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Sample records for emollients

  1. 21 CFR 349.14 - Ophthalmic emollients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... included in the monograph. (2) Lanolin, 1 to 10 percent in combination with one or more oleaginous emollient agents included in the monograph. (b) Oleaginous ingredients: (1) Light mineral oil, up to 50 percent in combination with one or more other emollient agents included in the monograph. (2) Mineral oil...

  2. 21 CFR 349.14 - Ophthalmic emollients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... included in the monograph. (2) Lanolin, 1 to 10 percent in combination with one or more oleaginous emollient agents included in the monograph. (b) Oleaginous ingredients: (1) Light mineral oil, up to 50 percent in combination with one or more other emollient agents included in the monograph. (2) Mineral oil...

  3. 21 CFR 349.14 - Ophthalmic emollients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... included in the monograph. (2) Lanolin, 1 to 10 percent in combination with one or more oleaginous emollient agents included in the monograph. (b) Oleaginous ingredients: (1) Light mineral oil, up to 50 percent in combination with one or more other emollient agents included in the monograph. (2) Mineral oil...

  4. 21 CFR 349.14 - Ophthalmic emollients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... included in the monograph. (2) Lanolin, 1 to 10 percent in combination with one or more oleaginous emollient agents included in the monograph. (b) Oleaginous ingredients: (1) Light mineral oil, up to 50 percent in combination with one or more other emollient agents included in the monograph. (2) Mineral oil...

  5. 21 CFR 349.14 - Ophthalmic emollients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... included in the monograph. (2) Lanolin, 1 to 10 percent in combination with one or more oleaginous emollient agents included in the monograph. (b) Oleaginous ingredients: (1) Light mineral oil, up to 50 percent in combination with one or more other emollient agents included in the monograph. (2) Mineral oil...

  6. The impact of emollients on phototherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Manuela L; Heller, Misha M; Lee, Eric S; Koo, John

    2013-05-01

    When treating psoriasis, various topical emollients exist that can affect the penetration of ultraviolet radiation in phototherapy. Compared with normal-appearing skin with a reflectance of 4% to 5%, psoriatic skin has higher reflectance as a result of its increased air-to-corneocyte interfaces. Studies have tested the effect of emollients on light penetration by assessing psoriatic plaque clearance, differences in minimal erythema dose, and physical properties of the emollient (eg, monochromatic protection factor and absorbance). Psoriatic plaque clearance was found to improve with serous (thin liquid)-based emollients (eg, Vaseline oil [Unilever, Blackfriars, London, UK], mineral oil, and glycerol), whereas clearance decreased with salicylic acid and viscous-based emollients (eg, petrolatum). Emollients with high ultraviolet absorbance properties increased minimal erythema dose, and those with low absorbance properties decreased minimal erythema dose. Interestingly, when a liquid emollient with a refractive index close to that of normal-appearing skin was applied, there was a net increase in light absorption, or a reduction in reflection that exceeded the emollient's innate ability to absorb light. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Emollient treatment of atopic dermatitis: latest evidence and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Jeng Sum Charmaine; Ng, Wing Gi Gigi; Leung, Ting Fan

    2018-01-01

    Aim To review current classes of emollients in the market, their clinical efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD) and considerations for choice of an emollient. Methods PubMed Clinical Queries under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow) and Systematic Reviews were used as the search engine. Keywords of ‘emollient or moisturizer’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’ were used. Overview of findings Using the keywords of ‘emollient’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’, there were 105 and 36 hits under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow) and Systematic Reviews, respectively. Plant-derived products, animal products and special ingredients were discussed. Selected proprietary products were tabulated. Conclusions A number of proprietary emollients have undergone trials with clinical data available on PubMed-indexed journals. Most moisturizers showed some beneficial effects, but there was generally no evidence that one moisturizer is superior to another. Choosing an appropriate emollient for AD patients would improve acceptability and adherence for emollient treatment. Physician’s recommendation is the primary consideration for patients when selecting a moisturizer/emollient; therefore, doctors should provide evidence-based information about these emollients. PMID:29692852

  8. Mechanism for prevention of infection in preterm neonates by topical emollients: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Ahmed, A S M Nawshad Uddin; Saha, Samir K

    2014-11-01

    Topical applications of emollients such as sunflower seed oil and Aquaphor have been shown to reduce the incidence of bloodstream infections and mortality of preterm infants in resource-poor settings. The causal mechanism for prevention of infection through cutaneous portals of entry is not well understood. We examined the relationship between skin condition score as a measure of skin barrier integrity and risk for bloodstream infection, and the effect of emollients on that relationship. Data for this study come from a randomized controlled trial of the impact of topical emollient therapy on nosocomial infections in 491 preterm infants <33 weeks gestational age at Dhaka Shishu Hospital, Bangladesh. Latent growth trajectory model with random-coefficient and multivariable logistic regression were utilized. Rate of deterioration of skin condition was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in both emollient arms compared with the untreated control group. Adjusted odds ratio of skin score for infection was 1.32 (95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.65). Emollients reduced the incidence of infection only when the skin had no signs of deterioration [Aquaphor incidence rate ratio: 0.43 (95% confidence interval: 0.19-0.97) and sunflower seed oil incidence rate ratio: 0.46 (95% confidence interval: 0.21-0.99)]. Skin condition deteriorated progressively after birth and compromised skin condition increased the risk of infection. Emollients preserved skin integrity and thus prevented infection in preterm neonates. To optimize benefits of emollients for the prevention of bloodstream infection, use of emollients should begin immediately after birth when the skin is still intact.

  9. Spreading properties of cosmetic emollients: Use of synthetic skin surface to elucidate structural effect.

    PubMed

    Douguet, Marine; Picard, Céline; Savary, Géraldine; Merlaud, Fabien; Loubat-Bouleuc, Nathalie; Grisel, Michel

    2017-06-01

    The study focuses on the impact of structural and physicochemical properties of emollients on their spreadability. Fifty-three emollients, among which esters, silicones, vegetable and mineral oils, have been characterized. Their viscosity, surface tension, density and spreadability have been measured. Vitro-skin ® , an artificial skin substitute, was used as an artificial porous substrate to measure spreadability. Two different methods have been selected to characterize spreadability, namely contact angle and spreading value. Dynamic contact angle measurements showed that emollient spreadability is first governed by spontaneous spreading and that, in a second phase, absorption and migration into the porous substrate becomes the driver of the extension of the spreading area. Statistical analysis of physicochemical and spreading value data revealed that viscosity has a major impact on the spreading behavior of emollients whatever their chemical type. A special emphasis was placed on the ester family in which chemical diversity is very wide. The results highlighted a difference between "high viscosity esters" for which viscosity is the main factor impacting spreadability and "low viscosity esters" for which structural variations (mono/diester, saturated/unsaturated chain, linear/branched chain) have to be considered in addition to viscosity. Linear regressions were used to express spreading value as a function of viscosity for each of the four emollient families tested (esters, silicones, vegetable and mineral oils). These regressions allowed the development of reliable predictive models as a powerful tool for formulators to forecast spreadability of emollients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Parents' and carers' views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Muller, I; Yardley, L; Lewis-Jones, S; Ersser, S; Little, P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Leave-on emollients form the mainstay of eczema treatment, but adherence is poor. We aimed to explore parents’/carers' views on effectiveness and acceptability of leave-on emollients for childhood eczema through secondary analysis of data from 2 qualitative data sets. Setting Study 1 recruited through mail-out from 6 general practices in southern England. Study 2 recruited from a feasibility trial of an intervention to support eczema self-care in 31 practices in the same area. Participants Study 1 included 28 interviews with carers of children aged ≤5 years with eczema. Study 2 included 26 interviews with carers of children aged ≤5 years with eczema. Methods Interviews followed semistructured guides: study 1 explored carers' understandings around eczema treatments in order to develop a web-based self-care support intervention; study 2 explored carers' understandings of eczema and eczema treatments after using the intervention. Interviews were carried out face to face or by telephone, audio-recorded and transcribed. Secondary analysis of data from both studies focused on views and experiences of emollient use. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach facilitated by NVivo V.10 software. Results In study 1, most participants felt emollients improved eczema but held mixed views about long-term use to prevent flare-ups. In study 2, where carers had used the web-based intervention, all participants held positive views about long-term emollient use. In both studies, participants expressed a range of preferences about emollient ‘thickness’; some felt that ‘thick’ emollients (ointments) were most effective, while others found these difficult to use. Carers described a process of ‘trial and error’, trying emollients suggested by professionals, friends and family, or bought over-the-counter. Carers expressed a need for understanding differences between products and their effective use. Conclusions Providing a rationale for long

  11. Parents' and carers' views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Santer, M; Muller, I; Yardley, L; Lewis-Jones, S; Ersser, S; Little, P

    2016-08-19

    Leave-on emollients form the mainstay of eczema treatment, but adherence is poor. We aimed to explore parents'/carers' views on effectiveness and acceptability of leave-on emollients for childhood eczema through secondary analysis of data from 2 qualitative data sets. Study 1 recruited through mail-out from 6 general practices in southern England. Study 2 recruited from a feasibility trial of an intervention to support eczema self-care in 31 practices in the same area. Study 1 included 28 interviews with carers of children aged ≤5 years with eczema. Study 2 included 26 interviews with carers of children aged ≤5 years with eczema. Interviews followed semistructured guides: study 1 explored carers' understandings around eczema treatments in order to develop a web-based self-care support intervention; study 2 explored carers' understandings of eczema and eczema treatments after using the intervention. Interviews were carried out face to face or by telephone, audio-recorded and transcribed. Secondary analysis of data from both studies focused on views and experiences of emollient use. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach facilitated by NVivo V.10 software. In study 1, most participants felt emollients improved eczema but held mixed views about long-term use to prevent flare-ups. In study 2, where carers had used the web-based intervention, all participants held positive views about long-term emollient use. In both studies, participants expressed a range of preferences about emollient 'thickness'; some felt that 'thick' emollients (ointments) were most effective, while others found these difficult to use. Carers described a process of 'trial and error', trying emollients suggested by professionals, friends and family, or bought over-the-counter. Carers expressed a need for understanding differences between products and their effective use. Providing a rationale for long-term emollient use and choice of emollients could help improve adherence

  12. Emollient enhancement of the skin barrier from birth offers effective atopic dermatitis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Eric L.; Chalmers, Joanne R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Thomas, Kim S.; Cork, Michael J.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Brown, Sara J.; Chen, Zunqiu; Chen, Yiyi; Williams, Hywel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached epidemic proportions in children worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Because of the significant socioeconomic effect of atopic dermatitis and its effect on the quality of life of children and families, there have been decades of research focused on disease prevention, with limited success. Recent advances in cutaneous biology suggest skin barrier defects might be key initiators of atopic dermatitis and possibly allergic sensitization. Objective Our objective was to test whether skin barrier enhancement from birth represents a feasible strategy for reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in high-risk neonates. Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial in the United States and United Kingdom of 124 neonates at high risk for atopic dermatitis. Parents in the intervention arm were instructed to apply full-body emollient therapy at least once per day starting within 3 weeks of birth. Parents in the control arm were asked to use no emollients. The primary feasibility outcome was the percentage of families willing to be randomized. The primary clinical outcome was the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at 6 months, as assessed by a trained investigator. Results Forty-two percent of eligible families agreed to be randomized into the trial. All participating families in the intervention arm found the intervention acceptable. A statistically significant protective effect was found with the use of daily emollient on the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis with a relative risk reduction of 50% (relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = .017). There were no emollient-related adverse events and no differences in adverse events between groups. Conclusion The results of this trial demonstrate that emollient therapy from birth represents a feasible, safe, and effective approach for atopic dermatitis prevention. If confirmed in larger trials

  13. Management of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: The Role of Emollient Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Catherine Mack Correa, M.; Nebus, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder that afflicts a growing number of young children. Genetic, immune, and environmental factors interact in a complex fashion to contribute to disease expression. The compromised stratum corneum found in atopic dermatitis leads to skin barrier dysfunction, which results in aggravation of symptoms by aeroallergens, microbes, and other insults. Infants—whose immune system and epidermal barrier are still developing—display a higher frequency of atopic dermatitis. Management of patients with atopic dermatitis includes maintaining optimal skin care, avoiding allergic triggers, and routinely using emollients to maintain a hydrated stratum corneum and to improve barrier function. Flares of atopic dermatitis are often managed with courses of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. This paper discusses the role of emollients in the management of atopic dermatitis, with particular emphasis on infants and young children. PMID:23008699

  14. Improving health visitor emollient prescribing using a CQUIN-based approach.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Christina; Khatau, Tejas

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing is an essential element of health visiting practice. This initiative used the payment framework of Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) to develop health visiting practice across a large health visiting workforce in the East Midlands. A focus on emollient prescribing practice was agreed and a guidance booklet regarding preferred emollient products was produced, based on the local formulary Each health visitor benefitted from receiving additional training and was given a guidance booklet to inform their practice. Targets were set for each quarter to demonstrate an improved prescribing adherence to the preferred product list.The targets were achieved for each quarter. Prescribing rates and confidence improved across the service. Therefore, it was demonstrated that specific guidance and ongoing support can improve prescribing practice within the health visiting service.

  15. 21 CFR 349.65 - Labeling of ophthalmic emollient drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...” or “emollient (lubricant)” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form... due to dryness of the eye.” (2) “For the temporary relief of discomfort due to minor irritations of the eye or to exposure to wind or sun.” (3) “For use as a protectant against further irritation or to...

  16. 21 CFR 349.65 - Labeling of ophthalmic emollient drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...” or “emollient (lubricant)” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form... due to dryness of the eye.” (2) “For the temporary relief of discomfort due to minor irritations of the eye or to exposure to wind or sun.” (3) “For use as a protectant against further irritation or to...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of skin-barrier-enhancing emollients among preterm infants in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    LeFevre, Amnesty; Shillcutt, Samuel D; Saha, Samir K; Ahmed, ASM Nawshad Uddin; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Chowdhury, MAK Azad; Law, Paul A; Black, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of topical emollients, sunflower seed oil (SSO) and synthetic Aquaphor, versus no treatment, in preventing mortality among hospitalized preterm infants (< 33 weeks gestation) at a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh. Methods Evidence from a randomized controlled efficacy trial was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo simulation. Programme costs were obtained from a retrospective review of activities. Patient costs were collected from patient records. Health outcomes were calculated as deaths averted and discounted years of life lost (YLLs) averted. Results were deemed cost-effective if they fell below a ceiling ratio based on the per capita gross national income of Bangladesh (United States dollars, US$ 470). Findings Aquaphor and SSO were both highly cost-effective relative to control, reducing neonatal mortality by 26% and 32%, respectively. SSO cost US$ 61 per death averted and US$ 2.15 per YLL averted (I$ 6.39, international dollars, per YLL averted). Aquaphor cost US$ 162 per death averted and US$ 5.74 per YLL averted (I$ 17.09 per YLL averted). Results were robust to sensitivity analysis. Aquaphor was cost-effective relative to SSO with 77% certainty: it cost an incremental US$ 26 more per patient treated, but averted 1.25 YLLs (US$ 20.74 per YLL averted). Conclusion Topical therapy with SSO or Aquaphor was highly cost-effective in reducing deaths from infection among the preterm neonates studied. The choice of emollient should be made taking into account budgetary limitations and ease of supply. Further research is warranted on additional locally available emollients, use of emollients in community-based settings and generalizability to other geographic regions. PMID:20428367

  18. Effects of Emollient Containing Bee Venom on Atopic Dermatitis: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Base-Controlled, Multicenter Study of 136 Patients.

    PubMed

    You, Chung Eui; Moon, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Kyu Han; Park, Chun Wook; Seo, Seong Joon; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, complex disease that follows a chronic relapsing course and significantly affects the quality of life of patients. Skin barrier dysfunction and inflammatory processes induce and aggravate this skin condition. Proper use of an emollient for hydration is a keystone of AD treatment. Bee venom is known to have anti-inflammatory effects and has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory disorders. To find out the beneficial effect of an emollient containing bee venom in the treatment of patients with AD. This study included 136 patients with AD who were randomized to receive either an emollient containing bee venom and silk-protein or a vehicle that was identical except for the bee venom for 4 weeks. The patients were instructed to apply the emollient twice daily on their entire body and not to use other medications, including topicals, during the course of the study. The eczema area and severity index (EASI) score, transepidermal water loss, and visual analogue scale (VAS) score of itching were evaluated at the first visit and after 2 and 4 weeks. The investigator global assessment was evaluated at 2 and 4 weeks after the application of emollient containing bee venom or vehicle. Patients applying emollient containing bee venom showed significantly lower EASI score and VAS value compared to patients applying emollient without bee venom. Emollient containing bee venom is a safe and effective option for patients with AD.

  19. Best practices, new perspectives and the perfect emollient: optimizing the management of contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, Jean-Marie; Gimenez-Arnau, Ana; Metz, Martin; Peters, Jill; Proksch, Ehrhardt

    2018-05-01

    Contact dermatitis (CD) is caused by environmental agents, irritants, and allergens that penetrate the epidermis and lead to inflammation. An intact skin barrier prevents penetration and is important in maintaining healthy skin. Classical diagnosis of CD is made using the patch test, and traditional treatment strategies for CD promote skin barrier integrity and resolve the inflammatory component of the condition. This can be achieved by using emollient-based therapy, which is most important for skin barrier repair, and in addition to topical glucocorticosteroids, which are used in severe cases of CD and are most effective in reducing inflammation. Preventative measures, such as irritant and allergen avoidance in the workplace, also play a pivotal role in effective CD management. Moreover, CD management necessitates a holistic approach that incorporates prevention, barrier repair, and inflammatory resolution to ensure optimized efficacy. It is also important to consider potential barriers to optimal management when evaluating individuals with CD, such as limited patient education or poor access to care. Finally, key literature and our own clinical practice experience have highlighted the value of patient preference, as well as safety, efficacy and simplicity, in building the perfect emollient.

  20. Emollient product design: objective measurements of formulation structure, texture and performance, and subjective assessments of user acceptability.

    PubMed

    Antonijević, M D; Owusu-Ware, S; Sanchon-Lopez, B

    2018-06-01

    The choice of prescribed emollients is usually based on cost and patient preference. Differences in formulations can affect user acceptability. To compare the physical performance, user acceptability and various product design features of two emollient gels that are prescribed in the UK and alleged to be therapeutically interchangeable because their formulations are described as having the same contents of oily ingredients. We found that here are in fact significant measurable differences between the structure and performance of the two formulations, which materially affect their user acceptability. These differences are attributed to the use of different types of gelling agents and other ingredients of differing grades/quality and concentrations, and probably due to the formulations being made by different manufacturing processes. We also identified other product design features that are important to user appeal, including the type of container in which the formulations are presented, the type of dispensing devices provided, and the nature and form of the supplied user instructions. Patients and prescribers should be aware that there can be important differences in performance and user appeal between emollients, even between products that, superficially, may appear to be very similar. These important performance aspects should be characterized for new emollient introductions to encourage better informed product selection. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists, North American Clinical Dermatologic Society and St Johns Dermatological Society.

  1. Histologic improvement in photodamage after 12 months of treatment with tretinoin emollient cream (0.02%).

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2012-09-01

    Topical retinoids, such as tretinoin, have been established as the gold standard for the treatment of photodamaged skin. This was a single-center, open-label, single-group, observational histologic subanalysis of 3 of 19 patients participating in a study of the efficacy and safety of tretinoin emollient cream 0.02% for the treatment of moderate to severe facial photodamage. Subjects were female, 18 years of age or older, and instructed to apply tretinoin 0.02% to the treatment areas for 12 months. Histology was undertaken using facial photographs and 2-mm biopsies of the lateral canthus area that were obtained from 3 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Histopathologic analyses revealed evidence of extensive solar elastosis at baseline for 2 of the 3 subjects who were white, with moderate elastosis observed for the third subject who was African American. Histologic improvements in photodamage following 12 months of treatment with tretinoin 0.02% were observed for each subject. Improvements included smoothing of the epidermis, a slightly thinner keratin layer, and thin, comparatively straight elastic and collagen fibers in the mid- to deep-dermal layer. The histologic changes in all subjects could be attributed to a remodeling (elastin) or repair (collagen) process that affected the connective tissue fibers in all layers of the dermis. These results suggest that tretinoin 0.02% may be an effective treatment for photodamage, and additional evaluation is warranted in future studies.

  2. Long-term maintenance therapy for vulvar lichen sclerosus: the results of a randomized study comparing topical vitamin E with an emollient.

    PubMed

    Virgili, Annarosa; Minghetti, Sara; Borghi, Alessandro; Corazza, Monica

    2013-04-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS) represents a challenge for its long-term management after an effective treatment with topical corticosteroids. To compare the effect of topical vitamin E with that of an emollient in reducing the risk of VLS relapse over a 52-week maintenance treatment. 156 patients with VLS were enrolled in a 12-week active treatment phase on topical 0.1% mometasone furoate ointment once daily. Those who achieved disease remission entered a 52-week maintenance phase in which patients were randomized to apply either an emollient or topical vitamin E once daily. 80 patients entered the maintenance phase. At 52 weeks, for the vitamin E maintenance group, the cumulative crude relapse rate was 27.8% and the cumulative modified crude relapse rate was 55.6%. For the emollient maintenance group, the cumulative crude relapse rate was 22.7% and the cumulative modified crude relapse rate was 50.0%. The median time to relapse was 20 weeks for the vitamin E group and 18.7 weeks for the emollient group. Once VLS has been stabilized with topical corticosteroids, long-term treatment with both vitamin E and emollients may be considered in maintain LS remission.

  3. The multifunctionality of 10% sodium sulfacetamide, 5% sulfur emollient foam in the treatment of inflammatory facial dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2010-03-01

    Prior to 1962, some of the most versatile drugs in dermatology were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) solely on the basis of safety. One of these is the combination 10% sodium sulfacetamide and 5% sulfur. Sodium sulfacetamide possesses anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties while sulfur is a nonspecific antibacterial and antifungal. A new emollient foam formulation of 10% sodium sulfacetamide and 5% sulfur allows a thinner application film and leaves behind no residue on hair bearing or non-hair bearing skin. The sulfur smell is also more quickly dissipated with reduced irritation. This uncontrolled, observational, prospective, open-label, single site, eight-week study enrolled 24 subjects (eight with rosacea, eight with seborrheic dermatitis, eight with acne vulgaris) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this novel foam formulation. At eight weeks, statistically significant improvement was seen in inflammatory rosacea lesion counts and the signs of seborrheic dermatitis. A 50% reduction was noted in the total acne lesion counts. These findings confirm the versatility of an emollient 10% sodium sulfacetamide and 5% sulfur foam.

  4. Efficacy of a Cream Containing Ceramides and Magnesium in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized, Double-blind, Emollient- and Hydrocortisone-controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Sjors A; Charles, Frank; Lammers, Laureen; Frings-Dresen, Monique; Kezic, Sanja; Rustemeyer, Thomas

    2016-11-02

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of a cream containing ceramides and magnesium (Cer-Mg) in the treatment of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis and to compare it with hydrocortisone and a commonly used emollient (unguentum leniens; cold cream). A total of 100 patients, randomized into 2 groups, were treated for 6 weeks simultaneously (left vs. right side of the body) with either Cer-Mg and hydrocortisone (group I) or Cer-Mg and emollient (group II). The primary outcome was a reduction in severity of lesions as assessed by (local) SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis). Levels of trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, and natural moisturizing factors (NMF) were then measured. After 6 weeks, group I showed comparable significant improvement in SCORAD and TEWL, while in group II, the decrease in SCORAD and TEWL was significantly greater after Cer-Mg compared with emollient. Finally, Cer-Mg cream was more effective in improving skin hydration and maintenance of levels of NMF than hydrocortisone and emollient.

  5. Reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers with a silicone-based dermal nourishing emollient-associated skincare regimen.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Ronald J; Coombs, Martha; Chakravarthy, Debashish

    2009-10-01

    To determine the effect of a silicone-based dermal nourishing emollient (SBDNE) regimen on the reduction of pressure ulcers (PrUs) and costs in a hospital medical unit. PrUs represent a serious problem for patients within the acute care setting and are a significant care management challenge for clinicians. Effective October 1, 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will no longer reimburse hospitals at the higher diagnosis-related group rate for Stages III and IV PrUs that are not documented on admission. In addition, formation of PrUs in the hospital also puts the institution at financial risk of lawsuits. The wound healing center at Porter Adventist Hospital, Denver, Colorado, documented the hospital-acquired incidence rate of PrU patients in the hospital from May 2006 to December 2007. A retrospective, quasi-experimental design was used to examine the changes in PrU incidence rates and the economic effect of introducing a SBDNE regimen into an existing PrU prevention protocol. The replacement of a mixture of ad hoc skin care products, none of which contained silicone-based emollients, with an SBDNE skin care regimen into an existing prevention program significantly reduced the proportion of hospital-acquired PrUs to 0% after 8 months. Estimated cost savings per patient admitted to the medical unit attributed to SBDNE averaged $6677.11 per patient. The use of an SBDNE skin care regimen was important in bringing about a significant reduction in the number of patients with PrUs and respective treatment costs in a medical unit experiencing high incidence rates of PrUs.

  6. Improved emollient use reduces atopic eczema symptoms and is cost neutral in infants: before-and-after evaluation of a multifaceted educational support programme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parents and carers of children with eczema often underuse emollient therapy, essential to repairing and protecting the defective skin barrier in atopic eczema. Educational interventions delivered by specialist dermatology nurses in hospital settings have been shown to improve emollient use and reduce symptoms of atopic eczema, but benefits of community-based interventions are uncertain. Support and information about appropriate care may often be inadequate for patients and carers in the community. Methods A multifaceted educational support programme was evaluated as a method of increasing emollient use and reducing atopic eczema in children. Support provided for parents and carers included an educational DVD, online daily diary and telephone helpline. The before and after study included 136 British children and their parents, providing baseline and 12 week follow-up data while receiving the programme. Measures included emollient use, POEM and PEST scores, and cost of care. Results Average emollient use increased by 87.6 g (95% CI: 81.9 to 119.5 g, p = 0.001) from baseline with the change being immediate and persistent. The POEM score reduced on average by 5.38 (95% CI: 4.36 to 6.41, p = 0.001), a 47% reduction from baseline. Similarly the PEST score reduced on average by 0.61 (95% CI: 0.47 to 0.75, p = 0.001), a 48% reduction from baseline. Sleep disturbance was reduced by 1.27 nights per week (95% CI: 0.85 to 1.68, p = 0.001) and parental feeling of control improved by 1.32 points (95% CI: 1.16 to 1.48, p = 0.001). From the NHS perspective, the programme was cost neutral overall within the study period. Conclusion A community-based multifaceted educational support programme greatly increased emollient use, reducing symptoms of atopic eczema and general practitioner contacts, without increasing cost. Significant benefits may accrue to the families and carers of children with atopic eczema due to improved sleep patterns and

  7. Acceptability and efficacy of an emollient containing ceramide-precursor lipids and moisturizing factors for atopic dermatitis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam Lun; Pong, Nga Hin; Wang, Shuxin Susan; Lee, Vivian W; Luk, Nai Ming; Leung, Ting Fan

    2013-03-01

    Atopic eczema or dermatitis (AD) is associated with atopy and is characterized by reduced skin hydration and an impaired skin barrier in the epidermis. We investigated the patient acceptability and efficacy of an emollient containing ceramide-precursor lipids and moisturizing factors (LMF) in AD. Consecutive AD patients were recruited. Swabs and cultures were obtained from the right antecubital fossa and the worst-affected eczematous area, and disease severity [according to the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) Index], skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured prior to and after 2 weeks' use of the LMF moisturizer. The general acceptability of treatment was documented as being 'very good', 'good', 'fair', or 'poor'. Twenty-four AD patients [mean age 13.8 (standard deviation 5.7) years] were recruited. Two thirds of the patients reported very good or good acceptability of the LMF moisturizer, whereas one third reported fair or poor acceptability. There were no inter-group differences in the pre-use clinical parameters of age, objective SCORAD score, pruritus score, sleep disturbance score, skin hydration, TEWL, topical corticosteroid use, oral antihistamine use, or acceptability of previously used proprietary emollients. However, patients in the fair/poor acceptability group were more likely to have Staphylococcus aureus colonization and to be female (odds ratio 13, 95 % confidence interval 1.7-99.4; p = 0.021). Following use of the LMF moisturizer, the objective SCORAD score, pruritus score, and sleep disturbance score were lower in the very good/good acceptability group than in the fair/poor acceptability group. The mean objective SCORAD score improved (from 31.5 to 25.7; p = 0.039) and skin hydration improved [from 30.7 arbitrary units (a.u.) to 36.0 a.u.; p = 0.021] in the very good/good acceptability group. When the data were analyzed for the strength of the agreement of the rating of acceptability, the κ values were 0.338 (fair) for

  8. A Double-Blind, Randomised Study Comparing the Skin Hydration and Acceptability of Two Emollient Products in Atopic Eczema Patients with Dry Skin.

    PubMed

    Djokic-Gallagher, Jasmina; Rosher, Phil; Oliveira, Gabriela; Walker, Jennine

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare professionals tend to recommend emollients based primarily on patient/consumer preference and cost, with cheaper options assumed to be therapeutically equivalent. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the effects on skin hydration of two emollients prescribed in the UK, Doublebase Dayleve™ gel (DELP) and a cheaper alternative, Zerobase Emollient™ cream (ZBC). This was a single-centre, randomised, double-blind, concurrent bi-lateral (within-patient) comparison in 18 females with atopic eczema and dry skin on their lower legs. DELP gel and ZBC cream were each applied to one lower leg twice daily for 4 days and on the morning only on day 5. The efficacy of both products was assessed by hydration measurements using a Corneometer CM825 probe (Courage-Khazaka Electronic). The measurements were made three times daily on days 1 to 5. The primary efficacy variable was the area under the curve (AUC) of the change from baseline corneometer readings over the 5 days. Skin hydration using DELP gel was significantly higher than using ZBC cream (p < 0.0001). The cumulative increase in skin hydration observed for DELP gel was substantial and long lasting. In contrast, for ZBC cream, there was no significant improvement of the cumulative skin hydration as measured by the AUC (p = 0.22). DELP gel achieved substantial, long-lasting and cumulative skin hydration, whilst ZBC cream achieved no measurable improvement in skin hydration compared to before treatment. Healthcare professionals should be aware that different emollients can perform differently. Dermal Laboratories Ltd. EudraCT number:2014-001026-16.

  9. Emollient efficacy and acceptability in the treatment of eczematous dry skin: A double-blind, randomised comparison of two UK-marketed products

    PubMed Central

    Djokic-Gallagher, Jasmina; Rosher, Philip; Walker, Jennine; Sykes, Krystyna; Hart, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the moisturising efficacy and acceptability of physical characteristics of two commonly prescribed emollients licenced in the UK, Doublebase Dayleve gel (DELP) and Diprobase cream (DIPC). Methods: The study was a double-blind, concurrent bi-lateral comparison in female eczema subjects with dry skin. Results: In Part 1, comparing the area under the curve (AUC) change from baseline corneometer readings over 24 h following single applications of the emollients to the volar forearms of 34 subjects, the AUC for DELP was more than three times that seen for DIPC (p < 0.0001). In Part 2, comparing the same outcome measured over 5 days of twice daily applications to the lower legs in 36 subjects, the AUC for DELP was approximately five times that for DIPC (p < 0.0001). 69% of subjects “Like Slightly” or “Like Strongly” DELP compared to 33% for DIPC (p = 0.025). 72% indicated they would use DELP again compared to 33% for DIPC (p = 0.033). 75% of subjects preferred DELP, 17% preferred DIPC and 8% expressed no preference (p = 0.0004). PMID:26864095

  10. Emollient bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): multicentre pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Rumsby, Kate; Chorozoglou, Maria; Becque, Taeko; Roberts, Amanda; Liddiard, Lyn; Nollett, Claire; Hooper, Julie; Prude, Martina; Wood, Wendy; Thomas, Kim S; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of including emollient bath additives in the management of eczema in children. Design Pragmatic randomised open label superiority trial with two parallel groups. Setting 96 general practices in Wales and western and southern England. Participants 483 children aged 1 to 11 years, fulfilling UK diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis. Children with very mild eczema and children who bathed less than once weekly were excluded. Interventions Participants in the intervention group were prescribed emollient bath additives by their usual clinical team to be used regularly for 12 months. The control group were asked to use no bath additives for 12 months. Both groups continued with standard eczema management, including leave-on emollients, and caregivers were given standardised advice on how to wash participants. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was eczema control measured by the patient oriented eczema measure (POEM, scores 0-7 mild, 8-16 moderate, 17-28 severe) weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes were eczema severity over one year (monthly POEM score from baseline to 52 weeks), number of eczema exacerbations resulting in primary healthcare consultation, disease specific quality of life (dermatitis family impact), generic quality of life (child health utility-9D), utilisation of resources, and type and quantity of topical corticosteroid or topical calcineurin inhibitors prescribed. Results 483 children were randomised and one child was withdrawn, leaving 482 children in the trial: 51% were girls (244/482), 84% were of white ethnicity (447/470), and the mean age was 5 years. 96% (461/482) of participants completed at least one post-baseline POEM, so were included in the analysis, and 77% (370/482) completed questionnaires for more than 80% of the time points for the primary outcome (12/16 weekly questionnaires to 16 weeks). The mean baseline POEM score was 9.5 (SD 5.7) in the

  11. Emollient bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): multicentre pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Santer, Miriam; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Rumsby, Kate; Chorozoglou, Maria; Becque, Taeko; Roberts, Amanda; Liddiard, Lyn; Nollett, Claire; Hooper, Julie; Prude, Martina; Wood, Wendy; Thomas, Kim S; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2018-05-03

    To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of including emollient bath additives in the management of eczema in children. Pragmatic randomised open label superiority trial with two parallel groups. 96 general practices in Wales and western and southern England. 483 children aged 1 to 11 years, fulfilling UK diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis. Children with very mild eczema and children who bathed less than once weekly were excluded. Participants in the intervention group were prescribed emollient bath additives by their usual clinical team to be used regularly for 12 months. The control group were asked to use no bath additives for 12 months. Both groups continued with standard eczema management, including leave-on emollients, and caregivers were given standardised advice on how to wash participants. The primary outcome was eczema control measured by the patient oriented eczema measure (POEM, scores 0-7 mild, 8-16 moderate, 17-28 severe) weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes were eczema severity over one year (monthly POEM score from baseline to 52 weeks), number of eczema exacerbations resulting in primary healthcare consultation, disease specific quality of life (dermatitis family impact), generic quality of life (child health utility-9D), utilisation of resources, and type and quantity of topical corticosteroid or topical calcineurin inhibitors prescribed. 483 children were randomised and one child was withdrawn, leaving 482 children in the trial: 51% were girls (244/482), 84% were of white ethnicity (447/470), and the mean age was 5 years. 96% (461/482) of participants completed at least one post-baseline POEM, so were included in the analysis, and 77% (370/482) completed questionnaires for more than 80% of the time points for the primary outcome (12/16 weekly questionnaires to 16 weeks). The mean baseline POEM score was 9.5 (SD 5.7) in the bath additives group and 10.1 (SD 5.8) in the no bath additives group. The mean POEM score

  12. Topical treatment with fresh human milk versus emollient on atopic eczema spots in young children: a small, randomized, split body, controlled, blinded pilot study.

