatic images of selected areas of the Sun in the EUV with high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution and obtain full images of the Sun and the inner corona in selectable EUV lines, corresponding to a temperature from 10,000 to more than 1,800,000 K.

  17. Method of making organic light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shiang, Joseph John; Janora, Kevin Henry; Parthasarathy, Gautam; Cella, James Anthony; Chichak, Kelly Scott

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides a method for the preparation of organic light-emitting devices comprising a bilayer structure made by forming a first film layer comprising an electroactive material and an INP precursor material, and exposing the first film layer to a radiation source under an inert atmosphere to generate an interpenetrating network polymer composition comprising the electroactive material. At least one additional layer is disposed on the reacted first film layer to complete the bilayer structure. The bilayer structure is comprised within an organic light-emitting device comprising standard features such as electrodes and optionally one or more additional layers serving as a bipolar emission layer, a hole injection layer, an electron injection layer, an electron transport layer, a hole transport layer, exciton-hole transporting layer, exciton-electron transporting layer, a hole transporting emission layer, or an electron transporting emission layer.

  18. Principles of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Agren, Hans

    2014-02-07

    Organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has found numerous applications in the development of solid state lighting, flat panel displays and flexible screens. These applications are already commercialized in mobile phones and TV sets. White OLEDs are of especial importance for lighting; they now use multilayer combinations of organic and elementoorganic dyes which emit various colors in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. At the same time the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is still a major challenge for OLED applications. In this review we highlight the basic principles and the main mechanisms behind phosphorescent light emission of various classes of photofunctional OLED materials, like organic polymers and oligomers, electron and hole transport molecules, elementoorganic complexes with heavy metal central ions, and clarify connections between the main features of electronic structure and the photo-physical properties of the phosphorescent OLED materials.

  19. Ultrasonic Vocalizations Emitted by Flying Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Murrant, Meghan N.; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J.; Prinzen, Brian; Mayberry, Heather; Faure, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of ultrasound use by flying squirrels have existed for decades, yet there has been little detailed analysis of their vocalizations. Here we demonstrate that two species of flying squirrel emit ultrasonic vocalizations. We recorded vocalizations from northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels calling in both the laboratory and at a field site in central Ontario, Canada. We demonstrate that flying squirrels produce ultrasonic emissions through recorded bursts of broadband noise and time-frequency structured frequency modulated (FM) vocalizations, some of which were purely ultrasonic. Squirrels emitted three types of ultrasonic calls in laboratory recordings and one type in the field. The variety of signals that were recorded suggest that flying squirrels may use ultrasonic vocalizations to transfer information. Thus, vocalizations may be an important, although still poorly understood, aspect of flying squirrel social biology. PMID:24009728

  20. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized.

  1. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  2. Passive secondary biological treatment systems reduce estrogens in dairy shed effluent.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Jennifer B; Northcott, Grant L; Tremblay, Louis A

    2010-10-01

    Steroid estrogens are found at high concentrations in untreated dairy shed effluents. Reduction of estrogenic activity and steroid estrogen concentrations was assessed in two systems used to treat dairy shed effluents: the two-pond system and the advanced pond system. Both include anaerobic and aerobic treatment stages. Samples of effluent were collected from the systems and analyzed for free estrogens, conjugated estrogens and total estrogenic activity using E-Screen assay. Both systems showed increases of up to 8000% in aqueous free estrogens and estrogenic activity after anaerobic treatment, followed by decreases after aerobic treatment (36-83%). The complete systems decreased total steroid estrogen concentrations by 50-100% and estrogen activity by 62-100%, with little difference between systems. Removal rates were lower in winter for both systems. Final effluents from the advanced pond system contained total estrogens at <15-1400 ng/L and estrogenic activity at 3.2-43 ng/L. Final effluent from the two-pond system contained total estrogens at <15-300 ng/L and estrogenic activity at 3.3-25 ng/L. At times the final effluent EEQs exceeded guideline values for protection of freshwater fish and suggest further treatment may be required.

  3. Both estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta agonists enhance cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, C A; Lieblich, S E; Bingham, B I; Williamson, M A; Viau, V; Galea, L A M

    2006-09-15

    This study investigated the involvement of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estradiol-induced enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult female rat. Subtype selective estrogen receptor agonists, propyl-pyrazole triol (estrogen receptor alpha agonist) and diarylpropionitrile (estrogen receptor beta agonist) were examined for each receptor's contribution, individual and cooperative, for estradiol-enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation. Estradiol increases hippocampal cell proliferation within 4 h [Ormerod BK, Lee TT, Galea LA (2003) Estradiol initially enhances but subsequently suppresses (via adrenal steroids) granule cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. J Neurobiol 55:247-260]. Therefore, animals received s.c. injections of estradiol (10 microg), propyl-pyrazole triol and diarylpropionitrile alone (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/0.1 ml dimethylsulfoxide) or in combination (2.5 mg propyl-pyrazole triol+2.5 mg diarylpropionitrile/0.1 ml dimethylsulfoxide) and 4 h later received an i.p. injection of the cell synthesis marker, bromodeoxyuridine (200 mg/kg). Diarylpropionitrile enhanced cell proliferation at all three administered doses (1.25 mg, P<0.008; 2.5 mg, P<0.003; 5 mg, P<0.005), whereas propyl-pyrazole triol significantly increased cell proliferation (P<0.0002) only at the dose of 2.5 mg. Our results demonstrate both estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta are individually involved in estradiol-enhanced cell proliferation. Furthermore both estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta mRNA was found co-localized with Ki-67 expression in the hippocampus albeit at low levels, indicating a potential direct influence of each receptor subtype on progenitor cells and their progeny. Dual receptor activation resulted in reduced levels of cell proliferation, supporting previous studies suggesting that estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta may modulate each other's activity. Our results also suggest that a component

  4. Surface emitting lasers with combined output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, Donald B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Surface emitting lasers are laterally aligned and coupled together and also have their light output signals combined. This results in greater phase and frequency coherency and narrower and reduced amplitude sidelobes. Preferably, not more than two lasers are longitudinally aligned along the same axis for still greater coherency compared with adding the light output signals of more than two longitudinally aligned lasers. The lasers can be of the DH-LOC type or of the QW type.

  5. PULSE PROFILES FROM THERMALLY EMITTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Turolla, R.; Nobili, L.

    2013-05-10

    The problem of computing the pulse profiles from thermally emitting spots on the surface of a neutron star in general relativity is reconsidered. We show that it is possible to extend Beloborodov's approach to include (multiple) spots of finite size in different positions on the star surface. The results for the pulse profiles are expressed by comparatively simple analytical formulae which involve only elementary functions.

  6. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended.

  7. Does antimatter emit a new light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilli, Ruggero Maria

    1997-08-01

    Contemporary theories of antimatter have a number of insufficiencies which stimulated the recent construction of the new isodual theory based on a certain anti-isomorphic map of all (classical and quantum) formulations of matter called isoduality. In this note we show that the isodual theory predicts that antimatter emits a new light, called isodual light, which can be distinguished from the ordinary light emitted by matter via gravitational interactions (only). In particular, the isodual theory predicts that all stable antiparticles such as the isodual photon, the positron and the antiproton experience antigravity in the field of matter (defined as the reversal of the sign of the curvature tensor). The antihydrogen atom is therefore predicted to: experience antigravity in the field of Earth; emit the isodual photon; and have the same spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom, although subjected to an anti-isomorphic isodual map. In this note we also show that the isodual theory predicts that bound states of elementary particles and antiparticles (such as the positronium) experience ordinary gravitation in both fields of matter and antimatter, thus bypassing known objections against antigravity. A number of intriguing and fundamental, open theoretical and experimental problems of “the new physics of antimatter” are pointed out.

  8. Molecular Characterization of a B-ring Unsaturated Estrogen: Implications for Conjugated Equine Estrogen Components of Premarin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Robert W.; Rajan, Shyamala S.; Sharma, Sanjay K.; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) are routinely used for hormone replacement therapy (HRT), making it important to understand the activities of individual estrogenic components. Although 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), the most potent estrogen in CEE, has been extensively characterized, the actions of nine additional less potent estrogens are not well understood. Structural differences between CEEs and 17β-E2 result in altered interactions with the two estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) and different biological activities. To better understand these interactions, we have determined the crystal structure of the CEE analog, 17β-methyl-17α-dihydroequilenin (NCI 122), in complex with the ERα ligand-binding domain and a peptide from the glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) coactivator. NCI 122 has chemical properties, including an unsaturated B-ring and 17α-hydroxyl group, which are shared with some of the estrogens found in CEEs. Structural analysis of the NCI 122-ERα LBD-GRIP1 complex, combined with biochemical and cell-based comparisons of CEE components, suggests that factors such as decreased ligand flexibility, decreased ligand hydrophobicity and loss of a hydrogen bond between the 17-hydroxyl group and His524, contribute significantly to the reduced potency of CEEs on ERα. PMID:17949766

  9. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štísová, Viktorie; Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie; Davídková, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERα, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with γ rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor: predictions across species.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, W; Perkins, R; Strelitz, R; Collantes, E R; Keenan, S; Welsh, W J; Branham, W S; Sheehan, D M

    1997-01-01

    The recognition of adverse effects due to environmental endocrine disruptors in humans and wildlife has focused attention on the need for predictive tools to select the most likely estrogenic chemicals from a very large number of chemicals for subsequent screening and/or testing for potential environmental toxicity. A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was constructed based on relative binding affinity (RBA) data from an estrogen receptor (ER) binding assay using calf uterine cytosol. The model demonstrated significant correlation of the calculated steric and electrostatic fields with RBA and yielded predictions that agreed well with experimental values over the entire range of RBA values. Analysis of the CoMFA three-dimensional contour plots revealed a consistent picture of the structural features that are largely responsible for the observed variations in RBA. Importantly, we established a correlation between the predicted RBA values for calf ER and their actual RBA values for human ER. These findings suggest a means to begin to construct a more comprehensive estrogen knowledge base by combining RBA assay data from multiple species in 3D-QSAR based predictive models, which could then be used to screen untested chemicals for their potential to bind to the ER. Another QSAR model was developed based on classical physicochemical descriptors generated using the CODESSA (Comprehensive Descriptors for Structural and Statistical Analysis) program. The predictive ability of the CoMFA model was superior to the corresponding CODESSA model. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9353176

  11. No substantial changes in estrogen receptor and estrogen-related receptor orthologue gene transcription in Marisa cornuarietis exposed to estrogenic chemicals☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Richard; Beresford, Nicola; Granger, David W.; Pounds, Nadine A.; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; White, Roger; Jobling, Susan; Routledge, Edwin J.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor orthologues in molluscs may be targets for endocrine disruptors, although mechanistic evidence is lacking. Molluscs are reported to be highly susceptible to effects caused by very low concentrations of environmental estrogens which, if substantiated, would have a major impact on the risk assessment of many chemicals. The present paper describes the most thorough evaluation to-date of the susceptibility of Marisa cornuarietis ER and ERR gene transcription to modulation by vertebrate estrogens in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the effects of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol exposure on in vivo estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen-related receptor (ERR) gene transcription in the reproductive and neural tissues of the gastropod snail M. cornuarietis over a 12-week period. There was no significant effect (p > 0.05) of treatment on gene transcription levels between exposed and non-exposed snails. Absence of a direct interaction of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol with mollusc ER and ERR protein was also supported by in vitro studies in transfected HEK-293 cells. Additional in vitro studies with a selection of other potential ligands (including methyl-testosterone, 17α-ethinylestradiol, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, diethylstilbestrol, cyproterone acetate and ICI182780) showed no interaction when tested using this assay. In repeated in vitro tests, however, genistein (with mcER-like) and bisphenol-A (with mcERR) increased reporter gene expression at high concentrations only (>10−6 M for Gen and >10−5 M for BPA, respectively). Like vertebrate estrogen receptors, the mollusc ER protein bound to the consensus vertebrate estrogen-response element (ERE). Together, these data provide no substantial evidence that mcER-like and mcERR activation and transcript levels in tissues are modulated by the vertebrate estrogen estradiol-17β or 4-tert-Octylphenol in vivo, or that other ligands of vertebrate ERs and ERRs (with the possible exception of

  12. Evolutionary origins of the estrogen signaling system: insights from amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Callard, G V; Tarrant, A M; Novillo, A; Yacci, P; Ciaccia, L; Vajda, S; Chuang, G-Y; Kozakov, D; Greytak, S R; Sawyer, S; Hoover, C; Cotter, K A

    2011-11-01

    Classically, the estrogen signaling system has two core components: cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme complex that catalyzes the rate limiting step in estrogen biosynthesis; and estrogen receptors (ERs), ligand activated transcription factors that interact with the regulatory region of target genes to mediate the biological effects of estrogen. While the importance of estrogens for regulation of reproduction, development and physiology has been well-documented in gnathostome vertebrates, the evolutionary origins of estrogen as a hormone are still unclear. As invertebrates within the phylum Chordata, cephalochordates (e.g., the amphioxus of the genus Branchiostoma) are among the closest invertebrate relatives of the vertebrates and can provide critical insight into the evolution of vertebrate-specific molecules and pathways. To address this question, this paper briefly reviews relevant earlier studies that help to illuminate the history of the aromatase and ER genes, with a particular emphasis on insights from amphioxus and other invertebrates. We then present new analyses of amphioxus aromatase and ER sequence and function, including an in silico model of the amphioxus aromatase protein, and CYP19 gene analysis. CYP19 shares a conserved gene structure with vertebrates (9 coding exons) and moderate sequence conservation (40% amino acid identity with human CYP19). Modeling of the amphioxus aromatase substrate binding site and simulated docking of androstenedione in comparison to the human aromatase shows that the substrate binding site is conserved and predicts that androstenedione could be a substrate for amphioxus CYP19. The amphioxus ER is structurally similar to vertebrate ERs, but differs in sequence and key residues of the ligand binding domain. Consistent with results from other laboratories, amphioxus ER did not bind radiolabeled estradiol, nor did it modulate gene expression on an estrogen-responsive element (ERE) in the presence of estradiol, 4

  13. Competitive product inhibition of aromatase by natural estrogens.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Yarborough, C; Osawa, Y

    1993-03-01

    In order to better understand the function of aromatase, we carried out kinetic analyses to assess the ability of natural estrogens, estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), 16 alpha-OHE1, and estriol (E3), to inhibit aromatization. Human placental microsomes (50 micrograms protein) were incubated for 5 min at 37 degrees C with [1 beta-3H]testosterone (1.24 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 35-150 nM) or [1 beta-3H,4-14C]androstenedione (3.05 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 3H/14C = 19.3, 7-65 nM) as substrate in the presence of NADPH, with and without natural estrogens as putative inhibitors. Aromatase activity was assessed by tritium released to water from the 1 beta-position of the substrates. Natural estrogens showed competitive product inhibition against androgen aromatization. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for testosterone aromatization was 1.5, 2.2, 95, and 162 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 61.8 +/- 2.0 nM (n = 5) for testosterone. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for androstenedione aromatization was 10.6, 5.5, 252, and 1182 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 35.4 +/- 4.1 nM (n = 4) for androstenedione. These results show that estrogen inhibit the process of androgen aromatization and indicate that natural estrogens regulate their own synthesis by the product inhibition mechanism in vivo. Since natural estrogen binds to the active site of human placental aromatase P-450 complex as competitive inhibitors, natural estrogens might be further metabolized by aromatase. This suggests that human placental estrogen 2-hydroxylase activity is catalyzed by the active site of aromatase cytochrome P-450 and also agrees with the fact that the level of catecholestrogens in maternal plasma increases during pregnancy. The relative affinities and concentration of androgens and estrogens would control estrogen and catecholestrogen biosynthesis by aromatase.

  14. Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator, sensitizes estrogen receptor negative breast tumors to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donghai; Huang, Yuan; Han, Ning; Xu, Mingjie; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Shu; Fan, Weimin

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance frequently results in poor prognosis and high 5-year recurrence rate in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer patients. Herein, we examined the reversal effects of fulvestrant on multidrug resistance (MDR) in ER- breast cancer cells. Co-administration of fulvestrant significantly sensitized ER- MDR tumors to paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses indicated that fulvestrant did not affect P-gp expression, but could inhibit P-gp function and subsequently reverse P-gp mediated drug resistance in ER- breast cancer cells. These results showed that combination of fulvestrant and chemotherapeutic agents might provide an effective treatment for ER- MDR breast cancers.

  15. Estrogen receptor-related receptors in the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus: diversity, expression, and estrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, A M; Greytak, S R; Callard, G V; Hahn, M E

    2006-08-01

    The estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) are a group of nuclear receptors that were originally identified on the basis of sequence similarity to the estrogen receptors. The three mammalian ERR genes have been implicated in diverse physiological processes ranging from placental development to maintenance of bone density, but the diversity, function, and regulation of ERRs in non-mammalian species are not well understood. In this study, we report the cloning of four ERR cDNAs from the Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, along with adult tissue expression and estrogen responsiveness. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that F. heteroclitus (Fh)ERRalpha is an ortholog of the single ERRalpha identified in mammals, pufferfish, and zebrafish. FhERRbetaa and FhERRbetab are co-orthologs of the mammalian ERRbeta. Phylogenetic placement of the fourth killifish ERR gene, tentatively identified as FhERRgammab, is less clear. The four ERRs showed distinct, partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns in adult tissues. FhERRalpha was broadly expressed. FhERRbetaa was expressed at apparently low levels in eye, brain, and ovary. FhERRbetab was expressed more broadly in liver, gonad, eye, brain, and kidney. FhERRgammab was expressed in multiple tissues including gill, heart, kidney, and eye. Distinct expression patterns of FhERRbetaa and FhERRbetab are consistent with subfunctionalization of the ERRbeta paralogs. Induction of ERRalpha mRNA by exogenous estrogen exposure has been reported in some mammalian tissues. In adult male killifish, ERR expression did not significantly change following estradiol injection, but showed a trend toward a slight induction (three- to five-fold) of ERRalpha expression in heart. In a second, more targeted experiment, expression of ERRalpha in adult female killifish was downregulated 2.5-fold in the heart following estradiol injection. In summary, our results indicate that killifish contain additional ERR genes relative to mammals, including

  16. Growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and by ganglioside GM3: involvement of receptor-directed protein tyrosine phosphatase(s).

    PubMed

    Suarez Pestana, E; Greiser, U; Sánchez, B; Fernández, L E; Lage, A; Perez, R; Böhmer, F D

    1997-01-01

    Growth of the EGF receptor-expressing non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line H125 seems to be at least partially driven by autocrine activation of the resident EGF receptors. Thus, the possibility of an EGF receptor-directed antiproliferative treatment was investigated in vitro using a monoclonal antibody (alpha EGFR ior egf/r3) against the human EGF receptor and gangliosides which are known to possess antiproliferative and anti-tyrosine kinase activity. The moderate growth-inhibitory effect of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 was strongly potentiated by the addition of monosialoganglioside GM3. Likewise, the combination of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 inhibited EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity in H125 cells more strongly than either agent alone. A synergistic inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 was also observed in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In both cell lines, the inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by GM3 was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pervanadate, a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Also, GM3 accelerated EGF receptor dephosphorylation in isolated A431 cell membranes. These findings indicate that GM3 has the capacity to activate EGF receptor-directed PTPase activity and suggest a novel possible mechanism for the regulation of cellular PTPases.

  17. Growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and by ganglioside GM3: involvement of receptor-directed protein tyrosine phosphatase(s).

