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Sample records for employs tertiary-amine solvent

  1. Characterization of molybdenum interfacial crud in a uranium mill that employs tertiary-amine solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.; McDowell, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    In the present work, samples of a molybdenum-caused green gummy interfacial crud from an operating western US uranium mill have been physically and chemically examined. Formaton of cruds of this description has been a long-standing problem in the use of tertiary amine solvent extraction for the recovery of uranium from low-grade ores (Amex Process). The crud is essentially an organic-continuous dispersion containing about 10 wt % aqueous droplets and about 37 wt % greenish-yellow crystalline solids suspended in kerosene-amine process solvent. The greenish-yellow crystals were found to be a previously unknown double salt of tertiary amine molybdophosphate with three tertiary amine chlorides having the empirical formula (R/sub 3/NH)/sub 3/(PMo/sub 12/O/sub 40/).3(R/sub 3/NH)Cl. To confirm the identification of the compound, a pure trioctylamine (TOA) analog was synthesized. In laboratory extraction experiments, it was demonstrated that organic-soluble amine molydophosphate forms slowly upon contact of TOA solvent with dilute sulfuric acid solutions containing low concentrations of molybdate and phosphate. If the organic solutions of amine molybdophosphate were then contacted with aqueous NaCl solutions, a greenish-yellow precipitate of (TOAH)/sub 3/(PMo/sub 12/O/sub 40/).3(TOAH)Cl formed at the interface. The proposed mechanism for the formation of the crud under process conditions involves build up of molybdenum in the solvent, followed by reaction with extracted phosphate to give dissolved amine molybdophosphate. The amine molybdophosphate then co-crystallizes with amine chloride, formed during the stripping cycle, to give the insoluble double salt, which precipitates as a layer of small particles at the interface. The proposed solution to the problem is the use of branched-chain, instead of straight-chain, tertiary amine extractants under the expectation that branching would increase the solubility of the double salt. 2 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Structure-Function Study of Tertiary Amines as Switchable Polarity Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron D. Wilson; Frederick F. Stewart

    2014-02-01

    A series of tertiary amines have been screened for their function as switchable polarity solvents (SPS). The relative ratios of tertiary amine and carbonate species as well as maximum possible concentration were determined through quantitative 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The viscosities of the polar SPS solutions were measured and ranged from near water in dilute systems through to gel formation at high concentrations. The van't Hoff indices for SPS solutions were measured through freezing point depression studies as a proxy for osmotic pressures. A new form of SPS with an amine : carbonate ratio significantly greater than unity has been identified. Tertiary amines that function as SPS at ambient pressures appear to be limited to molecules with fewer than 12 carbons. The N,N-dimethyl-n-alkylamine structure has been identified as important to the function of an SPS.

  3. DIRECT SYNTHESIS OF TERTIARY AMINES IN WATER USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct synthesis of tertiary amines is presented that proceeds expeditiously via N-alkylation of amines using alkyl halides in alkaline aqueous medium. This environmentally benign reaction is accelerated upon exposure to microwave irradiation resulting in shortened reaction tim...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10669 - Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10669 Tertiary amine alkyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tertiary...

  10. Ruthenium-catalyzed tertiary amine formation from nitroarenes and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Liu, Yong; Peng, Shengming; Shuai, Qi; Deng, Guojun; Li, Chao-Jun

    2010-11-05

    A highly selective ruthenium-catalyzed C-N bond formation was developed by using the hydrogen-borrowing strategy. Various tertiary amines were obtained efficiently from nitroarenes and primary alcohols. The reaction tolerates a wide range of functionalities. A tentative mechanism was proposed for this direct amination reaction of alcohols with nitroarenes.

  11. Synthesis of unsymmetric tertiary amines via alcohol amination.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shaofeng; Deng, Youquan; Shi, Feng

    2015-06-11

    The first one-pot selective synthesis of unsymmetric tertiary amines is reported by the amination of two types of alcohols with primary amines via the development of a simple CuAlOx-HT catalyst and enables the synthesis of unsymmetric amines in a wide variety of primary amines and alcohols.