    PubMed

    Berents, Teresa Løvold; Rønnevig, Jørgen; Søyland, Elisabeth; Gaustad, Peter; Nylander, Gro; Løland, Beate Fossum

    2015-05-04

    Public health nurses report on effects of fresh human milk as treatment for conjunctivitis, rhinitis and atopic eczema (AE), the latter being highly prevalent in early childhood. Emollients and topical corticosteroids are first line treatment of AE. As many caregivers have steroid phobia, alternative treatment options for mild AE are of interest. The aim of this small pilot study was to assess the potential effects and risks of applying fresh human milk locally on eczema spots in children with AE. This was a split body, controlled, randomized and physician blinded pilot study, of children with AE with two similar contralateral eczema spots having a mother breastfeeding the child or a sibling. Fresh expressed milk and emollient was applied on the intervention spot and emollient alone on the control area, three times a day for four weeks. The severity and area of the eczema spots was evaluated weekly, and samples from milk and the spots were analysed weekly with respect to bacterial colonisation. Of nine patients included, six completed the study. Mean age at inclusion was 18.5 months. The spots examined were localized on the arms, legs or cheeks. The spots were similar in severity, but differed in area. In one patient the eczema ceased after inclusion. In four patients both control and intervention areas increased during the intervention. The relative change in eczema area compared to baseline showed less increase in the intervention spots in two patients, whereas the opposite was observed in three. In four children Staphylococcus aureus was found in their eczema once or more. In three of the 28 human milk samples, Staphylococcus aureus, alfa haemolytic streptococci or coagulase negative staphylococci were detected. Staphylococcus aureus was found once both in human milk and in the eczema spots, no clinical signs of infection were however observed. No secondary infection due to milk application was detected. In this small pilot study, no effect was found on eczema

  13. Measurement of the Biomechanical Function and Structure of Ex Vivo Drying Skin Using Raman Spectral Analysis and its Modulation with Emollient Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Biniek, Krysta; Tfayli, Ali; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Quatela, Alessia; Galliano, Marie-Florence; Delalleau, Alexandre; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette; Dauskardt, Reinhold H; Duplan, Helene

    2018-06-22

    An important aspect of the biomechanical behavior of the stratum corneum (SC) is the drying stresses that develop with water loss. These stresses act as a driving force for damage in the form of chapping and cracking. Betasitosterol is a plant sterol with a structure similar to cholesterol, a key component in the intercellular lipids of the outermost layer of human skin, the SC. Cholesterol plays an important role in stabilizing the SC lipid structure, and altered levels of cholesterol have been linked with SC barrier abnormalities. Betasitosterol is currently applied topically to skin for treatment of wounds and burns. However, it is unknown what effect betasitosterol has on the biomechanical barrier function of skin. Here, by analyzing the drying stress profile of SC generated during a kinetics of dehydration, we show that betasitosterol, in combination with two emollient molecules, isocetyl stearoyl stearate (ISS) and glyceryl tri-2-ethylhexanoate (GTEH), causes a significant modulation of the drying stress behavior of the SC by reducing both the maximal peak stress height and average plateau of the drying stress profile. Raman spectra analyses demonstrate that the combination of betasitosterol with the two emollients, ISS and GTEH, allows a high water retention capacity within the SC, while the lipid conformational order by increasing the amount of trans conformers. Our study highlights the advantage of combining a biomechanical approach together with Raman spectroscopy in engineering a suitable combination of molecules for alleviating dryness and dry skin damage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of daily all-over-body application of emollient during the first year of life for preventing atopic eczema in high-risk children (The BEEP trial): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Joanne R; Haines, Rachel H; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Thomas, Kim S; Brown, Sara J; Ridd, Matthew; Lawton, Sandra; Simpson, Eric L; Cork, Michael J; Sach, Tracey H; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Montgomery, Alan A; Boyle, Robert J; Williams, Hywel C

    2017-07-21

    Atopic eczema (AE) is a common skin problem that impairs quality of life and is associated with the development of other atopic diseases including asthma, food allergy and allergic rhinitis. AE treatment is a significant cost burden for health care providers. The purpose of the trial is to investigate whether daily application of emollients for the first year of life can prevent AE developing in high-risk infants (first-degree relative with asthma, AE or allergic rhinitis). This is a protocol for a pragmatic, two-arm, randomised controlled, multicentre trial. Up to 1400 term infants at high risk of developing AE will be recruited through the community, primary and secondary care in England. Participating families will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive general infant skin-care advice, or general skin-care advice plus emollients with advice to apply daily to the infant for the first year of life. Families will not be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome will be a blinded assessment of AE at 24 months of age using the UK Working Party Diagnostic Criteria for Atopic Eczema. Secondary outcomes are other definitions of AE, time to AE onset, severity of AE (EASI and POEM), presence of other allergic diseases including food allergy, asthma and hay fever, allergic sensitisation, quality of life, cost-effectiveness and safety of the emollients. Subgroup analyses are planned for the primary outcome according to filaggrin genotype and the number of first-degree relatives with AE and other atopic diseases. Families will be followed up by online and postal questionnaire at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months with a face-to-face visit at 24 months. Long-term follow-up until 60 months will be via annual questionnaires. This trial will demonstrate whether skin-barrier enhancement through daily emollient for the first year of life can prevent AE from developing in high-risk infants. If effective, this simple and cheap intervention has the potential to result in

  15. Stand-alone Emollient Treatment Reduces Flares After Discontinuation of Topical Steroid Treatment in Atopic Dermatitis: A Double-blind, Randomized, Vehicle-controlled, Left-right Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Rippke, Frank; Richter, Daniel; Filbry, Alexander; Arrowitz, Craig; Weber, Teresa; Fischer, Tobias W; Zillikens, Detlef

    2018-04-27

    Prevention of the flares is a main goal in the long-term treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). Therefore we investigated the efficacy of a water-in-oil emollient, containing licochalcone A, omega-6-fatty acids, ceramide 3 and glycerol, for prevention of the flares in adults with mild to moderately severe AD, treated with topical steroids, that led to clearing of the inflammatory lesions and had been discontinued prior to inclusion. The study was a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled, left-right comparison test with the number of relapses, defined as re-occurrence of erythema for at least 3 consecutive days, considered the primary outcome. Compared with the vehicle, the active formulation significantly reduced the number of relapses and maintained the barrier homeostasis of the respective arm. To the best of knowledge, this is the first study to show prevention of the AD flares by the use of stand-alone emollient treatment, based on comparison with the corresponding vehicle while excluding concomitant/rescue medications.

  16. Efficacy of topical azathioprine and betamethasone versus betamethasone-only emollient cream in 2-18 years old patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Iraji, Fariba; Farhadi, Sadaf; Faghihi, Gita; Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Basiri, Akram; Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a considerable burden especially among children. To circumvent the problems related to oral azathioprine (AZT) we aimed to evaluate its topical variant and assess its efficacy in patients aged 2–18. Materials and Methods: In a single-blind trial, we randomized the patients into two groups, one treated with topical emollient containing AZT and betamethasone (BM), and the other treated solely with topical emollient of BM. The treatments were administered twice a day for 8 weeks in both groups. The efficacy, recurrence, and the presence of side effects were evaluated using SPSS 20. Results: The amount of reduction in severity scoring for atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) score was significantly greater in the group treated with the topical AZT (P = 0.024). Incidentally, there were no difference between two treatments in difference in proportions of recurrence and adverse effects as well as SCORAD reduction in subgroups of sex and age (all P > 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed the superiority of topical AZT over BM with a low recurrence and adverse effects. No expectation of severe side effects, like those of oral AZT, is the major advantage of topical AZT. The sample size was an issue in uncovering the value of AZT in the subgroups. Conducting prolonged studies of quality-of-life and comparing the topical AZT potency relative to the common alternatives are recommended areas of future work. PMID:26623403

  17. Efficacy of topical hydrating and emollient lotion containing 10% urea ISDIN® plus dexpanthenol (Ureadin Rx 10) in the treatment of skin xerosis and pruritus in hemodialyzed patients: an open prospective pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Castello, M; Milani, M

    2011-10-01

    Dry skin and pruritus are common complication of end-stage renal diseases (ESRD), affecting up to 80% of dialysis patients. They are chronic, unpleasant skin manifestations with a strong negative impact on patients' quality of life, often inducing sleeplessness and mood disorders. The pathogenesis of skin xerosis (SX) and uraemic pruritus (UP) are multifactorial. Moisturizing emollients are commonly used for the treatment of SX and UP. Urea is used in dermatology due to its excellent hydrating and moisturizing properties. Urea is useful in all cases of dry skin and, depending on the concentration levels, will act as moisturizing or keratolitic agent. Ureadin Rx 10 is a topical hydrating and emollient lotion formulation. So far no data are available regarding the efficacy of topical application of urea in lotion in the treatment of SX and UP in dialysed patients. In a prospective open pilot trial we assessed the effect of topical 10% Urea ISDIN® plus dexpanthenol lotion in the treatment of SX and UP in dialyzed patients. A total of 15 hemodialyzed patients (3 men; 12 women, mean age 66 years) with SX and UP were enrolled after their informed consent in the trial. Topical 10% Urea ISDIN® plus dexpanthenol (Ureadin RX; ISDIN) lotion (URx) was applied twice daily over the arm and the legs for 28 consecutive days. Primary outcomes were a 5-point SRRC Index score (evaluating scaling roughness, redness and cracks) and a 4-point itching score (IS) both measured at baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. At baseline mean (SD) SRRC was 5 (2.3). After URx treatment SRRC significantly (P=0.0001) decreased to 1.6 (2.1) and to 0.9 (1.2) after two and four weeks respectively (a relative reduction of 82% at week 4). IS at baseline was 1.0 (1.4). URx reduced IS significantly (P=0.008) to 0.2 (0.5) at week 2 and to 0.06 at week 4 (a relative reduction of 94% at week 4). Local tolerability was excellent/good in 14 out of 15 patients. One patient reported mild burning

  18. Methods for evaluating changes in skin condition due to the effects of antimicrobial hand cleansers: two studies comparing a new waterless chlorhexidine gluconate/ethanol-emollient antiseptic preparation with a conventional water-applied product.

    PubMed

    Grove, G L; Zerweck, C R; Heilman, J M; Pyrek, J D

    2001-12-01

    Hand-cleansing products that are milder to the skin of health care personnel are being developed, but the available methodologies to appropriately evaluate these products and quantify differences are not generally being applied in well-controlled studies. Two randomized, blinded, bilateral comparison studies evaluated skin condition during use of 2 antiseptic hand preparation products: a new 1% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG)/61% wt/wt ethanol antiseptic hand preparation in a unique emollient system for waterless/brushless application and a conventional 4% CHG antimicrobial product that is applied with water and a scrub brush. Trained technicians applied treatments 6 times (for a surgical scrub study) or 24 times (for a personnel handwash study) daily to the hands of healthy volunteers during 5 days of controlled washing. An expert grader evaluated skin for dryness, erythema, and roughness. Subjects completed a self-assessment questionnaire on skin condition. Transepidermal water loss was measured by an evaporimeter, and the skin surface hydration level was measured by an electrical conductance meter. Fifty-eight subjects were enrolled in the 2 studies and received both treatments. In general, skin treated with the waterless CHG/ethanol product scored significantly (P <.004) better on evaluations of visual dryness and erythema and showed greater improvement in the level of hydration (P <.003). In the health care personnel handwash study, transepidermal water loss was less than that for skin treated with the conventional CHG product (P <.002). Subject assessments showed similar results (total score, P <.007). All 3 approaches of expert grader evaluation, subject assessment, and instrumentation were in concordance, demonstrating that the waterless CHG/ethanol product was gentler to skin than the conventional CHG product.

  19. Novel antibacterial and emollient effects of coconut and virgin olive oils in adult atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Verallo-Rowell, Vermén M; Dillague, Kristine M; Syah-Tjundawan, Bertha S

    2008-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) skin is dry and readily colonized by Staphylococcus aureus (SA). Coconut and olive oils are traditionally used to moisturize and treat skin infections. To compare virgin coconut oil (VCO) and virgin olive oil (VOO) in moisturizing dryness and removing SA from colonized AD skin. This was a double-blind controlled trial in two outpatient dermatology clinics with adult AD patients who were diagnosed by history, pattern, evolution, and skin lesions and who were randomized to apply VCO or VOO twice daily at two noninfected sites. SA cultures, photography, and objective-SCORAD severity index (O-SSI) scoring were done at baseline and after 4 weeks. Twenty-six subjects each received VCO or VOO. Of those on VCO, 20 were positive for SA colonies at baseline versus 12 on VOO. Post intervention, only 1 (5%) VCO subject remained positive versus 6 (50%) of those on VOO. Relative risk for VCO was 0.10, significantly superior to that for VOO (10:1, p = .0028; 95% CI, 0.01-0.73); thus, the number needed to treat was 2.2. For the O-SSI, the difference was not significant at baseline (p = .15) but was significantly different post treatment (p = .004); this was reduced for both oils (p < .005) but was greater with VCO. VCO and monolaurin's O-SSI reduction and in vitro broad-spectrum activity against SA (given clinical validity here), fungi, and viruses may be useful in the proactive treatment of AD colonization.

  20. Effects of pretreatment with a urea-containing emollient on nickel allergic skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Natalia; Nyrén, Miruna; Lodén, Marie; Edlund, Fredrik; Emtestam, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a moisturizer containing urea on allergic contact dermatitis. Twenty-five nickel-sensitized patients and five controls (non-sensitized volunteers) applied such a moisturizer on the volar side of one forearm twice daily for 20 days, while the other forearm served as the control. After treatment with the moisturizer, patch tests with 0%, 0.5% and 2% NiSO4 in petrolatum were applied in a randomized manner on each arm. After 72 h, the skin reactions were blindly evaluated by clinical scoring and by measuring transepidermal water loss and electrical impedance. After treatment, the baseline transepidermal water loss values were lower and the baseline magnitude impedance index values were higher on the pretreated forearm. According to clinical scoring and measurements with the two physical measurement techniques, the degree of the patch test reactions was equal. All control subjects had negative nickel tests. We concluded that the skin reactivity to nickel in nickel-sensitized patients is not significantly affected by use of the urea-containing moisturizer.

  1. The strength of a remorseful heart: psychological and neural basis of how apology emolliates reactive aggression and promotes forgiveness

    PubMed Central

    Beyens, Urielle; Yu, Hongbo; Han, Ting; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Apology from the offender facilitates forgiveness and thus has the power to restore a broken relationship. Here we showed that apology from the offender not only reduces the victim’s propensity to react aggressively but also alters the victim’s implicit attitude and neural responses toward the offender. We adopted an interpersonal competitive game which consisted of two phases. In the first, “passive” phase, participants were punished by high or low pain stimulation chosen by the opponents when losing a trial. During the break, participants received a note from each of the opponents, one apologizing and the other not. The second, “active” phase, involved a change of roles where participants could punish the two opponents after winning. Experiment 1 included an Implicit Association Test (IAT) in between the reception of notes and the second phase. Experiment 2 recorded participants’ brain potentials in the second phase. We found that participants reacted less aggressively toward the apologizing opponent than the non-apologizing opponent in the active phase. Moreover, female, but not male, participants responded faster in the IAT when positive and negative words were associated with the apologizing and the non-apologizing opponents, respectively, suggesting that female participants had enhanced implicit attitude toward the apologizing opponent. Furthermore, the late positive potential (LPP), a component in brain potentials associated with affective/motivational reactions, was larger when viewing the portrait of the apologizing than the non-apologizing opponent when participants subsequently selected low punishment. Additionally, the LPP elicited by the apologizing opponents’ portrait was larger in the female than in the male participants. These findings confirm the apology’s role in reducing reactive aggression and further reveal that this forgiveness process engages, at least in female, an enhancement of the victim’s implicit attitude and a prosocial motivational change toward the offender. PMID:26579005

  2. The strength of a remorseful heart: psychological and neural basis of how apology emolliates reactive aggression and promotes forgiveness.

    PubMed

    Beyens, Urielle; Yu, Hongbo; Han, Ting; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Apology from the offender facilitates forgiveness and thus has the power to restore a broken relationship. Here we showed that apology from the offender not only reduces the victim's propensity to react aggressively but also alters the victim's implicit attitude and neural responses toward the offender. We adopted an interpersonal competitive game which consisted of two phases. In the first, "passive" phase, participants were punished by high or low pain stimulation chosen by the opponents when losing a trial. During the break, participants received a note from each of the opponents, one apologizing and the other not. The second, "active" phase, involved a change of roles where participants could punish the two opponents after winning. Experiment 1 included an Implicit Association Test (IAT) in between the reception of notes and the second phase. Experiment 2 recorded participants' brain potentials in the second phase. We found that participants reacted less aggressively toward the apologizing opponent than the non-apologizing opponent in the active phase. Moreover, female, but not male, participants responded faster in the IAT when positive and negative words were associated with the apologizing and the non-apologizing opponents, respectively, suggesting that female participants had enhanced implicit attitude toward the apologizing opponent. Furthermore, the late positive potential (LPP), a component in brain potentials associated with affective/motivational reactions, was larger when viewing the portrait of the apologizing than the non-apologizing opponent when participants subsequently selected low punishment. Additionally, the LPP elicited by the apologizing opponents' portrait was larger in the female than in the male participants. These findings confirm the apology's role in reducing reactive aggression and further reveal that this forgiveness process engages, at least in female, an enhancement of the victim's implicit attitude and a prosocial motivational change toward the offender.

  3. 76 FR 78258 - Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Order to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ....S.C. Sec. 18, and Section 5 of the FTC Act, as amended, 15 U.S.C. 45, in the market for tretinoin... rights to two pharmaceutical products, Refissa, a branded tretinoin emollient cream, and a generic tretinoin emollient cream, to Spear Pharmaceuticals (``Spear''), the company that owns both products. II...

  4. Quantitative assessment of combination bathing and moisturizing regimens on skin hydration in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Charles; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2009-01-01

    Standard recommendations for skin care for patients with atopic dermatitis stress the importance of skin hydration and the application of moisturizers. However, objective data to guide recommendations regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing and emollient application are scarce. This study quantified cutaneous hydration status after various combination bathing and moisturizing regimens. Four bathing/moisturizer regimens were evaluated in 10 subjects, five pediatric subjects with atopic dermatitis and five subjects with healthy skin. The regimens consisted of bathing alone without emollient application, bathing and immediate emollient application, bathing and delayed application, and emollient application alone. Each regimen was evaluated in all subjects, utilizing a crossover design. Skin hydration was assessed with standard capacitance measurements. In atopic dermatitis subjects, emollient alone yielded a significantly (p < 0.05) greater mean hydration over 90 minutes (206.2% baseline hydration) than bathing with immediate emollient (141.6%), bathing and delayed emollient (141%), and bathing alone (91.4%). The combination bathing and emollient application regimens demonstrated hydration values at 90 minutes not significantly greater than baseline. Atopic dermatitis subjects had a decreased mean hydration benefit compared with normal skin subjects. Bathing without moisturizer may compromise skin hydration. Bathing followed by moisturizer application provides modest hydration benefits, though less than that of simply applying moisturizer alone.

  5. [Evaluation of a waterless, scrubless chlorhexidine gluconate/ethanol surgical scrub and povidone-iodine for antimicrobial efficacy].

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Sil

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 1% chlorhexidine-gluconate/61% ethanol (CHG/Ethanol) emollient and 7.5% povidone-iodine (PVI) scrub for antimicrobial,residual effect, and skin condition. CHG/Ethanol emollient hand hygiene was performed waterless, and brushless by operating doctors and nurses (N=20). PVI hand washing was performed with water and a brush (N=20) for 5 min. The subjects were asked to press their left hand in hand-shaped agar before a surgical scrub, immediately after a surgical scrub and after the operation. The amount of isolated microorganisms were calculated by counting the number of divided areas(1 x 1 cm, 160 cell) which were culture positive in the hand culture plate. The skin condition was evaluated. The antimicrobial count of CHG/Ethanol emollient and PVI immediately post surgical scrub was 0.0 vs. 4.1 (p>.05), and after the operation was 0.1 vs. 37.8 (p>.05)respectively. The Residual effect of CHG/Ethanol emollient immediately post surgical scrub and after the operation were 0.0 vs. 0.1 (p>.05), and PVI were 4.1 vs. 37.8 (p>.05)respectively. The skin condition and satisfaction of CHG/Ethanol emollient was higher than PVI (p<.05). The antimicrobial effect between CHG/Ethanol emollient and PVI were the same. Considering skin condition, satisfaction and allergic reaction CHG/Ethanol emollient for surgical scrub is recommended in Korea.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Eastman Chemical Co., makes esters for emollients and emulsifiers in cosmetics with immobilized enzymes, saving energy and avoiding strong acids and organic solvents.

  7. Effects of topical corticosteroid and tacrolimus on ceramides and irritancy to sodium lauryl sulphate in healthy skin.

    PubMed

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellegren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2011-05-01

    The skin barrier, located in the stratum corneum, is influenced mainly by the lipid and protein composition of this layer. In eczematous diseases impairment of the skin barrier is thought to be of prime importance. Topical anti-inflammatory drugs and emollients are the most widely used eczema treatments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of topically applied corticosteroid, tacrolimus and emollient on stratum corneum lipids and barrier parameters. Nineteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Both forearms of the subjects were divided into four areas, which were treated twice daily for one week with betamethasone, tacrolimus, emollient, or left untreated, respectively. After one week each area was challenged with a 24 h sodium lauryl sulphate patch test. The lipids were collected using the cyanoacrylate method and evaluated by high performance thin layer chromatography. For evaluation of the skin barrier, transepidermal water loss, erythema and electrical capacitance were measured. The ceramide/cholesterol ratio was increased in betamethasone- (p = 0.008) and tacrolimus-treated (p = 0.025) skin compared with emollient-treated skin. No differences in ceramide subgroups were found between treatment regimes. Pretreatment with betamethasone (p = 0.01) or with tacrolimus (p = 0.001) causes a decreased inflammatory response to sodium lauryl sulphate compared with emollient. In conclusion, treatment with betamethasone and tacrolimus has a positive effect on the ceramide/cholesterol ratio and susceptibility to irritant reaction compared with an emollient.

  8. Current Neonatal Skin Care Practices in Four African Sites.

    PubMed

    Amare, Yared; Shamba, Donat D; Manzi, Fatuma; Bee, Margaret H; Omotara, Babatunji A; Iganus, Ruth B; Adejuyigbe, Ebunoluwa A; Odebiyi, Adetanwa L; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Hill, Zelee E

    2015-12-01

    Data for this study on skin care practices and emollient use in four African sites were collected using in-depth interviews, focus-group discussions and observations. Respondents were mothers, grandmothers, fathers, health workers, birth attendants and people selling skin-care products. Analysis included content and framework analyses.Emollient use was a normative practice in all sites, with frequent application from an early age in most sites. There were variations in the type of emollients used, but reasons for use were similar and included improving the skin, keeping the baby warm, softening/strengthening the joints/bones, shaping the baby, ensuring flexibility and encouraging growth and weight gain. Factors that influenced emollient choice varied and included social pressure, cost, availability and deep-rooted traditional norms. Massage associated with application was strong and potentially damaging to the skin in some sites.Given the widespread use of emollients, the repeated exposure of newborns in the first month of life and the potential impact of emollients on mortality, trials such as those that have been conducted in Asia are needed in a range of African settings. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Sensitive skin at menopause; dew point and electrometric properties of the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Paquet, F; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Fumal, I; Goffin, V; Paye, M; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-12

    A number of menopausal women experience skin sensitive to various environmental threats. Two panels of 15 menopausal women on or without HRT were compared. We studied the response of their stratum corneum to variations in environmental humidity, either in air or in response to an emollient. Environment dew point and electrometric measurements on the skin were recorded to search for correlations. Data show that the baseline stratum corneum hydration is influenced by the dew point. HRT improves the barrier function of the skin. The use of emollient further extends the improvement in the functional properties of skin in menopausal women. Both HRT and an emollient can counteract in part some of the deleterious effects of cold and dry weather.

  10. Choice of Moisturiser for Eczema Treatment (COMET): feasibility study of a randomised controlled parallel group trial in children recruited from primary care.

    PubMed

    Ridd, Matthew J; Garfield, Kirsty; Gaunt, Daisy M; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Redmond, Niamh M; Powell, Kingsley; Wilson, Victoria; Guy, Richard H; Ball, Nicola; Shaw, Lindsay; Purdy, Sarah; Metcalfe, Chris

    2016-11-16

    To determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of 'leave on' emollients for children with eczema. Single-centre, pragmatic, 4-arm, observer-blinded, parallel, randomised feasibility trial. General practices in the UK. Children with eczema aged 1 month to <5 years. Primary outcome-proportion of parents who reported use of the allocated study emollient every day for the duration of follow-up (12 weeks). Other feasibility outcomes-participant recruitment and retention, data collection and completeness and blinding of observers to allocation. Aveeno lotion, Diprobase cream, Doublebase gel, Hydromol ointment. 197 children were recruited-107 by self-referral (mainly via practice mail-outs) and 90 by inconsultation (clinician consenting and randomising) pathways. Participants recruited inconsultation were younger, had more severe Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure scores and were more likely to withdraw than self-referrals. Parents of 20 (10%) of all the randomised participants reported using the allocated emollient daily for 84 days. The use of other non-study emollients was common. Completeness of data collected by parent-held daily diaries and at monthly study visits was good. Daily diaries were liked (81%) but mainly completed on paper rather than via electronic ('app') form. Major costs drivers were general practitioner consultations and eczema-related prescriptions. Observer unblinding was infrequent, and occurred at the baseline or first follow-up visit through accidental disclosure. It is feasible in a primary care setting to recruit and randomise young children with eczema to emollients, follow them up and collect relevant trial data, while keeping observers blinded to their allocation. However, reported use of emollients (study and others) has design implications for future trials. ISRCTN21828118/EudraCT2013-003001-26. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  11. The ideal moisturizer: a survey of parental expectations and practice in childhood-onset eczema.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam-Lun Ellis; Wang, Shuxin Susan; Pong, Nga Hin; Leung, Ting Fan

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the moisturizing and bathing practices and preferences of patients with childhood-onset eczema. The attitudes and practice of patients with eczema managed at a pediatric dermatology clinic were evaluated, using children with non-eczematous skin diseases as controls. Disease severity of eczema in the preceding 12 months was evaluated by the Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS). Skin hydration (SH) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were assessed. Majority of patients took shower instead of bath and spent 12-13 min in shower. Most eczema patients applied emollients after shower/bath. Air-conditioning use was frequent, and patients with eczema maintained a lower ambient temperature than non-eczema patients (p = 0.001). Most eczema patients reported regular emollient usage (1.8 times/day for mild vs 2.8 times/day for moderate-to-severe eczema, p = 0.001), and acceptability of the current product was good to fair. Parents reported that the current emollients were most often recommended by doctors. Majority of parents/patients with mild eczema thought an ideal emollient needs only to be used twice a day whereas moderate-to-severe patients preferred more frequent usage (p = 0.001), and most of them preferred a non-fragrant, non-herbal white cream. Agreements concerning ideal emollient usage were only "moderate-to-fair" (kappa values <0.61), implying what parents/patients practiced was not the same as what they preferred. This study helps better understand the emolliation practices and preferences of eczema patients. Doctors remain the most important source of recommendation. Majority think an ideal moisturizer is a non-fragrant, non-herbal, white or transparent cream which needs only to be used two to three times per day. Compliance may be enhanced if the recommended moisturizer conforms to the parents/patients preference.

  12. Choice of Moisturiser for Eczema Treatment (COMET): feasibility study of a randomised controlled parallel group trial in children recruited from primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ridd, Matthew J; Garfield, Kirsty; Gaunt, Daisy M; Redmond, Niamh M; Powell, Kingsley; Wilson, Victoria; Guy, Richard H; Ball, Nicola; Shaw, Lindsay; Purdy, Sarah; Metcalfe, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of ‘leave on’ emollients for children with eczema. Design Single-centre, pragmatic, 4-arm, observer-blinded, parallel, randomised feasibility trial. Setting General practices in the UK. Participants Children with eczema aged 1 month to <5 years. Outcome measures Primary outcome—proportion of parents who reported use of the allocated study emollient every day for the duration of follow-up (12 weeks). Other feasibility outcomes—participant recruitment and retention, data collection and completeness and blinding of observers to allocation. Interventions Aveeno lotion, Diprobase cream, Doublebase gel, Hydromol ointment. Results 197 children were recruited—107 by self-referral (mainly via practice mail-outs) and 90 by inconsultation (clinician consenting and randomising) pathways. Participants recruited inconsultation were younger, had more severe Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure scores and were more likely to withdraw than self-referrals. Parents of 20 (10%) of all the randomised participants reported using the allocated emollient daily for 84 days. The use of other non-study emollients was common. Completeness of data collected by parent-held daily diaries and at monthly study visits was good. Daily diaries were liked (81%) but mainly completed on paper rather than via electronic (‘app’) form. Major costs drivers were general practitioner consultations and eczema-related prescriptions. Observer unblinding was infrequent, and occurred at the baseline or first follow-up visit through accidental disclosure. Conclusions It is feasible in a primary care setting to recruit and randomise young children with eczema to emollients, follow them up and collect relevant trial data, while keeping observers blinded to their allocation. However, reported use of emollients (study and others) has design implications for future trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN21828118/EudraCT2013

  13. Physical characteristics of tetrahydroxy and acylated derivatives of Jojoba liquid wax in lubricant applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Jojoba liquid wax is a mixture of esters of long-chain fatty acids and fatty alcohols, mainly C38:2-C46:2. The oil exhibits excellent emolliency on the skin and, therefore, is a component in many personal care cosmetic formulations. The virgin oil is a component of the seed of the jojoba (Simmondsia...

  14. Physical characteristics of tetrahydroxy and acylated derivatives of jojoba liquid wax

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Jojoba liquid wax is a mixture of esters of long chain fatty acids and fatty alcohols, mainly (C38:2-C46:2). The oil exhibits excellent emolliency on the skin and therefore is a component in many personal care cosmetic formulations. The virgin oil is a component of the seed of the Jojoba (Simmondsia...

  15. Thermophysical effects of ointments in cold: an experimental study with a skin model.

    PubMed

    Lehmuskallio, E; Anttonen, H

    1999-01-01

    The use of emollients on the face is a traditional way to protect the skin against cold injuries in cold climate countries like Finland, but their preventive effect against frostbite has been questioned. The purpose of this investigation was to define the thermal insulation and occlusivity of ointments in cold by using a skin model with a sweating hot plate. The properties of four different emollients were studied in both dry and humid conditions simulating transepidermal water loss, sweating, and a combination of sweating and drying. The thermal insulation of ointments applied on a dry surface was minimal. Evaporation of water from an oil-in-water cream caused significant cooling for 40 min after its application. The diffusion of water through the applied emollients changed their thermal effects depending on their composition and on the amount of water. Low input of water increased and high input diminished slightly the thermal resistance of ointments. The minimal or even negative thermal insulation of emollients in varying conditions gives them at best only a negligible and at worst a disadvantageous physical effect against cold.

  16. 9 CFR 3.116 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... such methods as intermittent spraying of water or application of a nontoxic emollient; (2) Assuring... related stress; and (5) Calming the marine mammals to avoid struggling, thrashing, and other unnecessary.../or warmed sufficiently to prevent overheating, hypothermia, or temperature related stress; and (2...

  17. 9 CFR 3.116 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... such methods as intermittent spraying of water or application of a nontoxic emollient; (2) Assuring... related stress; and (5) Calming the marine mammals to avoid struggling, thrashing, and other unnecessary.../or warmed sufficiently to prevent overheating, hypothermia, or temperature related stress; and (2...

  18. The Infant Skin Barrier: Can We Preserve, Protect, and Enhance the Barrier?

    PubMed Central

    Telofski, Lorena S.; Morello, A. Peter; Mack Correa, M. Catherine; Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    Infant skin is different from adult in structure, function, and composition. Despite these differences, the skin barrier is competent at birth in healthy, full-term neonates. The primary focus of this paper is on the developing skin barrier in healthy, full-term neonates and infants. Additionally, a brief discussion of the properties of the skin barrier in premature neonates and infants with abnormal skin conditions (i.e., atopic dermatitis and eczema) is included. As infant skin continues to mature through the first years of life, it is important that skin care products (e.g., cleansers and emollients) are formulated appropriately. Ideally, products that are used on infants should not interfere with skin surface pH or perturb the skin barrier. For cleansers, this can be achieved by choosing the right type of surfactant, by blending surfactants, or by blending hydrophobically-modified polymers (HMPs) with surfactants to increase product mildness. Similarly, choosing the right type of oil for emollients is important. Unlike some vegetable oils, mineral oil is more stable and is not subject to oxidation and hydrolysis. Although emollients can improve the skin barrier, more studies are needed to determine the potential long-term benefits of using emollients on healthy, full-term neonates and infants. PMID:22988452

  19. 21 CFR 349.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of acids or bases from such sources as drugs, body fluids, tears, etc. (d) Demulcent. An agent... membrane surfaces and relieve dryness and irritation. (e) Emollient. An agent, usually a fat or oil, which... present in body tissues and fluids, so that water is drawn from the body tissues and fluids across...

  20. 21 CFR 349.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of acids or bases from such sources as drugs, body fluids, tears, etc. (d) Demulcent. An agent... membrane surfaces and relieve dryness and irritation. (e) Emollient. An agent, usually a fat or oil, which... present in body tissues and fluids, so that water is drawn from the body tissues and fluids across...

  1. 21 CFR 349.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of acids or bases from such sources as drugs, body fluids, tears, etc. (d) Demulcent. An agent... membrane surfaces and relieve dryness and irritation. (e) Emollient. An agent, usually a fat or oil, which... present in body tissues and fluids, so that water is drawn from the body tissues and fluids across...

  2. Choice of Moisturiser for Eczema Treatment (COMET): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ridd, Matthew J; Redmond, Niamh M; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Ball, Nicola; Shaw, Lindsay; Guy, Richard; Wilson, Victoria; Metcalfe, Chris; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-07-15

    Eczema is common in children and in the UK most cases are managed in primary care. The foundation of all treatment is the regular use of leave-on emollients to preserve and restore moisture to the skin. This not only improves comfort but may also reduce the need for rescue treatment for 'flares', such as topical corticosteroids. However, clinicians can prescribe many different types of emollient and there is a paucity of evidence to guide this choice. One reason for this may be the challenges of conducting a clinical trial: are parents or carers of young children willing to be randomly allocated an emollient and followed up for a meaningful amount of time? This is a single-centre feasibility study of a pragmatic, four-arm, single-masked, randomized trial. Children with eczema who are eligible (from 1 month to less than 5 years of age, not known to be sensitive or allergic to any of study emollients or their constituents) are recruited via their general practices. Participants are allocated Aveeno® lotion, Diprobase® cream, Doublebase® gel or Hydromol® ointment via a web-based system, using a simple randomization process in a 1:1:1:1 fashion. Researchers are masked to the study emollient. Participants are assessed at baseline and followed up for 3 months. Data are collected by daily diaries, monthly researcher visits and review of electronic medical records. Because this is a feasibility study, a formal sample size calculation for the estimation of treatment effectiveness has not be made but we aim to recruit 160 participants. Recruitment is on-going. At the end of the study, as well as being able to answer the question, 'Is it is possible to recruit and retain children with eczema from primary care into a four-arm randomized trial of emollients?', we will also have collected important data on the acceptability and effectiveness of four commonly used emollients. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN21828118 and Clinical Trials Register EudraCT2013-003001-26.

  3. [THE ROLE OF PRESSURE ULCER SURROUNDING SKIN PREPARATION PRIOR TO THE APPLICATION OF WOUND DRESSING].

    PubMed

    Kulišić, S Marinović

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer develops as a result of many factors, primarily pressure, tensile forces and ischemia with immobility and incontinence. Targeted and properly designed preventive measures reduce the incidence and complications of pressure ulcers, among which the most common are infections. An important preventive measure is protection of the surrounding skin before the application of wound dressings. Skin changes dictate the use of emollients and topical therapy according to dermatological status.