    PubMed Central

    Suarez Pestana, E.; Greiser, U.; Sánchez, B.; Fernández, L. E.; Lage, A.; Perez, R.; Böhmer, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Growth of the EGF receptor-expressing non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line H125 seems to be at least partially driven by autocrine activation of the resident EGF receptors. Thus, the possibility of an EGF receptor-directed antiproliferative treatment was investigated in vitro using a monoclonal antibody (alpha EGFR ior egf/r3) against the human EGF receptor and gangliosides which are known to possess antiproliferative and anti-tyrosine kinase activity. The moderate growth-inhibitory effect of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 was strongly potentiated by the addition of monosialoganglioside GM3. Likewise, the combination of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 inhibited EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity in H125 cells more strongly than either agent alone. A synergistic inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 was also observed in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In both cell lines, the inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by GM3 was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pervanadate, a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Also, GM3 accelerated EGF receptor dephosphorylation in isolated A431 cell membranes. These findings indicate that GM3 has the capacity to activate EGF receptor-directed PTPase activity and suggest a novel possible mechanism for the regulation of cellular PTPases. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9010029

  18. Recombination zone in white organic light emitting diodes with blue and orange emitting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Taiju; Kishimoto, Tadashi; Wako, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kuniharu; Iguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-10-01

    White fluorescent OLED devices with a 10 nm thick blue-emitting layer and a 31 nm thick orange-emitting layer have been fabricated, where the blue-emitting layer is stacked on a hole transport layer. An interlayer was inserted between the two emitting layers. The thickness of the interlayer was changed among 0.3, 0.4, and 1.0 nm. White emission with CIE coordinates close to (0.33, 0.33) was observed from all the OLEDs. OLED with 0.3 nm thick interlayer gives the highest maximum luminous efficiency (11 cd/A), power efficiency (9 lm/W), and external quantum efficiency (5.02%). The external quantum efficiency becomes low with increasing the interlayer thickness from 0 nm to 1.0 nm. When the location of the blue- and orange-emitting layers is reversed, white emission was not obtained because of too weak blue emission. It is suggested that the electron-hole recombination zone decreases nearly exponentially with a distance from the hole transport layer.

  19. A gene expression biomarker accurately predicts estrogen ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA’s vision for the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) in the 21st Century (EDSP21) includes utilization of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays coupled with computational modeling to prioritize chemicals with the goal of eventually replacing current Tier 1 screening tests. The ToxCast program currently includes 18 HTS in vitro assays that evaluate the ability of chemicals to modulate estrogen receptor α (ERα), an important endocrine target. We propose microarray-based gene expression profiling as a complementary approach to predict ERα modulation and have developed computational methods to identify ERα modulators in an existing database of whole-genome microarray data. The ERα biomarker consisted of 46 ERα-regulated genes with consistent expression patterns across 7 known ER agonists and 3 known ER antagonists. The biomarker was evaluated as a predictive tool using the fold-change rank-based Running Fisher algorithm by comparison to annotated gene expression data sets from experiments in MCF-7 cells. Using 141 comparisons from chemical- and hormone-treated cells, the biomarker gave a balanced accuracy for prediction of ERα activation or suppression of 94% or 93%, respectively. The biomarker was able to correctly classify 18 out of 21 (86%) OECD ER reference chemicals including “very weak” agonists and replicated predictions based on 18 in vitro ER-associated HTS assays. For 114 chemicals present in both the HTS data and the MCF-7 c

  20. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  1. The Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Mixture DE-71 Is Mildly Estrogenic

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva; Bigsby, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely found in the environment, and they may act as endocrine disruptors. Objective Our goal in this study was to test the PBDE mixture DE-71 for estrogenic activity. Methods We used proliferation of cultured breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and trophic effects in the reproductive tracts of ovariectomized mice as estrogen bioassays. DE-71 was administered to mice by subcutaneous injection (sc) or oral gavage (po), alone or in combination with estradiol, for 3 or 34 days. Liver weights and cytochrome P450 enzyme activities were also measured. Results DE-71 increased MCF-7 cell proliferation, and this was prevented by antiestrogen. DE-71 cotreatment reduced the effect of estradiol in MCF-7 cells. In the mouse 3-day assay, DE-71 administered alone had no effect on uterine weight, uterine epithelial height (UEH), or vaginal epithelial thickness (VET); however, when DE-71 was administered as a cotreatment, it potentiated estradiol’s effect on uterine weight. DE-71 administered sc to BALB/c mice for 34 days slightly increased UEH and VET, and attenuated the estradiol-induced increase in UEH; these effects were not seen in BALB/c mice treated po or in C57BL/6 mice treated sc. DE-71 increased liver weight in BALB/c, C57BL/6, and estrogen receptor-α knockout mice. We also found an increase in liver cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) and CYP2B activities when DE-71 was administered po, but only CYP2B increased after sc treatment. Conclusion DE-71 behaves as a weak estrogen. In mice, the treatment route and duration determined if DE-71 was estrogenic. BALB/c mice are more susceptible to DE-71 effects in estrogen target tissues than C57BL/6 mice. DE-71 increased liver weight independently of estrogen receptor-α. PMID:18470304

  2. Can zero-valent iron nanoparticles remove waterborne estrogens?

    PubMed

    Jarošová, Barbora; Filip, Jan; Hilscherová, Klára; Tuček, Jiří; Šimek, Zdeněk; Giesy, John P; Zbořil, Radek; Bláha, Luděk

    2015-03-01

    Steroidal estrogens are one of the most challenging classes of hazardous contaminants as they can cause adverse effects to biota in extremely low concentrations. They emerge in both waste waters and surface waters serving as a source of drinking water. Environmental Quality Standards for 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), promulgated within the EU Water Framework Directive, are 0.4 and 0.035 ng L(-1), respectively. Because nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles have been previously used in numerous remediation technologies and have the advantage of possible magnetic separation, interaction of nZVI with E2 and EE2 in water was investigated to assess the potential role of nZVI in removing steroidal estrogens. A mixture of E2 and EE2 dissolved in water was shaken with varying doses of nZVI for 1-5 h. Concentration-dependent removal of the estrogens was observed but removal did not increase significantly with time. Concentrations of the estrogens were determined by HPLC/MS/MS and a biodetection reporter gene assay. Sorption and nonspecific oxygen-mediated oxidation of estrogens were identified as the most probable removal mechanisms. Two independent experiments confirmed that significant decrease of estrogens concentration is achieved when at least 2 g L(-1) of nZVI is applied. The presented study provides insights into the mechanisms of nZVI interaction with steroidal estrogens under aerobic conditions prevailing in currently applied water treatment technologies.

  3. Pilot Studies of Estrogen-Related Physical Findings in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bernbaum, Judy C.; Umbach, David M.; Ragan, N. Beth; Ballard, Jeanne L.; Archer, Janet I.; Schmidt-Davis, Holly; Rogan, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Soy formula containing estrogenic isoflavones is widely used in the United States. Infants consuming soy formula exclusively have high isoflavone exposures. We wanted to study whether soy formula prolonged the physiologic estrogenization of newborns, but available quantitative descriptions of the natural history of breast and genital development are inadequate for study design. Objective We piloted techniques for assessing infants’ responses to the withdrawal from maternal estrogen and gathered data on breast and genital development in infants at different ages. Methods We studied 37 boys and 35 girls, from term pregnancies with normal birth weights, who were < 48 hr to 6 months of age, and residents of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during 2004–2005. One-third of the children of each sex and age interval were exclusively fed breast milk, soy formula, or cow-milk formula. Our cross-sectional study measured breast adipose tissue, breast buds, and testicular volume; observed breast and genital development; and collected vaginal wall cells and information on vaginal discharge. We assessed reliability of the measures. Results Breast tissue was maximal at birth and disappeared in older children, consistent with waning maternal estrogen. Genital development did not change by age. Breast-milk secretion and withdrawal bleeding were unusual. Vaginal wall cells showed maximal estrogen effect at birth and then reverted; girls on soy appeared to show reestrogenization at 6 months. Conclusions Examination of infants for plausible effects of estrogens is valid and repeatable. Measurement of breast tissue and characterization of vaginal wall cells could be used to evaluate exposures with estrogen-like effects. PMID:18335112

  4. Photoperiod affects estrogen receptor α, estrogen receptor β and aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Brian C.; Rowland, Michael R.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2007-01-01

    Estrogens have important effects on male and female social behavior. Despite growing knowledge of the anatomy and behavioral effects of the two predominant estrogen receptor subtypes in mammals (ERα and ERβ), relatively little is known about how these receptors respond to salient environmental stimuli. Many seasonally breeding species respond to changing photoperiods that predict seasonal changes in resource availability. We characterized the effects of photoperiod on aggressive behavior in two species of Peromyscus that exhibit gonadal regression in short days. P. polionotus (old field mice) were more aggressive than P. maniculatus (deer mice) and both species were more aggressive in short days. We used immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction to characterize the effects of photoperiod on ERα and ERβ expression. In both species ERα-immunoreactive staining in the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) was increased in short vs. long days. Both species had reduced ERβ-immunoreactive expression in the posterior BNST in short days. In the medial amygdala ERβ immunoreactivity was increased in long days for both species. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction on punch samples that included the BNST, we observed that ERα mRNA was increased and ERβ mRNA was decreased in short days. These data suggest that the effects of photoperiod on ERα and ERβ expression may thus have important behavioral consequences. PMID:17614949

  5. Characteristics of blue organic light emitting diodes with different thick emitting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chong; Tsuboi, Taiju; Huang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated blue organic light emitting diodes (called blue OLEDs) with emitting layer (EML) of diphenylanthracene derivative 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN) doped with blue-emitting DSA-ph (1-4-di-[4-(N,N-di-phenyl)amino]styryl-benzene) to investigate how the thickness of EML and hole injection layer (HIL) influences the electroluminescence characteristics. The driving voltage was observed to increase with increasing EML thickness from 15 nm to 70 nm. The maximum external quantum efficiency of 6.2% and the maximum current efficiency of 14 cd/A were obtained from the OLED with 35 nm thick EML and 75 nm thick HIL. High luminance of 120,000 cd/m2 was obtained at 7.5 V from OLED with 15 nm thick EML.

  6. Evolutionary origins of the estrogen signaling system: insights from amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, AM; Novillo, A; Yacci, P; Ciaccia, L; Vajda, S; Chuang, G-Y; Kozakov, D; Greytak, SR; Sawyer, S; Hoover, C; Cotter, K

    2011-01-01

    Classically, the estrogen signaling system has two core components: cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme complex that catalyzes the rate limiting step in estrogen biosynthesis; and estrogen receptors (ERs), ligand activated transcription factors that interact with the regulatory region of target genes to mediate the biological effects of estrogen. While the importance of estrogens for regulation of reproduction, development and physiology has been well-documented in gnathostome vertebrates, the evolutionary origins of estrogen as a hormone are still unclear. As invertebrates within the phylum Chordata, cephalochordates (e.g. the amphioxus of the genus Branchiostoma) are among the closest invertebrate relatives of the vertebrates and can provide critical insight into the evolution of vertebrate-specific molecules and pathways. To address this question, this paper briefly reviews relevant earlier studies that help to illuminate the history of the aromatase and ER genes, with a particular emphasis on insights from amphioxus and other invertebrates. We then present new analyses of amphioxus aromatase and ER sequence and function, including an in silico model of the amphioxus aromatase protein, and CYP19 gene analysis. CYP19 shares a conserved gene structure with vertebrates (9 coding exons) and moderate sequence conservation (40% amino acid identity with human CYP19). Modeling of the amphioxus aromatase substrate binding site and simulated docking of androstenedione in comparison to the human aromatase shows that the substrate binding site is conserved and predicts that androstenedione could be a substrate for amphioxus CYP19. The amphioxus ER is structurally similar to vertebrate ERs, but differs in sequence and key residues of the ligand binding domain. Consistent with results from other laboratories, amphioxus ER did not bind radiolabeled estradiol, nor did it modulate gene expression on anestrogen-responsive element (ERE) in the presence of estradiol, 4

  7. Effects of reciprocal treatment with estrogen and estrogen plus parathyroid hormone on bone structure and strength in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, V; Birchman, R; Xu, R; Otter, M; Wu, D; Lindsay, R; Dempster, D W

    1995-01-01

    Intermittent administration of PTH has been found to be an effective anabolic agent in cancellous bone. We have reported previously that combined treatment with PTH and estrogen in estrogen-deficient rats was beneficial in correcting established osteopenia. To determine if the beneficial effects of PTH therapy can be preserved by estrogen alone and whether PTH therapy can be effective in treating osteopenic subjects stabilized with estrogen, we have undertaken a "crossover" study in the rat model of estrogen-deficiency induced osteopenia. Six-month-old female rats were ovariectomized and after 5 wk treated for 8 wk with vehicle, 30 micrograms/kg per day of rPTH(1-34) plus 15 micrograms/kg per day of 17 beta-estradiol or 17 beta-estradiol alone. One group from each treatment regimen was then sacrificed and for an additional 8 weeks the remaining rats were (a) maintained on their previous treatment; (b) "crossed over" to their reciprocal treatment; or (c) administered vehicle only. At the end of this second 8-wk treatment period all rats were sacrificed. Bone mineral density of the distal femur, histomorphometric measurements of the proximal tibia and mechanical testing of the distal femur and selected vertebral bodies were performed. Our results demonstrated that (a) the gains in bone mass, trabecular connectivity and mechanical strength induced by PTH can be maintained by estrogen alone, but are reversed when both agents are withdrawn; and (b) rats with established osteopenia, maintained on estrogen treatment alone, can derive the full beneficial effects from the addition of PTH to the treatment at a later date. These data indicate that combined and/or sequential use of antiresorptive and anabolic agents may be a promising approach to the treatment of osteoporosis. Images PMID:7593620

  8. Estrogenicity of food-associated estrogenic compounds in the fetuses of female transgenic mice upon oral and IP maternal exposure.

    PubMed

    Ter Veld, Marcel G R; Zawadzka, E; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigated to what extent seven food-associated in vitro estrogenic compounds can induce estrogenic effects in the fetuses of pregnant female mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc-induction was determined either 8h after maternal dosing with a single intraperitoneal (IP) dose or 24h after the last of a series of 8 daily oral dosages. Three known estrogens, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE) and 17beta-estradiol 3,17-dipropionate (EP) were used as positive controls at 1mg/kgbw and DMSO as solvent control. The food-associated estrogenic compounds tested were: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP) both at 50mg/kgbw, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) at 50mg/kgbw, quercetin at 16.6 mg/kgbw, and di-isoheptyl phthalate (DIHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) all at 100mg/kgbw. Exposure to E(2), EE and EP resulted in significant luc inductions upon both oral and/or IP dosing in a variety of tissues including liver, tibia and femurs, and upon IP dosing also in fetuses. BPA, NP, DEHA, DEHP, DIHP, DDE and quercetin were unable to significantly induce luc activity in fetuses. However, after maternal oral exposure during gestation to NP, BPA and DIHP placental luc activity was significantly lowered. The results indicate that at the current levels of exposure to food-associated estrogenic compounds, estrogenic effects to the fetus are not expected. The significant luc reduction in the placenta, should be further studied for its significance for fetal development and relevance for the human situation.

  9. Activation of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, but not estrogen receptor α or β, rapidly enhances social learning.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Kelsy Sharice Jean; Mulvale, Erin; Gallagher, Nicola; Roussel, Véronique; Choleris, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Social learning is a highly adaptive process by which an animal acquires information from a conspecific. While estrogens are known to modulate learning and memory, much of this research focuses on individual learning. Estrogens have been shown to enhance social learning on a long-term time scale, likely via genomic mechanisms. Estrogens have also been shown to affect individual learning on a rapid time scale through cell-signaling cascades, rather than via genomic effects, suggesting they may also rapidly influence social learning. We therefore investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol and involvement of the estrogen receptors (ERs) using the ERα agonist propyl pyrazole triol, the ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile, and the G protein-coupled ER 1 (GPER1) agonist G1 on the social transmission of food preferences (STFP) task, within a time scale that focused on the rapid effects of estrogens. General ER activation with 17β-estradiol resulted in a modest facilitation of social learning, with mice showing a preference up to 30min of testing. Specific activation of the GPER1 also rapidly enhanced social learning, with mice showing a socially learned preference up to 2h of testing. ERα activation instead shortened the expression of a socially learned food preference, while ERβ activation had little to no effects. Thus, rapid estrogenic modulation of social learning in the STFP may be the outcome of competing action at the three main receptors. Hence, estrogens' rapid effects on social learning likely depend on the specific ERs present in brain regions recruited during social learning.

  10. Establishment of a transgenic yeast screening system for estrogenicity and identification of the anti-estrogenic activity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Yeung, Eric K C; Chan, Chi Bun; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-12-15

    Endocrine disruptors refer to chemical compounds in the environment which interfere with the endocrine systems of organisms. Among them, environmental estrogens pose serious problems to aquatic organisms, in particular fish. It is therefore important and necessary to have a fast and low-cost system to screen the large number of different chemical compounds in the aquatic environment for their potential endocrine disrupting actions. In this study, a screening platform was developed to detect xenoestrogens in the aquatic environment using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and applied for compound screening. The aim was to demonstrate any significant potential differences between the fish screening system and the human screening system. To this end, a yeast expression vector harboring a fish estrogen receptor alpha and a reporter vector containing the estrogen responsive element fused with the Escherichia coli LacZ gene were constructed. After transformation with these two vectors, the transformed yeast clones were confirmed by Western blotting and selected on the basis of the beta-galactosidase activity. In this transgenic yeast system, the natural estrogen (estradiol) and other known xenoestrogens such as diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, genistein and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane exhibited dose-dependent activities. Using this system, more than 40 putative endocrine disruptors including phytoestrogens, pesticides, herbicides, industrial dyes and other industrial chemicals were screened. Ten of them were demonstrated to exhibit estrogenic actions. Industrial dyes such as malachite green (MG) that disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis are extensively used and are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Using this system, MG did not show any estrogenic action, but was demonstrated to exhibit anti-estrogenic activity.

  11. Efficient deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes using double-emitting layer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji Hoon; Seo, Bo Min; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2012-04-01

    Efficient deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes were demonstrated using 1,4-tetranaphthalene doped in double-emitting layers (D-EMLs) consisting of 2-methyl-9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene and 4'-(dinaphthalen-2-yl)-1,1'-binaphthyl as blue hosts. The device with D-EML exhibits good confinement of holes and electrons, as well as a broad recombination zone. The optimized device showed a peak current efficiency of 3.67 cd/A, a peak external quantum efficiency of 3.97%, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.16, 0.10).

  12. Atomically thin quantum light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Barbone, Matteo; Kara, Dhiren M.; Chen, Xiaolong; Goykhman, Ilya; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Beitner, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are optically active, layered materials promising for fast optoelectronics and on-chip photonics. We demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized sites in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide. To achieve this, we fabricate a light-emitting diode structure comprising single-layer graphene, thin hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenide mono- and bi-layers. Photon correlation measurements are used to confirm the single-photon nature of the spectrally sharp emission. These results present the transition metal dichalcogenide family as a platform for hybrid, broadband, atomically precise quantum photonics devices. PMID:27667022

  13. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  14. Atomically thin quantum light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Barbone, Matteo; Kara, Dhiren M.; Chen, Xiaolong; Goykhman, Ilya; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Beitner, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2016-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are optically active, layered materials promising for fast optoelectronics and on-chip photonics. We demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized sites in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide. To achieve this, we fabricate a light-emitting diode structure comprising single-layer graphene, thin hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenide mono- and bi-layers. Photon correlation measurements are used to confirm the single-photon nature of the spectrally sharp emission. These results present the transition metal dichalcogenide family as a platform for hybrid, broadband, atomically precise quantum photonics devices.

  15. Flexible inorganic nanowire light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Athavan; Word, Robert C; Meiss, Jan; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    We report a highly flexible light-emitting device in which inorganic nanowires are the optically active components. The single-crystalline ZnO nanowires are grown at 80 degrees C on flexible polymer-based indium-tin-oxide-coated substrates and subsequently encapsulated in a minimal-thickness, void-filling polystyrene film. A reflective top contact serving as the anode in the diode structure is provided by a strongly doped p-type polymer and an evaporated Au film. The emission through the polymer side of this arrangement covers most of the visual region. Electrical and optical properties as well as performance limitations of the device structure are discussed.

  16. Quantum dots for light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Khan; Lei, Wei; Li, Qing

    2013-05-01

    In this article we discuss the development and key advantages of quantum dot based light emitting diode (QD-LED) and other applications based on their color purity, stability, and solution processibility. Analysis of quantum dot based LEDs and the main challenges faced in this field, such as the QD luminescence quenching, QD charging in thin films, and external quantum efficiency are discussed in detail. The description about how different optical down-conversion and structures enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and to commercialize the products. The recent developments about how to overcome these difficulties have also been discussed in this article.