  12. The Petasis Reaction: Microscale Synthesis of a Tertiary Amine Antifungal Analog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroluk, Katherine J.; Jackson, Derek A.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Students prepare a tertiary amine antifungal analog in an upper-level undergraduate organic laboratory. A microscale Petasis reaction is performed to generate a liquid compound readily characterized via IR and proton NMR spectroscopy. The biological relevance of the product is highlighted, with the tertiary amine scaffold being an important…

  13. Formation Mechanism of NDMA from Ranitidine, Trimethylamine, and Other Tertiary Amines during Chloramination: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chloramination of drinking waters has been associated with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation as a disinfection byproduct. NDMA is classified as a probable carcinogen and thus its formation during chloramination has recently become the focus of considerable research interest. In this study, the formation mechanisms of NDMA from ranitidine and trimethylamine (TMA), as models of tertiary amines, during chloramination were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). A new four-step formation pathway of NDMA was proposed involving nucleophilic substitution by chloramine, oxidation, and dehydration followed by nitrosation. The results suggested that nitrosation reaction is the rate-limiting step and determines the NDMA yield for tertiary amines. When 45 other tertiary amines were examined, the proposed mechanism was found to be more applicable to aromatic tertiary amines, and there may be still some additional factors or pathways that need to be considered for aliphatic tertiary amines. The heterolytic ONN(Me)2–R+ bond dissociation energy to release NDMA and carbocation R+ was found to be a criterion for evaluating the reactivity of aromatic tertiary amines. A structure–activity study indicates that tertiary amines with benzyl, aromatic heterocyclic ring, and diene-substituted methenyl adjacent to the DMA moiety are potentially significant NDMA precursors. The findings of this study are helpful for understanding NDMA formation mechanism and predicting NDMA yield of a precursor. PMID:24968236

  14. OleD Loki as a Catalyst for Tertiary Amine and Hydroxamate Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ryan R; Shaaban, Khaled A; Zhang, Jianjun; Cao, Hongnan; Phillips, George N; Thorson, Jon S

    2017-02-16

    We describe the ability of an engineered glycosyltransferase (OleD Loki) to catalyze the N-glycosylation of tertiary-amine-containing drugs and trichostatin hydroxamate glycosyl ester formation. As such, this study highlights the first bacterial model catalyst for tertiary-amine N-glycosylation and further expands the substrate scope and synthetic potential of engineered OleDs. In addition, this work could open the door to the discovery of similar capabilities among other permissive bacterial glycosyltransferases.

  15. Using aqueous ammonia in hydroaminomethylation reactions: ruthenium-catalyzed synthesis of tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lipeng; Fleischer, Ivana; Zhang, Min; Liu, Qiang; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The direct synthesis of tertiary amines from ammonia and olefins is presented. Using a combination of Ru3 (CO)12 and 2-phosphino-substituted imidazole ligand as catalyst system allows for hydroaminomethylation reactions of bulk aliphatic and functionalized olefins. Tertiary amines are obtained in an atom-efficient domino process in moderate to good isolated yields (45-76%) with excellent regioselectivities (n/iso up to 99:1).

  16. Tertiary-amine-containing thermo- and pH-sensitive hydrophilic ABA triblock copolymers: effect of different tertiary amines on thermally induced sol-gel transitions.