  4. Dermal Influence on Epidermal Resurfacing during the Repair of Split Thickness Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-15

    by exposing purified platelets to thrombin also stimulated the proliferation of mooth muscle cells. They concluded that much of the growth-proanting...easily separated with forceps. The moist epidermis was placed on a microscope slide with the stratm corneum (and protruding hair shafts) against the glass...hcmogenate intradermally around the wound bed or using a viscous vehicle for the platelet factor, such as an ointment -based emollient. 3) The active factor

  5. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Methods and analysis Design: Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting: General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Participants: Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Interventions: Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Outcome measures: Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  6. [Norwegian scabies in a pediatric patient with Down syndrome, a case report].

    PubMed

    Mantero, Natalia M; Jaime, Lorena J; Nijamin, Tamara R; Laffargue, Jorge A; De Lillo, Leonardo; Grees, Susana A

    2013-12-01

    Norwegian (crusted) scabies is a rare and extreme manifestation of scabies that can be observed mainly among immunosuppressed patients. Due to the high number of scabies mites present in each lesion, crusted scabies symptoms are much more intense than in usual scabies and it is thus highly contagious. A case study of a child with Down syndrome and Norwegian scabies who shows a good response to a treatment combining keratolytics, emollients, ivermectin and topical scabicides is described.

  7. Hydrogel-gauze dressing for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: development and efficacy study on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Lew, Pit-Chin; Sin, Yong-Boey

    2014-11-01

    Topical emollients are known to provide symptomatic relief for atopic dermatitis. In hospitals, wet-wrap therapy has been shown to benefit children with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD), but the application of wet-wraps is tedious and time-consuming. Topical emollients have low residence time and often dry out easily. The aim of this work was to develop a hydrogel-gauze dressing that is not only easy to apply but also rehydrates and traps moisture to provide longer relief for AD patients. In this study, a prototype hydrogel-gauze dressing was developed with varying ratios of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) and propylene glycol. The hydrogel-gauze dressings were assessed based on the moisture vapor transmission rate, moisture absorption, mechanical properties and storage stability over three months. Then, the efficacy of the hydrogel-gauze dressing was compared to topical emollients using transgenic NC/Nga mice with AD-like lesions. The NaCMC hydrogel-gauze dressings significantly lowered transepidermal water loss, and the animals displayed a faster recovery, which indicates that hydrogel-gauze dressings can trap moisture more effectively and accelerate AD healing. Hence, we propose that hydrogel-gauze dressings can potentially become an alternative to wet-wrap therapy due to the ease of application and the higher efficacy compared to topical products.

  8. A skincare combined with combination of adapalene and benzoyl peroxide provides a significant adjunctive efficacy and local tolerance benefit in adult women with mild acne.

    PubMed

    Bouloc, A; Roo, E; Imko-Walczuk, B; Moga, A; Chadoutaud, B; Dréno, B

    2017-10-01

    Acne in adult women is an increasing reason for dermatological consultations. The aim of this study was to assess in adult women with mild acne the efficacy and tolerance of a daily adjunctive application of a skincare (Normaderm ® , Laboratoires Vichy, France) to a fixed combination of adapalene/benzoyl peroxide daily or every other evening and a standard emollient. Subjects were randomized to receive the fixed combination applied either every evening or every other evening and a daily application of the standard emollient and the test care or a once daily application of the fixed combination and the standard emollient alone. Clinical evaluations at Day 0, Day 45 and Day 90 included the count of acne lesions, assessment of clinical improvement and local tolerance. The quantitative lipid profile of the stratum corneum of the forehead was also determined. After 90 days of application, acne had improved in all 299 subjects with a statistically significant difference in favour of the test care regimens (P < 0.05). Moreover, skin quality, subject satisfaction, skin discomfort and sebum composition were in favour of these regimens. In conclusion, the tested skincare combined with a fixed adapalene and benzoyl peroxide combination provides a significant adjunctive efficacy and local tolerance benefit in adult women with mild acne. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy of stratum corneum: a pre-clinical validation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Polefka, T G

    2008-02-01

    Skin moisturization is not only important for maintaining skin functional properties but also has great impact on the skin's aesthetic properties. The top layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), plays a key role in protecting and preventing against external aggressions as well as in regulating water flux in and out. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is the first commercially available technique that provides a non-invasive, in vivo method to determine depth profiles of water concentration in the skin, however, in this case it was applied in an in vitro setting. As the first phase of validating the usefulness of confocal Raman microspectroscopy, we used porcine skin as a surrogate for human skin. Water concentration profiles were obtained using confocal Raman microspectroscopy from isolated pigskin SC and compared with that using the Karl Fischer titration method. The two methods correlated very well with a regression coefficient of 1.07 as well as a correlation coefficient, R(2) = 0.989, which demonstrated the consistency and accuracy of confocal Raman microspectroscopy for water concentration determination. To evaluate the instrument's response to different skin care/cleansing products, a wide range of products were tested to compare their skin moisturization ability. Among those tested were a lotion, commercial soap bar, syndet bar, traditional non-emollient shower gel (water, Sodium Laureth Ether Sulfate (SLES), cocamidopropyl betaine system) and emollient containing shower gel (water, sunflower oil, SLES, cocamidopropyl betaine, glycerin, petrolatum). The results were consistent with what was expected. The water content on skin treated with (A) lotion was significantly higher than the non-treated control; (B) syndet bar-treated skin had a significantly higher water content than soap-based bar-treated sites; (C) non-emollient shower gel washed sites were more moisturized than soap-based bar-treated samples; and (D) emollient shower gel-treated skin was

  10. Pseudoceramide for childhood eczema: does it work?

    PubMed

    Hon, K L; Wang, Susan S; Lau, Zoe; Lee, H C; Lee, Kenneth K C; Leung, T F; Luk, N M

    2011-04-01

    Atopic eczema is a chronic relapsing skin disease associated with atopy, and characterised by reduced skin hydration, impaired skin integrity (transepidermal water loss), and poor quality of life. Proper emollient usage is an important facet of its management. This study aimed to establish an approach to evaluate the efficacy of using an emollient over a 4-week period. Prospective observational study. A paediatric dermatology out-patient clinic of a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Consecutive new patients aged 5 to 18 years with atopic eczema diagnosed according to Hanifin and Rajka's criteria were recruited from March to August 2009. They or their parents were instructed to liberally apply the test emollient to the flexures and areas affected with eczema, twice daily. Outcome assessments were repeated 2 and 4 weeks later. Skin hydration and transepidermal water loss in the right forearm (2 cm below antecubital flexure), and disease severity (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index) and Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index. At the end of the study period, a global assessment of treatment was recorded. Thirty-three patients with atopic eczema were recruited and treated with applications of a pseudoceramide-containing cream (Curel, Kao, Japan). The mean age of the patients (16 males and 17 females) was 12 (standard deviation, 4) years. Four weeks following the use of the cream, skin hydration improved significantly and fewer patients were using topical corticosteroids. In these patients, there was no deterioration in transepidermal water loss, eczema severity, or quality of life. The pseudoceramide cream improved skin hydration but not severity or quality of life over a 4-week usage.

  11. Skin moisturization by hydrogenated polyisobutene--quantitative and visual evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Nava; Sivalenka, Rajarajeswari; Chase, John

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated polyisobutene (HP) is used in topically applied cosmetic/personal care formulations as an emollient that leaves a pleasing skin feel when applied, and rubbed in after application. This effect, although distinguishable to the user, is difficult to define and quantify. Recognizing that some of the physical properties of HP such as film formation and wear resistance may contribute, in certain mechanisms, to skin moisturization, we designed a short-term pilot study to follow changes in skin moisturization. HP's incorporation into an o/w emulsion at 8% yielded increased viscosity and reduced emulsion droplet size as compared to the emollient ester CCT (capric/caprylic triglyceride) or a control formulation. Quantitative data indicate that application of the o/w emulsion formulation containing either HP or CCT significantly elevated skin moisture content and thus reduced transepidermal water loss (TEWL) by a maximal approximately 33% against the control formulation within 3 h and maintained this up to 6 h. Visual observation of skin treated with the HP-containing formulation showed fine texture and clear contrast as compared to the control or the CCT formulation, confirming this effect. As a result of increased hydration, skin conductivity, as measured in terms of corneometer values, was also elevated significantly by about tenfold as early as 20 min after HP or CCT application and was maintained throughout the test period. Throughout the test period the HP formulation was 5-10% more effective than the CCT formulation both in reduction of TEWL as well as in increased skin conductivity. Thus, compared to the emollient ester (CCT), HP showed a unique capability for long-lasting effect in retaining moisture and improving skin texture.

  12. Prevention and treatment of diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kanti, Varvara

    2018-03-01

    Diaper dermatitis (DD) is one of the most common skin conditions that infants suffer from and their caregivers manage in the first months post-birth. As such, questions of effective prevention and treatment of the condition often arise. Nonmedical skincare practices that support healthy skin barrier function can prevent DD manifestation or alleviate the condition in many cases. The usage of barrier emollients and improved diaper technology contributes to keeping moisture and irritants away from an infant's delicate skin. This paper addresses facts behind commonly asked questions from caregivers regarding DD and discusses effective measures to prevent and treat the condition. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Safety Assessment of Polyether Lanolins as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan; Heldreth, Bart

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 39 polyether lanolin ingredients as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as hair conditioning agents, skin conditioning agent-emollients, and surfactant-emulsifying agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data, from previous CIR safety assessments of related ingredients and components. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these polyether lanolin ingredients are safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  14. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. ISRCTN84102309. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Managing atopic eczema in childhood: the health visitor and school nurse role.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jean

    2008-06-01

    Atopic eczema affects up to 20% of children in the UK. It is a disease of varying severity, and health visitors and school nurses have a vital role in educating and supporting children and their parents and carers in its management. Diagnosis and assessment needs to consider atopic eczema severity, effect on quality of life and contributing trigger factors. Treatment should be tailored to the individual child and should include education on emollient therapy, the use of topical corticosteroids and other measures. A case study is included to highlight practical issues and the support of the child and family in coping with atopic eczema at home and in school.

  16. Safety Assessment of Pentaerythrityl Tetraesters as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 16 pentaerythrityl tetraester compounds as used in cosmetics. These ingredients mostly function as hair-conditioning agents, skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous and binders, skin-conditioning agents-occlusive, viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous, and skin-conditioning agents-emollient. The Panel reviewed the available animal and human data related to these ingredients and previous safety assessments of the fatty acid moieties. The Panel concluded that pentaerythrityl tetraisostearate and the other pentaerythrityl tetraester compounds were safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Thermalism in Argentina. Alternative or complementary dermatologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ubogui, J; Stengel, F M; Kien, M C; Sevinsky, L; Rodríguez Lupo, L

    1998-11-01

    Our study took place in the region of the Copahue Volcano in the Andes Mountain range, 1900 m above sea level. Fifty-five patients who came to the Copahue Thermal Basin Complex (Neuquén, Argentina) for treatment of psoriasis vulgaris were clinically evaluated for participation in this study. Thermal products--waters, mud, and/or algae--were the only therapeutic agents used, except for bland emollients for xerosis. Treatment for brief periods (10 +/- 3 days) resulted in notable improvement.

  18. Tacrolimus treatment of atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian

    2003-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is today the most common chronic disease of children in Europe, the US and Japan. The 'golden standard' of therapy is topical glucocorticosteroids and emollients. The steroids have been on the market for four decades, are efficacious, but only advised for short-term treatment due to their risks of side effects. More than 16,000 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis have been enrolled in clinical studies of tacrolimus. One third of patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis experience over 90% improvement in their disease over a 12-week treatment period and up to 70% of patients have over 50% improvement. A 1-year treatment leads to more than 90% improvement in 75% of patients. The most pronounced side effect is a burning sensation occurring in up to 60% of patients. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin disease leading to a demand for long-term treatment control. Such treatment options have not previously been available--except for emollients which are not efficacious for controlling skin inflammation. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are new treatment options, free from the potential side effects of topical steroids, which are known for their efficacy in short-term treatment. The new treatment modalities prevent the eczema from relapsing and at the same time they control active eczema. The future will see a shift towards the long-term use of tacrolimus which is able to control the skin inflammation and, hopefully, shorten the course of the eczema.

  19. An unusual case of an immersion hand presentation in a military signaller operating in the jungle in Belize.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Kirstie E; Foster, P

    2017-12-01

    Belize, hosting one of the British Army's overseas training areas, provides access to challenging terrain and austere environments, which allows the delivery of training to soldiers on survival and combat within the jungle environment. A 26-year-old infanteer on exercise in Belize presented with progressive bilateral dry, painful, oedematous hands, secondary to the harsh environmental conditions of the jungle and inadequate drying of his hands resulting in his inability to perform his combat duties. The symptoms completely resolved with drying, emollient application and analgesia. While there are no reported cases of immersion hand, comparisons can be made with the well-reported warm weather immersion foot. This case highlights the importance of force preparation and soldier education for units deploying to the jungle. Simple preventive measures, including adequate 'wet-dry' drills and use of emollients can reduce the prevalence of immersion hand, a preventable condition, which can have a significant impact on the overall combat effectiveness of the unit. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Use of moisturizers among Danish atopic dermatitis patients-which perceived product characteristics associate with long-term adherence?

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Kristina Melbardis; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2018-03-01

    To identify factors perceived as most important regarding choice and continued use of moisturizers for adult patients with AD. Online survey among members of the Atopic eczema society Denmark. Among 75 participants, the most commonly tried (89.3%) and preferred (16%) product was Locobase ® (Leo Pharma, Denmark). A-derma ® (Pierre Fabre, France) had most continued use. The main reason for choosing preferred product was 'Best effect, in my experience' (36%). 'High lipid content' and 'GP/dermatologist suggested product' were considered as important main factors. 'Consistency', 'absorbs fast', and 'nice to wear' were secondary reasons for preferred product. A majority, 81.3% of respondents claimed to be very aware of perfumes and additives, 52% were very aware of allergy certification bodies on the product. AD patients state that the most important factor when choosing a product is out of personal experience followed by high lipid content and recommended by GP/dermatologist. As secondary reasons 'consistency', 'absorbs fast', and 'nice to wear' were important. Respondents generally use more than one product and are aware of additives. Evidence-based guidance on the choice of emollients is needed. The role of the professionals supporting the patient in navigating this market of emollients is therefore particularly important.

  1. The association between phthalate exposure and atopic dermatitis with a discussion of phthalate induced secretion of interleukin-1β and thymic stromal lymphopoietin.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Line E K; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Frederiksen, Hanne; Main, Katharina M; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-06-01

    Phthalate diesters are widely used as emollients in plastic and cosmetics as well as in food packaging and perfumes, potentially leading to prolonged and repeated dermal, oral and airborne exposure. We here review published articles that have evaluated the putative role of phthalate diesters in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and discuss possible pathogenic pathways. A literature search resulted in 563 articles in Embase and 263 articles in Pubmed. After identification of relevant articles based on screening of titles, abstracts and reference lists, a total of 39 articles were selected and included. While no clear association has been shown between systemic phthalate levels and atopic dermatitis in human studies, animal data suggests that phthalates may worsen dermatitis and in vitro data suggests that interleukin-4 could be upregulated. Moreover, both loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and atopic dermatitis have been associated with elevated systemic phthalate levels. There is a need for prospective studies to clarify the possible pathogenic role of phthalate diesters in atopic dermatitis and the associated health risk, especially with the general trend towards barrier restoration with emollients in infants at risk of developing atopic dermatitis. In summary, we conclude that the results from published studies are controversial and inconclusive.

  2. Moisturizers for Acne

    PubMed Central

    Chularojanamontri, Leena; Tuchinda, Papapit; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit that affects almost all teenagers. Different treatments offer different modes of action, but aim to target acne pathology. Topical therapies, such as benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, antibiotics with alcohol-based preparations, and salicylic acid, can cause skin irritation resulting in a lack of patient adherence. Some physicians recommend patients use moisturizers as adjunctive treatment of acne, especially when either topical benzoyl peroxide or a retinoid is prescribed. Furthermore, some evidence shows that moisturizers can contribute independently to improve signs and symptoms of acne. Moisturizers contain three main properties, which are occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Currently, many moisturizers claim to be suitable for acne treatment. This article aims to provide a review of the active ingredients and properties of those moisturizers. Fifty-two moisturizers for acne were included for analysis. Most of the products (92%) have anti-inflammatory properties apart from occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Anti-acne medications, including salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and retinol, were found respectively in 35, 10, and 8 percent of the moisturizer products containing anti-inflammatory properties. More than half of the products contain dimethicone and/or glycerin for its moisturizer property. Aloe vera and witch hazel are botanical anti-inflammatories that were commonly found in this study. Scientific data regarding some ingredients are discussed to provide a guide for physicians in selecting moisturizers for acne patients. PMID:24847408

  3. Understanding effects of topical ingredients on electrical measurement of skin hydration.

    PubMed

    Crowther, J M

    2016-12-01

    Methods that assess skin hydration based on changes in its electrical properties are widely used in both cosmetic and medical research. However, the devices themselves often give results which are significantly different to each other. Although some work has previously been carried out to try and understand what these devices are actually reading, it was based on a technique for measuring the devices' responses to filter discs impregnated with different liquids, which could in itself be influencing the measurements. Presented here is a new method for measuring the devices' direct responses to different materials and solutions which removes any other confounding effects, thereby providing a clearer insight into their operation. The responses of a variety of different liquids and solutions were measured using the Corneometer ® and Skicon ® . A new method is presented, based on the use of a custom-designed PTFE block to hold the liquids, allowing their measurement without using a filter paper. This method was developed and tested against the existing filter paper-based approach. Differences were observed in results between filter paper- and PTFE block-based approach, indicating that the filter paper itself is capable of influencing the measurements and as such is not to be recommended for assessing how different liquids impact on results from the devices. A positive correlation was observed between Corneometer ® and Skicon ® readings for certain solutions and under certain conditions. A large influence of salt concentration was noted for the Skicon ® device with no or minimal impact from the actual water itself, humectants and emollients. Salts, emollients, water and humectants were observed to have an effect on Corneometer ® readings. Both the Corneometer ® and Skicon ® were influenced to different extents by chemicals other than water and therefore cannot be seen purely as measures of skin 'hydration'. Although there is strong evidence that the devices do

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2016.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Hidehisa; Nakahara, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akio; Kabashima, Kenji; Sugaya, Makoto; Murota, Hiroyuki; Ebihara, Tamotsu; Kataoka, Yoko; Aihara, Michiko; Etoh, Takafumi; Katoh, Norito

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a disease characterized by relapsing eczema with pruritus as a primary lesion. Most patients have an atopic predisposition. The definitive diagnosis of AD requires the presence of all three features: (i) pruritus; (ii) typical morphology and distribution of the eczema; and (iii) chronic and chronically relapsing course. The current strategies to treat AD in Japan from the perspective of evidence-based medicine consist of three primary measures: (i) the use of topical corticosteroids and tacrolimus ointment as the main treatment for the inflammation; (ii) topical application of emollients to treat the cutaneous barrier dysfunction; and (iii) avoidance of apparent exacerbating factors, psychological counseling and advice about daily life. The guidelines present recommendations to review clinical research articles, evaluate the balance between the advantages and disadvantages of medical activities, and optimize medical activity-related patient outcomes with respect to several important points requiring decision-making in clinical practice. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Preliminary studies towards utilization of various plant extracts as antisolar agents.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M F; Santos, E P; Bizarri, C H; Mattos, H A; Padilha, M R; Duarte, H M

    1996-06-01

    Synopsis The aim of this work was to evaluate several plant extracts with regard to ultraviolet absorption spectra in view of a possible application as antisolar agents. Liquid and dry extracts of Hamamelis virginiana, Matricaria recutita, Aesculus hippocastanum, Rhamnus purshiana and Cinnamomum zeylanicum were prepared by repercolation, maceration and microwave oven extraction. UVB absorption spectra (290-320nm) were obtained and the solar protection factors (SPF) of these preparations were determined by a spectrophotometric method. The results showed that after incorporation to a 2% solution of the synthetic sunscreen octylmethoxycinnamate, the extracts showed an intensification in SPF values, suggesting that this can be an interesting method to intensify SPF. In addition, these extracts can contribute their emollient and moistening properties to the product. These are important characteristics for protecting skin against exposure to the sun.

  6. Hydroxychloroquine-induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sunil B; Sudershan, Bhuvaneshwari; Kuruvilla, Maria; Kamath, Ashwin; Suresh, Pooja K

    2017-01-01

    Erythroderma is characterized by diffuse erythema and scaling of the skin involving more than 90% of the total body skin surface area. Drug-induced erythroderma has rarely been reported with hydroxychloroquine. We report a case of a 50-year-old female patient, with systemic lupus erythematosus, who developed itchy lesions all over the body 1 month after starting treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Drug-induced erythroderma was suspected. Hydroxychloroquine was withdrawn and the patient was treated with emollients, mid-potency corticosteroids, and oral antihistamines. A biopsy was done which confirmed the diagnosis of erythroderma. She recovered with treatment and was discharged. A careful history and clinical examination to search for potential causative factors will help prevent disabling sequelae in erythroderma.

  7. Hydroxychloroquine-induced erythroderma

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sunil B.; Sudershan, Bhuvaneshwari; Kuruvilla, Maria; Kamath, Ashwin; Suresh, Pooja K.

    2017-01-01

    Erythroderma is characterized by diffuse erythema and scaling of the skin involving more than 90% of the total body skin surface area. Drug-induced erythroderma has rarely been reported with hydroxychloroquine. We report a case of a 50-year-old female patient, with systemic lupus erythematosus, who developed itchy lesions all over the body 1 month after starting treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Drug-induced erythroderma was suspected. Hydroxychloroquine was withdrawn and the patient was treated with emollients, mid-potency corticosteroids, and oral antihistamines. A biopsy was done which confirmed the diagnosis of erythroderma. She recovered with treatment and was discharged. A careful history and clinical examination to search for potential causative factors will help prevent disabling sequelae in erythroderma. PMID:28458440

  8. Green synthesis of isopropyl myristate in novel single phase medium Part I: Batch optimization studies.

    PubMed

    Vadgama, Rajeshkumar N; Odaneth, Annamma A; Lali, Arvind M

    2015-12-01

    Isopropyl myristate finds many applications in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries as an emollient, thickening agent, or lubricant. Using a homogeneous reaction phase, non-specific lipase derived from Candida antartica, marketed as Novozym 435, was determined to be most suitable for the enzymatic synthesis of isopropyl myristate. The high molar ratio of alcohol to acid creates novel single phase medium which overcomes mass transfer effects and facilitates downstream processing. The effect of various reaction parameters was optimized to obtain a high yield of isopropyl myristate. Effect of temperature, agitation speed, organic solvent, biocatalyst loading and batch operational stability of the enzyme was systematically studied. The conversion of 87.65% was obtained when the molar ratio of isopropyl alcohol to myristic acid (15:1) was used with 4% (w/w) catalyst loading and agitation speed of 150 rpm at 60 °C. The enzyme has also shown good batch operational stability under optimized conditions.

  9. The structure and function of the epidermal barrier in patients with atopic dermatitis – treatment options. Part two

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and recurrent disease induced by underlying defects of the epidermal barrier and immunological disorders, typical of atopic diseases. The genetic and immunological mechanisms (outlined in the previous paper) affecting the dysfunction of the barrier are intensified by environmental factors, e.g. airborne and food allergens, infections and stress. For this reason, proper skin care, which prevents further damage and restores the epidermal barrier is of such importance in the field of AD therapy. Appropriate therapy is based on emollients which, coupled with anti-inflammatory and antipruritic treatment, should be used as the first-line therapy. The aim of the present paper is to outline the effects of the abovementioned factors on the dysfunction of the epidermal barrier as well as to emphasize the importance of proper atopic skin care in maintaining the integrity of the barrier and preventing exacerbation of the disease. PMID:29760610

  10. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)--a promising spice for phytochemicals and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Policegoudra, R S; Aradhya, S M; Singh, L

    2011-09-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is a unique spice having morphological resemblance with ginger but imparts a raw mango flavour. The main use of mango ginger rhizome is in the manufacture of pickles and culinary preparations. Ayurveda and Unani medicinal systems have given much importance to mango ginger as an appetizer, alexteric, antipyretic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, emollient, expectorant and laxative and to cure biliousness, itching, skin diseases, bronchitis, asthma, hiccough and inflammation due to injuries. The biological activities of mango ginger include antioxidant activity, antibacterial activity, antifungal activity, anti-inflammatory activity, platelet aggregation inhibitory activity, cytotoxicity, antiallergic activity, hypotriglyceridemic activity, brine-shrimp lethal activity, enterokinase inhibitory activity, CNS depressant and analgesic activity. The major chemical components include starch, phenolic acids, volatile oils, curcuminoids and terpenoids like difurocumenonol, amadannulen and amadaldehyde. This article brings to light the major active components present in C. amada along with their biological activities that may be important from the pharmacological point of view.

  11. Topical treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Laws, Philip M; Young, Helen S

    2010-08-01

    The majority of patients with psoriasis can be safely and effectively treated with topical therapy alone, either under the supervision of a family physician or dermatologist. For those requiring systemic agents, topical therapies can provide additional benefit. Optimal use of topical therapy requires an awareness of the range and efficacy of all products. The review covers the efficacy and role of topical therapies including emollients, corticosteroids, vitamin D analogs, calcineurin inhibitors, dithranol, coal tar, retinoids, keratolyics and combination therapy. The report was prepared following a PubMed and Embase literature search up to April 2010. The paper provides a broad review of the relevant topical therapeutic options available in routine clinical practice for the management of psoriasis and a recommendation for selection of treatment. Topical therapies used appropriately provide a safe and effective option for the management of psoriasis. An awareness of the available products and their efficacy is key to treatment selection and patient satisfaction.

  12. Care of the growth-restricted newborn.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Bianca; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2018-05-01

    With the first 1,000 days of life proving to be a critical window of opportunity for physical and cognitive growth and development, an optimal intrauterine environment is vital. If fetus needs are compromised prenatally, there is an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and infants being born premature, low birth weight (LBW), or small-for-gestational age (SGA). Specialized care of these high-risk infants is necessary in terms of preconception interventions, resuscitation, thermoregulation, nutritional support and kangaroo mother care. Significant evidence supports exclusive breastfeeding as the standard of care for feeding SGA, preterm, LBW and very low birth weight infants. Expressed milk or donor milk may also require fortification, to meet higher nutrient needs of these newborns. Future research should address the gap in the literature on specific care of term and preterm IUGR and or SGA infants, and strengthening evidence for human milk bank models and emollient care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Apremilast Use in a Case of Cicatricial Ectropion Secondary to Severe Lamellar Ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Jean-Paul J; Whittington, Alexander; Ahmed, Masih; Himebaugh, Jesse T; Wiley, Lee A; Haffar, Ahmad; Nguyen, John

    Ichthyosis is a cutaneous disorder characterized by excessive amounts of dry thickened skin surface scales. Ocular manifestations of ichthyosis include cicatricial ectropion, which may cause exposure keratoconjunctivitis and rarely corneal perforation. Topical emollients, anti-inflammatory ointments, and systemic retinoids have been used to control the disease process, while surgical correction with donor graft has been reserved for severe cases involving corneal exposure. The authors report a case of a Caucasian male with lamellar ichthyosis with severe bilateral upper and lower eyelid cicatricial ectropion and corneal ulceration requiring surgical correction. Treatment with apremilast, a novel phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, for the treatment of a concomitant plaque psoriasis achieved good control of his skin diseases and minimized the recurrence of eyelid ectropion.

  14. Airborne irritant contact dermatitis due to synthetic fibres from an air-conditioning filter.

    PubMed

    Patiwael, Jiska A; Wintzen, Marjolein; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Bruynzeel, Derk P

    2005-03-01

    We describe 8 cases of occupational airborne irritant contact dermatitis in intensive care unit (ICU) employees caused by synthetic (polypropylene and polyethylene) fibres from an air-conditioning filter. Not until a workplace investigation was conducted, was it possible to clarify the unusual sequence of events. High filter pressure in the intensive care air-conditioning system, maintained to establish an outward airflow and prevent microorganisms from entering the ward, probably caused fibres from the filter to become airborne. Upon contact with air-exposed skin, fibres subsequently provoked skin irritation. Test periods in the ICU with varying filter pressures, in an attempt to improve environmental conditions, led to even higher filter pressure levels and more complaints. The sometimes-very-low humidity might have contributed to development of skin irritation. The fact that most patients recovered quickly after treatment with emollients and changing the filters made it most likely that the airborne dermatitis was of an irritant nature.

  15. Male skin and ingredients relevant to male skin care.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Z D

    2012-03-01

    Male skin care needs are heavily influenced by the need to remove facial hair on a regular basis. Facial skin issues associated with poor hair removal approaches are common and include razor burn and irritation. This paper evaluates current research on shaving technology and how careful ingredient selection can contribute to male skin health. The importance of maintaining hair softness during the shave and restoring facial hydration post-shave is discussed. Data are presented on how post-shave moisturizers containing glycerine and emollients can create an environment for improved barrier function which can be further improved by incorporating specific ingredients such as niacinamide. © 2012 The Author. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. Habit tic nail deformity - a rare presentation in an 8 year old boy.

    PubMed

    El-Heis, S; Abadie, Al

    2016-11-15

    Habit tic nail deformity is a nail dystrophy resulting from habitual, repetitive trauma to the nail. It is usually acquired in adulthood, however, we report a case of habit tic nail deformity in an 8 year old boy. The diagnosis was made clinically with further history revealing that the boy repeatedly rubbed his thumbnails and pushed the cuticles. Emollient cream (Balneum®) was recommended twice daily and both the patient and his mother were educated on the behavioral nature of this condition. There was marked improvement at 6 months of treatment and further improvement at 12 months.We note that habit tic nail deformity is not exclusive to adults. Diagnosis can be made clinically. History and physical examination provide valuable clues and psychosocial links must be explored and addressed. Management is challenging and compliance with treatment is variable. Patient education, barrier methods, and behavioral therapy can be helpful in preventing further trauma to the nails.

  17. Papular, profuse, and precocious keratosis pilaris.

    PubMed

    Castela, Emeline; Chiaverini, Christine; Boralevi, Franck; Hugues, Rosalind; Lacour, Jean Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a frequent and benign condition in children characterized by the presence of rough, follicular papules and varying degrees of erythema. Different variants have been described, including simple KP and red KP. Between September 2007 and October 2010, 11 children with profuse and precocious KP seen at the department of pediatric dermatology were included. They defined an underemphasized clinical variant of childhood KP: the papular, profuse, and precocious KP characterized by early age of onset (<18 mos), extensive involvement of the limbs and cheeks, and papular nature of lesions. No clinical association has been found. The main complication was episodes of folliculitis. Diagnosis was delayed for all patients. Treatment is difficult, but association between emollient and keratolytic agents can provide some help. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Active pharmaceutical ingredients available as substances for extemporaneous preparation in veterinary medicine in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Sklenář, Zbyněk; Horáčková, Kateřina; Bakhouche, Hana

    2014-04-01

    In veterinary medicine, extemporaneously prepared drugs can be also used in therapy. In the recent four years the selection of suitable compounds for extemporaneous (magistral) preparation has been expanded and new possibilities for the creation of formulas have appeared. The paper reports on the substances available for compounding that can be used in veterinary medicine, in the pharmacotherapeutic classes antibiotics, antimycotics, antiseptics, corticosteroids, emollients and epithelizing agents, anti-inflammatory drugs, local anesthetics, decongestives, beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers, antiemetics and prokinetics, sedatives and hypnotics. The emphasis has been placed on newly available substances. Examples of suitable magistral formulas are presented that can replace mass-produced drug products which are not readily obtainable. The aim of the paper is to inform pharmacists and veterinarians about new possibilities of drug compounding. compounded preparations extemporaneous preparation compounding of drugs possibilities magistral formulas in veterinary medicine.

  19. Formulation and Evaluation of Exotic Fat Based Cosmeceuticals for Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mandawgade, S. D.; Patravale, Vandana B.

    2008-01-01

    Mango butter was explored as a functional, natural supplement and active skin ingredient in skin care formulations. A foot care cream was developed with mango butter to evaluate its medicinal value and protective function in skin repair. Qualitative comparison and clinical case studies of the product were carried out. Wound healing potential of foot care cream was investigated on the rat excision and incision wound models. Results of the clinical studies demonstrated complete repair of worn and cracked skin in all the human volunteers. Furthermore, foot care cream exhibited significant healing response in both the wound models. The project work could be concluded as establishment of high potential for mango butter to yield excellent emolliency for better skin protection. Improving the product features and medicinal functionality further validate mango butter as a specialty excipient in development of cosmeceuticals and has an immense value for its commercialization. PMID:20046792

  20. Safety Assessment of Panax spp Root-Derived Ingredients as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 13 Panax spp root-derived ingredients as used in cosmetics. Panax "spp" indicates that multiple species within the genus are used in cosmetics, but not all species within that genus. Four species are being considered in this safety assessment. These ingredients function mostly as skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous, fragrance ingredients, skin-conditioning agents-humectant, skin-conditioning agents-emollient, and cosmetic astringents. The Panel reviewed available data related to these ingredients and addressed the issue of pulegone, a constituent of these ingredients and other ingredients, such as peppermint oil. The Panel concluded that these Panax spp root-derived ingredients are safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Preventing pressure ulcers in long-term care: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ba'; Stern, Anita; Chen, Wendong; Sander, Beate; John-Baptiste, Ava; Thein, Hla-Hla; Gomes, Tara; Wodchis, Walter P; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Machado, Márcio; Carcone, Steven; Krahn, Murray

    2011-11-14

    Pressure ulcers are common in many care settings, with adverse health outcomes and high treatment costs. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of evidence-based strategies to improve current prevention practice in long-term care facilities. We used a validated Markov model to compare current prevention practice with the following 4 quality improvement strategies: (1) pressure redistribution mattresses for all residents, (2) oral nutritional supplements for high-risk residents with recent weight loss, (3) skin emollients for high-risk residents with dry skin, and (4) foam cleansing for high-risk residents requiring incontinence care. Primary outcomes included lifetime risk of stage 2 to 4 pressure ulcers, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and lifetime costs, calculated according to a single health care payer's perspective and expressed in 2009 Canadian dollars (Can$1 = US$0.84). Strategies cost on average $11.66 per resident per week. They reduced lifetime risk; the associated number needed to treat was 45 (strategy 1), 63 (strategy 4), 158 (strategy 3), and 333 (strategy 2). Strategy 1 and 4 minimally improved QALYs and reduced the mean lifetime cost by $115 and $179 per resident, respectively. The cost per QALY gained was approximately $78 000 for strategy 3 and $7.8 million for strategy 2. If decision makers are willing to pay up to $50 000 for 1 QALY gained, the probability that improving prevention is cost-effective is 94% (strategy 4), 82% (strategy 1), 43% (strategy 3), and 1% (strategy 2). The clinical and economic evidence supports pressure redistribution mattresses for all long-term care residents. Improving prevention with perineal foam cleansers and dry skin emollients appears to be cost-effective, but firm conclusions are limited by the available clinical evidence.

  2. Oral and Topical Antibiotics for Clinically Infected Eczema in Children: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial in Ambulatory Care.