  17. Glareless light-emitting diode lighting tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rong-Seng; Li, Tung-Yen; Jwo, Ko-Wen; Wang, Sha-Wei; Tsai, Jang-Zern

    2012-03-01

    We develop a novel light bar waveguide design to produce a glareless light-emitting diode (LED) lighting tube. We design optimal parameters, such as the gap y between the tube and the reflective surface, the relative distance x between the lens and the LED, and so on. Using these parameters, we fabricate an illumination system consisting of LED light bulb installed at both ends of lighting tube. The lighting tube is shaped the same as a traditional fluorescent lighting tube in order to replace traditional lighting tubes without the modification of the lighting stand. The LED lighting tube is glareless to the observer from the side view.

  18. Disturbed estrogen and progesterone action in ovarian endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Smuc, Tina; Hevir, Neli; Ribic-Pucelj, Martina; Husen, Bettina; Thole, Hubert; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2009-03-25

    Endometriosis is a very common disease in pre-menopausal women, where defective metabolism of steroid hormones plays an important role in its development and promotion. In the present study, we have examined the expression of 11 estrogen and progesterone metabolizing enzymes and their corresponding receptors in samples of ovarian endometriomas and control endometrium. Expression analysis revealed significant up-regulation of enzymes involved in estradiol formation (aromatase, sulfatase and all reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases) and in progesterone inactivation (AKR1C1 and AKR1C3). Among the estrogen and progesterone receptors, ERalpha was down-regulated, ERbeta was up-regulated, and there was no significant difference in expression of progesterone receptors A and B (PRAB). Our data indicate that several enzymes of estrogen and progesterone metabolism are aberrantly expressed in endometriosis, which can lead to increased local levels of mitogenic estradiol and decreased levels of protective progesterone. Changes in estrogen receptor expression suggest that estradiol may also act via non-estrogen receptor-mediated pathways, while expression of progesterone receptors still needs further investigation.

  19. Effect of estrogen and testosterone replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue.

    PubMed

    Möller, Marika Christina; Rådestad, Angelique Flöter; von Schoultz, Bo; Bartfai, Aniko

    2013-02-01

    Both estrogen and testosterone insufficiency has been associated with reduced psychological well-being including fatigue. However, hormonal replacement studies on fatigue are rare. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of testosterone and estrogen replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue and the relation between sex hormone levels and cognitive fatigue in oophorectomized women. Fifty women with surgically induced menopause (mean age: 54.0 ± 2.9 years) were randomly assigned to treatment with estradiol valerate in combination with testosterone undecanoate or placebo for 24 weeks in a double-blind cross-over study. Neuropsychological tests and questionnaires were used to assess cognitive fatigue and psychological well-being. Cognitive fatigue was significantly associated to poor self-rated health and higher body mass index but not to general psychological well-being or sex hormone levels. Treatment with testosterone + estrogen had no significant effect on cognitive fatigue but the results indicated a curvilinear relation for hormonal levels. The estrogen/testosterone ratio was more related to functions rather than high or low hormone levels per se. We found that cognitive fatigue is frequent in oophorectomized women and negatively associated to self-perceived health and positively associated to BMI. A well-balanced ratio between estrogen and testosterone levels may be important for cognitive fatigue.

  20. Screening of estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Gyu; Kang, Se Chan; Kim, Kug Chan; Choung, Eui Su; Zee, Ok Pyo

    2008-01-01

    The medicinal plant extracts commercially used in Asia were screened for their estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in a recombinant yeast system featuring both a human estrogen receptor (ER) expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid. Pueraria lobata (flower) had the highest estrogenic relative potency (RP, 7.75×10(-3); RP of 17β-estradiol=1), followed by Amomum xanthioides (1.25×10(-3)). Next potent were a group consisting of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Zingiber officinale, Rheum undulatum, Curcuma aromatica, Eriobotrya japonica, Sophora flavescens, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Polygonum multiflorum, and Pueraria lobata (root) (ranging from 9.5×10(-4) to 1.0×10(-4)). Least potent were Prunus persica, Lycoppus lucidus, and Adenophora stricta (ranging from 9.0×10(-5) to 8.0×10(-5)). The extracts exerting antiestrogenic effects, Cinnamomum cassia and Prunus persica, had relative potencies of 1.14×10(-3) and 7.4×10(-4), respectively (RP of tamoxifen=1). The solvent fractions from selected estrogenic or antiestrogenic herbs had higher estrogenic relative potencies, with their RP ranging from 9.3×10(-1) to 2.7×10(-4) and from 8.2×10(-1) to 9.1×10(-3), respectively. These results support previous reports on the efficacy of Oriental medicinal plants used or not used as phytoestrogens for hormone replacement therapy.

  1. Inhibition of estrogen biosynthesis enhances lymphoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Talaber, Gergely; Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Guan, Jiyu; Inzunza, Jose; Okret, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Most lymphomas show higher incidence and poorer prognosis in males compared to females. However, the endocrine contribution to this gender difference is not entirely known. Here we show that castration accelerates lymphoma growth in C57BL6 male mice grafted with murine EG7 T cell lymphoma cells. However, the androgen receptor antagonist Bicalutamide did not affect lymphoma growth, suggesting no impact of androgen receptor signaling on lymphoma progression. In contrast, inhibition of androgen-to-estrogen conversion by the aromatase inhibitor (AI) Letrozole induced faster lymphoma growth in mice, suggesting that androgens impact lymphoma growth through its conversion to estrogens. This was supported by the inability of dihydrotestosterone, which is not converted to estrogens by aromatase, to influence lymphoma growth in castrated male mice. Lymphoma growth was also stimulated in immunocompromised mice grafted with human B cell lymphoma (Granta-519) and treated with either reversible or irreversible AIs, showing that the blockage of estrogen synthesis caused enhanced growth of both murine T and human B cell lymphomas and with different AIs. Additionally, AI-treated EG7 lymphomas showed accelerated growth not only in male but also in intact female mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that aromatase inhibition accelerates lymphoma growth but not androgens per se, highlighting a protective role of estrogens in lymphoma pathogenesis. These results also raise concern that the use of AIs in women with breast cancer might enhance lymphoma progression. PMID:26943574

  2. ESTROGEN INDUCED VITELLOGENIN MRNA AND PROTEIN IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally persistent xenobiotic chemicals appear to disrupt normal endocrine function by acting as ligands for endogenous steroid receptors, including the estrogen receptor. Xenobiotics that bind to the estrogen receptor may elicit several effects, one of which is acti...

  3. COLLAPSE OF A FISH POPULATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO A SYNTHETIC ESTROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipal wastewaters are a complex mixture containing estrogens and estrogen mimics that are known to affect the reproductive health of wild fishes. Male fishes downstream of some wastewater outfalls produce vitellogenin (VTG) (a protein normally synthesized by females during oo...

  4. Tissue-Specific Effects of Loss of Estrogen during Menopause and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wend, Korinna; Wend, Peter; Krum, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of estrogens have been best studied in the breast, breast cancers, and in the female reproductive tract. However, estrogens have important functions in almost every tissue in the body. Recent clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative have highlighted both the importance of estrogens and how little we know about the molecular mechanism of estrogens in these other tissues. In this review, we illustrate the diverse functions of estrogens in the bone, adipose tissue, skin, hair, brain, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular system, and how the loss of estrogens during aging affects these tissues. Early transcriptional targets of estrogen are reviewed in each tissue. We also describe the tissue-specific effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) used for the treatment of breast cancers and postmenopausal symptoms. PMID:22654856

  5. Estrogenic Activity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential estrogenic activity of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) was determined using separate screening and dose response studies with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results of this study indicate that some PFAAs may act as estrogens in fish.

  6. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  7. Adaptive Significance of ERα Splice Variants in Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) Resident in an Estrogenic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility that chronic, multigenerational exposure to environmental estrogens selects for adaptive hormone response phenotypes is a critical unanswered question. Embryos/larvae of killifish from an estrogenic polluted environment (New Bedford Harbor, NBH), as compared to th...

  8. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers. PMID:27314054

  9. COMPARISON OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have the potential to disrupt endocrine function in a myriad of species. However, in vitro assays designed to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) typically utilize mammalian estrogen receptors. Our overall objective is to charac...

  10. [Metrorrhagia caused by estrogen-progestin combinations].

    PubMed

    Erny, R; Erny, N

    1994-02-01

    Changes in combined oral contraceptives (OCs) include reduction in the estrogen and progestogen dose and recourse to the third generation, less androgenic progestogens. They retain the efficacy and convenience of OCs while reducing the metabolic and cardiovascular effects and the need to identify contraindications and subjects at risk. OCs sometimes cause menstrual cycle problems: spotting and intercurrent bleeding or bleeding at any time other than menstruation (metrorrhagia). OCs cause loose and edematous stroma in the endometrium where glands maintain a proliferative-like phase throughout the cycle. Many dilated capillaries with hyperplasia of the endothelial cells rise to the surface. Forgetting or failure to take OC pills are often responsible for intercurrent bleeding. It is hard to determine what OCs cause less bleeding than other OCs. The third generation progestogen, gestodene, appears to have better cycle control than the two other third generation progestogens (desogestrel and norgestimate). It is not clear whether triphasic OCs with second generation progestogens are better than monophasic third generation OCs. The OC with low dose ethinyl estradiol (20 mcg) (Mercilon) has as low a bleeding rate as does the OC, Varnoline (30 mcg). Menstrual cycle disturbances rarely happen. Providers must emphasize to new OC users the possibility of spotting or intercurrent bleeding, especially during the first cycle. Providers must also inform them that these disturbances do not affect the effectiveness of the OCs and that they should not stop taking OCs if they are concerned about bleeding. Providers must instruct them what to do if they forget to take a pill(s). Providers should schedule an appointment after a new OC user has completed the third OC packet. They should do a gynecologic exam to search for a genital infection, endo-uterine polyp or fibroma, and hyperplasia of the endometrium. If bleeding persists during the third cycle, the client should change

  11. Estrogenic activity of a polyphenolic extract of the leaves of Epimedium brevicornum.

    PubMed

    De Naeyer, An; Pocock, Victoria; Milligan, Stuart; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2005-01-01

    The estrogenic activity of a polyphenolic extract of the leaves of Epimedium brevicornum and five fractions obtained by solid-phase extraction were investigated using estrogen-responsive bioassays, a yeast cell assay and the Ishikawa Var-I assay. The extract was found to exhibit significant estrogenic activity in both assays. Furthermore, bioassay-guided fractionation led to localisation of the estrogenicity in the relatively non-polar fractions of the polyphenolic extract.

  12. Calculating the potential to emit particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vaart, D.R. van der

    1996-09-01

    As the implementation of the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act, and Title V in particular, continues, questions regarding the calculation of a facility`s potential to emit continue to surface. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided limited guidance decisions, although many are still being made during Title V implementation. This paper discusses what is meant by PM-10 and the validity of using sieve analysis in estimating particulate emissions. Title V of the Clean Air Amendments of 1990, and the accompanying regulations in 40 CFR Part 70, defines a major source subject to Title V by calculating its potential emissions of all regulated pollutants, both criteria and hazardous air pollutants. For PM, the threshold emission rate is 100 tons per year (tpy) for applicability to Title V. Much discussion has ensued regarding a definition of PM for the purpose of determining a facility`s potential to emit. Recently, EPA provided guidance which indicated that only PM-10 should be considered for making this determination although many states regulate larger particles through their state implementation plan (SIP) as a surrogate for PM-10.

  13. Electrically and Optically Readable Light Emitting Memories

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Wei; Tan, Wei-Chun; Lu, Meng-Lin; Pan, Tai-Chun; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical metallization memories based on redox-induced resistance switching have been considered as the next-generation electronic storage devices. However, the electronic signals suffer from the interconnect delay and the limited reading speed, which are the major obstacles for memory performance. To solve this problem, here we demonstrate the first attempt of light-emitting memory (LEM) that uses SiO2 as the resistive switching material in tandem with graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) light-emitting diode (LED). By utilizing the excellent properties of graphene, such as high conductivity, high robustness and high transparency, our proposed LEM enables data communication via electronic and optical signals simultaneously. Both the bistable light-emission state and the resistance switching properties can be attributed to the conducting filament mechanism. Moreover, on the analysis of current-voltage characteristics, we further confirm that the electroluminescence signal originates from the carrier tunneling, which is quite different from the standard p-n junction model. We stress here that the newly developed LEM device possesses a simple structure with mature fabrication processes, which integrates advantages of all composed materials and can be extended to many other material systems. It should be able to attract academic interest as well as stimulate industrial application. PMID:24894723

  14. Photonic crystal light-emitting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Aurélien; Benisty, Henri; Weisbuch, Claude

    2012-12-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) are periodically structured optical media offering the opportunity for spontaneous emission (SpE) to be strongly controlled in spatial terms (directions) or in absolute terms (rates). We discuss the application of this concept for practical light-emitting sources, summarizing the principles and actual merits of various approaches based on two- and three-dimensional PhCs. We take into consideration the numerous constraints on real-world light-emitting structures and materials. The various mechanisms through which modified photonic bands and band gaps can be used are first revisited in view of their use in light sources. We then present an in-depth discussion of planar emitters and enhanced extraction of light thanks to grating diffraction. Applications to conventional III-V semiconductors and to III-nitrides are reviewed. Comparison with random surface roughening reveals some common physical limitations. Some advanced approaches with complex structures or etched active structures are also discussed. Finally, the most promising mechanism to enhance the SpE rate, the Purcell effect, is considered. Its implementation, including through plasmonic effects, is shown to be effective only for very specific sources. We conclude by outlining the mix of physics and material parameters needed to grasp the relevant issues.

  15. Electrically and Optically Readable Light Emitting Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Tan, Wei-Chun; Lu, Meng-Lin; Pan, Tai-Chun; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Electrochemical metallization memories based on redox-induced resistance switching have been considered as the next-generation electronic storage devices. However, the electronic signals suffer from the interconnect delay and the limited reading speed, which are the major obstacles for memory performance. To solve this problem, here we demonstrate the first attempt of light-emitting memory (LEM) that uses SiO2 as the resistive switching material in tandem with graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) light-emitting diode (LED). By utilizing the excellent properties of graphene, such as high conductivity, high robustness and high transparency, our proposed LEM enables data communication via electronic and optical signals simultaneously. Both the bistable light-emission state and the resistance switching properties can be attributed to the conducting filament mechanism. Moreover, on the analysis of current-voltage characteristics, we further confirm that the electroluminescence signal originates from the carrier tunneling, which is quite different from the standard p-n junction model. We stress here that the newly developed LEM device possesses a simple structure with mature fabrication processes, which integrates advantages of all composed materials and can be extended to many other material systems. It should be able to attract academic interest as well as stimulate industrial application.

  16. Quantum well, beam deflecting surface emitting lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to surface emitting semiconductor lasers (SELs), with integrated 45 deg. beam deflectors. A SEL is formed on a wafer including vertical mirrors and 45 deg. beam deflectors formed in grooves by tilted ion beam etching. A SEL is a lattice matched, or unstrained, AlGaAs/GaAs GRINSCH SQW SEL. An alternate embodiment is shown, in which a SEL is lattice mismatched, strained or pseudomorphic, or InGaAs/AlGaAs GRINSCH SQW SEL which emits radiation at a wavelength to which its substrate is transparent. Both SELs exhibit high output power, low threshold current density, and relatively high efficiency, and each are processing compatible with conventional large scale integration technology. Such SELs may be fabricated in large numbers from single wafers. The novel features of this invention include the use of tilted ion beam etching to form a pair of grooves each including vertical mirrors and 45 deg. beam deflectors. The embodiment provides substantial circuit design flexibility because radiation may be coupled both up and/or down through the substrate.

  17. Organic bistable light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liping; Liu, Jie; Pyo, Seungmoon; Yang, Yang

    2002-01-01

    An organic bistable device, with a unique trilayer structure consisting of organic/metal/organic sandwiched between two outmost metal electrodes, has been invented. [Y. Yang, L. P. Ma, and J. Liu, U.S. Patent Pending, U.S. 01/17206 (2001)]. When the device is biased with voltages beyond a critical value (for example 3 V), the device suddenly switches from a high-impedance state to a low-impedance state, with a difference in injection current of more than 6 orders of magnitude. When the device is switched to the low-impedance state, it remains in that state even when the power is off. (This is called "nonvolatile" phenomenon in memory devices.) The high-impedance state can be recovered by applying a reverse bias; therefore, this bistable device is ideal for memory applications. In order to increase the data read-out rate of this type of memory device, a regular polymer light-emitting diode has been integrated with the organic bistable device, such that it can be read out optically. These features make the organic bistable light-emitting device a promising candidate for several applications, such as digital memories, opto-electronic books, and recordable papers.

  18. Emitted vibration measurement device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisler, G. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for measuring emitted vibrational forces produced by a reaction wheel assembly due to imbalances, misalignment, bearing defects and the like. The apparatus includes a low mass carriage supported on a large mass base. The carriage is in the form of an octagonal frame having an opening which is adapted for receiving the reaction wheel assembly supported thereon by means of a mounting ring. The carriage is supported on the base by means of air bearings which support the carriage in a generally frictionless manner when supplied with compressed air from a source. A plurality of carriage brackets and a plurality of base blocks provided for physical coupling of the base and carriage. The sensing axes of the load cells are arranged generally parallel to the base and connected between the base and carriage such that all of the vibrational forces emitted by the reaction wheel assembly are effectively transmitted through the sensing axes of the load cells. In this manner, a highly reliable and accurate measurment of the vibrational forces of the reaction wheel assembly can be had. The output signals from the load cells are subjected to a dynamical analyzer which analyzes and identifies the rotor and spin bearing components which are causing the vibrational forces.

  19. Immunomodulation of Mytilus hemocytes by individual estrogenic chemicals and environmentally relevant mixtures of estrogens: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura; Lorusso, Lucia Cecilia; Ciacci, Caterina; Betti, Michele; Rocchi, Marco; Pojana, Giulio; Marcomini, Antonio

    2007-02-15

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are almost ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. In the marine bivalve Mytilus the natural estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E2) and different EDCs have been recently demonstrated to affect the function of the immune cells, the hemocytes. The effects were Tamoxifen-sensitive and were mediated by rapid modulation of kinase-mediated transduction pathways. In this work we compared the in vitro effects of individual estrogenic chemicals (E2, EE: 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol; MES: mestranol; NP: nonylphenol; NP1EC: nonylphenol monoethoxylate carboxylate; BPA: bisphenol A; BP: benzophenone) on hemocyte parameters: lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), phagocytosis, lysozyme release. LMS was the most sensitive effect parameter, showing a decreasing trend at increasing concentrations of estrogens. EC50 values obtained from LMS data were utilized to calculate the estradiol equivalency factor (EEF) for each compound; these EEFs allowed for an estimation of the estrogenic potential of a synthetic mixture with a composition very similar to that previously found in waters of the Venice lagoon. Concentrated mixtures significantly affected hemocyte parameters in vitro and the effects were prevented by Tamoxifen. Significant effects of the mixture were also observed in vivo, at longer exposure times and at concentrations comparable with environmental exposure levels. The results indicate that Mytilus immune parameters can be suitably utilized to evaluate the estrogenic potential of environmental samples.

  20. Comparison of in vitro estrogenic activity and estrogen concentrations in source and treated waters from 25 U.S. drinking water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Conley, Justin M; Evans, Nicola; Mash, Heath; Rosenblum, Laura; Schenck, Kathleen; Glassmeyer, Susan; Furlong, Ed T; Kolpin, Dana W; Wilson, Vickie S

    2017-02-01

    In vitro bioassays have been successfully used to screen for estrogenic activity in wastewater and surface water, however, few have been applied to treated drinking water. Here, extracts of source and treated water samples were assayed for estrogenic activity using T47D-KBluc cells and analyzed by liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS) for natural and synthetic estrogens (including estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol, and ethinyl estradiol). None of the estrogens were detected above the LC-FTMS quantification limits in treated samples and only 5 source waters had quantifiable concentrations of estrone, whereas 3 treated samples and 16 source samples displayed in vitro estrogenicity. Estrone accounted for the majority of estrogenic activity in respective samples, however the remaining samples that displayed estrogenic activity had no quantitative detections of known estrogenic compounds by chemical analyses. Source water estrogenicity (max, 0.47ng 17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) L(-1)) was below levels that have been linked to adverse effects in fish and other aquatic organisms. Treated water estrogenicity (max, 0.078ngE2EqL(-1)) was considerably below levels that are expected to be biologically relevant to human consumers. Overall, the advantage of using in vitro techniques in addition to analytical chemical determinations was displayed by the sensitivity of the T47D-KBluc bioassay, coupled with the ability to measure cumulative effects of mixtures, specifically when unknown chemicals may be present.

  1. Estrogenicity of phytosterols evaluated in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nakari, Tarja

    2005-01-01

    The estrogenic activity of two phytosterol preparations was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro evaluation, freshly separated hepatocytes of rainbow trout were used. By contrast, the in vivo evaluation was performed by injecting the phytosterols intraperitoneally into juvenile rainbow trout. Both assays confirmed the estrogenic activity of the phytosterols. The in vitro screening technique, based on the synthesis and secretion of vitellogenin from the isolated liver cells, produced a clear, significant curve in response to the presence of both phytosterol mixtures. In the in vivo tests, the phytosterol preparations caused significant increases in plasma vitellogenin concentrations of juvenile fish. These shortterm assays proved to be suitable for assessing the estrogenic activity of phytosterols.

  2. [Is the cardioprotective effect of estrogens useful in menopause?].

    PubMed

    Calvo-Vargas, César G; Padilla-Ríos, Victoria; Meza-Flores, Alicia

    2002-03-01

    Tendency of coronary mortality to occur about 10 years later in women than in men is a well known fact. This difference has been attributed to the presence of estrogens in women. Despite the performance of many experimental and observational studies on the heart-protecting effect of estrogens, there are a lot of methodological limitations which make it difficult to obtain definitive results. This revision, shows the experimental studies where it has been demonstrated that estrogens do not increase cardiovascular protection. Emphasis is focused on adverse effects, such as the development of breast and endometrial cancer. It is also emphasized that during menopause, a series of life style modifications can be implemented, such as exercising, stop smoking and loosing weight. Undoubtedly, the results will be cardiovascular health benefits, with minimum integral health risks.

  3. Evaluation of oriental medicinal herbs for estrogenic and antiproliferative activities.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se Chan; Lee, Chang Min; Choi, Han; Lee, Jae Hyun; Oh, Joa Sub; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Zee, Ok Pyo

    2006-11-01

    Herb extracts commercially used in Asia were screened for their estrogenic activity with a recombinant yeast system with both a human estrogen receptor (ER) expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid. Pueraria lobata (flower) had the highest estrogenic relative potency (RP, 17-estradiol = 1.00) (7.8e-3) (RP for + control), followed by Amomum xanthioides (1.3e-3), Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Zingiber officinale, Rheum palmatum, Curcuma aromatica, Eriobotrya japonica, Sophora flavescens, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Polygonum multiflorum and Pueraria lobata (root) (9.5e-4-1.0e-4), and Prunus persica, Lycoppus lucidus and Adenophora stricta (9.0e-5-8.0e-5). In the antiproliferative assay, five human cancer cell lines representing different tissues (breast, lung and ovary) were used. Eriobotrya japonica showed strong cytotoxicity in ER-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231), cervix epitheloid (HeLa) and lung (A549) carcinoma cell lines.

  4. Estrogenic activity of the dichloromethane extract from Pueraria mirifica.

    PubMed

    Sookvanichsilp, N; Soonthornchareonnon, N; Boonleang, C

    2008-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica and its extracts are widely used as the ingredient(s) in many rejuvenating products. Up to now, the extract of P. mirifica roots that has been used in most studies, is the alcoholic extract. In the present study, we investigated the estrogenic activity using uterotropic and MCF-7 cell proliferation models of the dichloromethane extract as well as the water extract which was obtained from partitioning the ethanolic extract. The results indicated that among the three extracts, i.e. the ethanolic extract (PM1), the water extract (PM2) and dichloromethane extract (PM3), PM3 exhibited the most potent estrogenic activity in both models, followed by PM1. The extracts produced uterotropic activity associated with the increase of water content while uterotropic activity of 17beta-estradiol was related to the increase of muscle mass. The two isoflavonoids, genistein and daidzein, were not the major active phytoestrogens involving the estrogenic activity of these extracts.

  5. Synthesis of catechol estrogens by human uterus and leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.V.; Hanjani, P.; Rajan, R.

    1981-02-01

    Homogenates of human endometrial, myometrial and leiomyoma tissues were incubated with (2,4,6,7-/sub 3/H)-estradiol and tritiated catechol estrogens were isolated and identified. Though 2- and 4-hydroxylations were about the same in endometrium, 4-hydroxylation was two to four fold higher than 2-hydroxylation in myometrium and leiomyoma. However, endometrium showed greater capacity to form both 2- and 4-hydroxyestrogens than the other two tissues. Both 2- and 4-hydroxylations were significantly less than in myometrium. In view of the reports indicating that inhibitors of catechol 0-methyl transferase (COMT) might act as antineoplastic agents due to their interference with t-RNA methylases and since catechol estrogens inhibit COMT, the present results suggest that endogenous synthesis of catechol estrogens may play an important role in the pathophysiology of uterine leiomyoma.

  6. Estrogens Induce Expression of Membrane-Associated Estrogen Receptor α Isoforms in Lactotropes

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Sandra; Jaita, Gabriela; Ferraris, Jimena; Eijo, Guadalupe; Magri, María L.; Pisera, Daniel; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are key to anterior pituitary function, stimulating hormone release and controlling cell fate to achieve pituitary dynamic adaptation to changing physiological conditions. In addition to their classical mechanism of action through intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), estrogens exert rapid actions via cell membrane-localized ERs (mERs). We previously showed that E2 exerts a rapid pro-apoptotic action in anterior pituitary cells, especially in lactotropes and somatotropes, through activation of mERs. In the present study, we examined the involvement of mERα in the rapid pro-apoptotic action of estradiol by TUNEL in primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized rats using a cell-impermeable E2 conjugate (E2-BSA) and an ERα selective antagonist (MPP dihydrochloride). We studied mERα expression during the estrous cycle and its regulation by gonadal steroids in vivo by flow cytometry. We identified ERα variants in the plasma membrane of anterior pituitary cells during the estrous cycle and studied E2 regulation of these mERα variants in vitro by surface biotinylation and Western Blot. E2-BSA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by MPP in total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes. In cycling rats, we detected a higher number of lactotropes and a lower number of somatotropes expressing mERα at proestrus than at diestrus. Acute E2 treatment increased the percentage of mERα-expressing lactotropes whereas it decreased the percentage of mERα-expressing somatotropes. We detected three mERα isoforms of 66, 39 and 22 kDa. Expression of mERα66 and mERα39 was higher at proestrus than at diestrus, and short-term E2 incubation increased expression of these two mERα variants. Our results indicate that the rapid apoptotic action exerted by E2 in lactotropes depends on mERα, probably full-length ERα and/or a 39 kDa ERα variant. Expression and activation of mERα variants in lactotropes could be one of the mechanisms through which E2

  7. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  8. Progress in the molecular understanding of central regulation of body weight by estrogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens can act in the brain to prevent body weight gain. Tremendous research efforts have been focused on estrogen physiology in the brain in the context of body weight control; estrogen receptors and the related signals have been attractive targets for development of new obesity therapies. The o...

  9. Binding and transactivation of the largemouth bass estrogen receptors by model compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens (EEs) are chemicals in the environment that can elicit adverse effects on estrogen (E2) signaling by binding with the estrogen receptors (ERs). In largemouth bass (LMB), the physiological actions of E2 are primarily mediated via three receptors (ERα, ERßb ...

  10. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas citronellolis SJTE-3, an Estrogen- and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Daning; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Pingping; Peng, Wanli; Ji, Nannan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis SJTE-3, isolated from the active sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in China, can utilize a series of environmental estrogens and estrogen-like toxicants. Here, we report its whole-genome sequence, containing one circular chromosome and one circular plasmid. Genes involved in estrogen biodegradation in this bacterium were predicted. PMID:27932659

  11. Estrogen rapidly phosphorylates AMPK, Akt, and AS160 in isolated rat soleus muscles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen status is positively correlated with whole body insulin sensitivity, however direct effects of estrogen on skeletal muscle glucose uptake have not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine if estrogen can acutely activate Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and/or Akt...

  12. Evaluation of surface waters associated with animal feeding operations for estrogenic chemicals and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens and estrogenic activity (EA) were evaluated in surface waters associated with animal feeding operations. Water was sampled at 19 sites in 12 states using discrete (n=41) and POCIS (n=19) sampling methods. Estrogenic chemicals measured in unfiltered water by GC/MS2 included: estrone (E1),17...

  13. Bone marrow oxytocin mediates the anabolic action of estrogen on the skeleton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen withdrawal in women due to natural or artificial menopause is followed by rapid bone loss, osteoporosis, and a high fracture risk. Replacement with estrogen prevents this bone loss and reduces the risk of fracture. Estrogen uses two mechanisms to exert this effect: it inhibits bone resorpti...

  14. Steroid receptor coactivator-1 mediates estrogenic actions to prevent body weight gain in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) expressed by hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and steroidogenic factor-1 neurons largely mediates the antiobesity effects of estrogens in females. However, the critical molecular events that are coupled to ERalpha and mediate estrogenic effects on energy balance rem...

  15. The hair follicle as an estrogen target and source.

    PubMed

    Ohnemus, Ulrich; Uenalan, Murat; Inzunza, José; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Paus, Ralf

    2006-10-01

    For many decades, androgens have dominated endocrine research in hair growth control. Androgen metabolism and the androgen receptor currently are the key targets for systemic, pharmacological hair growth control in clinical medicine. However, it has long been known that estrogens also profoundly alter hair follicle growth and cycling by binding to locally expressed high-affinity estrogen receptors (ERs). Besides altering the transcription of genes with estrogen-responsive elements, 17beta-estradiol (E2) also modifies androgen metabolism within distinct subunits of the pilosebaceous unit (i.e., hair follicle and sebaceous gland). The latter displays prominent aromatase activity, the key enzyme for androgen conversion to E2, and is both an estrogen source and target. Here, we chart the recent renaissance of estrogen research in hair research; explain why the hair follicle offers an ideal, clinically relevant test system for studying the role of sex steroids, their receptors, and interactions in neuroectodermal-mesodermal interaction systems in general; and illustrate how it can be exploited to identify novel functions and signaling cross talks of ER-mediated signaling. Emphasizing the long-underestimated complexity and species-, gender-, and site-dependence of E2-induced biological effects on the hair follicle, we explore targets for pharmacological intervention in clinically relevant hair cycle manipulation, ranging from androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism via telogen effluvium to chemotherapy-induced alopecia. While defining major open questions, unsolved clinical challenges, and particularly promising research avenues in this area, we argue that the time has come to pay estrogen-mediated signaling the full attention it deserves in future endocrinological therapy of common hair growth disorders.

  16. Rapid actions of xenoestrogens disrupt normal estrogenic signaling.

    PubMed

    Watson, Cheryl S; Hu, Guangzhen; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A

    2014-03-01

    Some chemicals used in consumer products or manufacturing (e.g. plastics, surfactants, pesticides, resins) have estrogenic activities; these xenoestrogens (XEs) chemically resemble physiological estrogens and are one of the major categories of synthesized compounds that disrupt endocrine actions. Potent rapid actions of XEs via nongenomic mechanisms contribute significantly to their disruptive effects on functional endpoints (e.g. cell proliferation/death, transport, peptide release). Membrane-initiated hormonal signaling in our pituitary cell model is predominantly driven by mERα with mERβ and GPR30 participation. We visualized ERα on plasma membranes using many techniques in the past (impeded ligands, antibodies to ERα) and now add observations of epitope proximity with other membrane signaling proteins. We have demonstrated a range of rapid signals/protein activations by XEs including: calcium channels, cAMP/PKA, MAPKs, G proteins, caspases, and transcription factors. XEs can cause disruptions of the oscillating temporal patterns of nongenomic signaling elicited by endogenous estrogens. Concentration effects of XEs are nonmonotonic (a trait shared with natural hormones), making it difficult to design efficient (single concentration) toxicology tests to monitor their harmful effects. A plastics monomer, bisphenol A, modified by waste treatment (chlorination) and other processes causes dephosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases, in contrast to having no effects as it does in genomic signaling. Mixtures of XEs, commonly found in contaminated environments, disrupt the signaling actions of physiological estrogens even more severely than do single XEs. Understanding the features of XEs that drive these disruptive mechanisms will allow us to redesign useful chemicals that exclude estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities.

  17. Estrogenicity of bisphenol A and bisphenol A dimethacrylate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schafer, T E; Lapp, C A; Hanes, C M; Lewis, J B; Wataha, J C; Schuster, G S

    1999-06-05

    Although pit and fissure sealants have been utilized extensively in dentistry as a way of preventing occlusal caries, results described by Olea et al. (1996) raised concerns about the safety of sealants and other resin-based dental materials due to the reported presence of bisphenol A (BPA) and its dimethacrylate ester (BPA-DM). Although the release of these compounds from dental materials has not been substantiated by two subsequent studies, we believed it was important to confirm or refute the report that BPA and BPA-DM have estrogenic activity in vitro. We grew breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T-47D, ZR-75-1) known to proliferate under estrogenic stimulation in phenol red-free DMEM containing human serum and concentrations of BPA or BPA-DM ranging from 10(-8)M to 5 x 10(-6)M. After 1 week, plates were harvested for crystal violet or sulforhodamine-B assays, and the optical densities of groups of treated cells were compared with values from control cells. At concentrations at or above 10(-6)M, both BPA and BPA-DM significantly increased cell proliferation (p < 0.05), comparable to the increase seen with 10(-9)M of estrogen. Flow cytometric methods demonstrated that these mitogenic effects occurred within 24 h of exposure to estrogen, BPA, or BPA-DM. The increase in DNA synthesis was analogous to that seen with estrogen stimulation. Thus, we confirmed that BPA and BPA-DM cause cell proliferation at micromolar concentrations that exceed the effective concentrations of estrogen by 1 to 10,000-fold.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT REDUCES THE MNEMONIC AND NEURAL BENEFITS OF ESTROGEN

    PubMed Central

    GRESACK, J. E.; FRICK, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The degree to which memory is enhanced by estrogen replacement in postmenopausal women may depend on environmental factors such as education. The present study utilized an animal model of environmental enrichment to determine whether environmental factors influence the mnemonic and neural response to estrogen. Female mice were raised in standard (SC) or enriched (EC) conditions from weaning until adulthood (7 months). All mice were ovariectomized at 10 weeks, and tested in object recognition and water-escape motivated radial arm maze (WRAM) tasks at 6 months. Each day at the completion of training, mice received injections of 0.1 mg/kg cyclodextrin-encapsulated 17-β-estradiol (E2), 0.2 mg/kg E2, or cyclodextrin vehicle (VEH). At the completion of behavioral testing, hippocampal levels of the presynaptic protein synaptophysin and of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. Enrichment effects were evident in VEH-treated mice; relative to SC-VEH females, EC-VEH females committed fewer working memory errors in the WRAM and exhibited increased hippocampal synaptophysin levels. Estrogen effects depended on environmental conditions. E2 (0.2 mg/kg) improved object memory only in SC females. The same dose improved working memory in SC females, but somewhat impaired working memory in EC females. Furthermore, both doses reduced hippocampal synaptophysin levels in EC, but not SC, females. In contrast, E2 reduced hippocampal BDNF levels in SC, but not EC, females. This study is the first to compare the effects of estrogen on memory and hippocampal function in enriched and non-enriched female mice. The results suggest that: (1) estrogen benefits object and working memory more in mice raised in non-enriched environments than in those raised in enriched environments, and (2) the changes induced by estrogen and/or enrichment may be associated with alterations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:15381276

  19. Aromatase, estrogen receptors and brain development in fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Adrio, Fátima; Diotel, Nicolas; Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Nasri, Ahmed; Vaillant, Colette; Kah, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Estrogens affect brain development of vertebrates, not only by impacting activity and morphology of existing circuits, but also by modulating embryonic and adult neurogenesis. The issue is complex as estrogens can not only originate from peripheral tissues, but also be locally produced within the brain itself due to local aromatization of androgens. In this respect, teleost fishes are quite unique because aromatase is expressed exclusively in radial glial cells, which represent pluripotent cells in the brain of all vertebrates. Expression of aromatase in the brain of fish is also strongly stimulated by estrogens and some androgens. This creates a very intriguing positive auto-regulatory loop leading to dramatic aromatase expression in sexually mature fish with elevated levels of circulating steroids. Looking at the effects of estrogens or anti-estrogens in the brain of adult zebrafish showed that estrogens inhibit rather than stimulate cell proliferation and newborn cell migration. The functional meaning of these observations is still unclear, but these data suggest that the brain of fish is experiencing constant remodeling under the influence of circulating steroids and brain-derived neurosteroids, possibly permitting a diversification of sexual strategies, notably hermaphroditism. Recent data in frogs indicate that aromatase expression is limited to neurons and do not concern radial glial cells. Thus, until now, there is no other example of vertebrates in which radial progenitors express aromatase. This raises the question of when and why these new features were gained and what are their adaptive benefits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  20. Keto-enol tautomerism in estrogen hormone. A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameh-Bozorghi, Saeed; Shirani, Hossein; Ghaempanah, Aram; Ghapanvari, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The HF/6-311+G** calculation was used to investigate Keto-Enol tautomerism of Estrogen Hormone. Molecular geometries of keto, enol and transition state of this reaction were optimized and NBO calculations were performed. These calculation results showed that activation energy (Ea) of Keto-Enol tautomerization of Estrogen is 118.65 Kcal mol-1. Energetic study at B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory revealed that keto tautomer is more stable structure. NBO analysis results have a good agreements with optimized geometries and experimental data.

  1. Effect of diet on fecal and urinary estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Tucker, H A; Knowlton, K F; Meyer, M T; Khunjar, W O; Love, N G

    2010-05-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has identified estrogens from animal feeding operations as a major environmental concern, but few data are available to quantify the excretion of estrogenic compounds by dairy cattle. The objectives of this study were to quantify variation in estrogenic activity in feces and urine due to increased dietary inclusion of phytoestrogens. Ten Holstein heifers were assigned to 2 groups balanced for age and days pregnant; groups were randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a 2-period crossover design. Dietary treatments consisted of grass hay or red clover hay, and necessary supplements. Total collection allowed for sampling of feed refusals, feces, and urine during the last 4 d of each period. Feces and urine samples were pooled by heifer and period, and base extracts were analyzed for estrogenic activity (estrogen equivalents) using the yeast estrogen screen bioassay. Feces and urine samples collected from 5 heifers were extracted and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to quantify excretion of 7 phytoestrogenic compounds. Excretion of 17-beta estradiol equivalents in urine was higher and tended to be higher in feces for heifers fed red clover hay (84.4 and 120.2 mg/d for feces and urine, respectively) compared with those fed grass hay (57.4 and 35.6 mg/d). Analysis by LC-MS/MS indicated greater fecal excretion of equol, genistein, daidzein, coumestrol, and formononetin by heifers fed red clover hay (1634, 29.9, 96.3, 27.8, and 163 mg/d, respectively) than heifers fed grass hay (340, 3.0, 46.2, 8.8, and 18.3 mg/d, respectively). Diet had no effect on fecal biochanin A or 2-carbethoxy-5, 7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone. Four phytoestrogens were detected in urine (2-carbethoxy-5, 7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone, daidzein, equol, and formononetin) and their excretion was not affected by diet. Identifying sources of variation in estrogenic activity of manure will aid in the

  2. Determination of estrogenic activity by LYES-assay (yeast estrogen screen-assay assisted by enzymatic digestion with lyticase).