    PubMed

    Francis, Nick A; Ridd, Matthew J; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Butler, Christopher C; Hood, Kerenza; Shepherd, Victoria; Marwick, Charis A; Huang, Chao; Longo, Mirella; Wootton, Mandy; Sullivan, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Eczema may flare because of bacterial infection, but evidence supporting antibiotic treatment is of low quality. We aimed to determine the effect of oral and topical antibiotics in addition to topical emollient and corticosteroids in children with clinically infected eczema. We employed a 3-arm, blinded, randomized controlled trial in UK ambulatory care. Children with clinical, non-severely infected eczema were randomized to receive oral and topical placebos (control), oral antibiotic (flucloxacillin) and topical placebo, or topical antibiotic (fusidic acid) and oral placebo, for 1 week. We compared Patient Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores at 2 weeks using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). We randomized 113 children (40 to control, 36 to oral antibiotic, and 37 to topical antibiotic). Mean (SD) baseline Patient Oriented Eczema Measure scores were 13.4 (5.1) for the control group, 14.6 (5.3) for the oral antibiotic group, and 16.9 (5.5) for the topical antibiotic group. At baseline, 104 children (93%) had 1 or more of the following findings: weeping, crusting, pustules, or painful skin. Mean (SD) POEM scores at 2 weeks were 6.2 (6.0) for control, 8.3 (7.3) for the oral antibiotic group, and 9.3 (6.2) for the topical antibiotic group. Controlling for baseline POEM score, neither oral nor topical antibiotics produced a significant difference in mean (95% CI) POEM scores (1.5 [-1.4 to 4.4] and 1.5 [-1.6 to 4.5] respectively). There were no significant differences in adverse effects and no serious adverse events. We found rapid resolution in response to topical steroid and emollient treatment and ruled out a clinically meaningful benefit from the addition of either oral or topical antibiotics. Children seen in ambulatory care with mild clinically infected eczema do not need treatment with antibiotics. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. A Systematic Scoping Literature Review of Publications Supporting Treatment Guidelines for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis in Contrast to Clinical Practice Patterns.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, Elaine C; Jaworski, Jennifer C; Mina-Osorio, Paola

    2018-06-01

    Treatment guidelines endorse a variety of strategies for atopic dermatitis (AD) which may vary from published data and clinical practice patterns. The objective of this review was to quantify the volume of available medical literature supporting pediatric AD treatments and compare these patterns to those recommended by published guidelines and/or clinical practice patterns. Searches of Embase (2005-2016) and abstracts from selected meetings (2014-2016) related to AD treatment in patients younger than 17 years of age yielded references that were assessed by study design, primary treatment, age groups, and AD severity. Published literature partially supports clinical guidelines, with emollients and topical medications being the most investigated. There were disproportionately more publications for topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCI) compared with topical corticosteroids (TCS); however, the search interval may have biased the results toward treatments approved near the beginning of the time frame. In contrast, publications documenting clinical practice patterns reflect greater use of emollients and TCS (over TCI), as well as systemic corticosteroids. Data is relatively limited for long-term and combination treatment, treatment of severe AD, and patients younger than 2 years of age, and completely lacking for systemic corticosteroids. This scoping review demonstrates that available medical literature largely supports published guidelines for topical therapy; however, clinical practice patterns are less aligned. There is a lack of data for older, more frequently used generic treatments, including oral antihistamines, oral antibiotics, and systemic corticosteroids. Overall, literature is lacking for long-term treatment, treatment for patients younger than 2 years of age, and for systemic treatment for severe disease. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.

  4. Epidemiologic Background of Hand Hygiene and Evaluation of the Most Important Agents for Scrubs and Rubs

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Kramer, Axel

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of nosocomial infections, the frequency of contaminated hands with the different nosocomial pathogens, and the role of health care workers' hands during outbreaks suggest that a hand hygiene preparation should at least have activity against bacteria, yeasts, and coated viruses. The importance of efficacy in choosing the right hand hygiene product is reflected in the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline on hand hygiene (J. M. Boyce and D. Pittet, Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 51:1-45, 2002). The best antimicrobial efficacy can be achieved with ethanol (60 to 85%), isopropanol (60 to 80%), and n-propanol (60 to 80%). The activity is broad and immediate. Ethanol at high concentrations (e.g., 95%) is the most effective treatment against naked viruses, whereas n-propanol seems to be more effective against the resident bacterial flora. The combination of alcohols may have a synergistic effect. The antimicrobial efficacy of chlorhexidine (2 to 4%) and triclosan (1 to 2%) is both lower and slower. Additionally, both agents have a risk of bacterial resistance, which is higher for chlorhexidine than triclosan. Their activity is often supported by the mechanical removal of pathogens during hand washing. Taking the antimicrobial efficacy and the mechanical removal together, they are still less effective than the alcohols. Plain soap and water has the lowest efficacy of all. In the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline, promotion of alcohol-based hand rubs containing various emollients instead of irritating soaps and detergents is one strategy to reduce skin damage, dryness, and irritation. Irritant contact dermatitis is highest with preparations containing 4% chlorhexidine gluconate, less frequent with nonantimicrobial soaps and preparations containing lower concentrations of chlorhexidine gluconate, and lowest with well-formulated alcohol-based hand rubs containing emollients and other skin conditioners. Too few published data

  5. Patient acceptability, efficacy, and skin biophysiology of a cream and cleanser containing lipid complex with shea butter extract versus a ceramide product for eczema.

    PubMed

    Hon, K L; Tsang, Y C; Pong, N H; Lee, Vivian W Y; Luk, N M; Chow, C M; Leung, T F

    2015-10-01

    To investigate patient acceptability, efficacy, and skin biophysiological effects of a cream/cleanser combination for childhood atopic dermatitis. Paediatric dermatology clinic at a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Consecutive paediatric patients with atopic dermatitis who were interested in trying a new moisturiser were recruited between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014. Swabs and cultures from the right antecubital fossa and the worst eczematous area, disease severity (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index), skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss were obtained prior to and following 4-week usage of a cream/cleanser containing lipid complex with shea butter extract (Ezerra cream; Hoe Pharma, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia). Global or general acceptability of treatment was documented as 'very good', 'good', 'fair', or 'poor'. A total of 34 patients with atopic dermatitis were recruited; 74% reported 'very good' or 'good', whereas 26% reported 'fair' or 'poor' general acceptability of treatment of the Ezerra cream; and 76% reported 'very good' or 'good', whereas 24% reported 'fair' or 'poor' general acceptability of treatment of the Ezerra cleanser. There were no intergroup differences in pre-usage clinical parameters of age, objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index, pruritus, sleep loss, skin hydration, transepidermal water loss, topical corticosteroid usage, oral antihistamine usage, or general acceptability of treatment of the prior emollient. Following use of the Ezerra cream, mean pruritus score decreased from 6.7 to 6.0 (P=0.036) and mean Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index improved from 10.0 to 8.0 (P=0.021) in the 'very good'/'good' group. There were no statistically significant differences in the acceptability of wash (P=0.526) and emollients (P=0.537) with pre-trial products. When compared with the data of another ceramide-precursor moisturiser in a previous study, there was no statistical difference in efficacy and acceptability between the two

  6. Local rhamnosoft, ceramides and L-isoleucine in atopic eczema: a randomized, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Alessia; Licari, Amelia; Agostinis, Fabio; Barcella, Antonio; Bonamonte, Domenico; Puviani, Mario; Milani, Massimo; Marseglia, GianLuigi

    2014-01-01

    Background A non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory moisturizing cream containing rhamnosoft, ceramides, and L-isoleucine (ILE) (pro-AMP cream) has been recently developed for the specific treatment of atopic eczema (AE) of the face. In this trial, we evaluated the clinical efficacy and tolerability of pro-AMP cream in the treatment of facial AE in children in comparison with an emollient cream. Methods In a randomized, prospective, assessor-blinded, parallel groups (2:1) controlled trial, 107 children (72 allocated to pro-AMP cream and 35 allocated to control group) with mild-to-moderate chronic AE of the face were enrolled. Treatments were applied twice daily for a 6-week period. Facial Eczema Severity Score (ESS) was evaluated at baseline, week 3, and week 6, by an assessor unaware of treatment allocation. Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) score was assessed at week 3 and at week 6. Tolerability was evaluated at week 3 and at week 6 using a 4-point score (from 0: low tolerability to 3: very good tolerability). Results At baseline ESS, mean (SD) was 6.1 (2.4) in the pro-AMP cream group and 5.3 (3) in the control group. In the pro-AMP group, in comparison with baseline, ESS was significantly reduced to 2.5 (−59%) after 3 wks and to 1.0 (−84%) at week 6 (p = 0.0001). In the control group, ESS was reduced to 3 (−42%) at week 2 and to 2.6 (−50%) at week 6. At week 6, ESS in pro-AMP cream was significantly lower than the control group (1.0 vs. 2.6; p = 0.001). Both products were well tolerated. Conclusion Pro-AMP cream has shown to be effective in the treatment of mild-to-moderate chronic lesion of AE of the face. Clinical efficacy was greater in comparison with an emollient cream. (Clinical trial Registry: NTR4084). PMID:24750568

  7. Urgent consultations at the dermatology department of Basel University Hospital, Switzerland: characterisation of patients and setting - a 12-month study with 2,222 patients data and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, N; Itin, P H; Beltraminelli, H

    2014-01-01

    Urgent consultations for skin disorders are commonly done in different settings. Scarce data exist about the characteristics of these patients. The aim of this study was to analyse specific characteristics of patients receiving an urgent consultation at a dermatology department in a university hospital. We prospectively recorded the data of all patients having had an urgent consultation during a period of 12 months. We registered 2,222 urgent consultations. The most frequent diagnoses were eczemas (24.8%), dermatomycoses (5.1%) and dermatitis not otherwise specified (4.8%). The most frequent treatments were topical steroids, emollients, topical antibiotics, systemic antihistamines, antibiotics and virostatics. 2.2% of patients were hospitalized, 78.8% asked for a consultation for a disease lasting less than 4 weeks, and 6.9% presented the same day as the skin disease appeared. This study shows the characteristics of patients receiving an urgent dermatologic consultation. It underlines the need for collaboration between dermatologists, other physicians, general practitioners and nurses. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Comparative assessment of local tolerance of alcohols commonly used in alcohol-based hand rubs for hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Manche, Monique; Foligné, Benoît; Sauty, Mathieu; Platel, Anne; Vercauteren, Eric; Rauwel, Gaétan; Catoire, Sophie; Ficheux, Hervé; Criquelion, Jacques; Nesslany, Fabrice

    2017-10-01

    Hand hygiene plays a key role in nosocomial infection prevention. To achieve users' adherence, products' dermal tolerance is essential. We aimed at making a comparative assessment of skin irritation and phototoxicity of the 3 alcohols commonly used in alcohol-based hand rubs (Ethanol, Propan-2-ol, Propan-1-ol) at 60, 70, 80 or 85% w/w in water or with co-formulates (hydrating, emollient and skin protective agents). In vitro validated OECD methods 439 and 432 were used. For irritation, EpiSkin™ Small Model was the chosen Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RhE). For phototoxicity, co-formulates alone or in mixture with and without alcohol were tested using BALB/c 3T3 cell cultures. Whilst Ethanol and Propan-2-ol could not be differentiated and displayed good skin tolerance profiles, Propan-1-ol based products lead to significant viability impairments of RhE at 60, 70 or 80% and at 60% in the presence of co-formulates. However, these results could not be reproduced in another RhE model. Taking also into account bibliographic data on Propan-1-ol, this suggests that our results are probably related to a lack of specificity of the used RhE. Therefore, it can be relevant in case of significant results to use two different RhE models before performing any classification and/or performing any complementary tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antiseptic use in the neonatal intensive care unit - a dilemma in clinical practice: An evidence based review

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyamurthy, Sundar; Banerjee, Jayanta; Godambe, Sunit V

    2016-01-01

    Infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are highly susceptible to healthcare associated infections (HAI), with a substantial impact on mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. Effective skin disinfection with topical antiseptic agents is an important intervention in the prevention or reduction of HAI. A wide array of antiseptic preparations in varying concentrations and combinations has been used in neonatal units worldwide. In this article we have reviewed the current evidence of a preferred antiseptic of choice over other agents for topical skin disinfection in neonates. Chlorhexidine (CHG) appears to be a promising antiseptic agent; however there exists a significant concern regarding the safety of all agents used including CHG especially in preterm and very low birth weight infants. There is substantial evidence to support the use of CHG for umbilical cord cleansing and some evidence to support the use of topical emollients in reducing the mortality in infants born in developing countries. Well-designed large multicentre randomized clinical trials are urgently needed to guide us on the most appropriate and safe antiseptic to use in neonates undergoing intensive care, especially preterm infants. PMID:27170926

  10. Formulation and Characterization of Benzoyl Peroxide Gellified Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Naresh Kumar; Bharti, Pratibha; Mahant, Sheefali; Rao, Rekha

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out with the objective of formulating a gellified emulsion of benzoyl peroxide, an anti-acne agent. The formulations were prepared using four different vegetable oils, viz. almond oil, jojoba oil, sesame oil, and wheat germ oil, owing to their emollient properties. The idea was to overcome the skin irritation and dryness caused by benzoyl peroxide, making the formulation more tolerable. The gellified emulsions were characterized for their homogeneity, rheology, spreadability, drug content, and stability. In vitro permeation studies were performed to check the drug permeation through rat skin. The formulations were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity, as well as their acute skin irritation potential. The results were compared with those obtained for the marketed formulation. Later, the histopathological examination of the skin treated with various formulations was carried out. Formulation F3 was found to have caused a very mild dysplastic change to the epidermis. On the other hand, the marketed formulation led to the greatest dysplastic change. Hence, it was concluded that formulation F3, containing sesame oil (6%w/w), was the optimized formulation. It exhibited the maximum drug release and anti-microbial activity, in addition to the least skin irritation potential. PMID:23264949

  11. Physical Characteristics of Tetrahydroxy and Acylated Derivatives of Jojoba Liquid Wax in Lubricant Applications

    PubMed Central

    Biresaw, Girma; Gordon, Sherald

    2018-01-01

    Jojoba liquid wax is a mixture of esters of long-chain fatty acids and fatty alcohols mainly C38:2–C46:2. The oil exhibits excellent emolliency on the skin and, therefore, is a component in many personal care cosmetic formulations. The virgin oil is a component of the seed of the jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) plant which occurs naturally in the Sonora Desert in the United States and northwestern Mexico as well as in the northeastern Sahara desert. The seed contains 50–60% oil by dry weight. The plant has been introduced into Australia, Argentina, and Israel for commercial production of the jojoba oil. As a natural lubricant, we are seeking to explore its potential as a renewable industrial lubricant additive. Thus, we have chemically modified the carbon-carbon double bonds in the oil structure in order to improve its already good resistance to air oxidation so as to enhance its utility as well as its shelf life in nonpersonal care applications. To achieve this goal, we have hydroxylated its –C=C– bonds. Acylation of the resulting hydroxyl moieties has generated short-chain vicinal acyl substituents on the oil which keep the wax liquid, improving its cold flow properties and also protecting it from auto-oxidation and rancidity. PMID:29484216

  12. Physical Characteristics of Tetrahydroxy and Acylated Derivatives of Jojoba Liquid Wax in Lubricant Applications.

    PubMed

    Harry-O'kuru, Rogers E; Biresaw, Girma; Gordon, Sherald; Xu, Jingyuan

    2018-01-01

    Jojoba liquid wax is a mixture of esters of long-chain fatty acids and fatty alcohols mainly C38:2-C46:2. The oil exhibits excellent emolliency on the skin and, therefore, is a component in many personal care cosmetic formulations. The virgin oil is a component of the seed of the jojoba ( Simmondsia chinensis ) plant which occurs naturally in the Sonora Desert in the United States and northwestern Mexico as well as in the northeastern Sahara desert. The seed contains 50-60% oil by dry weight. The plant has been introduced into Australia, Argentina, and Israel for commercial production of the jojoba oil. As a natural lubricant, we are seeking to explore its potential as a renewable industrial lubricant additive. Thus, we have chemically modified the carbon-carbon double bonds in the oil structure in order to improve its already good resistance to air oxidation so as to enhance its utility as well as its shelf life in nonpersonal care applications. To achieve this goal, we have hydroxylated its -C=C- bonds. Acylation of the resulting hydroxyl moieties has generated short-chain vicinal acyl substituents on the oil which keep the wax liquid, improving its cold flow properties and also protecting it from auto-oxidation and rancidity.

  13. Surface Properties of Squalene/Meibum Films and NMR Confirmation of Squalene in Tears

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Slavyana; Tonchev, Vesselin; Yokoi, Norihiko; Yappert, Marta C.; Borchman, Douglas; Georgiev, Georgi As.

    2015-01-01

    Squalene (SQ) possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities (antioxidant, drug carrier, detoxifier, hydrating, emollient) that can be of benefit to the ocular surface. It can come in contact with human meibum (hMGS; the most abundant component of the tear film lipid layer) as an endogenous tear lipid or from exogenous sources as eyelid sebum or pharmaceuticals. The aims of this study were to determine (i) if SQ is in tear lipids and (ii) its influence on the surface properties of hMGS films. Heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR confirmed 7 mol % SQ in Schirmer’s strips extracts. The properties of SQ/hMGS pseudo-binary films at the air/water interface were studied with Langmuir surface balance, stress-relaxation dilatational rheology and Brewster angle microscopy. SQ does not possess surfactant properties. When mixed with hMGS squalene (i) localized over the layers’ thinner regions and (ii) did not affect the film pressure at high compression. Therefore, tear SQ is unlikely to instigate dry eye, and SQ can be used as a safe and “inert” ingredient in formulations to protect against dry eye. The layering of SQ over the thinner film regions in addition to its pharmacological properties could contribute to the protection of the ocular surface. PMID:26370992

  14. A Family-Engaged Educational Program for Atopic Dermatitis: A Seven-Year, Multicenter Experience in Daegu-Gyeongbuk, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jin Sub; Kim, Sang Lim; Song, Chang Hyun; Jung, Hong Dae; Shin, Dong Hoon; Cho, Jae We; Chung, Hyun; Suh, Moo Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important to educate families of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) so that they have a correct understanding of AD. Objective The purpose of this study is to introduce, evaluate, and improve our family-engaged educational program. Methods Children suffering from AD and their families have participated in a half-day educational program called "AD school" with catchy slogans such as "Enjoy with AD Families!" every year since 2005. Educational lectures were conducted for parents. For children with AD, various entertaining programs were provided. A feedback survey about AD school was administered for the purpose of evaluation. Results A total of 827 people (376 patients and 451 family members) participated in this program over 7 years. On-site surveys showed a positive response (i.e., "excellent" or "good") for the prick test (95.1%), emollient education (78.4%), educational lecture (97.0%), drawing contest and games (90.2%), and recreation (magic show; 99.0%) respectively. Telephone surveys one year later also elicited a positive response. Conclusion We herein introduce the experience of a half-day, family-engaged educational program for AD. Family-engaged education programs for AD such as this AD school encourage and validate family participation in the treatment of their children's AD. PMID:26273152

  15. A Family-Engaged Educational Program for Atopic Dermatitis: A Seven-Year, Multicenter Experience in Daegu-Gyeongbuk, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jin Sub; Kim, Sang Lim; Song, Chang Hyun; Jung, Hong Dae; Shin, Dong Hoon; Cho, Jae We; Chung, Hyun; Suh, Moo Kyu; Kim, Do Won

    2015-08-01

    It is important to educate families of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) so that they have a correct understanding of AD. The purpose of this study is to introduce, evaluate, and improve our family-engaged educational program. Children suffering from AD and their families have participated in a half-day educational program called "AD school" with catchy slogans such as "Enjoy with AD Families!" every year since 2005. Educational lectures were conducted for parents. For children with AD, various entertaining programs were provided. A feedback survey about AD school was administered for the purpose of evaluation. A total of 827 people (376 patients and 451 family members) participated in this program over 7 years. On-site surveys showed a positive response (i.e., "excellent" or "good") for the prick test (95.1%), emollient education (78.4%), educational lecture (97.0%), drawing contest and games (90.2%), and recreation (magic show; 99.0%) respectively. Telephone surveys one year later also elicited a positive response. We herein introduce the experience of a half-day, family-engaged educational program for AD. Family-engaged education programs for AD such as this AD school encourage and validate family participation in the treatment of their children's AD.

  16. Which medical device and/or which local treatment for prevention in patients with risk factors for pressure sores in 2012? Developing French guidelines for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, B; Moiziard, A S; Barrois, B; Colin, D; Michel, J M; Passadori, Y; Ribinik, P

    2012-10-01

    Implementation of a prevention strategy after the identification of risk factors is essential at the entrance in a care unit or in a medical-social unit. Determine which medical devices and which treatments may be used in order to prevent pressure sore in 2012. Systematic review of the literature using databases: Pascal, Biomed, PubMed, and Cochrane library between 2000 and 2010. Nursing care including use of soft product, non-irritating for the cleaning, hydration of the skin with emollients, protection of fragile skin in case of incontinence by applying a skin protector and application of dressings in front of bony prominences to reduce shear forces, remain valid (level C). Nursing cares and use of dressing in patients with high risks of pressure sores are the responsibility of the nurses. The engagement of health care teams involves screening of risk factors and the knowledge of treatments and local devices. Local preventive treatment in a patient with risk factors of pressure sore is of great interest at entrance in a care unit or in a medical-social unit. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Relation between sensory analysis and rheology of body lotions.

    PubMed

    Moravkova, T; Filip, P

    2016-12-01

    Evaluation of sensory attributes of cosmetic products is traditionally based on sensory panels. However, in some cases, a suitable candidate method that can reduce time and costs is the use of instrumental analysis that can detect relatively very small changes of entry ingredients. Such approach has been already applied for emollients, salt content, stabilizers, etc. The aim of this contribution is to apply the relations between sensory analysis and rheology to a series of body lotions differing in the contents of emulsifiers and viscosity regulators. Sensory and rheological analyses are related. Rheological analysis can represent a good alternative to basic orientation in chosen customer's feelings. A rotational rheometer is the only instrumental device required for the measurements. An empirical rheological model was proposed by means of which the selected sensory attributes were evaluated using the numerical values of adjustable model parameters. This approach exhibited a very good agreement with the results obtained by the sensory panel. It was shown that a description of chosen sensory attributes can be responsibly carried out by rheological measurements, that is through the attained numerical values of the parameters appearing in a proposed empirical model characterizing shear viscosity of body lotions. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. Infant Skin Care Products: What Are the Issues?

    PubMed

    Kuller, Joanne McManus

    2016-10-01

    Infant skin is susceptible to dryness and irritation from external factors, including topical skin care products not formulated for the infant's skin. This may increase the risk of contact dermatitis. Parents frequently express concern regarding potential harm from ingredients in skin care products and seek information. This is complicated by several skin care myths. The purpose of this literature review was to provide evidence-based information to educate parents on the use of products for preterm and term infants. Multiple searches using PubMed were conducted including the search terms "infant skin care," "infant products," "infant bath," "emollients," "diaper skin care," and "diaper wipes." Reference lists of comprehensive reviews were also scanned. Google searches were used to assess consumer information, product information, and regulatory guidelines. There is little scientific evidence to support safety of natural/organic products on infant skin. Raw materials originate from different sources, complicating testing and comparisons of ingredients. Research shows that cleansers formulated for infant skin do not weaken the skin barrier the way harsher soaps and detergents can. Oils with the lowest oleic acid content provide a lower risk of irritant contact dermatitis. Nurses must be informed about natural and organic products, preservatives, and fragrances and know the definition of commonly used marketing terms. Decisions regarding the use of infant products in preterm and term infants should be evidence based. More research is needed to support claims regarding the safety of products used on infant skin.

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Advice-Giving Behaviour of Community Pharmacists Regarding Topical Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wing Man

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between community pharmacists’ knowledge, attitudes to information provision and self-reported counselling behaviours in relation to topical corticosteroids and adjunct therapy in atopic eczema. A mixed-methods approach was used whereby data from interviews with community pharmacists were used to design a structured questionnaire that a larger sample of community pharmacists completed anonymously. The questionnaire was completed and returned by 105 pharmacists (36% response rate). Pharmacists showed gaps in their knowledge on the use of topical corticosteroids in atopic eczema but had good understanding on the use of emollients. There was a significant correlation between pharmacists’ attitudes to information provision and their self-reported counselling behaviour for most themes except in relation to corticosteroid safety where less advice was given. Improving attitudes to information provision should correlate with increased counselling behaviour. However, for the theme of corticosteroid safety, further studies are needed to examine why in practice pharmacists are not providing patient counselling on this topic even though most agreed this is a topic patients should know about. PMID:28970453

  20. Topical Therapies in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Torsekar, R.; Gautam, Manjyot M.

    2017-01-01

    Topical therapy as monotherapy is useful in psoriasis patients with mild disease. Topical agents are also used as adjuvant for moderate-to-severe disease who are being concurrently treated with either ultraviolet light or systemic medications. Emollients are useful adjuncts to the treatment of psoriasis. Use of older topical agents such as anthralin and coal tar has declined over the years. However, they are cheaper and can still be used for the treatment of difficult psoriasis refractory to conventional treatment. Salicylic acid can be used in combination with other topical therapies such as topical corticosteroids (TCS) and calcineurin inhibitors for the treatment of thick limited plaques to increase the absorption of the latter into the psoriatic plaques. Low- to mid-potent TCS are used in facial/flexural psoriasis and high potent over palmoplantar/thick psoriasis lesions. The addition of noncorticosteroid treatment can also facilitate the avoidance of long-term daily TCS. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus can be used for the treatment of facial and intertriginous psoriasis. Tazarotene is indicated for stable plaque psoriasis usually in combination with other therapies such as TCS. Vitamin D analogs alone in combination with TCS are useful in stable plaques over limbs and palmoplantar psoriasis. Topical therapies for scalp psoriasis include TCS, Vitamin D analogs, salicylic acid, coal tar, and anthralin in various formulations such as solutions, foams, and shampoos. TCS, vitamin D analogs, and tazarotene can be used in the treatment of nail psoriasis. PMID:28761838

  1. Calycophyllum spruceanum (Benth.), the Amazonian "Tree of Youth" Prolongs Longevity and Enhances Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Herbenya; Roxo, Mariana; Koolen, Hector; da Silva, Felipe; Silva, Emerson; Braun, Markus Santhosh; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wink, Michael

    2018-02-27

    The tree popularly known in Brazil as mulateiro or pau-mulato ( Calycophyllum spruceanum (Benth.) K. Schum.) is deeply embedded in the herbal medicine of the Amazon region. Different preparations of the bark are claimed to have anti-aging, antioxidant, antimicrobial, emollient, wound healing, hemostatic, contraceptive, stimulant, and anti-diabetic properties. The current study aims to provide the first step towards a science-based evidence of the beneficial effects of C. spruceanum in the promotion of longevity and in the modulation of age-related markers. For this investigation, we used the model system Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate in vivo antioxidant and anti-aging activity of a water extract from C. spruceanum . To chemically characterize the extract, HPLC MS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry)/MS analyses were performed. Five secondary metabolites were identified in the extract, namely gardenoside, 5-hydroxymorin, cyanidin, taxifolin, and 5-hydroxy-6-methoxycoumarin-7-glucoside. C. spruceanum extract was able to enhance stress resistance and to extend lifespan along with attenuation of aging-associated markers in C. elegans . The demonstrated bioactivities apparently depend on the DAF-16/FOXO pathway. The data might support the popular claims of mulateiro as the "tree of youth", however more studies are needed to clarify its putative benefits to human health.

  2. Primary seborrhoea in English springer spaniels: a retrospective study of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Scott, D W; Miller, W H

    1996-04-01

    Primary seborrhoea was diagnosed in 14 English springer spaniels over a 17-year period. Seven of the dogs developed clinical signs by two years of age. The dermatosis began as a generalised non-pruritic dry scaling which gradually worsened. Some dogs remained in this dry (seborrhoea sicca) stage, but in most cases the dermatosis became greasy and inflamed (seborrhoea oleosa and seborrhoeic dermatitis). Eight of the dogs suffered from recurrent episodes of superficial or deep bacterial pyoderma. Histological findings in skin biopsy specimens included marked orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis of surface and infundibular epithelium, papillomatosis, parakeratotic capping of the papillae, and superficial perivascular dermatitis in which lymphocytes and mast cells were prominent. The dogs with seborrhoea sicca responded more satisfactorily to therapy with topical emollient-humectant agents or oral omega-3/omega-6 fatty acid supplementation. Dogs with seborrhoea oleosa and seborrhoeic dermatitis did not respond satisfactorily to topical therapy. One dog, however, responded well to etretinate and omega-3/omega-6 fatty acid administration. No dog was cured.

  3. Solid lipid nanoparticles for delivery of Calendula officinalis extract.

    PubMed

    Arana, Lide; Salado, Clarisa; Vega, Sandra; Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; de la Arada, Igor; Suarez, Tatiana; Usobiaga, Aresatz; Arrondo, José Luis R; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M; Alkorta, Itziar

    2015-11-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) composed of long-chain fatty acids (palmitic acid, stearic acid or arachidic acid), Epikuron 200 (purified phosphatidylcholine), and bile salts (cholate, taurocholate or taurodeoxycholate) have been prepared by dilution of a microemulsion. A total of five different systems were prepared, and characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. The SLN formulation showing optimal properties (lowest size and polydispersity index and highest zeta potential) was obtained with stearic acid and taurodeoxycholate as cosurfactant. This formulation was loaded with Calendula officinalis extract, a natural compound used on ophthalmic formulations given its anti-inflammatory, emollient, and wound repairing activity. Calendula-loaded SLN preparations were characterized in order to determine loading capacity and entrapment efficiency. In vitro cytotoxicity and wound healing efficacy of Calendula-loaded SLN compared to that of a free plant extract were evaluated on a conjunctival epithelium cell line WKD. Our results suggest that this SLN formulation is a safe and solvent-free Calendula extract delivery system which could provide a controlled therapeutic alternative for reducing disease-related symptoms and improving epithelium repair in ocular surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational design of treatment strategies for proactive therapy on atopic dermatitis using optimal control theory

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulides, Panayiotis; Hirata, Yoshito; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Danby, Simon G.; Cork, Michael J.; Williams, Hywel C.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease characterized by recurrent skin inflammation and a weak skin barrier, and is known to be a precursor to other allergic diseases such as asthma. AD affects up to 25% of children worldwide and the incidence continues to rise. There is still uncertainty about the optimal treatment strategy in terms of choice of treatment, potency, duration and frequency. This study aims to develop a computational method to design optimal treatment strategies for the clinically recommended ‘proactive therapy’ for AD. Proactive therapy aims to prevent recurrent flares once the disease has been brought under initial control. Typically, this is done by using an anti-inflammatory treatment such as a potent topical corticosteroid intensively for a few weeks to ‘get control’, followed by intermittent weekly treatment to suppress subclinical inflammation to ‘keep control’. Using a hybrid mathematical model of AD pathogenesis that we recently proposed, we computationally derived the optimal treatment strategies for individual virtual patient cohorts, by recursively solving optimal control problems using a differential evolution algorithm. Our simulation results suggest that such an approach can inform the design of optimal individualized treatment schedules that include application of topical corticosteroids and emollients, based on the disease status of patients observed on their weekly hospital visits. We demonstrate the potential and the gaps of our approach to be applied to clinical settings. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology’. PMID:28507230

  5. Outcome of Split Thickness Skin Grafting and Multiple Z-Plasties in Postburn Contractures of Groin and Perineum: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sajad, Wani; Hamid, Raashid

    2014-01-01

    Background. Groin and perineal burn contracture is a rare postburn sequel. Such postburn contractures causes distressing symptoms to the patients and in the management of these contractures, both functional and cosmetic appearance should be the primary concern. Aims. To study the outcome of surgical treatment (STSG and multiple Z-plasties) in postburn contractures of groin and perineum. Material and Methods. We conducted a study of 49 patients, with postburn groin and perineal contractures. Release of contracture with split thickness skin grafting (STSG) was done in 44 (89.79%) patients and release of contracture and closure by multiple Z-plasties was done in 5 (10.21%) patients. Results. Satisfactory functional and cosmetic outcome was seen in 44 (89.79%) patients. Minor secondary contractures of the graft were seen in 3 (6.81%) patients who were managed by physiotherapy and partial recurrence of the contracture in 4 (8.16%) patients required secondary surgery. Conclusion. We conclude that postburn contractures of the groin and perineum can be successfully treated with release of contracture followed by STSG with satisfactory functional and cosmetic results. Long term measures like regular physiotherapy, use of pressure garments, and messaging with emollient creams should not be neglected and should be instituted postoperatively to prevent secondary contractures of the graft and recurrence of the contracture. PMID:24967100

  6. Outcome of split thickness skin grafting and multiple z-plasties in postburn contractures of groin and perineum: a 15-year experience.

    PubMed

    Sajad, Wani; Hamid, Raashid

    2014-01-01

    Background. Groin and perineal burn contracture is a rare postburn sequel. Such postburn contractures causes distressing symptoms to the patients and in the management of these contractures, both functional and cosmetic appearance should be the primary concern. Aims. To study the outcome of surgical treatment (STSG and multiple Z-plasties) in postburn contractures of groin and perineum. Material and Methods. We conducted a study of 49 patients, with postburn groin and perineal contractures. Release of contracture with split thickness skin grafting (STSG) was done in 44 (89.79%) patients and release of contracture and closure by multiple Z-plasties was done in 5 (10.21%) patients. Results. Satisfactory functional and cosmetic outcome was seen in 44 (89.79%) patients. Minor secondary contractures of the graft were seen in 3 (6.81%) patients who were managed by physiotherapy and partial recurrence of the contracture in 4 (8.16%) patients required secondary surgery. Conclusion. We conclude that postburn contractures of the groin and perineum can be successfully treated with release of contracture followed by STSG with satisfactory functional and cosmetic results. Long term measures like regular physiotherapy, use of pressure garments, and messaging with emollient creams should not be neglected and should be instituted postoperatively to prevent secondary contractures of the graft and recurrence of the contracture.

  7. Atopic dermatitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Berke, Rebecca; Singh, Arshdeep; Guralnick, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis, also known as atopic eczema, is a chronic pruritic skin condition affecting approximately 17.8 million persons in the United States. It can lead to significant morbidity. A simplified version of the U.K. Working Party's Diagnostic Criteria can help make the diagnosis. Asking about the presence and frequency of symptoms can allow physicians to grade the severity of the disease and response to treatment. Management consists of relieving symptoms and lengthening time between flare-ups. Regular, liberal use of emollients is recommended. The primary pharmacologic treatment is topical corticosteroids. Twice-daily or more frequent application has not been shown to be more effective than once-daily application. A maintenance regimen of topical corticosteroids may reduce relapse rates in patients who have recurrent moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Pimecrolimus and tacrolimus are calcineurin inhibitors that are recommended as second-line treatment for persons with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis and who are at risk of atrophy from topical corticosteroids. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a boxed warning about a possible link between these medications and skin malignancies and lymphoma, studies have not demonstrated a clear link. Topical and oral antibiotics may be used to treat secondary bacterial infections, but are not effective in preventing atopic dermatitis flare-ups. The effectiveness of alternative therapies, such as Chinese herbal preparations, homeopathy, hypnotherapy/biofeedback, and massage therapy, has not been established.

  8. Skin diseases in geriatric patients: our experience from a public skin outpatient clinic in Siena.

    PubMed

    Rubegni, P; Poggiali, S; Nami, N; Rubegni, M; Fimiani, M

    2012-12-01

    With the progressive aging of the Italian population, geriatric health care has become a major issue for health authorities. However, little data is available regarding geriatric skin diseases. In order to provide rapid access to specialist help, in 2003 we created a dermatology clinic dedicated only to geriatric patients age 65 and older. To determine the characteristic pattern and the prevalence of various skin disorders among the geriatric patients seen at the clinic, we performed a retrospective and descriptive study of all skin diseases in patients seen in our office from January 2003 to December 2009. We evaluated: age, proportion and gender for all skin disease categories. A total of 2100 geriatric patients were examined. The male to female ratio was 1.4 to 1. The most common disorder was pruritus "sine materia" (18.9%) followed by benign tumors (13.5%); 9.1% of our patients presented with actinic keratoses and 13.2% with malignant tumors. As reported by others, the quality of life in patients with skin cancer was better than patients with rashes as skin cancer patients tended to wait longer before seeking specialist care. To improve the assessment of skin diseases, we often worked closely with The prevalence of skin diseases in our patients emphasized the importance of educating the elderly about sun protection, the early detection of skin cancer, the use of emollients and proper skin care in general.