    PubMed

    Schultis, T; Metzger, J W

    2004-12-01

    In order to enhance the sensitivity and the speed of the yeast estrogen screen (YES)-assay, which has been established in many laboratories for the determination of estrogenic activity of compounds and environmental samples, the LYES-assay, a modified version of the YES-assay including a digestion step with the enzyme lyticase, was developed. With the LYES-assay the estrogenic activities of natural (17beta-estradiol E2 and estrone), synthetic (17alpha-ethinylestradiol EE2) and pharmaceutical estrogens (diethylstilbestrol DES) as well as xenoestrogens (4-nonylphenol NP and five parabens) were determined and compared with the results obtained by other in vitro-assays namely the conventional YES-assay, the E-Screen-assay (MCF-7 breast tumor cell proliferation) and a receptor binding-assay (RB) with human estrogen receptors hER-alpha and hER-beta. In the case of E2 the LYES-assay had a significantly lower limit of quantification (LOQ) than the conventional YES-assay and even two orders of magnitude lower than the RB-assay. Compared to the E-Screen-assay the LOQ of the LYES-assay was almost one order of magnitude higher. The time required to perform the LYES-assay was as little as seven hours compared to three to five days for the conventional YES-assay. Thus, the LYES-assay is a very good alternative to existing estrogenic in vitro-assays, since it has a good sensitivity, is cheap and much faster than the other assays.

  3. Dexamethasone suppresses the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer via inducing estrogen sulfotransferase and inactivating estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-jie; Li, Jian; Hao, Fang-ran; Yuan, Yin; Li, Jing-yun; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Dexamethasone (DEX) is a widely used synthetic glucocorticoid, which has shown anti-cancer efficacy and anti-estrogenic activity. In this study we explored the possibility that DEX might be used as an endocrine therapeutic agent to treat human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The viability and proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines A549 and H1299 were assessed in vitro. Anti-tumor action was also evaluated in A549 xenograft nude mice treated with DEX (2 or 4 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or the positive control tamoxifen (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 32 d. The expression of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) in tumor cells and tissues was examined. The intratumoral estrogen levels and uterine estrogen responses were measured. Results: DEX displayed mild cytotoxicity to the NSCLC cells (IC50 >500 μmol/L) compared to tamoxifen (IC50 <50 μmol/L), but it was able to inhibit the cell proliferation at low micromolar ranges. Furthermore, DEX (0.1–10 μmol/L) dose-dependently up-regulated EST expression in the cells, and inhibited the cell migration in vitro. Triclosan, a sulfation inhibitor, was able to diminish DEX-caused inhibition on the cell viability. In A549 xenograft nude mice, DEX or tamoxifen administration remarkably suppressed the tumor growth. Moreover, DEX administration dose-dependently increased EST expression in tumor tissues, and reduced intratumoral estrogen levels as well as the volumes and weights of uterine. Conclusion: DEX suppresses the growth of A549 xenograft tumors via inducing EST and decreasing estradiol levels in tumor tissues, suggesting that DEX may be used as anti-estrogenic agent for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27133297

  4. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  5. Recycling technology of emitted carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Hironori

    1993-12-31

    Ways to halt global warming are being discussed worldwide. Global warming is an energy problem which is mainly attributed to the large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) released into the atmosphere from the rapid increase in energy consumption since the Industrial Revolution. The basic solution to the problem, therefore, is to cut consumption of fossil fuels. To this end, it is important to promote energy conservation by improving the fuel efficiency of machines, as well as shift to energy sources that do not emit carbon dioxide and develop related technologies. If current trends in economic growth continue in the devloping world as well as the developed countries, there can be no doubt that energy consumption will increase. Therefore, alongside energy conservation and the development of alternative energies, the importance of technologies to recover and fix CO{sub 2} will increase in the fight against global warming.

  6. How Light Is Emitted by Plasmonic Metals.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jan; Kleemann, Marie-Elena; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Narang, Prineha; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2017-04-12

    The mechanism by which light is emitted from plasmonic metals such as gold and silver has been contentious, particularly at photon energies below direct interband transitions. Using nanoscale plasmonic cavities, blue-pumped light emission is found to directly track dark-field scattering on individual nanoconstructs. By exploiting slow atomic-scale restructuring of the nanocavity facets to spectrally tune the dominant gap plasmons, this correlation can be measured from 600 to 900 nm in gold, silver, and mixed constructs ranging from spherical to cube nanoparticles-on-mirror. We show that prompt electronic Raman scattering is responsible and confirm that "photoluminescence", which implies phase and energy relaxation, is not the right description. Our model suggests how to maximize light emission from metals.

  7. Light-emitting diodes for analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  8. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle-emitting immunoconjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Kinsey, B.M.; Kassis, A.L.; Ferrara, J.L.M.; Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.; Coleman, C.N.; Adelstein, S.J.; Burakoff, S.J.

    1988-05-20

    Alpha particles are energetic short-range ions whose higher linear energy transfer produces extreme cytotoxicity. An ..cap alpha..-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate consisting of a bismuth-212-labeled monoclonal immunoglobulin M specific for the murine T cell/neuroectodermal surface antigen Thy 1.2 was prepared. Analysis in vitro showed that the radioimmunoconjugate was selectively cytotoxic to a Thy 1.2/sup +/ EL-4 murine tumor cell line. Approximately three bismuth-212-labeled immunoconjugates per target cell reduced the uptake of (/sup 3/H)thymidine by the EL-4 target cells to background levels. Mice inoculated intraperitoneally with EL-4 cells were cured of their ascites after intraperitoneal injection of 150 microcuries of the antigen-specific radioimmunoconjugate, suggesting a possible role for such conjugates in intracavitary cancer therapy. 18 references, 3 figures.

  9. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Pincosy, Philip A.; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600.degree. C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for non-uniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  10. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1983-06-10

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  11. Plasmonic Structures for Sensing and Emitting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, Francesco; Fornasari, Lucia; Patrini, Maddalena; Figus, Cristiana; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Quochi, Francesco; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea; Marabelli, Franco

    2014-12-01

    We report on the study of a plasmonic nanostructure that could be adopted as platform for emitting and sensing applications. Several devices have been prepared and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform micro-reflectance (FT- pR) techniques. In addition, a modelling via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations have been developed in order to interpret the morphological shape and the optical response of the considered structures. Until now, remarkable performances as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based optical sensor have been founded. Moreover, we are performing preliminary trials in order to establish a coupling between photoluminescence (PL) features of suitable emitters with respect to the plasmonic resonances.

  12. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  13. Ionic liquid polyoxometalates as light emitting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-acosta, Denisse; Del Sesto, Rico E; Scott, Brian; Bennett, Bryan L; Purdy, Geraldine M; Muenchausen, Ross E; Mc Kigney, Edward; Gilbertson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The low melting point, negligible vapor pressure, good solubility, and thermal and chemical stability make ionic liquids useful materials for a wide variety of applications. Polyoxometalates are early transition metal oxygen clusters that can be synthesized in many different sizes and with a variety of heterometals. The most attractive feature of POMs is that their physical properties, in particular electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, can be easily modified following known procedures. It has been shown that POMs can exhibit cooperative properties, as superconductivity and energy transfer. POM ionic liquids can be obtained by selecting the appropliate cation. Different alkyl ammonium and alkyl phosphonium salts are being used to produce new POM ionic liquids together with organic or inorganic luminescent centers to design light emitting materials. Ammonium and phosphonium cations with activated, polymerizable groups are being used to further polymerize the ionic liquid into transparent, solid materials with high metal density.

  14. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  15. Why only some plants emit isoprene.

    PubMed

    Monson, Russell K; Jones, Ryan T; Rosenstiel, Todd N; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2013-03-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is emitted from many plants and it appears to have an adaptive role in protecting leaves from abiotic stress. However, only some species emit isoprene. Isoprene emission has appeared and been lost many times independently during the evolution of plants. As an example, our phylogenetic analysis shows that isoprene emission is likely ancestral within the family Fabaceae (= Leguminosae), but that it has been lost at least 16 times and secondarily gained at least 10 times through independent evolutionary events. Within the division Pteridophyta (ferns), we conservatively estimate that isoprene emissions have been gained five times and lost two times through independent evolutionary events. Within the genus Quercus (oaks), isoprene emissions have been lost from one clade, but replaced by a novel type of light-dependent monoterpene emissions that uses the same metabolic pathways and substrates as isoprene emissions. This novel type of monoterpene emissions has appeared at least twice independently within Quercus, and has been lost from 9% of the individuals within a single population of Quercus suber. Gain and loss of gene function for isoprene synthase is possible through relatively few mutations. Thus, this trait appears frequently in lineages; but, once it appears, the time available for evolutionary radiation into environments that select for the trait is short relative to the time required for mutations capable of producing a non-functional isoprene synthase gene. The high frequency of gains and losses of the trait and its heterogeneous taxonomic distribution in plants may be explained by the relatively few mutations necessary to produce or lose the isoprene synthase gene combined with the assumption that isoprene emission is advantageous in a narrow range of environments and phenotypes.

  16. Reshaping Light-Emitting Diodes To Increase External Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert; Egalon, Claudio

    1995-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) reshaped, according to proposal, increasing amount of light emitted by decreasing fraction of light trapped via total internal reflection. Results in greater luminous output power for same electrical input power; greater external efficiency. Furthermore, light emitted by reshaped LEDs more nearly collimated (less diffuse). Concept potentially advantageous for conventional red-emitting LEDs. More advantageous for new "blue" LEDs, because luminous outputs and efficiencies of these devices very low. Another advantage, proposed conical shapes achieved relatively easily by chemical etching of semiconductor surfaces.

  17. Rat uterine oxytocin receptor and estrogen receptor α and β mRNA levels are regulated by estrogen through multiple estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takuya; Narita, Kazumi; Ichimaru, Toru

    2014-03-07

    Estrogen action is mediated through several types of receptors (ERs), such as ERα, ERβ and putative membrane ERs. Oxytocin receptor (OTR) and ER expression levels in the rat uterus are regulated by estrogen; however, which types of ERs are involved has not been elucidated. This study examined OTR, ERα and ERβ levels in ovariectomized rats treated with 17β-estradiol (E2), an ERα agonist (PPT), an ERβ agonist (DPN) or estren (Es). E2 and PPT increased OTR mRNA levels and decreased ERα and ERβ mRNA levels 3 and 6 h posttreatment. DPN decreased ERα and ERβ mRNA levels at 3 and 6 h, while OTR mRNA levels increased at 3 h and decreased at 6 h. OTR mRNA levels increased 3 h after the Es treatment and then declined until 6 h. ERα and ERβ mRNA levels decreased by 3 h and remained low until 6 h posttreatment with Es. The ER antagonist ICI182,780 (ICI) suppressed the increases in OTR mRNA levels induced 3 h after the Es treatment. However, ICI and tamoxifen (Tam) had no significant effect on ERα and ERβ mRNA levels in the Es-treated or vehicle-treated group. In intact rats, proestrus-associated increases in OTR mRNA levels were antagonized by both ICI and Tam. However, decreases in ERα and ERβ mRNA levels were not antagonized by Tam and ICI, respectively. Therefore, uterine OTR gene expression is upregulated by estrogen through the classical nuclear (or non-nuclear) ERs, ERα and ERβ, while the levels of these ERs are downregulated by estrogen through multiple pathways including Es-sensitive nonclassical ERs.

  18. Estradiol-induced modulation of estrogen receptor-beta and GABA within the adult neocortex: a potential transsynaptic mechanism for estrogen modulation of BDNF.

    PubMed

    Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2006-12-01

    Estrogen influences brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the neocortex. However, BDNF-producing cortical neurons do not express detectable levels of nuclear estrogen receptors; instead, the most abundant cortical nuclear estrogen receptor, ER-beta, is present in GABAergic neurons, prompting us to test the hypothesis that estrogen effects on BDNF are mediated via cortical inhibitory interneurons. Adult female ovariectomized rats were provided acute estrogen replacement and the number of cortical GABA, ER-beta, and ER-beta/GABA double-labeled neurons was examined. Within 48 hours of injection of 17-beta-estradiol, the number of perirhinal neurons double-labeled for ER-beta/GABA was reduced by 28% (P<0.01 compared to vehicle-treated ovariectomized controls), and all cells expressing detectable levels of GABA were reduced by 19% (P<0.01). To investigate potential relationships between estrogen receptors, GABAergic neurons, and BDNF-expressing cells, brain sections were double- or triple-labeled for ER-beta, GABAergic, and BDNF immunomarkers. The findings indicated that ER-beta-bearing inhibitory neurons project onto other GABAergic neurons that lack nuclear estrogen receptors; these inhibitory neurons in turn innervate BDNF-expressing excitatory cells. High estrogen states reduce cortical GABA levels, presumably releasing inhibition on BDNF-expressing neurons. This identifies a putative two-step transsynaptic mechanism whereby estrogen availability modulates expression of inhibitory transmitters, resulting in increased BDNF expression.

  19. Dietary estrogens stimulate human breast cells to enter the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Dees, C; Foster, J S; Ahamed, S; Wimalasena, J

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that dietary estrogens neutralize the effect of synthetic chemicals that mimic the effects of estrogen (i.e., xenoestrogens, environmental estrogens). Genistein, a dietary estrogen, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells at high doses but additional studies have suggested that at low doses, genistein stimulates proliferation of breast cancer cells. Therefore, if dietary estrogens are estrogenic at low doses, one would predict that they stimulate estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer cells to enter the cell cycle. Genistein and the fungal toxin zearalenone were found to increase the activity of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclin D1 synthesis and stimulate the hyperphosphorylation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product pRb105 in MCF-7 cells. The steroidal antiestrogen ICI 182,780 suppressed dietary estrogen-mediated activation of Cdk2. Dietary estrogens not only failed to suppress DDT-induced Cdk2 activity, but were found to slightly increase enzyme activity. Both zearalenone and genistein were found to stimulate the expression of a luciferase reporter gene under the control of an estrogen response element in MVLN cells. Our findings are consistent with a conclusion that dietary estrogens at low concentrations do not act as antiestrogens, but act like DDT and estradiol to stimulate human breast cancer cells to enter the cell cycle. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9168007

  20. Both ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone are necessary for hormonal mammary carcinogenesis in ovariectomized ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Blank, Edward W; Wong, Po-Yin; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar; Guzman, Raphael; Nandi, Satyabrata

    2008-03-04

    August-Copenhagen-Irish (ACI) rats are unique in that the ovary-intact females develop high incidence of mammary cancers induced solely by hormones upon prolonged exposure to high levels of estrogen alone. Studies have also shown that such prolonged exposure to high-dose estrogen results in human-like aneuploid mammary cancers in ovary-intact ACI rats. To determine the role of progesterone in mammary carcinogenesis, six-week-old intact and ovariectomized ACI rats were continuously exposed to low- and high-dose estrogen alone, progesterone alone, low-dose estrogen plus progesterone, and ovariectomized ACI rats with high-dose estrogen plus progesterone. Also, ovariectomized ACI rats were treated with high-dose estrogen plus progesterone plus testosterone to determine the role of the androgen, testosterone, if any, in hormonal mammary carcinogenesis. The results indicate that continuous exposure to high, but not low, concentrations of estrogen alone can induce mammary carcinogenesis in intact but not in ovariectomized rats. Mammary carcinogenesis in ovariectomized ACI rats requires continuous exposure to high concentrations of estrogen and progesterone. The addition of testosterone propionate does not affect tumor incidence in such rats. These results suggest that both ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone are necessary for mammary carcinogenesis induced solely by hormones in ovariectomized ACI rats. Our results are in agreement with the Women's Health Initiative studies, where treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen (ERT) alone did not increase the risk of breast cancer, but estrogen and progesterone (HRT) did.

  1. GPER: a novel target for non-genomic estrogen action in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Han, Guichun; Li, Fen; Yu, Xuan; White, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    A key to harnessing the enormous therapeutic potential of estrogens is understanding the diversity of estrogen receptors and their signaling mechanisms. In addition to the classic nuclear estrogen receptors (i.e., ERα and ERβ), over the past decade a novel G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has been discovered in cancer and other cell types. More recently, this non-genomic signaling mechanism has been found in blood vessels, and mediates vasodilatory responses to estrogen and estrogen-like agents; however, downstream signaling events involved acute estrogen action remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to discuss the latest knowledge concerning GPER modulation of cardiovascular function, with a particular emphasis upon how activation of this receptor could mediate acute estrogen effects in the heart and blood vessels (i.e., vascular tone, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis, endothelial function, myocardial protection). Understanding the role of GPER in estrogen signaling may help resolve some of the controversies associated with estrogen and cardiovascular function. Moreover, a more thorough understanding of GPER function could also open significant opportunities for the development of new pharmacological strategies that would provide the cardiovascular benefits of estrogen while limiting the potentially dangerous side effects.

  2. Electrochemical estrogen screen method based on the electrochemical behavior of MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlian; Song, Jia; Bi, Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Jiguang; Wu, Dongmei

    2016-08-05

    It was an urgent task to develop quick, cheap and accurate estrogen screen method for evaluating the estrogen effect of the booming chemicals. In this study, the voltammetric behavior between the estrogen-free and normal fragmented MCF-7 cell suspensions were compared, and the electrochemical signal (about 0.68V attributed by xanthine and guanine) of the estrogen-free fragmented MCF-7 cell suspension was obviously lower than that of the normal one. The electrochemistry detection of ex-secretion purines showed that the ability of ex-secretion purines of cells sharp decreased due to the removing of endogenous estrogen. The results indicated that the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells was related to the level of intracellular estrogen. When the level of intracellular estrogen was down-regulated, the concentrations of the xanthine and hypoxanthine decreased, which led to the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells fall. Based on the electrochemical signal, the electrochemical estrogen screen method was established. The estrogen effect of estradiol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A was evaluated with the electrochemical method, and the result was accordant with that of MTT assay. The electrochemical estrogen screen method was simple, quickly, cheap, objective, and it exploits a new way for the evaluation of estrogenic effects of chemicals.

  3. Estrogenic activity of the phytoestrogens naringenin, 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin and 8-prenylnaringenin.

    PubMed

    Zierau, Oliver; Gester, Sven; Schwab, Pia; Metz, Peter; Kolba, Susanne; Wulf, Marina; Vollmer, Günter

    2002-05-01

    Chemically synthesized naringenin derivatives, identical to natural occurring compounds, were tested for their estrogenic activity using two independent estrogen screening assays. Using a yeast based estrogen receptor assay, strong estrogenic activities were demonstrated for 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin and 8-prenylnaringenin, while the parent compound naringenin did not show recognizable estrogenic activity. In MVLN cells, a bioluminescent MCF-7-derived cell line, the estrogenic activity of 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin was detected at concentrations of 10(-6) M and 5 x 10(-6) M respectively. Naringenin demonstrated estrogenic activity but only at a concentration of 10(-5) M. These estrogenic effects are mediated by the ER, as the antiestrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen inhibited these activities. In summary, this study provides the further confirmation that 8-prenylnaringenin demonstrates high estrogenic activity, and demonstrated for the first time for 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin a reasonable high estrogenic activity, while naringenin exhibit low or no estrogenic activity.

  4. Biosensor Zebrafish Provide New Insights into Potential Health Effects of Environmental Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Okhyun; Takesono, Aya; Tada, Masazumi; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Environmental estrogens alter hormone signaling in the body that can induce reproductive abnormalities in both humans and wildlife. Available testing systems for estrogens are focused on specific systems such as reproduction. Crucially, however, the potential for significant health impacts of environmental estrogen exposures on a variety of body systems may have been overlooked. Objective: Our aim was to develop and apply a sensitive transgenic zebrafish model to assess real-time effects of environmental estrogens on signaling mechanisms in a whole body system for use in integrated health assessments. Methods: We created a novel transgenic biosensor zebrafish containing an estrogen-inducible promoter derived with multiple tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) and a Gal4ff-UAS system for enhanced response sensitivity. Results: Using our novel estrogen-responsive transgenic (TG) zebrafish, we identified target tissues for environmental estrogens; these tissues have very high sensitivity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Exposure of the TG fish to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) induced specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a wide variety of tissues including the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, otic vesicle, forebrain, lateral line, and ganglions, most of which have not been established previously as targets for estrogens in fish. Furthermore, we found that different EDCs induced GFP expression with different tissue response patterns and time trajectories, suggesting different potential health effects. Conclusion: We have developed a powerful new model for understanding toxicological effects, mechanisms, and health impacts of environmental estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:22510978

  5. Biochar as potential adsorptive media for estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an emerging problem in water pollution due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife. Estrogenic compounds are a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are particularly dangerous since they are very potent and can affect fish at concentrations as low as ...

  6. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  7. Estrogenic protection against gp120 neurotoxicity: role of microglia.

    PubMed

    Zemlyak, Ilona; Brooke, Sheila; Sapolsky, Robert

    2005-06-07

    HIV infection of the nervous system can cause neurotoxicity, and the glycoprotein gp120 of HIV seems to play a key role in this. gp120 is neurotoxic through a multi-cellular pathway, stimulating microglia to release excitotoxins, cytokines and reactive oxygen species, which then damage neurons. We have previously shown that estrogen decreases the neurotoxicity of gp120 in mixed neuronal/glial cultures. In this study, we determine whether estrogen a) decreases the collective neurotoxicity of the factors released by gp120-treated microglia, and/or b) enhances the ability of neurons to survive such factors. To do so, we established microglial cultures, mixed neuronal/glial hippocampal cultures, and neuron-enriched cultures, independently manipulating gp120 and estrogen exposure in each type of culture, and inducing neurotoxicity in neuron-containing cultures by introducing conditioned media from gp120-treated microglial cultures. We observe that estrogen can exert some small protective effects at the level of bolstering neuronal resistance, but that the bulk of its protective effects arise at the level of decreasing the neurotoxicity of factors released by microglia.

  8. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  9. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  10. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  11. Removal and Transformation of Estrogens During the Coagulation Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over the possible presence of endocrine disrupting compounds in finished drinking waters. Bench-scale studies (jar tests) simulating coagulation were conducted to evaluate the ability of tw...

  12. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Recherche Louis- Charles Simard, Montreal, Canada. Four nor- mal human breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties of pre- menopausal women were obtained...to hormone resistance. Cancer Res 1990; 50: 6208-17. 22. Karnik PS, Kulkarni S, Lui XP, Budd GT, Bukowski RM. Estrogen receptor mutations in

  13. [Cardiovascular effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators. Current perspectives].

    PubMed

    Simoncini, Tommaso; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea R

    2003-02-01

    The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after the menopause for the prevention of the long-term complications of estrogen deprivation has recently been questioned after the publication of large clinical trials that failed to show benefits for postmenopausal women. Although these trials risk to dump the widespread opinion of the cardioprotective effects of long-term estrogen use, they have many pitfalls that prevent a direct clinical application of these negative results. Furthermore, the large amount of epidemiological and experimental evidence indicating estrogens as protective on the vascular system cannot be ignored, and efforts should be devoted to understand the reasons for the discrepancy of results of these recent large trials. In the meanwhile, different molecules should be studied in depth as for the actions on the cardiovascular system, and their specific mechanisms of actions should be elucidated. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) are a promising family of molecules and some of these compounds have positive effects on cardiovascular risk parameters as well as on vascular cells. Large trials are ongoing to study the impact of these substances on cardiovascular risk, and the near future should provide us with answers on the possible use of SERM as possible safer alternatives to HRT for the long-term prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women.

  14. Nuclear estrogen receptor molecular heterogeneity in the mouse uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, T.S.; Korach, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Holomeric estrogen receptor (ER) prepared from ovariectomized mouse uteri displays heterogeneous electrophoretic mobility when analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. ER derived from nuclei (ER/sub n/) appears as a closely spaced doublet having apparent molecular masses of 66.4 and 65 kDa, while ER from the cytosolic compartment (ER/sub c/) has a single band of 65 kDa. Both partially purified ER/sub c/ and the 8S form of unactivated ER/sub c/ show only the 65-kDa band. The appearance of the ER/sub n/ doublet is hormonally inducible, and the relative proportions of the two doublet bands are influenced by the type of hormone treatment, with weakly estrogenic compounds yielding the lower band as predominant while potent estrogens increase the proportion of the upper band. Steroid binding of the ER/sub n/ doublet was determined by (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine affinity labeling of both the 66.4- and the 65-kDa peptides; binding to the 65-kDa peptide was predominant. The ER/sub n/ doublet displays a time dependency after estrogen administration with maximal amounts occurring in a bimodal fashion at 1 and 8 hr.

  15. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  16. Sorption and degradation of estrogen conjugates in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural estrogenic hormone, 17'-estradiol (E2), can disrupt the endocrine system of some aquatic species at ng/L concentrations. Laboratory studies have shown low potentials for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment due to high degradation and soil retention. However, field studies have...

  17. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS THROUGH THE COAGULATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), leading to a growing concern over the possible presence of EDCs in finished drinking waters. C...

  18. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS THROUGH THE COAGULATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), leading to concern over the possible presence of EDCs in finished drinking waters. Consequently, it is ...

  19. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS THROUGH THE COAGULATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), leading to a growing concern over the possible presence of EDCs in finished drinking waters. Con...

  20. Examining triclosan-induced potentiation of the estrogen uterotrophic effect

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (TCS), a widely used antibacterial, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor. We reported previously that TCS potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth in rats orally administered 3 μg/kg EE and TCS (2 to 18 mg/kg) in the utero...

  1. Synchronous Multiple Lung Adenocarcinomas: Estrogen Concentration in Peripheral Lung

    PubMed Central

    Shinchi, Yusuke; Sanada, Mune; Motooka, Yamato; Fujino, Kosuke; Mori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection rate of synchronous multiple lung adenocarcinomas (SMLA), which display multiple ground glass opacity nodules in the peripheral lung, is increasing due to advances in high resolution computed tomography. The backgrounds of multicentric development of adenocarcinoma are unknown. In this study, we quantitated estrogen concentration in the peripheral lungs of postmenopausal female patients with SMLA. Methods The tissue concentration of estrogens (estrone [E1] and estdadiol [E2]) in the noncancerous peripheral lung were measured with liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in postmenopausal female patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The expression levels of CYP19A1 in the normal lung were also quantitated with real-time PCR. Thirty patients with SMLA and 79 cases of control patients with single lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Results The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the noncancerous tissue were significantly higher in SMLA cases than control cases (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). The minor allele (A) of single nucleotide polymorphism rs3764221 were significantly associated with higher concentration of E1 and E2 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively) and higher CYP19A1 mRNA expression (P = 0.03). Conclusion The tissue estrogen concentration of peripheral lung was significantly higher in SMLA than control cases. The high concentration of estrogen may be one of the causes of multicentric development of peripheral lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27526096

  2. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS FOLLOWING CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Although there has not yet been a determination of risks posed by EDCs in finished drinking wat...

  3. DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATION OF A POTENTIAL NON-STEROIDAL ESTROGEN: TRICLOSAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan is an antibacterial agent commonly used in industry and often detected in wastewater effluent. The potential of triclosan to act as an endocrine disruptor was examined because its chemical structure closely resembles known non-steroidal estrogens (e.g. DES, bis-phenol A...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about the potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife has prompted this study of effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection in songbirds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as a model as it is ...

  9. EFFECTS OF EXTROGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection of house finches. Clark, J., Fairbrother, A*. Parametrix, Inc., Corvallis, OR; Brewer, L., EBA, Inc., Sisters, OR; Bennett, R.S., USEPA, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN.

    Concern about the potential for endocrine...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  11. Farm-scale reconnaissance of estrogens in subsurface waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol is a natural estrogenic hormone found in animal manure and urine. In its parent form it has the ability to affect the reproductive systems of aquatic organisms at very low concentrations (10-100 ngL-1). While it has been reported to dissipate rapidly in soil laboratory studies it is...

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of hagfish estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Nishimiya, Osamu; Katsu, Yoshinao; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Todo, Takashi; Hara, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    One or more distinct forms of the nuclear estrogen receptor (ER) have been isolated from many vertebrates to date. To better understand the molecular evolution of ERs, we cloned and characterized er cDNAs from the inshore hagfish, Eptatretus burgeri, a modern representative of the most primitive vertebrates, the agnathans. Two er cDNAs, er1 and er2, were isolated from the liver of a reproductive female hagfish. A phylogenetic analysis placed hagfish ER1 into a position prior to the divergence of vertebrate ERs. Conversely, hagfish ER2 was placed at the base of the vertebrate ERβ clade. The tissue distribution patterns of both ER subtype mRNAs appeared to be different, suggesting that each subtype has different physiological roles associated with estrogen actions. An estrogen responsive-luciferase reporter assay using mammalian HEK293 cells was used to functionally characterize these hagfish ERs. Both ER proteins displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription. These results clearly demonstrate that the hagfish has two functional ER subtypes.

  13. Taxonomic, genetic, chemical and estrogenic characteristics of Epimedium species.

    PubMed

    Shen, P; Guo, B L; Gong, Y; Hong, Deborah Y Q; Hong, Y; Yong, E L

    2007-05-01

    To understand the factors contributing to estrogenic properties of extracts from the genus Epimedium L. (Berberidaceae), we performed taxonomic, genetic and chemical characterization on 37 specimens from 18 species and related these to estrogen receptor (ERalpha and ERbeta) bioactivity, as measured by reporter genes in stable human cells. Boot strap values derived from amplified fragment length polymorphisms indicated that specimens of E. koreanum, E. brevicornum, E. myrianthum, E. leishanense, and E. membranaceum were genetically distinct and this was supported by their very similar ERalpha activities. In contrast, specimens from E. pubescens and E. sagittatum were diverse both genetically, chemically and in terms of ERalpha and ERbeta bioactivities. Strikingly, a genetic cluster comprising six rare Epimedium species exhibited strongest ERalpha and ERbeta activity, and this bioactivity was positively correlated with content of trace flavonoid aglycones (kaempferol, apigenin, quercetin, luteolin and breviflavone B). In contrast, there was no association between estrogenic activity and the major flavonol glycoside constituents (icariin and epimedin A-C). Although they exhibited equally strong ERalpha and ERbeta activity, E. koreanum can be clearly differentiated from E. pubescens and E. brevicornum by genetic distance and its significantly lower content of epimedin C. Our morphologic, genetic, chemical and bioactivity profiling provide the basis for the production of extracts with reproducible estrogenic properties. Such reproducibility will be critical for the standardization of Epimedium-based products.

  14. Estrogens and organochlorine xenoestrogens and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Starek, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is responsible for considerable morbidity and the majority of female deaths in industrialized countries. In the etiology of breast cancer many endogenous and exogenous risk factors have been discussed. It is estimated that about 40% of all cancers in women are hormonally mediated. Both estrogens and androgens play critical roles in the development of breast cancer, which has been confirmed by numerous epidemiologic data on the levels of serum and urine hormons in populations at low and high risk, as well as by case-control and cohort studies. Estrogen carcinogenesis is attributed to receptor-mediated growth and proliferation of breast epithelial cells and to DNA impairment caused by activated estrogen metabolites, e.g., catechol estrogens and free radicals. In the last decade, the organochlorine chemicals, which include pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and other representatives of the dioxin family, have been regarded as xenoestrogens. These chemicals are capable of modulating hormonally regulated processes and inducing changes in growth factors that may be responsible for carcinogenic effect. Many case-control studies have shown the distinct association between breast adipose tissue concentrations of several organochlorine xenoestrogens and breast cancer risk. Also in some studies, the women with breast cancer had higher organochlorine levels in serum as compared with controls.

  15. Estrogen Receptor Polymorphisms and the Vascular Effects of Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, Jacques; Bray, Paul; Liu, Jingmin; Kooperberg, Charles; Hsia, Judith; Lewis, Cora; Cushman, Mary; Bonds, Denise; Hendrix, Susan; Papanicolaou, George; Howard, Tim; Herrington, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test whether estrogen receptor polymorphisms modify the effects of postmenopausal hormone therapy on biomarkers and on risk of coronary heart disease events, stroke, or venous thrombo-embolism. Methods and Results The design was a nested case-control study in the Women’s Health Initiative trials of postmenopausal hormone therapy. The study included all cases in the first 4 years: coronary heart disease, 359; stroke, 248; venous thrombo-embolism, 217). Six estrogen receptor-αand one estrogen receptor-β polymorphisms were genotyped; 8 biomarkers known to be affected by hormone therapy were measured at baseline and one year after randomization. The polymorphisms were not associated with risk of vascular events, and did not modify the increased risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, or venous thrombo-embolism due to hormone therapy. However, a reduced response of plasmin-antiplasmin (PAP) to hormone therapy was noted for ESR1 IVS1-354 (interaction P<0.0001, corrected for multiple comparisons P=0.014) and ESR1 IVS1-1415 (interaction P<0.0001, corrected P= 0.014). Conclusions Estrogen receptor polymorphisms reduce the effect of postmenopausal hormone therapy on PAP, a marker of coagulation and fibrinolysis. However screening for ER polymorphisms to identify women at less risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes is not likely to be useful for making HT treatment decisions. PMID:21106950

  16. Exercise and Estrogen in Women's Health: Getting a Clearer Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnings, Frances

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys recent research on how and when exercise or estrogen therapy should be used to treat or prevent athletic amenorrhea, osteoporosis, cancer, and heart disease. The suspected causes of each disease are discussed and the benefits and dangers of each form of treatment/prevention are weighed. (JL)

  17. Chondroitin sulfate-E mediates estrogen-induced osteoanabolism

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Toshiyasu; Mikami, Tadahisa; Shida, Miharu; Habuchi, Osami; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an age-related disorder of bone remodeling in which bone resorption outstrips bone matrix deposition. Although anticatabolic agents are frequently used as first-line therapies for osteoporosis, alternative anabolic strategies that can enhance anabolic, osteogenic potential are actively sought. Sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, are bidirectional regulators for bone homeostasis; therefore, estrogen-mediated events are important potential targets for such anabolic therapies. Here, we show that estrogen-induced, osteoanabolic effects were mediated via enhanced production of chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E), which could act as an osteogenic stimulant in our cell-based system. Conversely, estrogen deficiency caused reduced expression of CS-E-synthesizing enzymes, including GalNAc4S-6ST, and led to decreased CS-E production in cultures of bone marrow cells derived from ovariectomized mice. Moreover, Galnac4s6st-deficient mice had abnormally low bone mass that resulted from impaired osteoblast differentiation. These results indicated that strategies aimed at boosting CS-E biosynthesis are promising alternative therapies for osteoporosis. PMID:25759206

  18. Estrogen Metabolism and Familial Risk of Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    participating in one of three case - control studies of breast cancer at our institution. Five estrogen metabolites in urine are determined: 1 6a-OHE 1, OHE 1, El, E2 and E3 conjugates. The data collection is in progress.

  19. Efficacy of an advanced sewage treatment plant in southeast Queensland, Australia, to remove estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Leusch, Frederic D L; Chapman, Heather F; Korner, Wolfgang; Gooneratne, S Ravi; Tremblay, Louis A

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenicity profile of domestic sewage during treatment at a medium-sized (3800 EP) advanced biological nutrient removal plant in Queensland, Australia, was characterized using a sheep estrogen receptor binding assay (ERBA) and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay (E-Screen). The raw influent was highly estrogenic (20-54 ng/L EEq), and primary treatment resulted in a slight increase in estrogenicity that was detected in one of the assays (6-80 ng/L). Concurrent chemical analysis suggested that most of the estrogenicity in the influent was due to natural hormones (>48%). Secondary activated sludge treatment followed by nitrification/denitrification effectively removed > 95% of the estrogenic activity (to <0.75-2.6 ng/L), and estrogenicity of the final tertiary-treated effluent was below the detection limit of both assays (<0.75 ng/L).

  20. Are oral contraceptives a significant contributor to the estrogenicity of drinking water?

    PubMed

    Wise, Amber; O'Brien, Kacie; Woodruff, Tracey

    2011-01-01

    Recent observed feminization of aquatic animals has raised concerns about estrogenic compounds in water supplies and the potential for these chemicals to reach drinking water. Public perception frequently attributes this feminization to oral contraceptives (OCs) in wastewater and raises concerns that exposure to OCs in drinking water may contribute to the recent rise in human reproductive problems. This paper reviews the literature regarding various sources of estrogens, in surface, source and drinking water, with an emphasis on the active molecule that comes from OCs. It includes discussion of the various agricultural, industrial, and municipal sources and outlines the contributions of estrogenic chemicals to the estrogenicity of waterways and estimates that the risk of exposure to synthetic estrogens in drinking water on human health is negligible. This paper also provides recommendations for strategies to better understand all the potential sources of estrogenic compounds in the environment and possibilities to reduce the levels of estrogenic chemicals in the water supply.

  1. The Role of Estrogens in Control of Energy Balance and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, Deborah J.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens play a fundamental role in the physiology of the reproductive, cardiovascular, skeletal, and central nervous systems. In this report, we review the literature in both rodents and humans on the role of estrogens and their receptors in the control of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. Estrogen actions in hypothalamic nuclei differentially control food intake, energy expenditure, and white adipose tissue distribution. Estrogen actions in skeletal muscle, liver, adipose tissue, and immune cells are involved in insulin sensitivity as well as prevention of lipid accumulation and inflammation. Estrogen actions in pancreatic islet β-cells also regulate insulin secretion, nutrient homeostasis, and survival. Estrogen deficiency promotes metabolic dysfunction predisposing to obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. We also discuss the effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators on metabolic disorders. PMID:23460719

  2. Estrogenic activity of glyceollins isolated from soybean elicited with Aspergillus sojae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kang, Sun Chul; Park, Sunmin; Lee, Choong Hwan; Kim, Jong-Sang

    2010-04-01

    Glyceollins, which are synthesized from daidzein in soybeans cultured with fungi, have been shown to have antifungal effects and cancer preventive properties. Several studies have proposed that isoflavones and their metabolites act as a mixed agonist/antagonist for estrogen. Although glyceollins were reported to suppress some cancer cells via anti-estrogenic activity, it is not clear whether the compounds possess estrogenic potential. In contrast to the anti-estrogenic action reported thus far, we observed estrogenic effects of glyceollins using E-screen assay and pS2 expression, whereas glyceollins showed higher affinity for estrogen receptor (ER) beta than ERalpha. We also found that glyceollins were more efficiently produced de novo in minced than in half-sliced soybean, following infection with Aspergillus sojae. In conclusion, glyceollins may be useful in the prevention or amelioration of postmenopausal complications because they had strong estrogenic activity, and their production could be variable depending upon processing prior to fungal inoculation.

  3. White organic light-emitting devices with mixed interfaces between light emitting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Gu; Kee, In Seo; Shim, Hong Shik; Ko, Ick Hwan; Lee, Soonil; Koh, Ken Ha

    2007-06-01

    White organic light-emitting devices with mixed interfaces between emitting layers (MI-EML WOLEDs) showed luminance and efficiency as large as 26213cd/m2 and 9.85cd/A. Efficiencies of MI-EML WOLEDs were about 1.5 times better than those of conventional three-EML WOLEDs for luminance of 1000-5000cd/m2, and their half-decay lifetime showed 3.1 times improvement. Note that if the authors operate typical active-matrix mobile-phone displays based on combination of WOLED and color filters to produce standard white emission for high definition televisions and illumination sources, MI-EML WOLEDs will have advantages of 25% less power consumption and 2.8 times longer lifetime over conventional three-EML WOLEDs.