  9. Ultraviolet B Phototherapy for Psoriasis: Review of Practical Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Dhwani; Lim, Henry W

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition that affects approximately 2 % of people worldwide. Topical treatments, systemic treatments, biologic agents, and phototherapy are all treatment options for psoriasis. Ultraviolet (UV) B phototherapy is most appropriate for patients with >10 % affected body surface area who have not responded to topical treatments. This review outlines the use, dosage, safety, and efficacy of narrowband UVB (NB-UVB) and targeted phototherapy. NB-UVB and excimer laser are effective treatment options for psoriasis; they are administered two to three times weekly until clearance followed by maintenance treatment before discontinuation. Long-term data on NB-UVB indicate that it has a good safety profile. NB-UVB is commonly used with adjunctive topical treatments such as emollients, calcipotriene, cortico-steroids, retinoids, and tar. NB-UVB can be used in selected patients with traditional systemic agents such as methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine, although the duration of the combined treatment should be kept to a minimum and patients need to be closely monitored. Acitretin can be safely used with phototherapy, but robust data on the combination use of biologic agents or phosphodiesterase inhibitors with phototherapy are lacking.

  10. [Prevention of occupational dermatitis in an international perspective].

    PubMed

    Montomoli, L; Paolucci, V; Sartorelli, P

    2012-01-01

    Occupational dermatitis (OD) have always been a significant part of the occupational disease with huge social and economic costs. Traditionally, the standard program of OD prevention takes place in the three phases of protection, cleansing and use of emollient creams and other products able to improve the cutaneous trophism (skincare) at the end of the shiftwork. However, in countries like Germany where protection measures and skincare were widespread, there was not a simultaneous decrease in the OD. In recent years pilot programs for the prevention of OD have been implemented with positive results. In particular the integrated approach that includes three steps of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention (Osnabrueck model) is of great interest. Primary prevention is represented by introduction of technical regulations, pre-employment counselling and specific initiatives to promote health (healthy skin campaign). In the case of initial/minor OD, secondary prevention is accomplished through the dermatological treatment of the patient and 1-2 days outpatient education initiatives/skin protection training. In severe cases of individual OD, tertiary prevention involves the hospitalization of the patient in a dermatology department. In 2009 the European network EPOS (European Initiative for the Prevention of Occupational Skin Diseases) of preventive dermatology has been organized basing on the integrated approach of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention.

  11. 999 abuse: do mothers know what they are using?

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam-Lun Ellis; Burd, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Many parents purchase topical applications without knowing what they contain, and apply them liberally to their children with dermatological disorders. In one such case, an infant developed fever, diarrhea and a small ulcer near the right labia majora which was treated with a topical cream called '999' containing dexamethasone acetate. The infant subsequently developed extensive necrotizing fasciitis. She required prolonged intravenous antibiotic use and underwent multiple surgical procedures for debridement and reconstruction. Another mother was concerned about therapeutic corticosteroids prescribed to her 11-year old daughter with eczema. She acquired the 999 cream from the Chinese mainland and applied it liberally as an emollient to her daughter's back. When assessed at the clinic, her daughter appeared cushingoid with accelerated growth velocity in BMI and weight but decelerated growth in height. Furthermore, one mother applied a large quantity of 999 on her daughter with mild eczema and another mother applied it on her son with impetigo. None of these mothers knew that they were using potent topical corticosteroids. This report serves to alert the public to avoid applying unknown topical medication on children with skin diseases. The physician caring for patients with skin disease should be aware that even steroidophobic parents might indeed be unknowingly using potent corticosteroids.

  12. Extremely Preterm Infant Skin Care: A Transformation of Practice Aimed to Prevent Harm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deanna E

    2016-10-01

    The skin of extremely preterm infants is underdeveloped and has poor barrier function. Skin maintenance interventions initiated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have immediate and lifelong implications when the potential for infection, allergen sensitization, and altered aesthetic outcomes are considered. In addition, the high-level medical needs of extremely preterm infants demand skin-level medical interventions that too often result in unintended skin harm. We describe the use of a harm prevention, or consequence-centered, approach to skin care, which facilitates safer practice for extremely premature infants. Neonatal and pediatric Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) came together for monthly meetings to review the evidence around best skin care practices for extremely preterm infants, with an emphasis on reduction of skin harm. Findings were focused on the population of interest and clinical implementation strategies. Skin care for extremely preterm infants remains overlooked by current literature. However, clinical practice pearls were extracted and applied in a manner that promotes safer skin care practices in the NICU. Gentle adhesives, such as silicone tapes and hydrogel-backed electrodes, can help to reduce medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Diaper wipes are not appropriate for use among extremely preterm infants, as many ingredients may contain potential allergens. Skin cleansers should be pH neutral to the skin and the prophylactic use of petrolatum-based emollients should be avoided. Further exploration and understanding of skin care practices that examine issues of true risk versus hypothetical risk of harm.

  13. Optimizing topical therapies for treating psoriasis: a consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A; Lebwohl, Mark G; Menter, Alan; Bagel, Jerry; Del Rosso, James Q; Elewski, Boni E; Feldman, Steven R; Kircik, Leon H; Koo, John; Gold, Linda Stein; Tanghetti, Emil

    2010-09-01

    In 2010, an expert committee of physicians and researchers in the field of dermatology working together as the Psoriasis Process of Care Consensus Panel developed consensus guidelines for the treatment of psoriasis. As much as possible, the guidelines were evidence based but also included the extensive clinical experience of the dermatologists. Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that requires long-term treatment and 80% of psoriasis patients have mild to moderate disease. Topical therapies play an important role in the treatment of psoriasis, especially in patients with mild to moderate disease. Patients usually start with monotherapy; however, in more severe cases (> 10% body surface area [BSA], severely impaired quality of life [QOL], or recalcitrant psoriatic lesions), multiple treatment modalities may be used as part of combination, sequential, or rotational therapeutic regimens. Main treatment options include topical steroids, systemic therapies, topical vitamin D treatments such as vitamin D3 ointment, retinoids, phototherapy, and biologic therapies. Other topical therapies include the following steroid-sparing agents: coal tar, anthralin, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytics, and emollients. Therapeutic considerations also should focus on adherence, improving QOL, and promoting a good patient-physician relationship.

  14. [Updates on the earlier treatments for atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Jelen, G

    1998-01-01

    The GERDA classes have the function of updating our knowledge of dermato-allergology. One of the themes tackled this year was the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Apart from consideration of treatment or exception with cortisone, it seemed to be of interest to find the relevance of "old treatments" for atopic dermatitis, either preventive or symptomatic. Preventive treatment made reference to correction of food factors (diet in infants, removal of maternal allergens, supplementation on fatty acids) and of environmental factors especially the fight against house dust mites by use of anti-mite mattress covers. Miracle treatments of atopy do not always exist. Thus there is often need for, besides local corticosteroid therapy, an external symptomatic treatment where the emphasis is on the struggle against skin microbiology, the fight against pruritic inflammatory conditions and above all the battle against xerosis. Knowledge of the physiology of the stratum corneum gives better understanding of the effect of emollients and moisturizers in restoration of the cutaneous barrier, of which dysfunction is one of the elements of atopic dermatitis.

  15. Utilization of telemedicine in the U.S. military in a deployed setting.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jane S; Lappan, Charles M; Sperling, Leonard C; Meyerle, Jon H

    2014-11-01

    A retrospective evaluation of the Department of Defense teledermatology consultation program from 2004 to 2012 was performed, focusing on clinical application and outcome measures such as consult volume, response time, and medical evacuation status. A retrospective review of the teledermatology program between 2004 and 2012 was evaluated based on defined outcome measures. In addition, 658 teledermatology cases were reviewed to assess how the program was utilized by health care providers from 2011 to 2012. As high as 98% of the teledermatology consults were answered within 24 hours, and 23% of consults within 1 hour. The most common final diagnoses included eczematous dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and evaluation for nonmelanoma skin cancer. The most common medications recommended included topical corticosteroids, oral antibiotics, antihistamines, and emollients. Biopsy was most commonly recommended for further evaluation. Following teleconsultation, 46 dermatologic evacuations were "avoided" as the patient was not evacuated based on the consultants' recommendation. Consultants' recommendations to the referring provider "facilitated" 41 evacuations. Telemedicine in the U.S. military has provided valuable dermatology support to providers in remote locations by delivering appropriate and timely consultation for military service members and coalition partners. In addition to avoiding unnecessary medical evacuations, the program facilitated appropriate evacuations that may otherwise have been delayed. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Effect of bathing on atopic dermatitis during the summer season

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hakyoung; Ban, Jeongsuk; Park, Mi-Ran; Kim, Do-Soo; Kim, Hye-Young; Han, Youngshin; Ahn, Kangmo

    2012-01-01

    Background There are little objective data regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing, although bathing and the use of moisturizers are the most important facets to atopic dermatitis (AD) management. Objective We performed this study to evaluate the effect of bathing on AD. Methods Ninety-six children with AD were enrolled during the summer season. Parents were educated to bathe them once daily with mildly acidic cleansers, and to apply emollients for 14 days. Parents recorded the frequency of bathing and skin symptoms in a diary. Scoring AD (SCORAD) scores were measured at the initial and follow-up visits. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the compliance of bathing; poor compliance was defined as ≥ 2 bathless days. Results There was an improvement of SCORAD score, itching, and insomnia in the good compliance group (all p < 0.001). The mean change in SCORAD score from the baseline at the follow-up visit was greater in the good compliance group than the poor compliance group (p = 0.038). Conclusion Daily bathing using weakly acidic syndets can reduce skin symptoms of pediatric AD during the summer season. PMID:23130333

  17. Natural (Mineral, Vegetable, Coconut, Essential) Oils and Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Verallo-Rowell, Vermén M; Katalbas, Stephanie S; Pangasinan, Julia P

    2016-07-01

    Natural oils include mineral oil with emollient, occlusive, and humectant properties and the plant-derived essential, coconut, and other vegetable oils, composed of triglycerides that microbiota lipases hydrolyze into glycerin, a potent humectant, and fatty acids (FAs) with varying physico-chemical properties. Unsaturated FAs have high linoleic acid used for synthesis of ceramide-I linoleate, a barrier lipid, but more pro-inflammatory omega-6:-3 ratios above 10:1, and their double bonds form less occlusive palisades. VCO FAs have a low linoleic acid content but shorter and saturated FAs that form a more compact palisade, more anti-inflammatory omega-6:-3 ratio of 2:1, close to 7:1 of olive oil, which disrupts the skin barrier, otherwise useful as a penetration enhancer. Updates on the stratum corneum illustrate how this review on the contrasting actions of NOs provide information on which to avoid and which to select for barrier repair and to lower inflammation in contact dermatitis genesis.

  18. Role of Microbial Modulation in Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    van’t Land, Belinda; Sprikkelman, Aline B.; Garssen, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD) is multifactorial and is a complex interrelationship between skin barrier, genetic predisposition, immunologic development, skin microbiome, environmental, nutritional, pharmacological, and psychological factors. Several microbial modulations of the intestinal microbiome with pre- and/or probiotics have been used in AD management, with different clinical out-come (both positive, as well as null findings). This review provides an overview of the clinical evidence from trials in children from 2008 to 2017, aiming to evaluate the effect of dietary interventions with pre- and/or pro-biotics for the treatment of AD. By searching the PUBMED/MEDLINE, EMBADE, and COCHRANE databases 14 clinical studies were selected and included within this review. Data extraction was independently conducted by two authors. The primary outcome was an improvement in the clinical score of AD severity. Changes of serum immunological markers and/or gastrointestinal symptoms were explored if available. In these studies some dietary interventions with pre- and/or pro-biotics were beneficial compared to control diets in the management of AD in children, next to treatment with emollients, and/or local corticosteroids. However, heterogeneity between studies was high, making it clear that focused clinical randomized controlled trials are needed to understand the potential role and underlying mechanism of dietary interventions in children with AD. PMID:28792444

  19. Role of Microbial Modulation in Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Hulshof, Lies; Van't Land, Belinda; Sprikkelman, Aline B; Garssen, Johan

    2017-08-09

    The pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD) is multifactorial and is a complex interrelationship between skin barrier, genetic predisposition, immunologic development, skin microbiome, environmental, nutritional, pharmacological, and psychological factors. Several microbial modulations of the intestinal microbiome with pre- and/or probiotics have been used in AD management, with different clinical out-come (both positive, as well as null findings). This review provides an overview of the clinical evidence from trials in children from 2008 to 2017, aiming to evaluate the effect of dietary interventions with pre- and/or pro-biotics for the treatment of AD. By searching the PUBMED/MEDLINE, EMBADE, and COCHRANE databases 14 clinical studies were selected and included within this review. Data extraction was independently conducted by two authors. The primary outcome was an improvement in the clinical score of AD severity. Changes of serum immunological markers and/or gastrointestinal symptoms were explored if available. In these studies some dietary interventions with pre- and/or pro-biotics were beneficial compared to control diets in the management of AD in children, next to treatment with emollients, and/or local corticosteroids. However, heterogeneity between studies was high, making it clear that focused clinical randomized controlled trials are needed to understand the potential role and underlying mechanism of dietary interventions in children with AD.

  20. Release Behavior and Antibacterial Activity of Chitosan/Alginate Blends with Aloe vera and Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Chabala, Luisa Fernanda; Cuartas, Claudia Elena Echeverri; López, Martha Elena Londoño

    2017-01-01

    Aloe vera is a perennial plant employed for medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic purposes that is rich in amino acids, enzymes, vitamins and polysaccharides, which are responsible for its therapeutic properties. Incorporating these properties into a biopolymer film obtained from alginate and chitosan allowed the development of a novel wound dressing with antibacterial capacity and healing effects to integrate the antibacterial capacity of silver nanoparticles with the healing and emollient properties of Aloe vera gel. Three alginate-chitosan matrices were obtained through blending methods using different proportions of alginate, chitosan, the Aloe vera (AV) gel and silver nanoparticles (AgNps), which were incorporated into the polymeric system through immersion methods. Physical, chemical and antibacterial characteristics were evaluated in each matrix. Interaction between alginate and chitosan was identified using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique (FTIR), porosity was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling degree was calculated by difference in weight, Aloe vera gel release capacity was estimated by applying a drug model (Peppas) and finally antibacterial capacity was evaluated against S. Aureus and P. aeruginosa. Results show that alginate-chitosan (A (1:3 Chit 1/Alg 1); B (1:3 Chit 1.5/Alg 1) and C (3:1 Chit 1/Alg 1/B12)) matrices with Aloe vera (AV) gel and silver nanoparticles (AgNps) described here displayed antibacterial properties and absorption and Aloe vera release capacity making it a potential wound dressing for minor injuries. PMID:29064431

  1. [Atopic dermatitis and urticaria: for the prevention and cure via disease control and management].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi

    2009-11-01

    Standard ways of management are introduced through guidelines. The present standard therapies for atopic dermatitis consist of the use of topical steroids and tacrolimus ointment for inflammation as well as emollients for dry and barrier-disrupted skin as the first-line topical application, systemic anti-histamines and anti-allergic drugs for pruritus, avoidance of apparent exacerbating factors and so on. The importance of correct selection of topical steroids according to the severity of the lesion is also emphasized. As for urticaria, the use of oral histamine H1-receptor antagonists is the first line treatment, regardless of the groups, provided that sufficient efforts to eliminate the cause and/or aggravating factors are taken. Several options for the treatment are suggested as the second and/or the third line treatments, but the aim of examinations and treatments should be determined according to the type and severity of the diseases. Standard therapies and elimination of the cause and/or aggravating factors are the best way for the cure and prevention.

  2. Generalized morphea in a child with harlequin ichthyosis: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, Maria F A; França, Camila M P; Oliveira, Zilda N P; Machado, Maria C R; Sallum, Adriana M E; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a severe and rare hereditary congenital skin disorder characterized by excessive dryness, ectropion and eclabion. The association of ichthyosis with systemic sclerosis has been described in only three children. No patient with generalized morphea (GM) associated with harlequin ichthyosis was described. A 4-years and 6-months girl, diagnosed with harlequin ichthyosis based on diffuse cutaneous thickening, scaling, erythema, ectropion and eclabium since the first hours of birth was described. She was treated with acitretin (1.0mg/kg/day) and emollient cream. At 3 years and 9 months, she developed muscle contractures with pain on motion and limitation in elbows and knees, and diffuse sclerodermic plaques on the abdomen, back, suprapubic area and lower limbs. Skin biopsy showed rectified epidermis and mild hyperorthokeratosis, reticular dermis with perivascular and periadnexal infiltrates of lymphocytes and mononuclear cells, and reticular dermis and sweat gland sclerosis surrounded by a dense collagen tissue, compatible with scleroderma. The patient fulfilled the GM subtype criteria. Methotrexate and prednisone were introduced. At 4 years and 3 months, new scleroderma lesions occurred and azathioprine was associated with previous therapy, with no apparent changes after two months. A case of harlequin ichthyosis associated with a GM was reported. The treatment of these two conditions is a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Menter, A.; Korman, N.J.; Elmets, C.A.

    2009-04-15

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the Population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use ofmore » topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.« less

  4. Topical Oil Application and Trans-Epidermal Water Loss in Preterm Very Low Birth Weight Infants-A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Nangia, Sushma; Paul, Vinod Kumar; Deorari, Ashok Kumar; Sreenivas, V; Agarwal, Ramesh; Chawla, Deepak

    2015-12-01

    Topical emollient application reduces trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in preterm neonates. Coconut oil used traditionally for infant massage in India has not been evaluated for the same. Very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates were randomized at 12 h of age to Oil (n = 37) or Control (n = 37) groups. Oil group neonates received twice-daily coconut oil application without massage, and Control group received standard care. TEWL was measured every 12 h using an evaporimeter till Day 7 when skin swabs were obtained for bacterial growth and skin condition was assessed using a validated score. Birth weight (g; mean ± SD: 1213 + 214 vs. 1164 + 208, p = 0.31), gestation [week; median (interquartile range): 32 (31-33) vs. 32 (29-33), p = 0.10] and other baseline variables were comparable. TEWL was significantly reduced (g/m(2)/h, mean difference: -6.80, 95% confidence interval: -3.48, -10.15; p < 0.01) with better skin condition and lower bacterial growth in the Oil group (20% vs. 60%, p < 0.01). Coconut oil application reduced TEWL without increasing skin colonization in VLBW neonates. NCT01758068. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A case of loiasis in Rome.

    PubMed

    Morrone, A; Franco, G; Toma, L; Tchangmena, O B; Marangi, M

    2002-05-01

    Owing to the increase of an immigrant population and of Italian citizens travelling for tourism or on business, it is nowadays possible to observe clinical pictures characteristic of tropical regions, often with indistinct symptoms. One of these is Loa loa infestation, or loiasis, a form of filariasis caused by Loa loa and transmitted by the Chrysops fly. We present the case of a male immigrant from Cameroon. Characteristic symptoms were intense xerosis, mostly of the third inferior part of the legs, intensely pruritic, with numerous lesions from scratching. No benefit was obtained by emollient topics, anti-acarus and systemic antihistamines. Serum samples and Giemsa, haematoxylin, haematoxylin + Giemsa concentration-on-membrane stains, have evidenced the presence of Loa loa microfilariae. A diagnosis for L. loa (loiasis) infestation was made. At the beginning of the migration phenomenon, particularly from Africa, Italian physicians, especially dermatologists, were eagerly looking for 'tropical' diseases; this approach can be defined as 'Salgari's syndrome' from the name of the Italian novelist who, though never travelling out of Italy, had perfectly described environments and habits typical of far away countries. Now, conversely, we have to avoid the opposite approach of considering real tropical diseases as related to social or psychological difficult conditions.

  6. Cupping Therapy May be Harmful for Eczema: A PubMed Search

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Kam Lun E.; Luk, David Chi Kong; Leong, Kin Fon; Leung, Alexander K. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eczema is a common childhood atopic condition and treatment is with emollients, topical corticosteroids, and avoidance of possible triggers. S. aureus colonization is a common complication. As there is no immediate cure, many parents seek alternative therapies that claim unproven therapeutic efficacy. We report a girl with long history of treatment noncompliance. After practicing a long period of dietary avoidance and supplementation, the grandparents took her to an alternative medicine practitioner. Following cupping therapy and acupuncture, the child developed blistering and oozing over her back the next day, which rapidly evolved to two large irregular-edge deep ulcers. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics and received multidisciplinary supportive intervention. Using search words of  “cupping,” “eczema,” and “atopic dermatitis,” only two reports were found on PubMed. Therapeutic efficacy was claimed but not scientifically documented in these reports. Childhood eczema is an eminently treatable atopic disease. Extreme alternative therapy seems not to be efficacious and may even be associated with serious undesirable sequelae. Physicians should be aware of various alternative treatment modalities and be prepared to offer evidence-based advice to the patients with eczema and their families. PMID:24282650

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Copaiba (Copaifera officinalis) and Pracaxi (Pentaclethra macroloba) Oils against Staphylococcus Aureus: Importance in Compounding for Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Anna Luísa Aguijar; Cunha, Elisa Alves; Matias, Fernanda Oliveira; Garcia, Patrícia Guedes; Danopoulos, Panagiota; Swikidisa, Rosita; Pinheiro, Vanessa Alves; Nogueira, Rodrigo José Lupatini

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is the largest reserve of natural products in the world. Its rich biodiversity of medicinal plants has been utilized by local populations for hundreds of years for the prevention and treatment of various diseases and ailments. Oil extracts from plant species such as Copaifera officinalis and Pentaclethra macroloba are used in compounded formulations for their antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, emollient, moisturizing, and wound-healing activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro bacteriostatic effect of two Amazonian oils, Copaiba and Pracaxi, against Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important microorganism responsible for wound infection, to support the use of these oils as novel natural products for compounded wound-treatment modalities. The antibacterial activity of Copaiba and Pracaxi oils against a standard strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed using broth microdilution to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of the oil extracts. Copaiba oil demonstrated antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, with a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of 0.3125 mg/mL and a Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of 0.3125 mg/mL. Conversely, Pracaxi oil failed to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth. While additional studies are required to further evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Pracaxi oil, even low concentrations of Copaiba oil effectively inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth, supporting its potential use as a promising adjuvant in compounded topical formulations for wound and scar healing.

  8. Release Behavior and Antibacterial Activity of Chitosan/Alginate Blends with Aloe vera and Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gómez Chabala, Luisa Fernanda; Cuartas, Claudia Elena Echeverri; López, Martha Elena Londoño

    2017-10-24

    Aloe vera is a perennial plant employed for medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic purposes that is rich in amino acids, enzymes, vitamins and polysaccharides, which are responsible for its therapeutic properties. Incorporating these properties into a biopolymer film obtained from alginate and chitosan allowed the development of a novel wound dressing with antibacterial capacity and healing effects to integrate the antibacterial capacity of silver nanoparticles with the healing and emollient properties of Aloe vera gel. Three alginate-chitosan matrices were obtained through blending methods using different proportions of alginate, chitosan, the Aloe vera (AV) gel and silver nanoparticles (AgNps), which were incorporated into the polymeric system through immersion methods. Physical, chemical and antibacterial characteristics were evaluated in each matrix. Interaction between alginate and chitosan was identified using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique (FTIR), porosity was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling degree was calculated by difference in weight, Aloe vera gel release capacity was estimated by applying a drug model (Peppas) and finally antibacterial capacity was evaluated against S. Aureus and P. aeruginosa . Results show that alginate-chitosan (A (1:3 Chit 1/Alg 1); B (1:3 Chit 1.5/Alg 1) and C (3:1 Chit 1/Alg 1/B12)) matrices with Aloe vera (AV) gel and silver nanoparticles (AgNps) described here displayed antibacterial properties and absorption and Aloe vera release capacity making it a potential wound dressing for minor injuries.

  9. Ginger From Ancient Times to the New Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Khodaie, Laleh; Sadeghpoor, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ginger is the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, a perennial plant, used alone or in compounds as a spice or remedy in ancient recipes of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) as an effective tonic for the memory and digestive system, the opener of hepatic obstructions, aphrodisiac, for expelling compact wind from stomach and intestines, diluting, desiccating and emollient of phlegmatic and compact humor sticking to body organs, stomach, intestine, brain and throat. The ITM scholars believed that ginger was a vermifuge as well as a remedy for paralysis and obstructive jaundice. They also revealed that this phytomedicine cures diarrhea due to corrupted food. This study aimed to compare the medicinal properties (afaal) of ginger in ITM with those indicated in modern research. Results: Results of this study showed that the modern phytotherapy confirmed some of the properties of ginger. In addition, some of the properties of this phytomedicine have not been studied yet. Conclusions: By studding the ITM literature, herb elements or in other words ITM keywords, researchers can predict and state some unknown or less known potential pharmacologic effects of medicinal plants. PMID:25866718

  10. Ginger from ancient times to the new outlook.

    PubMed

    Khodaie, Laleh; Sadeghpoor, Omid

    2015-02-01

    Ginger is the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, a perennial plant, used alone or in compounds as a spice or remedy in ancient recipes of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) as an effective tonic for the memory and digestive system, the opener of hepatic obstructions, aphrodisiac, for expelling compact wind from stomach and intestines, diluting, desiccating and emollient of phlegmatic and compact humor sticking to body organs, stomach, intestine, brain and throat. The ITM scholars believed that ginger was a vermifuge as well as a remedy for paralysis and obstructive jaundice. They also revealed that this phytomedicine cures diarrhea due to corrupted food. This study aimed to compare the medicinal properties (afaal) of ginger in ITM with those indicated in modern research. Results of this study showed that the modern phytotherapy confirmed some of the properties of ginger. In addition, some of the properties of this phytomedicine have not been studied yet. By studding the ITM literature, herb elements or in other words ITM keywords, researchers can predict and state some unknown or less known potential pharmacologic effects of medicinal plants.

  11. Eosinophilic folliculitis occurring after stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, Kristine; Fernandes, Neil; Adams, Brian B

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) comprises classic eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related EF, and infantile EPF subtypes. A fourth proposed subtype describes EF associated with hematologic malignancy. Recently, EF has occurred after bone marrow or stem cell transplantation (SCT). We report a unique case of EF after haploidentical allogeneic SCT for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and review the literature for similar cases. A 56-year-old, HIV-negative ALL patient presented with an intensely pruritic papulopustular eruption. He had undergone haploidentical allogeneic SCT 65 days earlier, which he had tolerated well. Histopathology revealed a moderately dense perifollicular and perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate with many eosinophils extending from the superficial dermis to the subcutaneous fat. Fungal stains were negative. These findings were highly consistent with EF. Therapy with a class II topical corticosteroid ointment, oral doxepin, and emollients achieved near-resolution of the lesions within eight weeks. Transition to topical tacrolimus 0.1% ointment applied twice daily to residual lesions yielded complete clearance by 12 weeks with mild post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. The patient's ALL remains in remission. A fourth proposed subtype of EF is associated with HIV-negative hematologic disease. This subtype is distinguished by a predictable timeframe to presentation and a relatively rapid response to therapy. Although EF is an important consideration in all patients with hematologic malignancy, clinically heightened suspicion is warranted during the 2-3 months after transplant. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Edema: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Trayes, Kathryn P; Studdiford, James S; Pickle, Sarah; Tully, Amber S

    2013-07-15

    Edema is an accumulation of fluid in the interstitial space that occurs as the capillary filtration exceeds the limits of lymphatic drainage, producing noticeable clinical signs and symptoms. The rapid development of generalized pitting edema associated with systemic disease requires timely diagnosis and management. The chronic accumulation of edema in one or both lower extremities often indicates venous insufficiency, especially in the presence of dependent edema and hemosiderin deposition. Skin care is crucial in preventing skin breakdown and venous ulcers. Eczematous (stasis) dermatitis can be managed with emollients and topical steroid creams. Patients who have had deep venous thrombosis should wear compression stockings to prevent postthrombotic syndrome. If clinical suspicion for deep venous thrombosis remains high after negative results are noted on duplex ultrasonography, further investigation may include magnetic resonance venography to rule out pelvic or thigh proximal venous thrombosis or compression. Obstructive sleep apnea may cause bilateral leg edema even in the absence of pulmonary hypertension. Brawny, nonpitting skin with edema characterizes lymphedema, which can present in one or both lower extremities. Possible secondary causes of lymphedema include tumor, trauma, previous pelvic surgery, inguinal lymphadenectomy, and previous radiation therapy. Use of pneumatic compression devices or compression stockings may be helpful in these cases.

  13. Evolving Concepts in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sidbury, Robert; Khorsand, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in the field of atopic dermatitis in the past 5 years. We will explore developments in burden of disease, co-morbidities, pathogenesis, prevention, and management. The tremendous burden moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) places on families from a medical, psychosocial, and financial perspective has been characterized. Epidemiologic studies have identified intriguing new associations beyond the well-characterized "atopic march" of food allergies, asthma, and hay fever. Studies of primary prevention have gained traction including the remarkable impacts of early emollient therapy. Basic advances have simultaneously elucidated the nature of atopic inflammation, setting the stage for an explosion of new potential therapeutic targets. After a fallow period of nearly 15 years without a substantial therapeutic advance, this year has already seen two new FDA-approved treatments for AD. AD has a tremendous impact on quality of life with an underappreciated burden of disease; there are important newly described co-morbidities including ADHD and anemia; new insights into etio-pathogenesis have paved the way for novel topical therapies like crisaborole, and new systemic interventions like dupilumab.

  14. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Osinka, Katarzyna; Dumycz, Karolina; Kwiek, Bartłomiej; Feleszko, Wojciech

    2018-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases. The number of people affected by AD is relatively high and seems to be rising. Although mild and moderate forms of the disease can be well controlled by the use of emollients, topical corticosteroids, and topical calcineurin inhibitors, treatment of severe is still a huge challenge. The new hope is biologic drugs, magic bullets in allergy, targeted at different points of the complex pathomechanism of inflammation in AD. In this review, novel biologic therapies are discussed, including recombinant monoclonal antibodies directed against various interleukin pathways (such as IL-4, IL-13, TSLP, IL-31, and IL-12/23), on immunoglobulin E, molecules acting as T cells, B cells, etc. Of biological drugs, the most promising seems to be anti-IL-4/IL-13 therapy (dupilumab-the biological agent) and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (crisaborole-a small molecule). A deep understanding of the AD pathomechanism provides a new perspective for tailor-made treatment of severe atopic dermatitis.

  15. Integrated approach in the assessment of skin compatibility of cosmetic formulations with green coffee oil.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, T A L; Rijo, P; Rodrigues, L M; Maia Campos, P M B G; Fernandes, A S; Rosado, C

    2015-10-01

    Green coffee oil (GCO) has been used in cosmetic formulations due to its emollient and anti-ageing properties. However, there are insufficient studies about its safety when applied in cosmetic formulations. Cytotoxicity of GCO and of formulations containing 2.5-15% of GCO was evaluated by the MTT reduction assay, in human keratinocytes. Formulations containing 15% of GCO and the vehicle were applied under in use conditions in the volar forearm of human volunteers during 3 days. Transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum water content and erythema index were evaluated each 24 h using biophysical techniques. The same formulations were probed for skin tolerance through a patch test. Neither pure GCO nor its formulations showed cytotoxic effects in concentrations up to 100 μg mL(-1) . Transepidermal water loss values showed a slight reduction when the formulation containing GCO was applied. Stratum corneum water content and erythema index did not show significant differences, as the results observed in the first day of the study were maintained throughout 3 days. None of the volunteers display any reaction after using an occlusive patch. The results obtained in the study indicate that GCO seems to be safe for topical applications and showed good skin compatibility under the experimental conditions of the study. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  16. Actinic cheilitis in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; McKay, C; Faulkner, C

    2010-06-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially premalignant condition involving predominantly the vermilion of the lower lip. The aim of the current paper was to review the clinical presentation of actinic cheilitis and demonstrate the development of management plans using a series of cases. These are designed to provide immediate treatment where required but also to address the medium and long-term requirements of the patient. The authors suggest that the clinical examination of lips and the assessment of actinic cheilitis and other lip pathology become a regular part of the routine soft tissue examination undertaken as a part of the periodic examination of dental patients. Early recognition of actinic cheilitis can allow the development of strategies for individual patients that prevent progression. These are based on past sun exposure, future lifestyle changes and the daily use of emollient sunscreens, broad-brimmed hats and avoidance of sun exposure during the middle of the day. This is a service that is not undertaken as a matter of routine in general medical practice as patients are not seen with the regularity of dental patients and generally not under the ideal examination conditions available in the dental surgery.

  17. Knowledge, Attitude and Advice-Giving Behaviour of Community Pharmacists Regarding Topical Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wing Man; Donyai, Parastou

    2017-07-25

    This study examines the relationship between community pharmacists' knowledge, attitudes to information provision and self-reported counselling behaviours in relation to topical corticosteroids and adjunct therapy in atopic eczema. A mixed-methods approach was used whereby data from interviews with community pharmacists were used to design a structured questionnaire that a larger sample of community pharmacists completed anonymously. The questionnaire was completed and returned by 105 pharmacists (36% response rate). Pharmacists showed gaps in their knowledge on the use of topical corticosteroids in atopic eczema but had good understanding on the use of emollients. There was a significant correlation between pharmacists' attitudes to information provision and their self-reported counselling behaviour for most themes except in relation to corticosteroid safety where less advice was given. Improving attitudes to information provision should correlate with increased counselling behaviour. However, for the theme of corticosteroid safety, further studies are needed to examine why in practice pharmacists are not providing patient counselling on this topic even though most agreed this is a topic patients should know about.

  18. Clobetasol propionate for psoriasis: are ointments really more potent?

    PubMed

    Warino, Lindsey; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Feldman, Steven R

    2006-06-01

    Clobetasol propionate is the most common topical therapy used for psoriasis in the US. Conventional dermatologic wisdom is that ointment preparations provide the highest potency (due to their occlusive nature and moisturizing ability) and are best suited for psoriasis. However, patients often find application of ointment to be messy, raising concerns about both short-term and long-term adherence to treatment. This article reviews the current literature and assesses the relative potency of clobetasol propionate ointment compared to other clobetasol propionate preparations in the treatment of psoriasis. Relevant literature was identified by PubMed and Google searches. We included studies of psoriasis that reported the percentage of subjects that achieved desired efficacy endpoints, as well as studies that reported the subjects' mean change in symptoms from baseline. We excluded studies conducted before 1980 and those that allowed concomitant treatments. Efficacy rates ranged from 17% to 80% for the different vehicles: ointment, solution, foam, cream, lotion, shampoo, and emollient. Clobetasol propionate is a very effective treatment for psoriasis. Ointment preparations have similar efficacy to other preparations in clinical trial situations. In clinical practice, a situation in which patient preferences are more likely to affect compliance, it may be best to choose whichever vehicle patients find preferable.

  19. Seborrhoeic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Naldi, Luigi

    2010-12-07

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis affects at least 10% of the population. Malassezia (Pityrosporum) ovale is thought to be the causative organism, and causes inflammation by still poorly defined mechanisms. Seborrhoeic dermatitis tends to relapse after treatment. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of topical treatments for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp in adults? What are the effects of topical treatments for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and body in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bifonazole, emollients, ketoconazole, lithium succinate, selenium sulphide, tar shampoo, terbinafine, and topical corticosteroids (betamethasone valerate, clobetasol propionate, clobetasone butyrate, hydrocortisone, mometasone furoate).