  4. A green top-emitting organic light-emitting device with improved luminance and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shufen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Jie, Zhonghai; Xie, Wenfa; Zhao, Yi; Song, Ruili; Li, Chuannan; Quan, Baofu; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-09-01

    A top-emitting organic light-emitting device (TOLED) with an architecture of Si/SiO2/Ag/Ag2O/4, 4', 4''-tris(3-methylphenylphenylamino) triphenylamine/4, 4'-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]-biphenyl/ tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3)/LiF/Al/semitransparent Ag is designed with the resonance wavelength in the TOLED corresponding to the emission peak of Alq3. With this optimized cavity structure, light magnification with a coefficient of ~16 (in the forward direction) is observed, leading to significantly improved performances such as a brightness of 100529 cd m-2 (12.5 V), a large luminous efficiency of 10.4 cd A-1 (7 V) and an external quantum efficiency of 2.94% (5 V).

  5. Red-emitting fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with low sensitivity to self-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, S.; Chenais, S.; Tondelier, D.; Geffroy, B.; Gozhyk, I.; Lebental, M.; Ishow, E.

    2010-09-01

    Concentration quenching is a major impediment to efficient organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). We herein report on OLEDs based on a fluorescent amorphous red-emitting starbust triarylamine molecule [4-di(4'-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)amino-4'-dicyanovinylbenzene, named FVIN], exhibiting a very small sensitivity to concentration quenching. OLEDs are fabricated with various doping levels of FVIN into Alq3, and show a remarkably stable external quantum efficiency of 1.5% for doping rates ranging from 5% up to 40%, which strongly relaxes the technological constraints on the doping accuracy. An efficiency of 1% is obtained for a pure undoped active region, along with deep red emission (x=0.6; y=0.35 in the Commission Internationale de l'Energie (CIE) coordinates). A comparison of FVIN with the archetypal 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran dye is presented in an identical multilayer OLED structure.

  6. Relative potencies and combination effects of steroidal estrogens in fish.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Karen L; Cummings, Rob I; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Scholze, Martin; Brighty, Geoff; Sumpter, John P; Tyler, Charles R

    2003-03-15

    The natural steroids estradiol-17beta (E2) and estrone (E1) and the synthetic steroid ethynylestradiol-17alpha (EE2) have frequently been measured in waters receiving domestic effluents. All of these steroids bind to the estrogen receptor(s) and have been shown to elicit a range of estrogenic responses in fish at environmentally relevant concentrations. At present, however, no relative potency estimates have been derived for either the individual steroidal estrogens or their mixtures in vivo. In this study the estrogenic activity of E2, E1, and EE2, and the combination effects of a mixture of E2 and EE2 (equi-potent fixed-ratio mixture), were assessed using vitellogenin induction in a 14-day in vivo juvenile rainbow trout screening assay. Median effective concentrations, relative to E2, for induction of vitellogenin were determined from the concentration-response curves and the relative estrogenic potencies of each of the test chemicals calculated. Median effective concentrations were between 19 and 26 ng L(-1) for E2, 60 ng L(-1) for E1, and between 0.95 and 1.8 ng L(-1) for EE2, implying that EE2 was approximately 11 to 27 times more potent than E2, while E2 was 2.3 to 3.2 times more potent than E1. The median effective concentration, relative to E2, for the binary mixture of E2 and EE2 was 15 ng L(-1) (comprising 14.4 ng L(-1) E2 and 0.6 ng L(-1) EE2). Using the model of concentration addition it was shown that this activity of the binary mixture could be predicted from the activity of the individual chemicals. The ability of each individual steroid to contribute to the overall effect of a mixture, even at individual no-effect concentrations, combined with the high estrogenic potency of the steroids, particularly the synthetic steroid EE2, emphasizes the need to consider the total estrogenic load of these chemicals in our waterways.

  7. Positive association of female overactive bladder symptoms and estrogen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen-Li; Li, Jian-Ri; Lin, Ching-Heng; de Groat, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Estrogen is considered to be a unique hormone in females that has an impact on voiding function. Animal models and clinical epidemiologic studies showed high correlation between estrogen deficiency and female overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. We designed a population-based cohort study from a national health database to assess the association of estrogen deprivation therapy and female OAB. Materials and methods: This study examined the records of 16,128 patients ranging in age from 18 to 40 that were included in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in the years between 2001 and 2010. Of these, 1008 had breast cancer with hormone therapy only and the other 15,120 controls did not have breast cancer or hormone therapy. All patients with neurologic diseases and those with pre-existing OAB identified by information in the NHIRD database were excluded. OAB was defined by medications prescribed for at least 1 month. Risk of new onset OAB in the breast cancer and nonbreast cancer groups was estimated. Fourteen patients (1.4%) experienced OAB in the breast cancer group. Overall, breast cancer with estrogen deprivation therapy increased the risk of OAB by 14.37-fold (adjusted hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval 7.06–29.27). Subgroup analysis showed that in the older age breast cancer group (36–40), a lower Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score and antidepressant medication use for at least 30 days had an impact on the increase of OAB risk. After adjustment of variables, the higher CCI and the use of antipsychotic drugs increased risk of OAB 3.45-fold and 7.45-fold, respectively. The Kaplan–Meier analysis of OAB-free survival in the breast cancer group showed a significant time-dependent increase in incidence of OAB. Conclusion: Estrogen deprivation in young patients with breast cancer increased the risk of OAB. The OAB development rate was steady and fast in the beginning 3 years after estrogen deprivation. This result

  8. ADAM12 induces estrogen-independence in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Roopali; Moses, Marsha A

    2012-02-01

    Antiestrogen therapy has been used successfully to prolong disease-free and overall survival of ER positive breast cancer patients. However, 50% of patients with ER+ tumors fail to respond to such therapy or eventually acquire resistance to endocrine therapy, resulting in tumor progression and mortality. It is imperative, therefore, to understand the mechanisms that lead to hormone refractory breast cancer in order to develop therapeutics that can modulate the resistance to antiestrogen therapy. The protease, ADAM12, can be detected in the urine of breast cancer patients and its levels correlate with disease status, stage, and cancer risk. Within the context of this study, the authors have investigated the role of the two distinct isoforms of ADAM12 in breast tumor cell proliferation and as potential mediators of endocrine resistance. Using stable clones of ADAM12-overexpressing MCF-7 cells, the authors analyzed proliferation rates of these ER+ breast tumor cells both in estrogen-depleted medium and in the presence of the antiestrogens, tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780. Acquired estrogen resistance in these cells was analyzed using phospho-RTK analysis. Upregulation and phosphorylation of proteins were detected via immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. EGFR and MAPK inhibitors were used to explore the mechanism of acquired estrogen resistance in breast tumor cells. It was observed that overexpression of the two isoforms, transmembrane ADAM12-L, and secreted ADAM12-S, in breast tumor cells promoted estrogen-independent proliferation. In ADAM12-L-expressing cells, estrogen-independence was a direct result of increased EGFR expression and MAPK activation, whereas, the mechanism in ADAM12-S-expressing cells may be enhanced IGF-1R signaling. The importance of the EGFR signaling pathway in the estrogen-independent growth of ADAM12-L expressing cells was highlighted by the effect of EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and PD15035 or MAPK inhibitor U0126, each of which abolished the

  9. Identification of estrogenic compounds in fish bile using bioassay-directed fractionation.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Van Oostveen, Annemiek M; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette

    2004-12-01

    Conjugates of estrogenic chemicals, endogenous as well as xenobiotic, are mainly excreted via bile into the intestine. Therefore, measurement of estrogenic activity in bile yields useful information about an organism's internal exposure to (xeno-)estrogens. Although previous studies in The Netherlands have reported estrogenic activity in male fish bile, the contribution of natural hormones and xenobiotic substances to this activity is unknown. To identify compounds responsible for estrogenic activity in fish bile, we developed a bioassay-directed fractionation method for estrogenic chemicals. In this approach, the in vitro reporter gene assay ER-CALUX (Estrogen Responsive Chemical Activated Luciferase Gene Expression) was used to assess estrogenic activity in deconjugated bile samples and to direct RP-HPLC fractionation and chemical analysis (by GC-MS) of estrogenic compounds. The method was applied to bile from male breams (Abramis brama) collected at three locations in The Netherlands. At one of these locations, the River Dommel, extremely high levels of plasma vitellogenin and a high incidence of intersex gonads in these male breams have previously been observed, indicating the exposure to estrogens. In this study, the natural hormones 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and estriol accounted for the majority of estrogenic activity in male bream bile. At the River Dommel, the synthetic contraceptive pill component ethynylestradiol was found in effective concentrations as well. The detected natural and synthetic hormones may be responsible forthe estrogenic effects observed in wild bream from this location. Furthermore, a large number of xenobiotic chemicals was detected at relatively high levels in bile, including triclosan, chloroxylenol, and clorophene. Although chloroxylenol was shown for the first time to be weakly estrogenic, these compounds did not contribute significantly to the estrogenic activity observed.

  10. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  11. Soy consumption alters endogenous estrogen metabolism in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Duncan, A M; Wangen, K E; Kurzer, M S

    2000-08-01

    Isoflavones are soy phytoestrogens that have been suggested to be anticarcinogenic. Our previous study in premenopausal women suggested that the mechanisms by which isoflavones exert cancer-preventive effects may involve modulation of estrogen metabolism away from production of potentially carcinogenic metabolites [16alpha-(OH) estrone, 4-(OH) estrone, and 4-(OH) estradiol] (X. Xu et al., Cancer Epidemiol. Biomark. Prev., 7: 1101-1108, 1998). To further evaluate this hypothesis, a randomized, cross-over soy isoflavone feeding study was performed in 18 healthy postmenopausal women. The study consisted of three diet periods, each separated by a washout of approximately 3 weeks. Each diet period lasted for 93 days, during which subjects consumed their habitual diets supplemented with soy protein isolate providing 0.1 (control), 1, or 2 mg isoflavones/kg body weight/day (7.1 +/- 1.1, 65 +/- 11, or 132 +/- 22 mg/day). A 72-h urine sample was collected 3 days before the study (baseline) and days 91-93 of each diet period. Urine samples were analyzed for 10 phytoestrogens and 15 endogenous estrogens and their metabolites by a capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Compared with the soy-free baseline and very low isoflavone control diet, consumption of 65 mg isoflavones increased the urinary 2/16alpha-(OH) estrone ratio, and consumption of 65 or 132 mg isoflavones decreased excretion of 4-(OH) estrone. When compared with baseline values, consumption of all three soy diets increased the ratio of 2/4-(OH) estrogens and decreased the ratio of genotoxic: total estrogens. These data suggest that both isoflavones and other soy constituents may exert cancer-preventive effects in postmenopausal women by altering estrogen metabolism away from genotoxic metabolites toward inactive metabolites.

  12. Estrogen-dependent visceral hypersensitivity following stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Karpowicz, Jane M; Furman, Andrew J; da Silva, Joyce Teixeira; Traub, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We used functional MRI and a longitudinal design to investigate the brain mechanisms in a previously reported estrogen-dependent visceral hypersensitivity model. We hypothesized that noxious visceral stimulation would be associated with activation of the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala, and that estrogen-dependent, stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity would both enhance activation of these regions and recruit activation of other brain areas mediating affect and reward processing. Ovariectomized rats were treated with estrogen (17 β-estradiol, E2) or vehicle (n = 5 per group) and scanned in a 7T MRI at three different time points: pre-stress (baseline), 2 days post-stress, and 18 days post-stress. Stress was induced via a forced-swim paradigm. In a separate group of ovariectomized rats, E2 treatment induced visceral hypersensitivity at the 2 days post-stress time point, and this hypersensitivity returned to baseline at the 18 days post-stress time point. Vehicle-treated rats show no hypersensitivity following stress. During the MRI scans, rats were exposed to noxious colorectal distention. Across groups and time points, noxious visceral stimulation led to activations in the insula, anterior cingulate, and left amygdala, parabrachial nuclei, and cerebellum. A group-by-time interaction was seen in the right amygdala, ventral striatum-pallidum, cerebellum, hippocampus, mediodorsal thalamus, and pontine nuclei. Closer inspection of the data revealed that vehicle-treated rats showed consistent activations and deactivations across time, whereas estrogen-treated animals showed minimal deactivation with noxious visceral stimulation. This unexpected finding suggests that E2 may dramatically alter visceral nociceptive processing in the brain following an acute stressor. This study is the first to examine estrogen-stress dependent interactions in response to noxious visceral stimulation using functional MRI. Future studies that include other control

  13. Oxidative removal of aqueous steroid estrogens by manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Meirong; Qiu, Yuping; Sheng, G Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the oxidative removal of steroid estrogens from water by synthetic manganese oxide (MnO2) and the factors influencing the reactions. Using 1 x 10(-5)M MnO2 at pH 4, estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3) and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), all at 4 x 10(-6)M, were rapidly removed within 220 min, indicating the effectiveness of MnO2 as an oxidizing agent towards estrogens. E2 removal increased with decreasing pH over the tested range of 4-8, due most likely to increased oxidizing power of MnO2 and a cleaner reactive surface in acidic solutions. Coexisting metal ions of 0.01 M (Cu(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Mn(II)) and Mn(II) released from MnO2 reduction competed with E2 for reactive sites leading to reduced E2 removal. Observed differential suppression on E2 removal may be related to different speciations of metals, as suggested by the MINTEQ calculations, and hence their different adsorptivities on MnO2. By suppressing the metal effect, humic acid substantially enhanced E2 removal. This was attributed to complexation of humic acid with metal ions. With 0.01 M ZnCl2 in solutions containing 1 mg l(-1) humic acid, the binding of humic acid for Zn(II) was determined at 251 mmol g(-1). An in vitro assay using human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells indicated a near elimination of estrogenic activities without secondary risk of estrogen solutions treated with MnO2. Synthetic MnO2 is therefore a promising chemical agent under optimized conditions for estrogen removal from water. Metal chelators recalcitrant to MnO2 oxidation may be properly used to further enhance the MnO2 performance.

  14. LSD1 engages a corepressor complex for the activation of the estrogen receptor α by estrogen and cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Bennesch, Marcela A.; Segala, Gregory; Wider, Diana; Picard, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a transcription factor that can be directly activated by estrogen or indirectly by other signaling pathways. We previously reported that activation of the unliganded ERα by cAMP is mediated by phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator CARM1 by protein kinase A (PKA), allowing CARM1 to bind ERα directly. This being insufficient by itself to activate ERα, we looked for additional factors and identified the histone H3 demethylase LSD1 as a substrate of PKA and an important mediator of this signaling crosstalk as well as of the response to estrogen. Surprisingly, ERα engages not only LSD1, but its partners of the CoREST corepressor complex and the molecular chaperone Hsp90. The recruitment of Hsp90 to promote ERα transcriptional activity runs against the steroid receptor paradigm and suggests that it might be involved as an assembly factor or scaffold. In a breast cancer cell line, which is resistant to the anti-estrogen tamoxifen because of constitutively activated PKA, some interactions are constitutive and drug combinations partially rescue tamoxifen sensitivity. In ERα-positive breast cancer patients, high expression of the genes encoding some of these factors correlates with poor prognosis. Thus, these mechanisms might contribute to ERα-driven breast cancer. PMID:27325688

  15. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analyses of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentration of estrogens in streams from these manures is of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. S...

  16. An estrogen model: the relationship between body mass index, menopausal status, estrogen replacement therapy, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda E; Dinh, Tuan A; Smith, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    We present a mathematical model that lends support to the hypothesis that estrogen levels mediate the complex relationship between body mass index (BMI), menopausal status, estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and breast cancer risk. The model predicts a decrease in the relative risk of breast cancer of 3% per unit increase in BMI (kg/m(2)) for premenopausal women and an increase in the relative risk of 4% per unit increase in BMI for postmenopausal women who are not HRT users. When comparing postmenopausal women who use estrogen-only HRT to postmenopausal women who do not use HRT, the model predicts an increased risk of breast cancer associated with use of estrogen that diminishes with increasing BMI, with a relative risk of 1.6 for women with BMI of 18, 1.2 for women with BMI of 25, and 1.0 for women with BMI ≥ 30. Model predictions agree with data from five major epidemiological studies.

  17. Laccase-mediated transformations of endocrine disrupting chemicals abolish binding affinities to estrogen receptors and their estrogenic activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Viana, María Teresa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are known to mainly affect aquatic organisms, producing negative effects in aquaculture. Transformation of the estrogenic compounds 17β-estradiol (E2), bisphenol-A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), and triclosan (TCS) by laccase of Coriolopsis gallica was studied. Laccase is able to efficiently transform them into polymers. The estrogenic activity of the EDCs and their laccase transformation products was evaluated in vitro as their affinity for the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERα) and for the ligand binding domain of zebrafish (Danio rerio) estrogen receptor alpha (zfERαLBD). E2, BPA, NP, and TCS showed higher affinity for the zfERαLBD than for hERα. After laccase treatment, no affinity was found, except a marginal affinity of E2 products for the zfERαLBD. Endocrine disruption studies in vivo on zebrafish were performed using the induction of vitellogenin 1 as a biomarker (VTG1 mRNA levels). The use of enzymatic bioreactors, containing immobilized laccase, efficiently eliminates the endocrine activity of BPA and TCS, and significantly reduces the effects of E2. The potential use of enzymatic reactors to eliminate the endocrine activity of EDCs in supply water for aquaculture is discussed.

  18. Estrogen Receptor (ER)-α36 Is Involved in Estrogen- and Tamoxifen-Induced Neuroprotective Effects in Ischemic Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chen; Ji, Xiaofei; Liang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yang; Han, Chao; Huang, Liang; Zhang, Qiqi; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Yejun; Liu, Jinqiu

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotection by estrogen (E2) and tamoxifen is well documented in experimental stroke models; however, the exact mechanism is unclear. A membrane-based estrogen receptor, ER-α36, has been identified. Postmenopausal-levels of E2 act through ER-α36 to induce osteoclast apoptosis due to a prolonged activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling. We hypothesized that ER-α36 may play a role in the neuroprotective activities of estrogen and tamoxifen. Here, we studied ER-α36 expression in the brain, as well as its neuroprotective effects against oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in PC12 cells. We found that ER-α36 was expressed in both rat and human brain. In addition, OGD-induced cell death was prevented by l nmol/L 17β-estradiol (E2β). E2β activates the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway in PC12 cells under basal and OGD conditions by interacting with ER-α36 and also induces ER-α36 expression. Low-dose of tamoxifen up-regulated ER-α36 expression and enhanced neuronal survival in an ovariectomized ischemic stroke model. Furthermore, low-dose of tamoxifen enhanced neuroprotective effects by modulating activates or suppress ER-α36. Our results thus demonstrated that ER-α36 is involved in neuroprotective activities mediated by both estrogen and tamoxifen. PMID:26484775

  19. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analysis of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentration of estrogens in streams from these wastes is of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. Streams associated with...