  20. Atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Stephan; Novak, Natalija

    2016-03-12

    Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterised by intense itching and recurrent eczematous lesions. Although it most often starts in infancy and affects two of ten children, it is also highly prevalent in adults. It is the leading non-fatal health burden attributable to skin diseases, inflicts a substantial psychosocial burden on patients and their relatives, and increases the risk of food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and mental health disorders. Originally regarded as a childhood disorder mediated by an imbalance towards a T-helper-2 response and exaggerated IgE responses to allergens, it is now recognised as a lifelong disposition with variable clinical manifestations and expressivity, in which defects of the epidermal barrier are central. Present prevention and treatment focus on restoration of epidermal barrier function, which is best achieved through the use of emollients. Topical corticosteroids are still the first-line therapy for acute flares, but they are also used proactively along with topical calcineurin inhibitors to maintain remission. Non-specific immunosuppressive drugs are used in severe refractory cases, but targeted disease-modifying drugs are being developed. We need to improve understanding of the heterogeneity of the disease and its subtypes, the role of atopy and autoimmunity, the mechanisms behind disease-associated itch, and the comparative effectiveness and safety of therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An organically modified silica aerogel for online in-tube solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yanan; Feng, Juanjuan; Tian, Yu; Wang, Xiuqin; Sun, Min; Luo, Chuannan

    2017-09-29

    Aerogels have received considerable attentions because of its porous, high specific surface, unique properties and environmental friendliness. In this work, an organically modified silica aerogel was functionalized on the basalt fibers (BFs) and filled into a poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) tube, which was coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME). The aerogel was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR). The extraction efficiency of the tube was systematically investigated and shown enrichment factors from 2346 to 3132. An automated, sensitive and selective method was developed for the determination of five estrogens. The linear range was from 0.03 to 100μgL -1 with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9989, and low detection limits (LODs) were 0.01-0.05μgL -1 . The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra-day and inter-day were less than 4.5% and 6.7% (n=6), respectively. Finally, the analysis method was successfully applied to detect estrogens in sewage and emollient water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy in AD of liquid soap containing 12% ammonium lactate + 20% urea.

    PubMed

    Amichai, B; Grunwald, M H

    2009-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease, which mainly affects children. Xerosis is one of the most troublesome signs of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of liquid soap containing 12% ammonium lactate + 20% urea in patients with AD. In a randomized, double-blind study, 36 patients (both male and female patients; age range 3-40 years) with mild to moderate AD were enrolled. Patients were divided randomly into two groups, in a ratio of 2:1 (active:placebo). The prescribed soap was used on a daily basis during a shower for 3 weeks. All patients continued all other systemic or topical medication but avoided any other soap or emollients. After 3 weeks of treatment, efficacy was assessed both by clinician and patient. There were significant improvements in scaling (P < 0.0001), skin dryness (P < 0.0001) and redness (P = 0.03) as rated by the investigator, and subjective patient assessment of itch also improved (P < 0.001) in the study group compared with the control group. The liquid soap was found to be effective in patients with AD, as use of this soap in patients with stable mild to moderate AD improved the parameters studied.

  3. Influence of the container on the consumption of cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Berrada, M P; Ficheux, A S; Galonnier, M; Rolfo, J E; Rielland, A; Guillou, S; De Javel, D; Roudot, A C; Ferret, P J

    2017-11-01

    The container, also known as primary package or inner package, could be defined as the packaging designed to come into direct contact with the cosmetic product. To author's knowledge, no study was available regarding the effect of the primary package on the consumption of cosmetic products. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of the container on the consumption of three cosmetic products widely used, i.e. shampoo, shower gel and emollient cream. The three products were contained in a tube with a flip top cap and in a bottle with a pump. The study was conducted on 221 French adults: 108 women and 113 men. Results showed that the consumption of each cosmetic product was slightly higher when the product was packaged in tube with a flip top cap than in bottle with a pump. The difference of consumption could vary from 5 % to 23 % when calculated with mean values. This information could be interesting for safety evaluators, safety agencies and commercial services of cosmetic manufacturers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethylhexylglycerin: a low-risk, but highly relevant, sensitizer in 'hypo-allergenic' cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Olivier; Verhulst, Lien; Goossens, An

    2016-05-01

    Ethylhexylglycerin is a relatively new cosmetic ingredient that is used for its surfactant, emollient, skin-conditioning and antimicrobial properties. Since 2002, it has been occasionally reported as a contact allergen. To report on 13 patients who presented with allergic contact dermatitis caused by ethylhexylglycerin, evaluated at two Belgian university patch test clinics during the period 1990-2015. The patients were patch tested with the European baseline series, a cosmetic series, and - if indicated - additional series. Both the cosmetic products used and their single ingredients were patch tested. All but one of the ethylhexylglycerin-allergic patients were female, with a median age of 43 years (range: 29-81 years), most often suffering from dermatitis on the face, and sometimes on the hands and/or axillae. As the culprit products, leave-on cosmetics were identified, including a high number of proclaimed 'hypo-allergenic' and 'preservative-free' facial creams, sun protection creams, and deodorants. Ethylhexylglycerin is a rare, but highly relevant, cosmetic sensitizer, even in those products advertised to be safe for consumers. Targeted patch testing with ethylhexylglycerin 5% pet. is very useful, and routine patch testing in a cosmetic series may be considered. Higher test concentrations might be indicated in selected cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The provision of patient personal hygiene in the intensive care unit: a descriptive exploratory study of bed-bathing practice.

    PubMed

    Coyer, Fiona M; O'Sullivan, Judy; Cadman, Nicola

    2011-08-01

    The provision of the patient bed-bath is a fundamental nursing care activity yet few quantitative data and no qualitative data are available on registered nurses' (RNs) clinical practice in this domain in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to describe ICU RNs current practice with respect to the timing, frequency and duration of the patient bed-bath and the cleansing and emollient agents used. The study utilised a two-phase sequential explanatory mixed method design. Phase one used a questionnaire to survey RNs and phase two employed semi-structured focus group (FG) interviews with RNs. Data was collected over 28 days across four Australian metropolitan ICUs. Ethical approval was granted from the relevant hospital and university human research ethics committees. RNs were asked to complete a questionnaire following each episode of care (i.e. bed-bath) and then to attend one of three FG interviews: RNs with less than 2 years ICU experience; RNs with 2-5 years ICU experience; and RNs with greater than 5 years ICU experience. During the 28-day study period the four ICUs had 77.25 beds open. In phase one a total of 539 questionnaires were returned, representing 30.5% of episodes of patient bed-baths (based on 1767 bed occupancy and one bed-bath per patient per day). In 349 bed-bath episodes 54.7% patients were mechanically ventilated. The bed-bath was given between 02.00 and 06.00h in 161 episodes (30%), took 15-30min to complete (n=195, 36.2%) and was completed within the last 8h in 304 episodes (56.8%). Cleansing agents used were predominantly pH balanced soap or liquid soap and water (n=379, 71%) in comparison to chlorhexidine impregnated sponges/cloths (n=86, 16.1%) or other agents such as pre-packaged washcloths (n=65, 12.2%). In 347 episodes (64.4%) emollients were not applied after the bed-bath. In phase two 12 FGs were conducted (three FGs at each ICU) with a total of 42 RN participants. Thematic analysis of FG transcripts across the three

  6. Application of moisturizer to neonates prevents development of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Horimukai, Kenta; Morita, Kumiko; Narita, Masami; Kondo, Mai; Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Nozaki, Makoto; Shigematsu, Yukiko; Yoshida, Kazue; Niizeki, Hironori; Motomura, Ken-Ichiro; Sago, Haruhiko; Takimoto, Tetsuya; Inoue, Eisuke; Kamemura, Norio; Kido, Hiroshi; Hisatsune, Junzo; Sugai, Motoyuki; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro; Sasaki, Takashi; Amagai, Masayuki; Morita, Hideaki; Matsuda, Akio; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Ohya, Yukihiro

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested that epidermal barrier dysfunction contributes to the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) and other allergic diseases. We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial to investigate whether protecting the skin barrier with a moisturizer during the neonatal period prevents development of AD and allergic sensitization. An emulsion-type moisturizer was applied daily during the first 32 weeks of life to 59 of 118 neonates at high risk for AD (based on having a parent or sibling with AD) who were enrolled in this study. The onset of AD (eczematous symptoms lasting >4 weeks) and eczema (lasting >2 weeks) was assessed by a dermatology specialist on the basis of the modified Hanifin and Rajka criteria. The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of AD plus eczema (AD/eczema) at week 32 of life. A secondary outcome, allergic sensitization, was evaluated based on serum levels of allergen-specific IgE determined by using a high-sensitivity allergen microarray of diamond-like carbon-coated chips. Approximately 32% fewer neonates who received the moisturizer had AD/eczema by week 32 than control subjects (P = .012, log-rank test). We did not show a statistically significant effect of emollient on allergic sensitization based on the level of IgE antibody against egg white at 0.34 kUA/L CAP-FEIA equivalents. However, the sensitization rate was significantly higher in infants who had AD/eczema than in those who did not (odds ratio, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.22-6.73). Daily application of moisturizer during the first 32 weeks of life reduces the risk of AD/eczema in infants. Allergic sensitization during this time period is associated with the presence of eczematous skin but not with moisturizer use. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The first step in infection control is hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Canham, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A dental health care worker (DHCW) has an obligation to prevent the spread of health care associated infections. Adhering to proper hand hygiene procedures, selecting appropriate hand hygiene products and the use of gloves are all important elements of infection control. The CDC Guidelines for Hand Hygiene state that improved hand hygiene practices can reduce transmission of pathogenic microorganisms to patients and personnel in health care settings. DHCWs must also protect themselves by recognizing pitfalls such as irritants or allergies that may pose obstacles to proper hand hygiene. Occupational irritants and allergies can be caused by frequent hand washing, exposure to hand hygiene products, exposure to chemicals and shear forces associated with wearing or removing gloves. Since the primary defense against infection and transmission of pathogens is healthy, unbroken skin, DHCWs must take steps to ensure that their skin remains healthy and intact. These steps include evaluating different types of hand hygiene products, lotions and gloves for the best compatibility. If the DHCW sees a breakdown of his or her skin barrier, steps should be taken to determine the cause and remedy. Remedies can include the use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers containing emollients and moisturizers and regular use of a medical grade hand lotion. The bottom line: healthy skin protects you at work and at home. Selection and use of appropriate hand hygiene products, including moisturizers, are an essential part ofa dental office infection control program. My coworker lost the use of her thumb for several months due to complications of a staph infection. She was unable to work and found even simple tasks such as closing a button hard to do. Think of how difficult your work would be if something happened to your hands. Injury, irritation or allergies could alter your ability to work or even perform routine tasks. Our hands provide us with the ability to work in clinical dentistry. It makes

  8. Evaluation of additive effects of hydrolyzed jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) esters and glycerol: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jaimi; Marshall, Brooke; Gacula, Maximo; Rheins, Lawrence

    2008-12-01

    Glycerol has long served the topical prescriptive and personal care industry as a versatile and functional active and inactive ingredient. In skin care products, it acts primarily as an emollient, softening the skin through robust humectant hydration action. Hydrolyzed Jojoba Esters K-20W (K-20W) have been shown to increase skin hydration and improve sensory skin "feel" when included in a variety of skin, hair, and nail care cosmetic/personal care formulations. The addition of glycerol and hydrolyzed jojoba esters provides a substantial long-acting 24 h (moisturizing) skin hydration effect for topical products. A small pilot study was conducted to support the "proof of concept" that an enhanced, additive role exists between these two ingredients resulting in a long-term (24 h) skin moisturization effect. Topical treatments were applied to the skin (lower leg) of subjects, and evaluations were made at baseline and 8- to 24-h post-application. Skin hydration data were obtained via bio-instrumental transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements and expert clinical skin grading, including standardized digital clinical photography. Clinical skin grading evaluations and TEWL measurements found that significantly lower evaporative (P < 0.05) TEWL values occurred in the topical formulations containing 3.75% glycerol and 1.25% K-20W (hydrolyzed jojoba esters) than with glycerol alone in a standard base skin care lotion at 8 and 24 h posttreatment. This preliminary data "proof of concept" supports the position that glycerol and hydrolyzed jojoba esters work in tandem to enhance skin moisturization for at least 24 h. This unique moisturizing potential may prove valuable in the future development of cosmetic and over-the-counter/prescriptive topical products, including new medicaments containing botanicals. This fact is further reinforced with the recent greater commercial use and demand for defined safe botanicals in cosmetic as well as pharmaceutical topical formulations

  9. Effect of provision of an integrated neonatal survival kit and early cognitive stimulation package by community health workers on developmental outcomes of infants in Kwale County, Kenya: study protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pell, Lisa G; Bassani, Diego G; Nyaga, Lucy; Njagi, Isaac; Wanjiku, Catherine; Thiruchselvam, Thulasi; Macharia, William; Minhas, Ripudaman S; Kitsao-Wekulo, Patricia; Lakhani, Amyn; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Armstrong, Robert; Morris, Shaun K

    2016-09-08

    Each year, more than 200 million children under the age of 5 years, almost all in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), fail to achieve their developmental potential. Risk factors for compromised development often coexist and include inadequate cognitive stimulation, poverty, nutritional deficiencies, infection and complications of being born low birthweight and/or premature. Moreover, many of these risk factors are closely associated with newborn morbidity and mortality. As compromised development has significant implications on human capital, inexpensive and scalable interventions are urgently needed to promote neurodevelopment and reduce risk factors for impaired development. This cluster randomized trial aims at evaluating the impact of volunteer community health workers delivering either an integrated neonatal survival kit, an early stimulation package, or a combination of both interventions, to pregnant women during their third trimester of pregnancy, compared to the current standard of care in Kwale County, Kenya. The neonatal survival kit comprises a clean delivery kit (sterile blade, cord clamp, clean plastic sheet, surgical gloves and hand soap), sunflower oil emollient, chlorhexidine, ThermoSpot(TM), Mylar infant sleeve, and a reusable instant heater. Community health workers are also equipped with a portable hand-held electric scale. The early cognitive stimulation package focuses on enhancing caregiver practices by teaching caregivers three key messages that comprise combining a gentle touch with making eye contact and talking to children, responsive feeding and caregiving, and singing. The primary outcome measure is child development at 12 months of age assessed with the Protocol for Child Monitoring (Infant and Toddler version). The main secondary outcome is newborn mortality. This study will provide evidence on effectiveness of delivering an innovative neonatal survival kit and/or early stimulation package to pregnant women in Kwale County

  10. [Chemotherapy-induced acral erythema: a clinical and histopathologic study of 44 cases].

    PubMed

    Hueso, L; Sanmartín, O; Nagore, E; Botella-Estrada, R; Requena, C; Llombart, B; Serra-Guillén, C; Alfaro-Rubio, A; Guillén, C

    2008-05-01

    Acral erythema, also known as palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia or hand-foot syndrome, is a relatively common cutaneous reaction caused by a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. It presents during cancer treatment as painful erythema and paresthesia affecting the palms and soles. It seems to be dose dependent and its appearance is determined by both the peak plasma concentration and the cumulative dose of the chemotherapeutic agent. The symptoms and histopathology findings are suggestive of direct cytotoxicity affecting the epidermis of the extremities caused by high concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents. The most commonly implicated agents are doxorubicin, 5-fluoracil and its derivatives, cytarabine, and docetaxel. We present the clinical and histologic characteristics of a series of patients diagnosed with chemotherapy-induced acral erythema. The study included all patients who developed acral erythema lesions following chemotherapy between January 2000 and December 2003. Out of 2186 patients who underwent chemotherapy, 44 cases of acral erythema were identified, representing an incidence of 2.01 % during the study period and 16.75 % of all cutaneous lesions attributed to chemotherapy. The most commonly implicated drug was 5-fluoracil administered by continuous infusion and the highest incidence was observed in patients treated with liposomal doxorubicin. Acral erythema was a dose-limiting toxic effect in 29.5 % of cases. The histologic findings varied according to the clinical severity of the lesions and included interface dermatitis with variable keratinocyte necrosis, dilation of the superficial vascular plexus, and limited inflammatory infiltrate. The most commonly used treatment was pyridoxine, along with topical treatments such as cold compresses, emollients, and topical corticosteroids.

  11. Safety and efficacy evaluation of tretinoin cream 0.02% for the reduction of photodamage: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies as well as histologic data maintain that tretinoin improves the appearance of photodamage; however, the long-term benefits of tretinoin 0.02% in moderate to severe photodamage have not been established. We performed independent assessments to demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of tretinoin emollient cream 0.02% for moderate to severe facial photodamage. A single-center, open-label, single-group observational study followed 19 patients over 52 weeks. Efficacy assessments consisted of the Glogau Photodamage Classification Scale and severity grading of photodamage signs and symptoms. Facial photography and biopsies were taken from three subjects at baseline and final visits. Tolerability was assessed by the investigator. Twelve patients completed 52 weeks of treatment. Mean change in Glogau photodamage demonstrated statistically significant differences at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months (P<.0005). All patients with moderate to severe photodamage had improved to mild photodamage status by 9 months. Statistically significant improvements (P<.05) were observed at all time points for fine wrinkling, tactile roughness, and mottled hyperpigmentation as well as for lentigines at 6, 9, and 12 months and telangiectasia at 12 months. Biopsy samples revealed microscopic improvement in photodamage. Tretinoin cream 0.02% was generally well-tolerated, with few subjects experiencing adverse events. Our pilot study is limited by lack of control and the small study sample. Tretinoin cream 0.02% was safe and effective for moderate to severe photodamage of facial skin and demonstrated sustainable benefits over an entire year based on the clinically validated Glogau classification system and expert visual grading analysis.

  12. Treatment of Human Scabies with Oral Ivermectin. Eczematous Eruptions as a New Non-Reported Adverse Event.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Navarro, J; Feal, C; Dauden, E

    2017-09-01

    Oral ivermectin is an alternative therapy for human scabies infection due to its ease of administration and good safety profile. However, there is no definitive consensus on the optimal dosing regimen. To describe the treatment of human scabies with different dosages of oral ivermectin and the possible adverse events. 23 patients with human scabies were treated with oral ivermectin: 10 patients received a single oral dose of 200μg/kg and 13 a dose of 400μg/kg. A second, or even a third dose, was administered in cases of treatment failure. A complete clinical response was achieved by all of the patients. The first ten patients required at least two (80%) or three (20%) doses of ivermectin for complete resolution of the infection. The remaining cases resolved with a single 400μg/kg oral dose. Within the first 72h after the administration of oral ivermectin, new cutaneous lesions were observed in eleven patients (47.8%). Cutaneous biopsies showed signs of subacute eczema. The eruption was treated with topical corticosteroids and emollient therapy. There was no other new drug administration or a history of irritants. There was no history of atopic diathesis except for one patient. Oral ivermectin is an effective therapy for the treatment of human scabies. A single 400μg/kg oral dose demonstrated high efficacy and good tolerance. However, the appearance of eczematous cutaneous lesions induced by oral ivermectin has not previously been reported in the literature. Dermatologists should be aware of this possible adverse event. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Podoconiosis patients’ willingness to pay for treatment services in Northwest Ethiopia: potential for cost recovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Podoconiosis is non-filarial elephantiasis of the lower legs. It is more commonly found in tropical Africa, Central and South America, and northwest India. In Ethiopia, a few non-governmental organizations provide free treatment to podoconiosis patients, but sustainability of free treatment and scale-up of services to reach the huge unmet need is challenged by resource limitations. We aimed to determine podoconiosis patient’s willingness to pay (WTP) for a treatment package (composed of deep cleaning of limbs with diluted antiseptic solution, soap, and water, bandaging, application of emollient on the skin, and provision of shoes), and factors associated with WTP in northwestern Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected untreated podoconiosis patients (n = 393) in Baso Liben woreda, northwestern Ethiopia. The contingent valuation method was used with a pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results The majority of podoconiosis patients (72.8%) were willing to pay for treatment services. The median WTP amount was 64 Birr (US$ 3.28) per person per year. More than one-third of patients (36.7%) were willing to pay at least half of the full treatment cost and 76.2% were willing to pay at least half of the cost of shoes. A multivariate analysis showed that having a higher monthly income, being a woman, older age, being aware of the role of shoes to prevent podoconiosis, and possession of a functional radio were significantly associated with higher odds of WTP. Conclusions The considerable WTP estimates showed that podoconiosis treatment could improve sustainability and service utilization. A subsidized cost recovery scheme could reduce treatment costs and more feasibility integrate podoconiosis treatment service with other NTDs and the government’s primary health care system. PMID:24642085

  14. Jet Fuel-Associated Occupational Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Contestable, James J

    2017-03-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is a ubiquitous problem. Sailors onboard U.S. Navy vessels are at high risk given the multitude of potential workplace exposures. Solvents, petrochemicals, and fuels are abundant and can cause irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. Symptoms of contact dermatitis can cause inability to work and, if chronic, may require a change in rating or job. Prevention of this issue requires patient education about the risks and correct personnel protective equipment. Even with preventative strategies in place, exposures and cases of contact dermatitis will occur. Treatment consists of topical steroids and immunomodulators, as well as barrier creams and emollients. The goal of treatment is to fully restore the skin's natural barrier and prevent further exposure. A classic case of jet fuel-associated contact dermatitis is reviewed. A literature review utilizing PubMed, Google Scholar, and Google Search was conducted to elucidate our understanding of this issue, current occupational health guidelines, preventative approaches, and treatments. This case report provides guidance and recommendations for providers who encounter contact dermatitis related to petrochemicals, such as jet fuel. The literature review revealed limited knowledge surrounding in vivo human skin effects of jet fuel, specifically JP-5. Even larger gaps were found in our understanding of, and guidelines for, protective modalities against jet fuel exposure and dermatitis. A case is presented to facilitate recognition of jet fuel contact dermatitis and guidance for treatment and prevention. Given our current limited knowledge and guidelines concerning protective equipment and skin protectants, multiple proposals for future studies are suggested. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. The reduction in inflammation and impairment in wound healing by using strontium chloride hexahydrate.

    PubMed

    Berksoy Hayta, Sibel; Durmuş, Kasim; Altuntaş, Emine Elif; Yildiz, Esin; Hisarciklıo, Mehmet; Akyol, Melih

    2018-03-01

    Numerous growth factors, cytokine, mitogen and chemotactic factors are involved in wound healing. Even though inflammation is important for the stimulation of proliferative phase, excessive inflammation also causes impairment in wound healing. Strontium salts suppress keratinocyte-induced TNF-alpha and interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 in in vitro cultures. This study was conducted to determine the effects of administration of topical strontium chloride hexahydrate on wound healing through TNF-alpha and TGF-beta in surgical wound healing model of in-vivo rat skin. Twenty-four rats were used in the study. After approximately 2 cm cutaneous-subcutaneous incision was horizontally carried out on the mid-neckline of the rats, the incision was again closed using 2.0 vicryl. The rats were assigned into three groups including eight rats in each group. Placebo emollient ointment and also the ointments, which were containing 5% and 10% strontium chloride hexahydrate and were prepared at the same base with placebo ointment, were administered to the groups by a blind executor twice a day for a week. At the end of seventh day, the rats were sacrificed and cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue of their wound site was resected for histopathological examination. Scoring of histopathological wound healing and scoring of tissue TNF-alpha and TGF-beta level with immunohistochemical staining were performed. The groups, to which both 5% and 10% strontium chloride hexahydrate was administered, had lower immunohistochemical TNF-alpha levels and histopathological wound scores compared to controls, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Strontium chloride hexahydrate can lead to impairment in wound healing by suppressing inflammation through TNF-alpha.

  16. Synbiotics could not reduce the scoring of childhood atopic dermatitis (SCORAD): a randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Alireza; Moin, Mostafa; Pourpak, Zahra; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Aghamohamadi, Asghar; Sajedi, Vahid; soheili, Habib; Sotoodeh, Soheila; Movahedi, Masoud

    2011-03-01

    Despite preliminary evidence, the role of probiotic and synbiotic in treatment of the atopic dermatitis has shown varying results. We aimed to evaluate whether synbiotic supplementation decrease severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) in childhood. In a randomized double blind-placebo controlled trial, we evaluated the synbiotic supplementation efficiency on the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Infants aged 1-36 months with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis were randomized (n=41) and received either synbiotic (probiotic plus prebiotic) (n=20) or placebo (n=21) daily as a powder for two months. Emollient (Eucerin) and topical corticosteroid (Hydrocortisone) were permitted. Children were scored for severity of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Also allergen Skin Prick Tests (SPT), IgE blood level and eosinophil count were measured at first visit. Patients' SCORAD were reevaluated at the end of intervention. We followed 36 out of 41 subjects for two months (drop out rate = 9%). In the whole group, the mean Total SCORAD (at base line 40.93) decreased by 56% (p=0.00). The mean Objective SCORAD (at base line 31.29) decreased by 53% (p=0.00). There was no significant difference in the mean decrease of total SCORAD between placebo (22.3) and synbiotic groups (24.2). There was also no difference between two intervention groups in the mean decrease of total SCORAD regarding to different demographic, clinical and para clinical subgroups. This study could not confirm synbiotic as an effective treatment for childhood atopic dermatitis and further studies are needed. These findings challenge the role of synbiotics in the treatment of childhood atopic dermatitis.

  17. Development and evaluation of a new alcohol-based surgical hand scrub formulation with persistent antimicrobial characteristics and brushless application.

    PubMed

    Hobson, D W; Woller, W; Anderson, L; Guthery, E

    1998-10-01

    Since the introduction in the 1970s of surgical hand scrub formulations that contain 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), new surgical scrub formulations that have improved efficacy, persistence, or significantly improved use characteristics have not been forthcoming. In addition, the manufacturer's labeling for popular hand scrub products generally requires scrub times in excess of 6 minutes, whereas current practical needs call for products with substantially shorter scrub times. A new alcohol-based surgical scrub formulation, which has ingredients that provide emollient, surfactant, and antimicrobial persistence characteristics to complement the rapid and broad-spectrum antiseptic qualities of alcohol, has been developed in an effort to address these current practical needs. The relative efficacy of a new alcohol-based surgical scrub formulation that contains ingredients that provide surfactant and antimicrobial persistence characteristics was compared with that of commercial 4% CHG and 7.5% povidone iodine (PVPI) formulations with use of human subjects. Hand antimicrobial count sampling was performed by using standardized "glove juice" methodology. The efficacy and persistence results of the new formulation showed statistically significant improvement over both CHG and PVPI at a substantially lessened scrub time (3 minutes). In addition, use of the new formulation without a scrub brush produced results statistically similar to 3-minute applications with either a brush or a sponge. The new alcohol-based formulation demonstrates promise as a new surgical hand scrub formulation with antimicrobial and use characteristics that are significantly improved over current CHG and PVPI formulations. These studies demonstrate the suitability of this formulation for use as a surgical hand scrub and for brushless application.

  18. Evaluation of a novel very high sun-protection-factor moisturizer in adults with rosacea-prone sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Grivet-Seyve, Mathieu; Santoro, Francine; Lachmann, Nadège

    2017-01-01

    Rosacea-prone sensitive skin requires high sun-protection factor (SPF) moisturizers. This study evaluated Daylong Extreme SPF 50+ lotion, a novel cream containing five ultraviolet filters, two emollients, and three skin conditioners. This was an open-label, single-center study. On day 1, before treatment, subjects answered a questionnaire on their skin conditions and sunscreen habits, and both subjects and dermatologist evaluated skin status. Subjects applied the product once daily in the morning to the face for 21 days, and after approximately 3-5 minutes they assessed tolerability and short-term cosmetic acceptability in a questionnaire and daily diary. On day 22, the dermatologist and subjects evaluated skin status for long-term tolerance and cosmetic acceptability. The study enrolled 44 individuals (mean age 58.8 years, 91% female). At baseline, most subjects (39 of 44) showed erythema, and ~30% showed dryness and scaling. Dermatologists noted four cases of pustules and one case of papules. After 21 days' treatment with the product, the dermatologist reported significantly less erythema, dryness and scaling, three cases of pustules and two cases of papules. At baseline, ~75% of subjects noted a feeling of dryness, >50% reported tension, and nearly 25% reported tickling. After using the product for 21 days, subjects reported significantly less tension, dryness, and tickling. Some subjects noted itching and burning before and after using the product. One subject noted papules during treatment. Most subjects said that the product was pleasant, did not irritate the skin or cause stinging/burning, was easy to apply, quickly absorbed, and nongreasy, improved skin moisturization, helped prevent sun-provoked facial redness, did not worsen rosacea, and was easily incorporated into their skincare regimen. Half would switch to the product, and 80% of subjects would buy and recommend the product. The product was well tolerated in rosacea-prone subjects, producing objective

  19. Evaluation of a novel very high sun-protection-factor moisturizer in adults with rosacea-prone sensitive skin

    PubMed Central

    Grivet-Seyve, Mathieu; Santoro, Francine; Lachmann, Nadège

    2017-01-01

    Background/objective Rosacea-prone sensitive skin requires high sun-protection factor (SPF) moisturizers. This study evaluated Daylong Extreme SPF 50+ lotion, a novel cream containing five ultraviolet filters, two emollients, and three skin conditioners. Subjects and methods This was an open-label, single-center study. On day 1, before treatment, subjects answered a questionnaire on their skin conditions and sunscreen habits, and both subjects and dermatologist evaluated skin status. Subjects applied the product once daily in the morning to the face for 21 days, and after approximately 3–5 minutes they assessed tolerability and short-term cosmetic acceptability in a questionnaire and daily diary. On day 22, the dermatologist and subjects evaluated skin status for long-term tolerance and cosmetic acceptability. Results The study enrolled 44 individuals (mean age 58.8 years, 91% female). At baseline, most subjects (39 of 44) showed erythema, and ~30% showed dryness and scaling. Dermatologists noted four cases of pustules and one case of papules. After 21 days’ treatment with the product, the dermatologist reported significantly less erythema, dryness and scaling, three cases of pustules and two cases of papules. At baseline, ~75% of subjects noted a feeling of dryness, >50% reported tension, and nearly 25% reported tickling. After using the product for 21 days, subjects reported significantly less tension, dryness, and tickling. Some subjects noted itching and burning before and after using the product. One subject noted papules during treatment. Most subjects said that the product was pleasant, did not irritate the skin or cause stinging/burning, was easy to apply, quickly absorbed, and nongreasy, improved skin moisturization, helped prevent sun-provoked facial redness, did not worsen rosacea, and was easily incorporated into their skincare regimen. Half would switch to the product, and 80% of subjects would buy and recommend the product. Conclusion The product

  20. Efficacy of a shower cream and a lotion with skin-identical lipids in healthy subjects with atopic dry skin.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, Enzo; Mortillo, Susan; Cameli, Norma; Ardigo, Marco; Mariano, Maria

    2018-05-10

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disease that adversely affects quality of life. The current study evaluates the efficacy of a shower cream and a lotion, each with skin-identical lipids and emollients, in the treatment of atopic dry skin of subjects with a history of atopic condition. In all, 40 healthy females with clinically dry skin on the lower legs were enrolled in the study and underwent 4 weeks of daily use of the shower cream and 2 additional weeks of both the shower cream and the body lotion. Subjects were evaluated at day 0, week 4, and week 6. Skin barrier function was assessed by Tewameter ® , skin hydration by Corneometer ® , smoothness and desquamation by Visioscan ® , and stratum corneum architecture by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). The investigator assessed the degree of dryness, roughness, redness, cracks, tingling and itch, and subjective self-assessment evaluated the perception of skin soothing, smoothness, and softness. Skin barrier function and skin moisture maintenance were significantly improved using the shower cream. The lotion with physiological lipids, together with the shower cream, also improved skin barrier function and moisture. Both the shower cream and the body lotion reduced clinical dryness, roughness, redness, cracks, tingling and itch, according to the dermatologist, and increased soothing, smoothness, and softness, according to the subjects of the study. The combination of a shower cream and a lotion with physiological lipids efficiently restores skin barrier function and increases skin hydration, becoming an effective skin-care option for patients with atopic dry skin. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluating lotion transfer from products to skin using the behind-the-knee test.

    PubMed

    Farage, Miranda A

    2010-05-01

    Adding lotions or emollients to the surface of a variety of paper products confers a number of benefits to the skin of consumers. A modification of the 'behind-the-knee (BTK)' test model was used as a means of measuring the effectiveness of lotion transfer to the skin. Two series of feminine protection pads were prepared: (1) identically constructed pads differing only in the amount of lotion applied to the surface and (2) pads of various compositions to compare the influence of other product characteristics. For the first series, pads were applied for 3 h using the BTK protocol, and lotion transfer was evaluated. For the second series of products, two sample pads were applied consecutively for 3 h each, and lotion transfer was evaluated a both time points (e.g., 3 and 6 h). In addition, a clinical in-use study was used to evaluate lotion transfer for the second product series. In the BTK model using pads of identical composition, lotion transfer was a function of the amount of lotion placed on the pad. However, results from the second product series indicated that when pads were prepared using different absorbant materials (supreabsorbent gelling material, or AGM and cellulose), pads with the AGM core transferred lotion more effectively than pads with a cellulose core. Other product characteristics, i.e., pad thickness and lotion configuration, did not detectibly influence lotion transfer. The results of an in-use clinical study conducted on the second series of test products were directionally similar to those from the BTK, but statistical significance was not reached. An adaptation of the BTK test method provides an effective means of evaluating the transfer of lotion formulations from feminine protection pads at a fraction of the cost of clinical in-use studies.

  2. Comparative trial of 5% dexpanthenol in water-in-oil formulation with 1% hydrocortisone ointment in the treatment of childhood atopic dermatitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Udompataikul, Montree; Limpa-o-vart, Dipenn

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic relapsing disease particularly affecting children. The emollient used for protection of skin barrier function is the standard treatment for patients with AD. Currently, there is a growing interest in the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as dexpanthenol (vitamin B5) as an alternative treatment. To compare the effectiveness of 5% dexpanthenol (DT) ointment with 1% hydrocortisone (HC) ointment in childhood AD therapy. Patients were treated topically with 5% DT ointment on the right side of the body and 1% HC ointment on the other side twice daily for 4 weeks. The clinical responses were evaluated by SCORAD (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index) with statistical analysis using paired t-test. Of the 30 children enrolled, 26 completed the protocol; mean age was 7.19 years. The average baseline SCORAD score of the DT-treated side and the HC-treated side was 30.95 and 30.54, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in SCORAD score reduction between the 2 agents. The edematous score of the HC-treated side exhibited faster resolution than that of the DT-treated side, with a statistically significant difference at week 1 and without a statistically significant difference at weeks 2 to 4. The lichenification response rate of HC treatment was more rapid than that of DT treatment; however, there was no statistical group difference. No adverse events were observed with either agent. The effectiveness of 5% DT ointment is equal to that of 1% HC ointment. DT ointment may be used as alternative treatment in mild to moderate childhood AD therapy.

  3. Podoconiosis patients' willingness to pay for treatment services in Northwest Ethiopia: potential for cost recovery.

    PubMed

    Tamiru, Abreham; Tsegay, Girmay; Wubie, Moges; Gedefaw, Molla; Tomczyk, Sara; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil

    2014-03-19

    Podoconiosis is non-filarial elephantiasis of the lower legs. It is more commonly found in tropical Africa, Central and South America, and northwest India. In Ethiopia, a few non-governmental organizations provide free treatment to podoconiosis patients, but sustainability of free treatment and scale-up of services to reach the huge unmet need is challenged by resource limitations. We aimed to determine podoconiosis patient's willingness to pay (WTP) for a treatment package (composed of deep cleaning of limbs with diluted antiseptic solution, soap, and water, bandaging, application of emollient on the skin, and provision of shoes), and factors associated with WTP in northwestern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected untreated podoconiosis patients (n=393) in Baso Liben woreda, northwestern Ethiopia. The contingent valuation method was used with a pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire. The majority of podoconiosis patients (72.8%) were willing to pay for treatment services. The median WTP amount was 64 Birr (US$ 3.28) per person per year. More than one-third of patients (36.7%) were willing to pay at least half of the full treatment cost and 76.2% were willing to pay at least half of the cost of shoes. A multivariate analysis showed that having a higher monthly income, being a woman, older age, being aware of the role of shoes to prevent podoconiosis, and possession of a functional radio were significantly associated with higher odds of WTP. The considerable WTP estimates showed that podoconiosis treatment could improve sustainability and service utilization. A subsidized cost recovery scheme could reduce treatment costs and more feasibility integrate podoconiosis treatment service with other NTDs and the government's primary health care system.