  20. Degradation in organic light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Vincent Vinh

    This thesis is about the fundamental causes of degradation in tris(8-Hydroxyquinoline) Aluminum (Alq3)-based organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Degradation typically occurs when a current is forced through an insulating material. Since the insulator does not support conduction waves (in its ground state), chemical restructuring must occur to accommodate the current. OLEDs have many technical advantages over the well known semiconductor-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). OLEDs have quantum efficiencies ˜1% (˜10 times higher than the LEDs), and operational power thresholds ˜.05mW (˜100 lower than the LEDs). OLEDs are preferred in power limited and portable devices; devices such as laptops and displays consume ˜1/4 of the supplied power---any power saving is significant. Other advantages, like better compliance to curved surfaces and ease of fabrication, give the OLEDs an even greater edge over the LEDs. OLEDs must have at least comparable or better lifetimes to remain attractive. Typical OLEDs last several 100hrs compared to the several 1000hrs for the LEDs. For reliable OLED application, it is necessary to understand the above breakdown mechanism. In this thesis, we attempt to understand the breakdown by looking at how OLEDs are made, how they work, and when they don't. In the opening sections, we give an overview of OLEDs and LEDs, especially how sustained luminescence is achieved through current circulation. Then in Chapter 2, we look at the basic components in the OLEDs. In Chapter 3 we look at how a hole material (like poly-vinyl carbazole or PVK) establishes an excitonic environment for the sustained luminescence in Alq3. We then approximate how potential is distributed when a simple luminescence system is in operation. In Chapter 4, we look at ways of measuring this distribution via the OLED impedance. Finally in Chapter 5, we look at the OLED stability under light emission conditions via PVK and Alq3 photoemission and photoabsorption spectra

  1. Icariin exerts estrogen-like activity in ameliorating EAE via mediating estrogen receptor β, modulating HPA function and glucocorticoid receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhisheng; Wang, Mengxia; Hong, Mingfan; Diao, Shengpeng; Liu, Aiqun; Huang, Yeqing; Yu, Qingyun; Peng, Zhongxing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Estrogen exerts neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in EAE and multiple sclerosis (MS), but its clinical application is hindered due to side effects and risk of tumor. Phytoestrogen structurally or functionally mimics estrogen with fewer side effects than endogenous estrogen. Icariin (ICA), an active component of Epimedium extracts, demonstrates estrogen-like neuroprotective effects. However, it is unclear whether ICA is effective in EAE and what are the underlying mechanisms. Objective: To determine the therapeutic effects of ICA in EAE and explore the possible mechanisms. Methods: C57BL/6 EAE mice were treated with Diethylstilbestrol, different dose of ICA and mid-dose ICA combined with ICI 182780. The clinical scores and serum Interleukin-17 (IL-17), Corticosterone (CORT) concentrations were then analyzed. Western blot were performed to investigate the expressions of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and ERβ in the cerebral white matter of EAE mice. Results: High dose ICA is equally effective in ameliorating neurological signs of EAE as estrogen. Estrogen and ICA has no effects on serum concentrations of IL-17 in EAE. While the CORT levels were decreased by ICA at mid or high doses, the expressions of GR, ERα and ERβ were up-regulated by estrogen or different doses of ICA in a dosedependent manner. Estrogen induced the elevation of ERα more markedly than ICA. In contrast, ICA at mid and high doses promoted ERβ more significantly than estrogen. Conclusion: ICA exerts estrogen-like activity in ameliorating EAE via mediating ERβ, modulating HPA function and up-regulating the expression of GR in cerebral white matter. ICA may be a promising therapeutic option for MS. PMID:27186315

  2. Light emitting elastomer compositions and method of use

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Zifer, Thomas; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2004-11-23

    There is provided a light emitting device comprising a plurality of triboluminescent particles dispersed throughout an elastomeric body and activated by deforming the body in order to transfer mechanical energy to some portion of the particles. The light emitted by these mechanically excited particles is collected and directed into a light conduit and transmitted to a detector/indicator means.

  3. Estrogenic activity and estrogen receptor beta binding of the UV filter 3-benzylidene camphor. Comparison with 4-methylbenzylidene camphor.

    PubMed

    Schlumpf, Margret; Jarry, Hubert; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Ma, Risheng; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2004-07-01

    UV filters represent new classes of estrogenic [Environ. Health Perspect. 109 (2001) 239] or antiandrogenic [Toxicol. Sci. 74 (2003) 43] chemicals. We tested 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC), reported as estrogenic in fish [Pharmacol. Toxicol. 91 (2002) 204], and mammalian systems in comparison to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), shown to be active in rats, and analyzed binding to estrogen receptor subtypes. 3-BC and 4-MBC stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation (EC(50): 0.68 and 3.9 microM). The uterotrophic assay of 3-BC (oral gavage) in immature rats showed unexpected potency with ED50 45.3mg/kg per day; lowest effective dose 2mg/kg per day, and maximum effect with 70% of ethinylestradiol. After comparing with literature data, we found that the oral 3-BC was considerably more potent than oral bisphenol A and almost as active as subcutaneous genistein. 3-BC and 4-MBC displaced 16alpha 125I-estradiol from porcine uterine cytosolic receptors (IC(50): 14.5 and 112 microM), and from recombinant human estrogen receptor beta (hERbeta) (IC(50): 3-BC, 11.8 microM; 4-MBC, 35.3 microM), whereas no displacement was detected at human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) up to 3mM. This subtype selectivity makes the two camphor derivatives interesting model compounds. Their activity on immature rat uterus is not easily explained by ERbeta activation. It cannot be excluded that active metabolites with possibly different receptor binding characteristics are formed in vivo.

  4. Bioactivation of dibrominated biphenyls by cytochrome P450 activity to metabolites with estrogenic activity and estrogen sulfotransferase inhibition capacity.

    PubMed

    van Lipzig, Marola M H; Commandeur, Jan N; de Kanter, Frans J J; Damsten, Micaela C; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Maat, Evelina; Groot, Ed J; Brouwer, Abraham; Kester, Monique H A; Visser, Theo J; Meerman, John H N

    2005-11-01

    Exposure of humans and wildlife to xenobiotics, such as halogenated biphenyls, that interfere with the endogenous estrogen balance may lead to endocrine disruption. Such compounds may either mimic or block estradiol's action by agonistic or antagonistic action, respectively. They may also affect endogenous estradiol concentrations by induction or inhibition of enzymes that metabolize estradiol. In the present study, we demonstrate that estrogenic metabolites of two brominated biphenyls, 2,2'-dibromobiphenyl (2,2'-DBB) and 4,4'-dibromobiphenyl (4,4'-DBB), are formed by rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity. Bioactivation of 2,2'-DBB and 4,4'-DBB yielded various mono- and dihydroxylated bromobiphenyl metabolites, which were collected by preparative HPLC and analyzed by LC/MS. Several of the metabolites bound to the estrogen receptor (ER) activated the ER and inhibited human estrogen sulfotransferase (hEST). Seven monohydroxylated metabolites were positively identified using synthetic monohydroxylated reference compounds. These synthetic monohydroxylated bromobiphenyls also bound to and activated the ER and inhibited hEST. The highest ER affinity was observed for 4-OH-2,2'-DBB, with an EC50 of 6.6 nM. The highest ER activation was observed for 4-OH-3,4'-DBB (EC50 of 74 nM) while 4-OH-4'-MBB and 4-OH-2,2'-DBB induced a supramaximal (as compared to estradiol) ER activation. The strongest hEST inhibition was found with 4-OH-3,4'-DBB (EC50 = 40 nM). In conclusion, we show that two dibrominated biphenyls are bioactivated by CYP activity into very potent estrogenic metabolites and inhibitors of hEST. These findings are of vital importance for accurate risk assessment of exposure to environmental contaminants, such as halogenated biphenyls. Neglecting bioactivation through biotransformation will lead to underestimation of health risks of this class of xenobiotics.

  5. Radioimmunotherapy with α-particle-emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Christof

    2014-01-01

    α-particle-emitting radionuclides are highly cytotoxic and are thus promising candidates for use in targeted radioimmunotherapy of cancer. Due to their high linear energy transfer (LET) combined with a short path length in tissue, α-particles cause severe DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired inaccurately and finally trigger cell death. For radioimmunotherapy, α-emitters such as (225)Ac, (211)At, (212)Bi/(212)Pb, (213)Bi and (227)Th are coupled to antibodies via appropriate chelating agents. The α-emitter immunoconjugates preferably target proteins that are overexpressed or exclusively expressed on cancer cells. Application of α-emitter immunoconjugates seems particularly promising in treatment of disseminated cancer cells and small tumor cell clusters that are released during the resection of a primary tumor. α-emitter immunoconjugates have been successfully administered in numerous experimental studies for therapy of ovarian, colon, gastric, blood, breast and bladder cancer. Initial clinical trials evaluating α-emitter immunoconjugates in terms of toxicity and therapeutic efficacy have also shown positive results in patients with melanoma, ovarian cancer, acute myeloid lymphoma and glioma. The present problems in terms of availability of therapeutically effiective α-emitters will presumably be solved by use of alternative production routes and installation of additional production facilities in the near future. Therefore, clinical establishment of targeted α-emitter radioimmunotherapy as one part of a multimodal concept for therapy of cancer is a promising, middle-term concept.

  6. Spiral inertial waves emitted from geophysical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-03-01

    By numerically simulating an initially unstable geophysical vortex, we discover for the first time a special kind of inertial waves, which are emitted in a spiral manner from the vortices; we refer to these waves as spiral inertial waves (SIWs). SIWs appear at small Rossby numbers (0.01 ≤ Ro ≤ 1) according to our parameter sweep experiments; the amplitude, wavelength and frequency of SIWs are sensitive to Rossby numbers. We extend the Lighthill-Ford radiation into inertial waves, and propose an indicator for the emission of inertial waves; this indicator may be adopted into general circulation models to parameterize inertial waves. Additionally, in our tracer releasing experiments, SIWs organize tracers into spirals, and modify the tracer's local rate of change by advecting tracers vertically. Further, the spirals of SIWs resembles some spiral features observed in the ocean and atmosphere, such as spiral ocean eddies and spiral hurricane rainbands; thus, SIWs may offer another mechanism to form spiral eddies and rainbands. Since no density anomaly is required to generate the spirals of SIWs, we infer that the density anomaly, hence the baroclinic or frontal instability, is unlikely to be the key factor in the formation of these spiral features.

  7. Aggregation in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Abigail

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology has great potential for becoming a solid state lighting source. However, there are inefficiencies in OLED devices that need to be understood. Since these inefficiencies occur on a nanometer scale there is a need for structural data on this length scale in three dimensions which has been unattainable until now. Local Electron Atom Probe (LEAP), a specific implementation of Atom Probe Tomography (APT), is used in this work to acquire morphology data in three dimensions on a nanometer scale with much better chemical resolution than is previously seen. Before analyzing LEAP data, simulations were used to investigate how detector efficiency, sample size and cluster size affect data analysis which is done using radial distribution functions (RDFs). Data is reconstructed using the LEAP software which provides mass and position data. Two samples were then analyzed, 3% DCM2 in C60 and 2% DCM2 in Alq3. Analysis of both samples indicated little to no clustering was present in this system.

  8. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications.

  9. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J; Dedecker, R

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. A calibrated sky radiance spectrum is produced every 8 minutes in normal mode and every minute in rapid sampling mode. The actual sample scan time is 20-30 sec in rapid sampling mode with periodic gaps when the instrument is looking at the blackbodies. Rapid sampling will become available in all AERIs. Rapid sampling time will eventually be reduced to data every 20 seconds. The AERI data can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  10. Photoswitchable NIR-Emitting Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bonacchi, Sara; Cantelli, Andrea; Battistelli, Giulia; Guidetti, Gloria; Calvaresi, Matteo; Manzi, Jeannette; Gabrielli, Luca; Ramadori, Federico; Gambarin, Alessandro; Mancin, Fabrizio; Montalti, Marco

    2016-09-05

    Photo-switching of the NIR emission of gold nanoparticles (GNP) upon photo-isomerization of azobenzene ligands, bound to the surface, is demonstrated. Photophysical results confirm the occurrence of an excitation energy transfer process from the ligands to the GNP that produces sensitized NIR emission. Because of this process, the excitation efficiency of the gold core, upon excitation of the ligands, is much higher for the trans form than for the cis one, and t→c photo-isomerization causes a relevant decrease of the GNP NIR emission. As a consequence, photo-isomerization can be monitored by ratiometric detection of the NIR emission upon dual excitation. The photo-isomerization process was followed in real-time through the simultaneous detection of absorbance and luminescence changes using a dedicated setup. Surprisingly, the photo-isomerization rate of the ligands, bound to the GNP surface, was the same as measured for the chromophores in solution. This outcome demonstrated that excitation energy transfer to gold assists photo-isomerization, rather than competing with it. These results pave the road to the development of new, NIR-emitting, stimuli-responsive nanomaterials for theranostics.

  11. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Wood, Vanessa; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs) have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI). We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs) in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs - optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection - that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt). We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  12. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gero, Jonathan; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth's atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols.The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3-19.2 μm (520-3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3-25.0 μm (400-3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  13. Thermally enhanced blue light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jin; Zhao, Yuji; Oh, Sang-Ho; Herrington, William F.; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate thermoelectric pumping in wide-bandgap GaN based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to take advantage of high junction temperature rather than avoiding the problem of temperature-induced efficiency droop through external cooling. We experimentally demonstrate a thermally enhanced 450 nm GaN LED, in which nearly fourfold light output power is achieved at 615 K (compared to 295 K room temperature operation), with nearly no reduction in the wall-plug efficiency (i.e., electrical-optical energy conversion efficiency) at bias V <ℏω/q . The LED is shown to work in a mode similar to a thermodynamic heat engine operating with charged carriers pumped into the active region by a combination of electrical work and Peltier heat (phonons) drawn from the lattice. In this optimal operating regime at 615 K, the LED injection current (3.26 A/cm2) is of similar magnitude to the operating point of common high power GaN based LEDs (5-35 A/cm2). This result suggests the possibility of removing bulky heat sinks in current high power LED products thus realizing a significant cost reduction for solid-state lighting.

  14. Efficient semiconductor light-emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Lear, Kevin L.; Schneider, Jr., Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    A semiconductor light-emitting device and method. The semiconductor light-emitting device is provided with at least one control layer or control region which includes an annular oxidized portion thereof to channel an injection current into the active region, and to provide a lateral refractive index profile for index guiding the light generated within the device. A periodic composition grading of at least one of the mirror stacks in the device provides a reduced operating voltage of the device. The semiconductor light-emitting device has a high efficiency for light generation, and may be formed either as a resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) or as a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL).

  15. Efficient semiconductor light-emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-02-20

    A semiconductor light-emitting device and method are disclosed. The semiconductor light-emitting device is provided with at least one control layer or control region which includes an annular oxidized portion thereof to channel an injection current into the active region, and to provide a lateral refractive index profile for index guiding the light generated within the device. A periodic composition grading of at least one of the mirror stacks in the device provides a reduced operating voltage of the device. The semiconductor light-emitting device has a high efficiency for light generation, and may be formed either as a resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) or as a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). 12 figs.

  16. Estrogen receptor-beta, estrogen receptor-alpha, and progesterone resistance in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Bulun, Serdar E; Cheng, You-Hong; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Xue, Qing; Attar, Erkut; Trukhacheva, Elena; Tokunaga, Hideki; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Yin, Ping; Luo, Xia; Lin, Zhihong; Imir, Gonca; Thung, Stephen; Su, Emily J; Kim, J Julie

    2010-01-01

    Loss of progesterone signaling in the endometrium may be a causal factor in the development of endometriosis, and progesterone resistance is commonly observed in women with this disease. In endometriotic stromal cells, the levels of progesterone receptor (PR), particularly the PR-B isoform, are significantly decreased, leading to a loss of paracrine signaling. PR deficiency likely underlies the development of progesterone resistance in women with endometriosis who no longer respond to progestin therapy. Here we review the complex epigenetic and transcriptional mechanisms leading to PR deficiency. The initial event may involve deficient methylation of the estrogen receptor (ER)beta promoter resulting in pathologic overexpression of ERbeta in endometriotic stromal cells. We speculate that alterations in the relative levels of ERbeta and ERalpha in endometrial tissue dictate E2-regulated PR expression, such that a decreased ERalpha-tauomicron-ERbeta ratio may result in suppression of PR. In this review, we propose a molecular model that may be responsible for changes in ERbeta and ERalpha leading to PR loss and progesterone resistance in endometriosis.

  17. Contribution of a membrane estrogen receptor to the estrogenic regulation of body temperature and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Troy A; Bosch, Martha A; Rick, Elizabeth A; Lee, Benjamin; Wagner, Edward J; Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Scanlan, Thomas S; Rønnekleiv, Oline K; Kelly, Martin J

    2010-10-01

    The hypothalamus is a key region of the central nervous system involved in the control of homeostasis, including energy and core body temperature (Tc). 17β-Estradiol (E2) regulates Tc, in part, via actions in the basal hypothalamus and preoptic area. E2 primarily controls hypothalamic functions via the nuclear steroid receptors, estrogen receptor α/β. However, we have previously described an E2-responsive, Gq-coupled membrane receptor that reduces the postsynaptic inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic tone and attenuates postovariectomy body weight gain in female guinea pigs through the administration of a selective Gq-mER ligand, STX. To determine the role of Gq-mER in regulating Tc, energy and bone homeostasis, ovariectomized female guinea pigs, implanted ip with temperature probes, were treated with STX or E2 for 7-8 wk. Tc was recorded for 4 wk, whereas food intake and body weight were monitored daily. Bone density and fat accumulation were determined postmortem. Both E2 and STX significantly reduced Tc in the females compared with controls. STX, similar to E2, reduced food intake and fat accumulation and increased tibial bone density. Therefore, a Gq-mER-coupled signaling pathway appears to be involved in maintaining homeostatic functions and may constitute a novel therapeutic target for treatment of hypoestrogenic symptoms.

  18. Contribution of a Membrane Estrogen Receptor to the Estrogenic Regulation of Body Temperature and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Troy A.; Bosch, Martha A.; Rick, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Benjamin; Wagner, Edward J.; Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key region of the central nervous system involved in the control of homeostasis, including energy and core body temperature (Tc). 17β-Estradiol (E2) regulates Tc, in part, via actions in the basal hypothalamus and preoptic area. E2 primarily controls hypothalamic functions via the nuclear steroid receptors, estrogen receptor α/β. However, we have previously described an E2-responsive, Gq-coupled membrane receptor that reduces the postsynaptic inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic tone and attenuates postovariectomy body weight gain in female guinea pigs through the administration of a selective Gq-mER ligand, STX. To determine the role of Gq-mER in regulating Tc, energy and bone homeostasis, ovariectomized female guinea pigs, implanted ip with temperature probes, were treated with STX or E2 for 7–8 wk. Tc was recorded for 4 wk, whereas food intake and body weight were monitored daily. Bone density and fat accumulation were determined postmortem. Both E2 and STX significantly reduced Tc in the females compared with controls. STX, similar to E2, reduced food intake and fat accumulation and increased tibial bone density. Therefore, a Gq-mER-coupled signaling pathway appears to be involved in maintaining homeostatic functions and may constitute a novel therapeutic target for treatment of hypoestrogenic symptoms. PMID:20685867

  19. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts estrogen-signaling through up-regulation of estrogen receptor β (ERβ).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Yoshida, Kazutaka; Nishimura, Hajime; Harada, Mari; Okajima, Shunsuke; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2013-07-15

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) has been reported as possessing antiestrogenic activity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly delineated. In this study, we used the estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, as an experimental model and showed that Δ(9)-THC exposures markedly suppresses 17β-estradiol (E2)- induced MCF-7 cell proliferation. We demonstrate that these effects result from Δ(9)-THC's ability to inhibit E2-liganded ERα activation. Mechanistically, the data obtained from biochemical analyses revealed that (i) Δ(9)-THC up-regulates ERβ, a repressor of ERα, inhibiting the expression of E2/ERα-regulated genes that promote cell growth and that (ii) Δ(9)-THC induction of ERβ modulates E2/ERα signaling in the absence of direct interaction with the E2 ligand binding site. Therefore, the data presented support the concept that Δ(9)-THC's antiestrogenic activities are mediated by the ERβ disruption of E2/ERα signaling.

  20. Potential Approaches to Enhance the Effects of Estrogen on Senescent Blood Vessels and Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in postmenopausal than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular protective effects of estrogen. Vascular estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and a transmembrane estrogen-binding protein GPR30 have been described. Also, experimental studies have demonstrated vasodilator effects of estrogen on the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle and extracellular matrix. However, randomized clinical trials have not supported vascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), possibly due to the subjects' advanced age and age-related changes in estrogen synthesis and metabolic pathways, the vascular ERs number, distribution and integrity, and the post-ER vascular signaling pathways. Current MHT includes natural estrogens such as conjugated equine estrogen, as well as synthetic and semi-synthetic estrogens. New estrogenic formulations and hormone combinations have been developed. Phytoestrogens is being promoted as an alternative MHT. Specific ER modulators (SERMs), and selective agonists for ERα such as PPT, ERβ such as DPN, and GPR30 such as G1 are being evaluated. In order to enhance the vascular effectiveness of MHT, its type, dose, route of administration and timing may need to be customized depending on the subject's age and pre-existing CVD. Also, the potential interaction of estrogen with progesterone and testosterone on vascular function may need to be considered in order to maximize the vascular benefits of MHT on senescent blood vessels and postmenopausal CVD. PMID:20210774