  4. Topical Coconut Oil in Very Preterm Infants: An Open-Label Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Tobias; Pupala, Sameer; Hibbert, Julie; Doherty, Dorota; Patole, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    The immature fragile skin of preterm infants represents an inadequate protective barrier. The emollient and anti-infective properties of coconut oil make it a potentially beneficial topical agent for this population. Our aim was to evaluate feasibility, safety, and the effects of topical coconut oil on skin condition in very preterm infants. An open-label randomised controlled trial in preterm infants <30 weeks' gestation was conducted. Enrolled infants were randomised to receive either routine care or topical coconut oil (5 mL/kg) twice daily for 21 days, starting within 24 h of birth. The neonatal skin condition was the primary outcome, and was assessed using the Neonatal Skin Condition Score (NSCS) on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. The number of coconut oil applications was recorded to assess clinical feasibility and all enrolled infants were monitored for adverse effects of topical coconut application, such as skin irritation. A total of 72 infants born <30 weeks' gestation were enrolled (36 infants per arm), with comparable demographic characteristics. Topical application of coconut oil was feasible and without adverse effects. The NSCS was maintained in the coconut oil group throughout the intervention period, but deteriorated from a median (IQR) of 3 (3-4) on day 1 to 4 (4-4) on day 21 in the control group (p = 0.01). There were no differences in common neonatal outcomes, including sepsis, necrotising enterocolitis, retinopathy of prematurity, chronic lung disease, and mortality. Topical coconut oil maintained a better skin condition in very preterm infants without adverse effects. This simple, safe, and affordable intervention warrants further investigation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Questionnaire-based study on the key to the guidance to the patients with atopic dermatitis by pharmacist].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sakae; Kakamu, Takeyasu; Matsuo, Hiroaki; Naora, Koji; Morita, Eishin

    2014-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a condition with a chronic or recurrent course that requires continued treatment, meaning that patients must be provided with instructions that fit their lifestyle. Surveys of doctors and patients have revealed the importance of instructions on how to apply topical medication. Here we conducted a survey of the instructions provided by pharmacists, who play an important role in educating patients on how to apply topical medication. Questionnaires were distributed to clinics and dispensing pharmacies in Shimane and Hiroshima prefectures. The questionnaire format comprised selecting each matter on which instructions are provided. A total of 548 questionnaires (response rate, 13.8%) were collected and analyzed. Concerning topical steroids, the most frequently instructed item was "Explanation of application site"(86%), followed by "Explanation of number and timing of applications"(68%). Only 45% chose "Instruction to apply a small amount to avoid side effects." For tacrolimus ointment, "Explanation of tingling sensation"(as a side effect) was the most frequently selected item (52%), and "Instruction by using a brochure"(27.3%) was more commonly selected for tacrolimus ointment than for steroids and emollients. "Demonstrate the application method by means of actual application" was selected by few respondents for any topical medication. Regarding what they wanted from doctors, many respondents wrote in the section for their own comments that they would like a clear description of the method of use and dose and indications of the amount to be applied. Failure included times when patients failed to apply medication correctly due to inadequate instructions and an insufficient explanation of side effects. Instructions vary among patients and professions, but good instructions lead to good results. Cross-tabulation showed that pharmacists who are aware of the guidelines of atopic dermatitis offer significantly more instructions in a range of areas

  6. Transdermal rivastigmine: management of cutaneous adverse events and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, Jill; Herrmann, Nathan; Adam, David N

    2011-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder resulting in part from the degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brain. Rivastigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is commonly used as a treatment for dementia due to its ability to moderate cholinergic neurotransmission; however, treatment with oral rivastigmine can lead to gastrointestinal adverse effects such as nausea and vomiting. Transdermal administration of rivastigmine can minimize these adverse effects by providing continuous delivery of the medication, while maintaining the effectiveness of the oral treatment. While the transdermal form of rivastigmine has been found to have fewer systemic adverse effects compared with the oral form, cutaneous reactions, such as contact dermatitis, can lead to discontinuation of the drug in its transdermal form. Lack of patient compliance with regard to applying the patch to the designated site, applying the patch for the correct length of time or rotating patch application sites increases the risk of cutaneous adverse reactions. This article outlines the diagnosis and management of irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis secondary to transdermal rivastigmine. The large majority of reactions to transdermal patches are of an irritant type, which can be diagnosed clinically by the presence of a pruritic, erythematous, eczematous plaque strictly confined to the borders of the patch. In contrast, an allergic reaction can be differentiated by the presence of vesicles and/or oedema, erythema beyond the boundaries of the transdermal patch and lack of improvement of the lesion 48 hours after removal of the offending treatment. By encouraging the patient to follow a regular rotation schedule for the patch, and using lipid-based emollients for irritant dermatitis and pre- and post-treatment topical corticosteroids for allergic dermatitis, cutaneous reactions can often be alleviated and patients can continue with their medication regimen. Other

  7. Community level morbidity control of lymphoedema using self care and integrative treatment in two lymphatic filariasis endemic districts of South India: a non randomized interventional study.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Saravu R; Bose, Kuthaje S; Aggithaya, Madhur G; Swamy, Gaddam Kumara; Ryan, Terence J; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Washington, Reynold G; Rao, Balu Palicheralu Sreenivasa; Rajagopala, Shrikrishna; Manjula, Kadengodlu; Vandana, Usha; Sreemol, Thaivalath Anandan; Rojith, Mathew; Salimani, Shanappa Y; Shefuvan, Mohammed

    2013-09-01

    Currently there is no global program to manage lymphoedema as a result of lymphatic filariasis (LF). The primary aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a previously proposed integrative treatment protocol, using locally available resources to address the morbidity, in a community village setting. Two LF endemic districts of south India, Gulbarga in Karnataka (GK) and Alleppey in Kerala (AK), were selected for the study. All known patients were invited to an LF camp. Patients with grade two late or three lymphoedema were enrolled. All patients were given training in the integrative procedure which involved patient education and the domiciliary protocol. A total of 730 patients (851 limbs) completed the three and half month follow up. There was a statistically significant (1%) reduction up to mid thigh level volume measurement for both small (0.7-1.1 liters) and large (1.8-5.0 liters) limbs, p < 0.000. In AK inflammatory episodes at the three months interval reduced from 37.5% (127 patients) to 28.3% (96 patients) and in GK from 37.6% (147 patients) to 10.2% (40 patients), p < 0.000. All patients had reduced bacterial entry points. There was an overall improvement in quality of life in all domains of LF specific quality of life questionnaire p < 0.000. Self care and integrative treatment is possible in resource poor Indian village settings. Further work is needed to explore factors leading to better compliance by randomizing the interventions such as washing and emollient compression vs Ayurvedic and yoga interventions before integrative treatment is considered for national health programmes in developing countries.

  8. DFD-01 Reduces Transepidermal Water Loss and Improves Skin Hydration and Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J Mark; Grove, Gary L; Allenby, Kent; Houser, Tim

    2017-12-01

    In plaque psoriasis, the benefit of topical steroids is well established. The vehicle formulation of topical steroids may also provide benefit in addition to the effects of the steroid itself. DFD-01 (betamethasone dipropionate spray, 0.05%) is a formulation composed of a topical steroid in an emollient-like vehicle that enhances penetration to the target site of inflammation in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of DFD-01 and its vehicle on skin hydration and barrier function in compromised skin and to evaluate its effect on flexibility in healthy skin. Eighteen healthy white volunteers were enrolled in each of two studies. In Study 1, dry shaving of volar forearms created a compromised skin barrier, through which transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured using an evaporimeter. Capacitance, a measure of epidermal hydration, was also measured at baseline and at 1, 2 and 4 h after application of DFD-01 or its vehicle formulation. In Study 2, intact skin flexibility was tested with a cutometer before and at 1, 2 and 4 h after application of DFD-01 or vehicle. In Study 1, both DFD-01 and its vehicle were effective at reducing TEWL through the compromised stratum corneum. Capacitance measurements confirmed this finding; razor-chafed skin treated with either DFD-01 or vehicle exhibited levels of skin hydration similar to unshaved control skin. Study 2 found softening and greater flexibility of normal skin treated with either DFD-01 or vehicle compared with nontreated control skin samples. These tests suggest that the DFD-01 formulation and its vehicle are each effective at retaining moisture within a damaged skin barrier and for softening and increasing the flexibility of intact skin. Dr. Reddy's Laboratories.

  9. Mathematical modeling of atopic dermatitis reveals "double-switch" mechanisms underlying 4 common disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Christodoulides, Panayiotis; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Irvine, Alan D; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kubo, Masato; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2017-06-01

    The skin barrier acts as the first line of defense against constant exposure to biological, microbial, physical, and chemical environmental stressors. Dynamic interplay between defects in the skin barrier, dysfunctional immune responses, and environmental stressors are major factors in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). A systems biology modeling approach can yield significant insights into these complex and dynamic processes through integration of prior biological data. We sought to develop a multiscale mathematical model of AD pathogenesis that describes the dynamic interplay between the skin barrier, environmental stress, and immune dysregulation and use it to achieve a coherent mechanistic understanding of the onset, progression, and prevention of AD. We mathematically investigated synergistic effects of known genetic and environmental risk factors on the dynamic onset and progression of the AD phenotype, from a mostly asymptomatic mild phenotype to a severe treatment-resistant form. Our model analysis identified a "double switch," with 2 concatenated bistable switches, as a key network motif that dictates AD pathogenesis: the first switch is responsible for the reversible onset of inflammation, and the second switch is triggered by long-lasting or frequent activation of the first switch, causing irreversible onset of systemic T H 2 sensitization and worsening of AD symptoms. Our mathematical analysis of the bistable switch predicts that genetic risk factors decrease the threshold of environmental stressors to trigger systemic T H 2 sensitization. This analysis predicts and explains 4 common clinical AD phenotypes from a mild and reversible phenotype through to severe and recalcitrant disease and provides a mechanistic explanation for clinically demonstrated preventive effects of emollient treatments against development of AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Alkaloids from piper: a review of its phytochemistry and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Rosa Martha Perez; Gonzalez, Adriana Maria Neira; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Piper has been used for long timelike condiment and food, but also in traditional medicine around of the world. This work resumes the available and up to date work done on members of the Piperaceae family and their uses for therapeutic purposes. Information on Piper genus was gathered via internet using scientific databases such as Scirus, Google Scholar, CAB-abstracts, MedlinePlus, Pubmed, SciFinder, Scopus and Web of Science. The largeleafed perennial plant Piper is used for its spicy aromatic scent and flavor. It has an important presence in the cuisine of different cultures. Another quality of these plants is their known medicinal properties. It has been used as emollient, antirheumatic, diuretic, stimulant, abortifacient, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antidermatophytic. A survey of the literature shows that the genus Piper is mainly known for its alkaloids with cytotoxic, chemopreventive, antimetastatic and antitumor properties in several types of cancer. Studies of its alkaloids highlight the existence of various potential leads to develop new anti-cancer agents. Modern pharmacology studies have demonstrated that its crude extracts and active compounds possess wide pharmacological activities, especially asantioxidant, anti-depressive, hepatoprotective, antimicrobial, anti-obesity, neuropharmacological, to treat cognitive disorders, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-feedant, cardioactive, immuno-enhancing, and anti-inflamatory. All this evidence supporting its traditional uses. This review summarizes the up-to-date and comprehensive information concerning the botany, traditional use, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Piper together with its toxicology, and discusses the possible trend and scope for further research on Piper in the future.

  11. The Hand Eczema Trial (HET): Design of a randomised clinical trial of the effect of classification and individual counselling versus no intervention among health-care workers with hand eczema.

    PubMed

    Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Agner, Tove; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Gluud, Christian

    2010-08-31

    Hand eczema is the most frequently recognized occupational disease in Denmark with an incidence of approximately 0.32 per 1000 person-years. Consequences of hand eczema include chronic severe eczema, prolonged sick leave, unemployment, and impaired quality of life. New preventive strategies are needed to reduce occupational hand eczema. We describe the design of a randomised clinical trial to investigate the effects of classification of hand eczema plus individual counselling versus no intervention. The trial includes health-care workers with hand eczema identified from a self-administered questionnaire delivered to 3181 health-care workers in three Danish hospitals. The questionnaire identifies the prevalence of hand eczema, knowledge of skin-protection, and exposures that can lead to hand eczema. At entry, all participants are assessed regarding: disease severity (Hand Eczema Severity Index); self-evaluated disease severity; number of eruptions; quality of life; skin protective behaviour, and knowledge of skin protection. The patients are centrally randomised to intervention versus no intervention 1:1 stratified for hospital, profession, and severity score. The experimental group undergoes patch and prick testing; classification of the hand eczema; demonstration of hand washing and appliance of emollients; individual counselling, and a skin-care programme. The control group receives no intervention. All participants are reassessed after six months. The primary outcome is observer-blinded assessment of disease severity and the secondary outcomes are unblinded assessments of disease severity; number of eruptions; knowledge of skin protection; skin-protective behaviour, and quality of life. The trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.Gov, NCT01012453.

  12. Pereskia aculeata Miller leaves present in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity in models of acute and chronic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Machado, Danielle Cunha; da Silva, Josiane Mello; Conegundes, Jéssica Leiras Mota; Gualberto, Ana Cristina Moura; Gameiro, Jacy; Moreira Chedier, Luciana; Castañon, Maria Christina Marques Nogueira; Scio, Elita

    2015-09-15

    The leaves of Pereskia aculeata Miller (Cactaceae), known as Barbados gooseberry, are used in Brazilian traditional medicine as emollients and to treat skin wounds and inflammation. This study investigated the topical anti-inflammatory activity of the hexane fraction (HF) obtained from the methanol extract of the leaves of this species in models of acute and chronic ear dermatitis in mice. Mice ear edema was induced by topical application of croton oil, arachidonic acid, capsaicin, ethyl-phenylpropiolate and phenol; and by subcutaneous injection of histamine. Ear biopsies were obtained to determine the levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α cytokines by ELISA assay. Histopathological analysis was also performed to evaluate the HF activity in croton oil multiple application test. In addition, acute dermal irritation/corrosion test in rats was accomplished. HF chemical characterization was performed by GC-MS analysis. HF intensively reduced the inflammatory process induced by all irritant agents used, except for arachidonic acid. This activity is related, at least in part, to the reduction of IL-6 and TNF-α cytokines levels. Moreover, when the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone was used, HF failed to respond to the croton oil application.The results strongly suggested a glucocorticoid-like effect, which was reinforced by the presence of considerable amounts of sterol compounds identified in HF. The acute dermal irritaton/corrosion test showed no signs of toxicity. This study showed that the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity of P. aculeata leaves is very promising, and corroborates to better understand their ethnopharmacological applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Avocado and soybean extracts as active principles in the treatment of mild-to-moderate vulvar lichen sclerosus: results of efficacy and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Borghi, A; Corazza, M; Minghetti, S; Toni, G; Virgili, A

    2015-06-01

    Limited evidence is available on the effectiveness of treatments alternative to corticosteroids for vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS). The present study aimed to assess the efficacy and tolerability of avocado and soybean extracts (ASE) as active principles of both a topical product and a nutritional supplement in the treatment of active mild-to-moderate VLS. Twenty-three patients were enrolled. Treatment consisted of a topical product containing ASE and other lenitive and anti-oxidant principles administered twice daily for 24 weeks, in association with a dietary supplement containing ASE, vitamin E and para-aminobenzoic acid for the first 12 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the rate of patients achieving an improvement from baseline in global subjective score (GSS) and global objective score (GOS) of ≥ 75%. Secondary efficacy endpoint was the rate of patients achieving GSS50 and GOS50. Tertiary efficacy endpoint was the mean reduction in subjective and objective scores throughout the treatment. By the end of the 24-week treatment, 12 (70.5% of symptomatic patients) and 13 patients (72.2%) achieved an improvement of at least 75% in subjective and objective global scores, respectively; 100% and 88.9% reached GSS50 and GOS50, respectively. Mean symptom and sign scores decreased significantly after treatment. The treatment was well tolerated. Our results provide evidence that the topical and dietary supplements used in the study, which contain active principles exerting anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, emollient and lenitive actions, are effective alternatives in the treatment of symptoms and signs of mild-to-moderate VLS. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. Effect of an exfoliating skincare regimen on the numbers of epithelial squames on the skin of operating theatre staff, studied by surface microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wernham, A G; Cain, O L; Thomas, A M

    2018-03-23

    The shedding of epithelial squames (skin scales) by staff in operating theatre air is an important source of deep infection following joint replacement surgery. This is a serious complication, resulting in significant morbidity for the patient and substantial cost implications for healthcare systems. Much effort has been put into providing clean air in operating theatres, yet little attention has been given to reducing the shedding of surface skin scales at source. To develop a novel method for calculating surface skin scale density using surface microscopy, and to use it to evaluate the effect of a skincare regimen on operating theatre staff. Surface microscopy with Z-stacked imaging was used to visualize the effect of a skincare regimen involving three stages: washing with soap; exfoliation; and application of emollient. A USB microscope was then used in a field study to take images of the skin of operating theatre staff who applied the regimen to one lower limb the night before testing. The other limb was used as a control. Two blinded assessors analysed scale density. Z-stack images from the surface microscope enabled observations of the skincare regimen. The USB microscope also provided adequate images that enabled assessment of skin scale density. In the operating theatre staff, a 72.1% reduction in visible skin scales was observed following application of the skincare regimen. Further work is required to demonstrate how this effect correlates with dispersion of skin particles in a cleanroom, and subsequently in live operating theatre studies. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [What's new in pediatric dermatology?

    PubMed

    Léauté-Labrèze, C

    2016-12-01

    The association of a birth defect and a segmental hemangioma is well established, a consensus concerning evaluation and monitoring of infants with PHACE or LUMBAR syndromes has been published. The efficacy of propranolol in infantile hemangioma is proven; however there were still unresolved issues concerning the safety in children; after 8 years of use on thousands of children safety data collection did not show any unexpected side effects. Topical treatment of infantile hemangiomas with beta-blockers, such as timolol, is very popular, but recent publications revealed a significant systemic absorption that could be responsible for severe side effects, such as bradycardia, in low birthweight infants. As a consequence, this therapeutic option should be considered with caution. In the last 2 years mTOR inhibitors have been tested in low-flow vascular malformations with varying success, but progress remains to be done in the treatment of vascular abnormalities. Today, genetics has led to advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and in the future targeted therapies could probably be feasible. Skin barrier deficiency is responsible for the development of allergic phenomena in atopic patients, since it has been shown that sensibilisation, even to food, could probably be induced by skin contact. Unfortunately, the topical treatment with crisaborole, a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, does not look like a revolution in children atopic dermatitis, its efficacy seems equivalent to emollient application. In the field of infectious diseases, changes in viral outbreaks are the most reported. Furthermore epidemic Zika virus, enteroviruses are responsible for expanded dermatological manifestations and also severe meningoencephalitis. Paraviral character of various eruptions, such as gloves and socks syndrome or eruptive pseudoangiomatosis is challenged. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  16. The clinicoaetiological, hormonal and histopathological characteristics of melasma in men.

    PubMed

    Handa, S; De, D; Khullar, G; Radotra, B D; Sachdeva, N

    2018-01-01

    Melasma is relatively uncommon in males, and there is a paucity of data on male melasma, including its clinical pattern, triggering factors, endocrine profile and histopathological findings. To characterize the clinical findings and aetiological factors, including hormonal and histopathological features, of male melasma. Male patients with melasma and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. Demographic profile, risk factors, clinical pattern and Wood lamp findings of patients were recorded. Sera were obtained from patients and HCs to determine hormone levels. Biopsy specimens were obtained from lesional and adjacent nonlesional skin. In total, 50 male patients with melasma and 20 HCs were recruited into the study. Mean age of patients was 27.58 ± 4.51 years. The most common clinical pattern of melasma was malar, which occurred in 52% of cases. Positive family history was present in 16% of patients, while 34% had disease aggravation with sun exposure and 62% used mustard oil for hair growth and/or as an emollient. Wood lamp examination revealed epidermal-type melasma in 54% of patients. There were no significant differences in hormone levels between patients and HCs. Histologically, epidermal melanin, elastotic degeneration, vascular proliferation and mast cells were more pronounced in lesional compared with nonlesional skin. Absent to weak expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors and stem cell factor was observed in lesional skin. Ultraviolet light and mustard oil are important causative factors in male melasma. Although stress and family history may contribute, hormonal factors possibly have no role. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemical markers would provide insight in understanding the pathogenesis of melasma. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine for Childhood Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Alexander K C; Leung, Theresa N H; Lee, Vivian W Y

    2017-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing dermatosis associated with itch, sleep disturbance and poor quality of life. Treatment of AD includes the use of emollients, and topical and systemic immunomodulating agents. Many patients also use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This article reviews the pathophysiology of AD, clinical trials and recent patents involving various modalities of CAM in the treatment of AD. A Medline/Pubmed search was conducted using Clinical Queries with the key terms "Chinese Medicine OR Complementary and Alternative medicine" AND "Eczema OR Atopic dermatitis". The search strategy included meta-analyses, Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), clinical trials, reviews and pertinent references. Patents were searched using the key term "atopic dermatitis" from www.google.com/patents, www.uspto.gov, and www.freepatentsonline.com. Only a few RCTs evaluated the efficacy of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating AD. There was some evidence for other modalities of CAM. Integrative Medicine (IM) usually refers to the various forms of CAM that combine conventional western medicine and Chinese medicine. Supporting evidence for the efficacy of IM in the treatment of AD is presently lacking. Integration is difficult. Western medicine practitioners are often ignorant about CAM and IM. Parents are concerned about the potential side effects of Western medicine and will tend to be non-compliant with the conventional Western component of IM. Recent patents on CAM and IM are reviewed. Most CAM patents are herbal compositions, evidence on their efficacy is generally lacking. AD is a complex disease. The psychodynamics of the child and his/her family is the reason for the often suboptimal outcomes. Both Western and CAM practitioners should collaborate to create a mutually encouraging environment for the advances of IM. CAM and IM publications and patents are reviewed. Evidence of their efficacy is generally lacking. Further research is needed

  18. New era of biologic therapeutics in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Dhingra, Nikhil; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease regulated by genetic and environmental factors. Both skin barrier defects and aberrant immune responses are believed to drive cutaneous inflammation in AD. Existing therapies rely largely on allergen avoidance, emollients and topical and systemic immune-suppressants, some with significant toxicity and transient efficacy; no specific targeted therapies are in clinical use today. As our specific understanding of the immune and molecular pathways that cause different subsets of AD increases, a variety of experimental agents, particularly biologic agents that target pathogenic molecules bring the promise of safe and effective therapeutics for long-term use. This paper discusses the molecular pathways characterizing AD, the contributions of barrier and immune abnormalities to its pathogenesis, and development of new treatments that target key molecules in these pathways. In this review, we will discuss a variety of biologic therapies that are in development or in clinical trials for AD, perhaps revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Biologic agents in moderate to severe AD offer promise for controlling a disease that currently lacks good and safe therapeutics posing a large unmet need. Unfortunately, existing treatments for AD aim to decrease cutaneous inflammation, but are not specific for the pathways driving this disease. An increasing understanding of the immune mechanisms underlying AD brings the promise of narrow targeted therapies as has occurred for psoriasis, another inflammatory skin disease, for which specific biologic agents have been demonstrated to both control the disease and prevent occurrence of new skin lesions. Although no biologic is yet approved for AD, these are exciting times for active therapeutic development in AD that might lead to revolutionary therapeutics for this disease.

  19. Immune-Stimulatory Effects of Althaea rosea Flower Extracts through the MAPK Signaling Pathway in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Nawarathna, Weligala Pahalagedara Amila Srilal; Dong, Xin; Shin, Woen-Bin; Park, Jin-Su; Moon, Sang-Ho; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2017-04-25

    Althaea rosea (Linn.) is a medicinal plant from China and Korea that has been traditionally used to control inflammation, to stop bedwetting and as a mouthwash in cases of bleeding gums. Its flowers are employed medicinally for their emollient, demulcent and diuretic properties, which make them useful in chest complaints. Furthermore, a flower extract decoction is used to improve blood circulation, for the treatment of constipation, dysmenorrhoea, haemorrhages, etc. However, the possible mechanisms of the immune-stimulatory effect remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the role of Althaea rosea flower (ARF) extracts in the immune-stimulatory effect of macrophages and the underlying mechanisms of action. ARF water extract (ARFW) could dose-dependently increase NO production and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α). We also found that ARFW significantly increased the expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins in RAW264.7 cells. Consistent with these results, MAPK protein (JNK, ERK, p38) expression levels were induced after treatment with ARFW. Additionally, ARFW showed a marked increase in the phosphorylation level of IκBα and subsequent IκBα degradation allowing NF-κB nuclear translocation. These results suggest that the immune-stimulatory effect of A. rosea flower extracts is mediated through the translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit into the nucleus from the cytoplasm and subsequent activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) and other mediators (iNOS and COX-2), which occurs mainly through MAPK signalling pathway. Thus, we suggest that ARFW could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent useful in the development of immune-stimulatory compounds.

  20. Skin conditions common to people with HIV infection or AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kalibala, S

    1990-04-01

    The World Health Organization clinical criteria for AIDS diagnosis in Africa include Kaposi's sarcoma, Herpes zoster, Herpes simplex, and pruritic maculopapular rash, which have a predictive value for HIV seropositivity of 71-98%. Skin conditions may be classified as: 1) generalized dermatitis, 2) bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections, and 3) skin tumors. Pruritic maculopapular rash (prurigo) is often the first outward sign of HIV infection. Soothing preparations such as calamine lotion or E45 emollient cream can be applied. Occasionally antihistamine may be necessary, e.g., 10 mg of chlorpheniramine 8 hourly. Skin lesions may become secondarily infected with bacteria; usually Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species. Persistent folliculitis or carbuncles should be treated with flucloxacillin 250 mg QDS for 7 days. In HIV/AIDS fungal infections often develop secondary infection. Candidiasis (thrush) is caused by yeasts, mainly Candida albicans and a small percentage by Tolurosis glabrata. Many HIV-infected patients suffer from seborrheic dermatitis. Fungal diseases more typically present as ringworms of the scalp (Tinea capitis). Whitfield's ointment is effective for ringworm. Antifungal creams such as miconazol or clotrimazole and systemic antifungal tablets such as ketoconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole are also effective. Gentian violet lotion twice daily and Acyclovir tablets, 200 mg 5 times daily for 5 days, may help to reduce secondary Herpes simplex infection. HIV has been associated with an increased incidence of Herpes zoster (shingles). It is often necessary to give analgesics like aspirin or paracetamol to control the pain. Gentian violet paint may help to prevent secondary infection. When shingles affects the eye, Acyclovir tablets (800 mg 5 times daily) should be given. Kaposi's sarcoma affects wider age groups, and it is disseminated and more aggressive than the endemic type. Treatment options include radiotherapy and systemic

  1. Softness sensor system for simultaneously measuring the mechanical properties of superficial skin layer and whole skin.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Masashi; Fukuda, Toru; Arakawa, Naomi; Kawasoe, Tomoyuki; Omata, Sadao

    2013-02-01

    Few attempts have been made to distinguish the softness of different skin layers, though specific measurement of the superficial layer would be useful for evaluating the emollient effect of cosmetics and for diagnosis of skin diseases. We developed a sensor probe consisting of a piezoelectric tactile sensor and a load cell. To evaluate it, we firstly measured silicone rubber samples with different softness. Then, it was applied to human forearm skin before and after tape-stripping. A VapoMeter and skin-surface hygrometer were used to confirm removal of the stratum corneum. A Cutometer was used to obtain conventional softness data for comparison. Both the piezoelectric tactile sensor and the load cell could measure the softness of silicone rubber samples, but the piezoelectric tactile sensor was more sensitive than the load cell when the reaction force of the measured sample was under 100 mN in response to a 2-mm indentation. For human skin in vivo, transepidermal water loss and skin conductance were significantly changed after tape-stripping, confirming removal of the stratum corneum. The piezoelectric tactile sensor detected a significant change after tape-stripping, whereas the load cell did not. Thus, the piezoelectric tactile sensor can detect changes of mechanical properties at the skin surface. The load cell data were in agreement with Cutometer measurements, which showed no change in representative skin elasticity parameters after tape-stripping. These results indicate that our sensor can simultaneously measure the mechanical properties of the superficial skin layer and whole skin. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of oral alitretinoin in patients with severe chronic hand eczema - a long-term analysis from a Swiss perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The impact on patients suffering from chronic hand eczema (CHE) is enormous, as no licensed systemic treatment option with proven efficacy for CHE is available. Alitretinoin is a novel agent which showed high clinical efficacy in patients with severe, refractory CHE. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of alitretinoin for CHE patient treatment from a Swiss third party payer perspective. A further objective of this study was to determine the burden of disease in Switzerland. Methods A long-term Markov cohort simulation model was used to estimate direct medical costs (€) and clinical effectiveness (quality adjusted life years, QALYs) of treating severe CHE patients with alitretinoin. Comparison was against the standard treatment of supportive care (optimised emollient therapy). Information on response rates were derived from a randomized controlled clinical trial. Costs were considered from the perspective of the Swiss health system. Swiss epidemiological data was derived from official Swiss Statistic institutions. Results Annual costs of alitretinoin treatment accounted for €2'212. After a time horizon of 22.4 years, average remaining long-term costs accounted for €42'208 or €38'795 in the alitretinoin and the standard treatment arm, respectively. Compared with the standard therapy, the addition of alitretinoin yielded an average gain of 0.230 QALYs at the end of the simulation. Accordingly, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio resulted in €14'816/QALY gained. These results were robust to changes in key model assumptions. Conclusion The therapy for CHE patients is currently insufficient. In our long-term model we identified the treatment with alitretinoin as a cost-effective alternative for the therapy of CHE patients in Switzerland. PMID:20579358

  3. Assessment of two hand hygiene regimens for intensive care unit personnel.

    PubMed

    Larson, E L; Aiello, A E; Bastyr, J; Lyle, C; Stahl, J; Cronquist, A; Lai, L; Della-Latta, P

    2001-05-01

    To compare skin condition and skin microbiology among intensive care unit personnel using one of two randomly assigned hand hygiene regimens: a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG)-containing traditional antiseptic wash and a waterless handrub containing 61% ethanol with emollients (ALC). Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Two critical care units (medical and surgical) in a large, metropolitan academic health center in Manhattan. Fifty staff members (physicians, nurses, housekeepers, respiratory therapists) working full time in the intensive care unit. One of two hand hygiene regimens randomly assigned for four consecutive weeks. The two outcomes were skin condition (measured by two tools: Hand Skin Assessment form and Visual Skin Scaling form) and skin microbiology. Samples were obtained at baseline, on day 1, and at the end of wks 2 and 4. Participants in the ALC group had significant improvements in the Hand Skin Assessment scores at wk 4 (p = 0.04) and in Visual Skin Scaling scores at wks 3 (p = 0.01) and 4 (p = 0.0005). There were no significant differences in numbers of colony-forming units between participants in the CHG or ALC group at any time period. The ALC regimen required significantly less time than the CHG regimen (mean: 12.7 secs and 21.1 secs, respectively; p = 0.000) and resulted in a 50% reduction in material costs. Changes in hand hygiene practices in acute care settings from the traditional antiseptic wash to use of plain, mild soap and an alcohol-based product should be considered. Further research is needed to examine the association between use of antiseptic products for hand hygiene of staff and reductions in nosocomial infection rates among patients.

  4. Pereskia aculeata Miller leaves accelerate excisional wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria de; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Castañon, Maria Christina Marques Nogueira; Scio, Elita

    2016-12-24

    The leaves of Pereskia aculeata Miller (Cactaceae), known as Barbados gooseberry, are used as emollients and to treat skin wounds and inflammatory process in Brazilian traditional medicine. This study investigated the topical wound healing activity of gels containing the methanol extract (ME) and hexane fraction (HF) of the leaves of this plant in a model of excisional wound healing in mice. Mice were anesthetized and excisional skin wounds were performed using a circular metal punch of 5mm diameter. Next, the animals were treated with 30µL of topical gel formulations containing the gel base (vehicle), HF 5% or ME 5%. The treatments were applied immediately after the injury and every 48h during 14 days. To verify the wound closure kinetics, a digital caliper was used throughout this period. Laser Doppler perfusion image (LDPI) was applied to evaluate the blood flow rate at the injury site. Microscopic examination of the skin tissues was performed by histopathological analysis with hematoxylin and eosin and Gomori trichrome staining. Picrosirius-red staining was also used for morphometric analysis for collagen quantification. Both HF and ME markedly accelerated the closeness of the skin wounds; however the HF activity was more evident, as this fraction induced the increase of blood flow rate and collagen deposition when statistically compared to the vehicle. The mice skin treated with HF and ME also showed less fibroplasia, blood vessels and inflammatory cells on the last day of experiment, which indicated a more advanced wound healing process. As the wound healing process was considerably accelerated, especially by HF gel formulation, the results of this study not only contributed to better understand the ethnopharmacological application of P. acuelata leaves, but also encouraged further investigations on how to explore the potential uses of this plant in skin therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The community-based delivery of an innovative neonatal kit to save newborn lives in rural Pakistan: design of a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Turab, Ali; Pell, Lisa G; Bassani, Diego G; Soofi, Sajid; Ariff, Shabina; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Morris, Shaun K

    2014-09-08

    Worldwide, an estimated 2.9 million neonatal deaths occurred in 2012, accounting for 44% of all under-five deaths. In Pakistan, more than 200,000 newborns die annually and neonatal mortality rates are higher than in any other South Asian country and haven't changed over the last three decades. The high number of neonatal deaths highlights the urgent need for effective and sustainable interventions that target newborn mortality in Pakistan. This cluster randomized trial aims at evaluating the impact of delivering an integrated neonatal kit to pregnant women during the third trimester of pregnancy and providing education on how to use the contents (intervention arm) compared to the current standard of care (control arm) in the district of Rahimyar Khan, Punjab province, Pakistan. The kit, which will be distributed through the national Lady Health Worker program, comprises a clean delivery kit (sterile blade, cord clamp, clean plastic sheet, surgical gloves and hand soap), sunflower oil emollient, chlorhexidine, ThermoSpot™, Mylar infant sleeve, and a reusable instant heat pack. Lady health workers will be provided with a standard portable hand-held electric weighing scale. The primary outcome measure is neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life). While many cost-effective, evidence-based interventions to save newborn lives exist, they are not always accessible nor have they been integrated into a portable kit designed for home-based implementation entirely by caregivers. The implementation of cost-effective, portable, and easy-to-use interventions has tremendous potential for sustainably reducing neonatal mortality and long-term improvements in population health. The bundling of interventions and commodities together also has much potential for cost-effective delivery and maximizing gains from points of contact. This study will provide empirical evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of the delivery of an innovative neonatal kit to pregnant

  6. Common pediatric and adolescent skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Angela M; Barrio, Victoria; Kulp-Shorten, Carol; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2003-10-01

    Skin lesions are encountered in all areas of medicine, and it is therefore important for physicians to understand the fundamentals of explaining and diagnosing common skin conditions. This article begins with a discussion of description and documentation of skin lesions based on color, size, morphology, and distribution. Pigmentation disorders such as vitiligo are depicted. Cutaneous growths that are found in the pediatric and adolescent population include acrochordons, dermatofibromas, keloids, milia, neurofibromas, and pyogenic granulomas. Treatment of these growths usually involves observation or curettage with electrodessication.Psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, poison ivy, and eczema are comprised of scaling patches and plaques; poison ivy and atopic dermatitis may also present with bullous and vesicular changes. Therapy typically consists of topical emollients and corticosteroids; phototherapy is reserved for refractory cases. Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease of the pediatric and adolescent population. This condition can be psychologically debilitating and, therefore, proper treatment is of paramount importance. Therapeutic options include topical as well as oral antibiotics and retinoids. Extreme caution must be used when prescribing retinoids to post-pubescent females, as these agents are teratogenic. Vascular anomalies are most commonly exemplified as port wine stains and hemangiomas. Port wine stains may be treated with pulsed dye laser or may be observed if they are not of concern to the patient or physician. Hemangiomas typically spontaneously regress by age ten; however, there has been recent concern that certain cases may need to be treated. Dermal rashes may be localized or generalized. Treatment of generalized drug eruptions involves elimination of the inciting agent, topical antipruritics, and systemic corticosteroids for severe reactions. Infectious etiologic agents of skin disease include bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Many sexually

  7. Efficacy of Iralfaris shampoo in the treatment of scalp psoriasis: a videodermoscopy evaluation prospective study in 70 patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Pranteda, G; Iorio, A; Mari, E; Milani, M

    2012-12-01

    This work has the aim to test the sensibility of VSCAPSI method in the evaluation of effectiveness of a medicated shampoo for the treatment of scalp psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease histologically characterized by proliferation and loss of differentiation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis with vasodilatation and increased permeability, and inflammation. Scalp involvement is a common clinical feature of psoriasis, that is present in the 25% of patients who suffer of it. Videodermoscopy (VD) permits a magnified view of the surface components of the epidermis and papillary dermis, which are not visible to the naked eye, together with the ability to capture digitally the viewed images and to store them for later use. Moreover videodermoscopy is a non-invasive technique, used to analyze cutaneous peripheral microcirculation. Therefore VD could be an useful tool in evaluating the efficacy of treatments for scalp psoriasis. The clinical benefit of currently available medicated shampoos for the treatment of scalp psoriasis is restricted, due to their limited efficacy, low cosmetic appeal and safety and tolerability problems. Therefore effective and safe products are needed especially for the long term management of scalp psoriasis. A specific shampoo designed for the scalp hygiene in psoriatic patients has been recently developed. This shampoo contains urea, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, icthyol pale and laureth 9 (polidocanol). Aim of the study was to evaluate in a 12-week prospective monocenter, open-study the efficacy and tolerability of an emollient, keratolytic shampoo (Iralfaris shampoo ISDIN, Barcelona; Ir-S) applied three times a week in patients with scalp psoriasis. The efficacy of the shampoo has been valuated with VSCAPSI. Seventy subjects with mild to moderate/severe scalp psoriasis were enrolled in the trial, after their informed consent. Efficacy was assessed using a specific and validated videodermoscopy scalp psoriasis severity

  8. Use of topical petroleum jelly for prevention of sepsis in very low-birthweight infants: a prospective, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    AlKharfy, Turki; Ba-Abbad, Rubana; Hadi, Anjum; AlFaleh, Khalid

    2014-08-01

    Emollient therapy is used frequently to prevent nosocomial infection in the management of preterm infants, despite a lack of adequate evidence of its efficacy. To assess the efficacy of prophylactic whole-body application of pure preservative-free topical petroleum jelly on the incidence of nosocomial sepsis in very low-birthweight (VLBW) infants. A prospective, randomised controlled trial of the application of topical petroleum jelly was conducted. Infants weighing <1250 g at birth and with a gestational age of ≤32 weeks were included. The intervention group received twice-daily topical therapy of 2 g/kg pure, preservative-free topical petroleum jelly until the completion of 34 weeks of gestation. The control group received no topical petroleum jelly treatment. The primary outcome was the incidence of late-onset sepsis during hospitalisation. Other data collected included the pattern of temperature control, weight changes, fluid requirements, serum bilirubin level, electrolyte imbalance and skin condition. Thirty-five infants in the intervention group and 39 in the control group were recruited. Birthweight, gestational age, gender and perinatal variables were comparable in the two groups. There was a trend towards an increased incidence of culture-proven nosocomial sepsis in the intervention group - 19 episodes (54%) in the intervention group vs 16 (41%) in the control group, and an increased rate of NEC - 20% in the intervention group vs 8% in the control group. The intervention group had better skin condition throughout their stay and the incubator ambient temperature was lower in the intervention group in the 1st week of life. The fluid balance of the infants in the intervention group was better, as reflected by their mean (SD) shorter time to regain birthweight [12 (5) vs 14 (6) days], and there were fewer episodes of hypernatraemia in the 1st week of life, although none of these reached statistical significance. However, there was a significantly lower mean

  9. A multi-centre, parallel group superiority trial of silk therapeutic clothing compared to standard care for the management of eczema in children (CLOTHES Trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Eleanor F; Haines, Rachel H; Cowdell, Fiona; Sach, Tracey H; Dean, Taraneh; Pollock, Ian; Burrows, Nigel P; Buckley, Hannah; Batchelor, Jonathan; Williams, Hywel C; Lawton, Sandra; Brown, Sara J; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Ahmed, Amina; Montgomery, Alan A; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Thomas, Kim S

    2015-09-02

    Eczema is a chronic, itchy skin condition that can have a large impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. People with eczema are often keen to try out non-pharmacological therapies like silk therapeutic garments that could reduce itching or the damage caused by scratching. However, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these garments in the management of eczema has yet to be proven. The CLOTHES Trial will test the hypothesis that 'silk therapeutic garments plus standard eczema care' is superior to 'standard care alone' for children with moderate to severe eczema. Parallel group, observer-blind, pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial of 6 months' duration. Three hundred children aged 1 to 15 years with moderate to severe eczema will be randomised (1:1) to receive silk therapeutic garments plus standard eczema care, or standard eczema care alone. Primary outcome is eczema severity, as assessed by trained and blinded investigators at 2, 4 and 6 months (using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI)). Secondary outcomes include: patient-reported eczema symptoms (collected weekly for 6 months to capture long-term control); global assessment of severity; quality of life of the child, family and main carer; use of standard eczema treatments (emollients, corticosteroids applied topically, calcineurin inhibitors applied topically and wet wraps); frequency of infections; and cost-effectiveness. The acceptability and durability of the clothing will also be assessed, as will adherence to wearing the garments. A nested qualitative study will assess the views of a subset of children wearing the garments and their parents, and those of healthcare providers and commissioners. Randomisation uses a computer-generated sequence of permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by recruiting hospital and child's age (< 2 years; 2 to 5 years; > 5 years), and concealed using a secure web-based system. The sequence of treatment allocations

  10. Integrating modern dermatology and Ayurveda in the treatment of vitiligo and lymphedema in India.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Saravu R; Ryan, Terence J; Bose, Kuthaje S; Prasanna, Kodimoole S; Aggithaya, Guruprasad M

    2011-03-01

    Globally, governments have recognized the growing popularity of Complementary and Alternative Medicines and the possibility of their combined use with biomedicine. Decisions within the Government of India have led to a conducive environment for conducting clinical studies, to achieve integration of more than one system of medicine, so that their combined benefits can be brought to bear on chronic, difficult-to-treat conditions. To develop integrative dermatology treatment protocols for patients with long-standing skin diseases who have received treatment from many centers. A team of doctors from modern dermatology, Ayurveda, yoga therapy, and homeopathy studied recruited patients to develop mutual orientation on each therapeutic system and a working knowledge of approach to their clinical diagnosis. Six-hundred thirty-eight patients affected by lower limb lymphedema requiring skin care as a major part of treatment were treated integrating modern dermatology and Ayurveda. Three-hundred eighty-one vitiligo patients were examined and treated to understand the clinical presentations and treatment options in Ayurveda. A two-step cluster analysis performed by SPSS Version 16 showed average volume reductions of 13.3% and 23% on day 14, 19.7% and 31.1% on day 45, and 23.4% and 39.7% on day 90 of treatment in small and large lymphedematous limbs. Inflammatory episodes before the onset on this treatment was reported by 79.5% of our lymphedema patients, and 9.4% reported this at the end of three months after our treatment. Among vitiligo patients, we found that 39.6% of patients had kapha, 39.8% pitta, 10.8% had vatha and 0.52% has tridoshaja presentation. There are over 100 treatment options available in Ayurveda to treat vitiligo. Each system of medicine recognizes the same disease albeit with minor difference in description. Skin care procedures like washing and emollients restore the barrier function and skin health. We have converged Ayurvedic skin care with that of

  11. Effectiveness of a simple lymphoedema treatment regimen in podoconiosis management in southern ethiopia: one year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Catherine; Ashine, Meskele; Zeleke, Zewdie; Davey, Gail

    2010-11-30

    Podoconiosis is a non-filarial elephantiasis caused by long-term barefoot exposure to volcanic soils in endemic areas. Irritant silicate particles penetrate the skin, causing a progressive, debilitating lymphoedema of the lower leg, often starting in the second decade of life. A simple patient-led treatment approach appropriate for resource poor settings has been developed, comprising (1) education on aetiology and prevention of podoconiosis, (2) foot hygiene (daily washing with soap, water and an antiseptic), (3) the regular use of emollient, (4) elevation of the limb at night, and (5) emphasis on the consistent use of shoes and socks. We did a 12-month, non-comparative, longitudinal evaluation of 33 patients newly presenting to one clinic site of a non-government organization (the Mossy Foot Treatment & Prevention Association, MFTPA) in southern Ethiopia. Outcome measures used for the monitoring of disease progress were (1) the clinical staging system for podoconiosis, and (2) the Amharic Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), both of which have been recently validated for use in this setting. Digital photographs were also taken at each visit. Twenty-seven patients completed follow up. Characteristics of patients completing follow-up were not significantly different to those not. Mean clinical stage and lower leg circumference decreased significantly (mean difference -0.67 (95% CI -0.38 to -0.96) and -2.00 (95% CI -1.26 to -2.74), respectively, p<0.001 for both changes). Mean DLQI diminished from 21 (out of a maximum of 30) to 6 (p<0.001). There was a non-significant change in proportion of patients with mossy lesions (p = 0.375). This simple, resource-appropriate regimen has a considerable impact both on clinical progression and self-reported quality of life of affected individuals. The regimen appears ideal for scaling up to other endemic regions in Ethiopia and internationally. We recommend that further research in the area include analysis of cost

  12. A global framework to model spatial ecosystems exposure to home and personal care chemicals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Wannaz, Cedric; Franco, Antonio; Kilgallon, John; Hodges, Juliet; Jolliet, Olivier

    2018-05-01

    This paper analyzes spatially ecosystem exposure to home and personal care (HPC) chemicals, accounting for market data and environmental processes in hydrological water networks, including multi-media fate and transport. We present a global modeling framework built on ScenAT (spatial scenarios of emission), SimpleTreat (sludge treatment plants), and Pangea (spatial multi-scale multimedia fate and transport of chemicals), that we apply across Asia to four chemicals selected to cover a variety of applications, volumes of production and emission, and physico-chemical and environmental fate properties: the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS), the antimicrobial triclosan (TCS), the personal care preservative methyl paraben (MeP), and the emollient decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). We present maps of predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) and compare them with monitored values. LAS emission levels and PECs are two to three orders of magnitude greater than for other substances, yet the literature about monitored levels of LAS in Asia is very limited. We observe a good agreement for TCS in freshwater (Pearson r=0.82, for 253 monitored values covering 12 streams), a moderate agreement in general, and a significant model underestimation for MeP in sediments. While most differences could be explained by uncertainty in both chemical/hydrological parameters (DT50 water , DT50 sediments , K oc , f oc , TSS) and monitoring sites (e.g. spatial/temporal design), the underestimation of MeP concentrations in sediments may involve potential natural sources. We illustrate the relevance of local evaluations for short-lived substances in fresh water (LAS, MeP), and their inadequacy for substances with longer half-lives (TCS, D5). This framework constitutes a milestone towards higher tier exposure modeling approaches for identifying areas of higher chemical concentration, and linking large-scale fate modeling with (sub) catchment-scale ecological scenarios; a

  13. Chemoprevention of skin cancer by grape constituent resveratrol: relevance to human disease?

    PubMed

    Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Wu, Jianqiang; Longley, B Jack; Ahmad, Nihal

    2005-07-01

    responses. Our study also suggests that resveratrol enhanced apoptosis in UVB-exposure-mediated skin tumors. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that 1) resveratrol imparts strong chemopreventive effects against UVB exposure-mediated skin carcinogenesis (relevant to human skin cancers), and 2) the chemopreventive effects of resveratrol may, at least in part, be mediated via modulations in Survivin and other associated events. On the basis of our work, it is conceivable to design resveratrol-containing emollient or patch, as well as sunscreen and skin-care products for prevention of skin cancer and other conditions, which are believed to be caused by UV radiation.

  14. Fractional lasers in dermatology--current status and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Goel, Apratim; Krupashankar, D S; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev; Nischal, K C; Omprakash, H M; Mysore, Venkataram

    2011-01-01

    carried out in all cases of resurfacing. A close-up front and 45-degree lateral photographs of both sides must be taken. There are different machines based on different technologies available. Choice parameters depend on the type of machine, location and type of lesion, and skin color. Physician needs to be familiar with these requirements before using the machine. Fractional laser treatment can be carried out under topical anesthesia with eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine. Some machines can be used without any anesthesia or only with topical cooling or cryospray. But for maximal patient comfort, a topical anesthetic prior to the procedure is recommended. Proper postoperative care is important in avoiding complications. Post-treatment edema and redness settle in a few hours to a few days. A sunscreen is mandatory, and emollients may be prescribed for the dryness and peeling that could occur.

  15. Towards satisfying performance of an O/W cosmetic emulsion: screening of reformulation factors on textural and rheological properties using general experimental design.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, M; Lukic, M; Djordjevic, S; Krstonosic, V; Pantelic, I; Vuleta, G; Savic, S

    2017-10-01

    Consumers' demand for improved products' performance, alongside with the obligation of meeting the safety and efficacy goals, presents a key reason for the reformulation, as well as a challenging task for formulators. Any change of the formulation, whether it is wanted - in order to innovate the product (new actives and raw materials) or necessary - due to, for example legislative changes (restriction of ingredients), ingredients market unavailability, new manufacturing equipment, may have a number of consequences, desired or otherwise. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of multiple factors - variations of the composition, manufacturing conditions and their interactions, on emulsion textural and rheological characteristics, applying the general experimental factorial design and, subsequently, to establish the approach that could replace, to some extent, certain expensive and time-consuming tests (e.g. certain sensory analysis), often required, partly or completely, after the reformulation. An experimental design strategy was utilized to reveal the influence of reformulation factors (addition of new actives, preparation method change) on textural and rheological properties of cosmetic emulsions, especially those linked to certain sensorial attributes, and droplet size. The general experimental factorial design revealed a significant direct effect of each factor, as well as their interaction effects, on certain characteristics of the system and provided some valuable information necessary for fine-tuning reformulation conditions. Upon addition of STEM-liposomes, consistency, index of viscosity, firmness and cohesiveness were decreased, as along with certain rheology parameters (elastic and viscous modulus), whereas maximal and minimal apparent viscosities and droplet size were increased. The presence of an emollient (squalene) affected all the investigated parameters in a concentration-dependent manner. Modification of the preparation method (using

  16. Adjuvant treatment with the bacterial lysate (OM-85) improves management of atopic dermatitis: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Bodemer, Christine; Guillet, Gerard; Cambazard, Frederic; Boralevi, Franck; Ballarini, Stefania; Milliet, Christian; Bertuccio, Paola; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bach, Jean-François; de Prost, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Background Environmental factors play a major role on atopic dermatitis (AD) which shows a constant rise in prevalence in western countries over the last decades. The Hygiene Hypothesis suggesting an inverse relationship between incidence of infections and the increase in atopic diseases in these countries, is one of the working hypothesis proposed to explain this trend. Objective This study tested the efficacy and safety of oral administration of the bacterial lysate OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), in the treatment of established AD in children. Methods Children aged 6 months to 7 years, with confirmed AD diagnosis, were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to receive, in addition to conventional treatment with emollients and topical corticosteroids, 3.5mg of the bacterial extract OM-85 or placebo daily for 9 months. The primary end-point was the difference between groups in the occurrence of new flares (NF) during the study period, evaluated by Hazard Ratio (HR) derived from conditional Cox proportional hazard regression models accounting for repeated events. Results Among the 179 randomized children, 170 were analysed, 88 in the OM-85 and 82 in the placebo group. As expected most children in both treatment groups experienced at least 1 NF during the study period (75 (85%) patients in the OM-85 group and 72 (88%) in the placebo group). Patients treated with OM-85 as adjuvant therapy had significantly fewer and delayed NFs (HR of repeated flares = 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67–0.96), also when potential confounding factors, as family history of atopy and corticosteroids use, were taken into account (HR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.98). No major side effect was reported, with comparable and good tolerability for OM-85 and placebo. Conclusions Results show an adjuvant therapeutic effect of a well standardized bacterial lysate OM-85 on established AD. PMID:28333952

  17. Magnitude of benefit for topical crisaborole in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in children and adults does not look promising: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A; Solman, L; Williams, H C

    2018-03-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of crisaborole ointment, a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, for the treatment of mild or moderate atopic dermatitis (AD) in two phase III studies (AD-301 and AD-302). Two identically designed multicentre, double-blind randomized controlled trials were conducted in the U.S.A. Participants were randomized 2 : 1 to receive crisaborole or vehicle treatment. In total 47 and 42 investigational centres were identified for AD-301 and AD-302, respectively. Inclusion criteria were identified as age ≥ 2 years, clinical diagnosis of AD (as per the Hanifin and Rajka criteria), ≥ 5% body surface area involvement, and baseline Investigator's Static Global Assessment (ISGA) mild or moderate. Exclusion criteria included previous use of biologics or systemic corticosteroids (within the last 28 days) or a topical calcineurin inhibitor/corticosteroid (within the last 14 days), and active skin infection. Participants were instructed to apply the study drug twice daily to all lesions identified at baseline, and all new lesions identified after day 1 (with weekly review of application instructions). Bland emollients were permitted to be used on skin not treated with the study drug. The primary outcome was defined as ISGA clear or almost clear at day 29, with a 2-grade or more improvement from baseline. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients with an ISGA score of clear or almost clear at day 29, and time to success in ISGA score. Additional outcomes included pruritus severity and signs of AD (erythema, exudation, excoriation, induration/papulation and lichenification), and were measured on a 4-point scale (none, mild, moderate, severe). Adverse events were also recorded. More participants in the crisaborole-treated group achieved ISGA scores of clear or almost clear with ≥ 2-grade improvement than in the vehicle-treated group (AD-301, 32·8% vs. 25·4%, P = 0·38; AD-302, 31·4% vs. 18·0%, P < 0·001). Greater percentages of

  18. Reduced prevalence and severity of wounds following implementation of the Champions for Skin Integrity model to facilitate uptake of evidence-based practice in aged care.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Helen E; Chang, Anne M; Gibb, Michelle; Finlayson, Kathleen J; Parker, Christina; O'Reilly, Maria; McDowell, Jan; Shuter, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the implementation of the Champions for Skin Integrity model on facilitating uptake of evidence-based wound management and improving skin integrity in residents of aged care facilities. The incidence of skin tears, pressure injuries and leg ulcers increases with age, and such wounds can be a serious issue in aged care facilities. Older adults are not only at higher risk for wounds related to chronic disease but also injuries related to falls and manual handling requirements. A longitudinal, pre-post design. The Champions for Skin Integrity model was developed using evidence-based strategies for transfer of evidence into practice. Data were collected before and six months after implementation of the model. Data on wound management and skin integrity were obtained from two random samples of residents (n = 200 pre; n = 201 post) from seven aged care facilities. A staff survey was also undertaken (n = 126 pre; n = 143 post) of experience, knowledge and evidence-based wound management. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables. Where relevant, chi-square for independence or t-tests were used to identify differences between the pre-/postdata. There was a significant decrease in the number of residents with a wound of any type (54% pre vs 43% post, χ 2 4·2, p = 0·041), as well as a significant reduction in specific wound types, for example pressure injuries (24% pre vs 10% post, χ 2 14·1, p < 0·001), following implementation of the model. An increase in implementation of evidence-based wound management and prevention strategies was observed in the postimplementation sample in comparison with the preimplementation sample. This included use of limb protectors and/or protective clothing 6% pre vs 20% post (χ 2 17·0, p < 0·001) and use of an emollient or soap alternative for bathing residents (50% pre vs 74% post, χ 2 13·9, p = 0·001). Implementation of the model in this sample fostered an increase in implementation of

  19. Management of atopic dermatitis: safety and efficacy of phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Patrizi, Annalisa; Raone, Beatrice; Ravaioli, Giulia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that can affect all age groups. It is characterized by a relapsing course and a dramatic impact on quality of life for patients. Environmental interventions together with topical devices represent the mainstay of treatment for AD, in particular emollients, corticosteroids, and calcineurin inhibitors. Systemic treatments are reserved for severe cases. Phototherapy represents a valid second-line intervention in those cases where non-pharmacological and topical measures have failed. Different forms of light therapy are available, and have showed varying degrees of beneficial effect against AD: natural sunlight, narrowband (NB)-UVB, broadband (BB)-UVB, UVA, UVA1, cold-light UVA1, UVA and UVB (UVAB), full-spectrum light (including UVA, infrared and visible light), saltwater bath plus UVB (balneophototherapy), Goeckerman therapy (coal tar plus UVB radiation), psoralen plus UVA (PUVA), and other forms of phototherapy. In particular, UVA1 and NB-UVB have gained importance in recent years. This review illustrates the main trials comparing the efficacy and safety of the different forms of phototherapy. No sufficiently large randomized controlled studies have been performed as yet, and no light modality has been defined as superior to all. Parameters and dosing protocols may vary, although clinicians mainly refer to the indications included in the American Academy of Dermatology psoriasis guidelines devised by Menter et al in 2010. The efficacy of phototherapy (considering all forms) in AD has been established in adults and children, as well as for acute (UVA1) and chronic (NB-UVB) cases. Its use is suggested with strength of recommendation B and level of evidence II. Home phototherapy can also be performed; this technique is recommended with strength C and level of evidence III. Phototherapy is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated, with a low but established percentage of short-term and long

  20. Supporting self-care for families of children with eczema with a Web-based intervention plus health care professional support: pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Santer, Miriam; Muller, Ingrid; Yardley, Lucy; Burgess, Hana; Selinger, Hannah; Stuart, Beth L; Little, Paul

    2014-03-04

    Childhood eczema, or childhood atopic dermatitis, causes significant distress to children and their families through sleep disturbance and itch. The main cause of treatment failure is nonuse of prescribed treatments. The objective of this study was to develop and test a Web-based intervention to support families of children with eczema, and to explore whether support from a health care professional (HCP) is necessary to engage participants with the intervention. We followed the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: regular emollient use was the target behavior we were seeking to promote and we identified potential techniques to influence this. LifeGuide software was used to write the intervention website. Carers of children with eczema were invited through primary care mail-out and randomized to 3 groups: (1) website only, (2) website plus HCP support, or (3) usual care. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores were measured online by carer report at baseline and at 12 weeks. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 13 HCPs (primarily practice nurses) and 26 participants to explore their experiences of taking part in the study. A total of 143 carers were recruited through 31 practices. We found a decrease of ≥2 in follow-up compared with baseline POEM score in 23 of 42 (55%) participants in the website only group, 16 of 49 (33%) in the usual care group, and 18 of 47 (38%) in the website plus HCP group. Website use data showed that 75 of 93 (81%) participants allocated to the website groups completed the core modules, but less than half used other key components (videos: 35%; regular text reminders: 39%). There were no consistent differences in website use between the website only or the website plus HCP groups. Qualitative feedback showed that most HCPs had initial concerns about providing support for eczema self-care because this was not a condition that they felt expert in. However, HCPs reported productive consultations and that they found it helpful to use the

  1. Systematic review of treatments for atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Hoare, C; Li Wan Po, A; Williams, H

    2000-01-01

    forms, with discrepancies resolved by discussion. The quality assessment of retrieved RCTs included an assessment of: a clear description of method and concealment of allocation of randomisation, the degree to which assessors and participants were blinded to the study interventions, and whether all those originally randomised were included in the final main analysis. Where possible, quantitative pooling of similar RCTs was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration's methods. Where statistical heterogeneity was found, sources of heterogeneity in terms of study participants, formulation or posology of intervention, and use of co-treatments were explored. Where pooling was not deemed to be appropriate, detailed descriptions of the study characteristics and main reported results were presented along with comments on study quality. A total of 1165 possible RCTs were retrieved in hard copy form for further scrutiny. Of these, 893 were excluded from further analysis because of lack of appropriate data. The 272 remaining RCTs of atopic eczema covered at least 47 different interventions, which could be broadly categorised into ten main groups. Quality of reporting was generally poor, and limited statistical pooling was possible only for oral cyclosporin, and only then after considerable data transformation. There was reasonable RCT evidence to support the use of oral cyclosporin, topical corticosteroids, psychological approaches and ultraviolet light therapy. There was insufficient evidence to make recommendations on maternal allergen avoidance for disease prevention, oral antihistamines, Chinese herbs, dietary restriction in established atopic eczema, homeopathy, house dust mite reduction, massage therapy, hypnotherapy, evening primrose oil, emollients, topical coal tar and topical doxepin. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  2. A randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral and topical antibiotics for children with clinically infected eczema in the community: the ChildRen with Eczema, Antibiotic Management (CREAM) study.

    PubMed

    Francis, Nick A; Ridd, Matthew J; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Shepherd, Victoria; Butler, Christopher C; Hood, Kerenza; Huang, Chao; Addison, Katy; Longo, Mirella; Marwick, Charis; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; Roberts, Amanda; Haq, Mohammed Inaam-ul; Madhok, Vishnu; Sullivan, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Secondary skin infection is common during eczema exacerbations and many children are treated with antibiotics when this is suspected, although there is little high-quality evidence to justify this practice. To determine the clinical effectiveness of oral and topical antibiotics, in addition to standard treatment with emollients and topical corticosteroids, in children with clinically infected eczema. Multicentre randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. General practices and dermatology clinics in England, Wales and Scotland. Children (aged 3 months to < 8 years) with a diagnosis of eczema (according to U.K. Working Party definition) and clinical suspicion of infection. (1) Oral flucloxacillin and topical placebo; (2) topical fusidic acid (Fucidin(®), Leo Laboratories Limited) and oral placebo; and (3) oral and topical placebos, all for 1 week. Patient-Orientated Eczema Measure (POEM) at 2 weeks (assessing subjective severity in the week following treatment). We randomised 113 children (36 to oral antibiotic, 37 to topical antibiotic and 40 to placebo), which was fewer than our revised target sample size of 282. A total of 103 (92.0%) children had one or more clinical features suggestive of infection and 78 (69.6%) children had Staphylococcus aureus cultured from a skin swab. Oral and topical antibiotics resulted in a 1.52 [95% confidence interval (CI) -1.35 to 4.40] and 1.49 (95% CI -1.55 to 4.53) increase (worse subjective severity) in POEM score at 2 weeks, relative to placebo and controlling for baseline POEM score. Eczema Area and Severity Index (objective severity) scores were also higher (worse) in the intervention groups, at 0.20 (95% CI -0.12 to 0.52) and 0.42 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.75) for oral and topical antibiotics, respectively, at 2 weeks. Analyses of impact on the family, quality of life, daily symptom scores, and longer-term outcomes were all consistent with the finding of no or limited difference and a trend towards worse outcomes in the

  3. Supporting Self-Care for Families of Children With Eczema With a Web-Based Intervention Plus Health Care Professional Support: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Ingrid; Yardley, Lucy; Burgess, Hana; Selinger, Hannah; Stuart, Beth L; Little, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood eczema, or childhood atopic dermatitis, causes significant distress to children and their families through sleep disturbance and itch. The main cause of treatment failure is nonuse of prescribed treatments. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and test a Web-based intervention to support families of children with eczema, and to explore whether support from a health care professional (HCP) is necessary to engage participants with the intervention. Methods We followed the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: regular emollient use was the target behavior we were seeking to promote and we identified potential techniques to influence this. LifeGuide software was used to write the intervention website. Carers of children with eczema were invited through primary care mail-out and randomized to 3 groups: (1) website only, (2) website plus HCP support, or (3) usual care. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores were measured online by carer report at baseline and at 12 weeks. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 13 HCPs (primarily practice nurses) and 26 participants to explore their experiences of taking part in the study. Results A total of 143 carers were recruited through 31 practices. We found a decrease of ≥2 in follow-up compared with baseline POEM score in 23 of 42 (55%) participants in the website only group, 16 of 49 (33%) in the usual care group, and 18 of 47 (38%) in the website plus HCP group. Website use data showed that 75 of 93 (81%) participants allocated to the website groups completed the core modules, but less than half used other key components (videos: 35%; regular text reminders: 39%). There were no consistent differences in website use between the website only or the website plus HCP groups. Qualitative feedback showed that most HCPs had initial concerns about providing support for eczema self-care because this was not a condition that they felt expert in. However, HCPs reported productive consultations and that

  4. Final report of the cosmetic ingredient review expert panel on the safety assessment of Polyisobutene and Hydrogenated Polyisobutene as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Polyisobutene and Hydrogenated Polyisobutene are homopolymers of isobutene. These ingredients are produced in a wide range of molecular weights. Polybutene is a chemically related cosmetic ingredient previously determined to be safe as used in cosmetic products. Polyisobutene is used in cosmetic products as a binder, film former, and nonaqueous viscosity-increasing agent. Hydrogenated Polyisobutene functions as a skin-conditioning agent-emollient and nonaqueous viscosity-increasing agent with a wide range of uses in cosmetic formulations. The estimated octanol water partition coefficient for Hydrogenated Polyisobutene and Polybutene is log K(ow) of 13.27 and the estimated water solubility was 5.6 x 10(-3) ng/L for Hydrogenated Polyisobutene and Polybutene. Acute oral toxicity testing demonstrated no effects other than lethargy in one rat study. The oral LD(50) was > 5.0 g/kg in rats. No short-term or subchronic animal toxicity data were available. A 2-year chronic oral toxicity study of Polybutene revealed no gross or microscopic pathological changes, and no changes in body weights or food consumption, hematological results, urology, or tumor formation that could be correlated with Polybutene ingestion, except that in the 20,000 ppm group, three out of six males that died between weeks 17 and 24 exhibited hematuria. In a 2-year chronic oral toxicity study of Polybutene in Beagle dogs, no abnormalities in body weight, food consumption, survival, behavioral patterns, hematology, blood chemistry, urinalysis, liver function, gross and histopathologic examinations, or organ weights and ratios were reported. In a three-generation reproductive study in Charles River albino rats that ingested Polybutene, none of the animals in successive generations differed from controls with regard to weight gain, litter size, the number of stillborn, and the number of viable pups during lactation. The survival, body weights, and reactions of test animals were comparable to those of

  5. Efficacy and safety of pimecrolimus cream in the long-term management of atopic dermatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Wahn, Ulrich; Bos, Jan D; Goodfield, Mark; Caputo, Ruggero; Papp, Kim; Manjra, Ahmed; Dobozy, Attila; Paul, Carle; Molloy, Stephen; Hultsch, Thomas; Graeber, Michael; Cherill, Robert; de Prost, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Pimecrolimus cream (SDZ ASM 981), a nonsteroid inhibitor of inflammatory cytokines, is effective in atopic dermatitis (AD). We assessed whether early treatment of AD signs/symptoms with pimecrolimus could influence long-term outcome by preventing disease flares. Early intervention with pimecrolimus was compared with a conventional AD treatment strategy (ie, emollients and topical corticosteroids). In this 1-year, controlled, double-blind study, 713 AD patients (2-17 years) were randomized 2:1 to a pimecrolimus-based or conventional regimen. Both groups used emollients for dry skin. Early AD signs/symptoms were treated with pimecrolimus cream or, in the conventional treatment group, vehicle to prevent progression to flares. If flares occurred, moderately potent topical corticosteroids were mandated. The primary efficacy endpoint was ranked flares at 6 months. Safety was monitored clinically, and a skin recall-antigen test was performed at study completion. BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PATIENTS: The mean age for both groups was approximately 8 years, and the majority of patients had moderate disease at baseline. PATIENT FOLLOW-UP AND EXPOSURE TO STUDY MEDICATION: The mean duration of follow-up (+/-standard error) was 303.7 (+/-5.30) days in the pimecrolimus group and 235.2 (+/-9.40) days in the control group. The discontinuation rate was significantly higher in the control group than in the pimecrolimus group (51.5% vs 31.6% at 12 months), and proportionately more patients with severe or very severe disease discontinued in the control group. The main reason for the higher discontinuation rate in the control group was unsatisfactory therapeutic effect (30.4% vs 12.4%). This resulted in a substantially higher mean number of study medication treatment days in the pimecrolimus group compared with the control group: 211.9 (69.8% of study days) versus 156.0 (66.3% of study days). Of those patients who completed 12 months on study, 14.2% and 7.0% of patients in the

  6. IN MY OPINION: Bricks, buildings and brickbats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1999-09-01

    to assess everything by `attainment target' - of which there were twenty-odd in Science. It took the emollient genius of Lord Dearing to rescue the system from the ultimate ramifications of that decision. Several years down the line a new Curriculum appears which is to be an improvement on the previous versions. In many ways it is. Lots of things have been tidied up, but it is still organized as slightly neater piles of bricks. There must come a time when the powers that be will realize that what they are doing is getting better and better at doing the wrong thing, and begin the agonizing reappraisal required to start doing the right thing (however badly). The bottom line, of course, is whether the National Curriculum works. I am depressed to hear so many teachers complaining about how difficult it has become to interest children in Science - especially Physics - at secondary level. League tables and exam results do not reveal this kind of deep-seated failure. The impulse for a national curriculum came from a justified desire and need to give all children an appropriate, effective and balanced education. Politicians felt that this was not happening, and spoke of the `secret garden of the curriculum', the preserve of entrenched `experts' who never had need to justify or explain their doings. But we will not have improved upon this if the garden, however secret, changes to a dry and lifeless desert.

  7. Randomised controlled trial of silk therapeutic garments for the management of atopic eczema in children: the CLOTHES trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kim S; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Sach, Tracey H; Cowdell, Fiona; Batchelor, Jonathan M; Lawton, Sandra; Harrison, Eleanor F; Haines, Rachel H; Ahmed, Amina; Dean, Taraneh; Burrows, Nigel P; Pollock, Ian; Buckley, Hannah K; Williams, Hywel C; Llewellyn, Joanne; Crang, Clare; Grundy, Jane D; Guiness, Juliet; Gribbin, Andrew; Wake, Eileen V; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Brown, Sara J; Montgomery, Alan A

    2017-04-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic, itchy, inflammatory skin condition that affects the quality of life of children and their families. The role of specialist clothing in the management of AE is poorly understood. To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of silk garments for the management of AE in children with moderate to severe disease. Parallel-group, observer-blind, randomised controlled trial of 6 months' duration, followed by a 2-month observational period. A nested qualitative study evaluated the beliefs of trial participants, health-care professionals and health-care commissioners about the use of silk garments for AE. Secondary care and the community in five UK centres. Children aged 1-15 years with moderate or severe AE. Participants were randomised (1 : 1 using online randomisation) to standard care or standard care plus 100% silk garments made from antimicrobially protected knitted sericin-free silk [DermaSilk TM (AlPreTec Srl, San Donà di Piave, Italy) or DreamSkin TM (DreamSkin Health Ltd, Hatfield, UK)]. Three sets of garments were supplied per participant, to be worn for up to 6 months (day and night). At 6 months the standard care group received the garments to use for the remaining 2-month observational period. Primary outcome - AE severity using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) assessed at 2, 4 and 6 months, by nurses blinded to treatment allocation. EASI scores were log-transformed for analysis. Secondary outcomes - patient-reported eczema symptoms (Patient Oriented Eczema Measure); global assessment of severity (Investigator Global Assessment); quality of life of the child (Atopic Dermatitis Quality of Life, Child Health Utility - 9 Dimensions), family (Dermatitis Family Impact Questionnaire) and main carer (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions-3 Levels); use of standard eczema treatments (e.g. emollients, topical corticosteroids); and cost-effectiveness. The acceptability and durability of the clothing, and adherence to wearing the