    PubMed

    Henn, Daniel M; Wright, Roger A E; Woodcock, Jeremiah W; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-03-11

    This Article reports on the synthesis of a series of well-defined, tertiary-amine-containing ABA triblock copolymers, composed of a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) central block and thermo- and pH-sensitive outer blocks, and the study of the effect of different tertiary amines on thermally induced sol-gel transition temperatures (T(sol-gel)) of their 10 wt % aqueous solutions. The doubly responsive ABA triblock copolymers were prepared from a difunctional PEO macroinitiator by atom transfer radical polymerization of methoxydi(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and ethoxydi(ethylene glycol) methacrylate at a feed molar ratio of 30:70 with ∼5 mol % of either N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA), N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate, or N,N-di(n-butyl)aminoethyl methacrylate. The chain lengths of thermosensitive outer blocks and the molar contents of tertiary amines were very similar for all copolymers. Using rheological measurements, we determined the pH dependences of T(sol-gel) of 10 wt % aqueous solutions of these copolymers in a phosphate buffer. The T(sol-gel) versus pH curves of all polymers exhibited a sigmoidal shape. The T(sol-gel) increased with decreasing pH; the changes were small on both high and low pH sides. At a specific pH, the T(sol-gel) decreased with increasing the hydrophobicity of the tertiary amine, and upon decreasing pH the onset pH value for the T(sol-gel) to begin to increase noticeably was lower for the more hydrophobic tertiary amine-containing copolymer. In addition, we studied the effect of different tertiary amines on the release behavior of FITC-dextran from 10 wt % micellar gels in an acidic medium at 37 and 27 °C. The release profiles for three studied hydrogels at 37 °C were essentially the same, suggesting that the release was dominated by the diffusion of FITC-dextran. At 27 °C, the release was significantly faster for the DEAEMA-containing copolymer, indicating that both diffusion and gel dissolution contributed to the

  17. The roles of tertiary amine structure, background organic matter and chloramine species on NDMA formation.

    PubMed

    Selbes, Meric; Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-02-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a probable human carcinogen, is a disinfection by-product that has been detected in chloraminated and chlorinated drinking waters and wastewaters. Formation mechanisms and precursors of NDMA are still not well understood. The main objectives of this study were to systematically investigate (i) the effect of tertiary amine structure, (ii) the effect of background natural organic matter (NOM), and (iii) the roles of mono vs. dichloramine species on the NDMA formation. Dimethylamine (DMA) and 20 different tertiary aliphatic and aromatic amines were carefully examined based on their functional groups attached to the basic DMA structure. The wide range (0.02-83.9%) of observed NDMA yields indicated the importance of the structure of tertiary amines, and both stability and electron distribution of the leaving group of tertiary amines on NDMA formation. DMA associated with branched alkyl groups or benzyl like structures having only one carbon between the ring and DMA structure consistently gave higher NDMA yields. Compounds with electron withdrawing groups (EWG) reacted preferentially with monochloramine, whereas compounds with electron donating group (EDG) showed tendency to react with dichloramine to form NDMA. When the selected amines were present in NOM solutions, NDMA formation increased for compounds with EWG while decreased for compounds with EDG. This impact was attributed to the competitions between NOM and amines for chloramine species. The results provided additional information to the commonly accepted mechanism for NDMA formation including chloramine species reacting with tertiary amines and the role of the leaving group on overall NDMA conversion.

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation from reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erupe, M. E.; Price, D. J.; Silva, P. J.; Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, L.; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2008-09-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical was investigated in an indoor environmental chamber. Particle chemistry was monitored using a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer while gas-phase species were detected using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. Trimethylamine, triethylamine and tributylamine were studied. Results indicate that tributylamine forms the most aerosol mass followed by trimethylamine and triethylamine respectively. Spectra from the aerosol mass spectrometer indicate the formation of complex non-salt aerosol products. We propose a reaction mechanism that proceeds via abstraction of a proton by nitrate radical followed by RO2 chemistry. Rearrangement of the aminyl alkoxy radical through hydrogen shift leads to the formation of hydroxylated amides, which explain most of the higher mass ions in the mass spectra. These experiments show that oxidation of tertiary amines by nitrate radical may be an important night-time source of secondary organic aerosol.

  19. Structure-Function Relationships of a Tertiary Amine-Based Polycarboxybetaine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Jung; Wu, Haiyan; Tang, Qiong; Cao, Bin; Wang, Huifeng; Cong, Hongbo; Zhe, Jiang; Xu, Fujian; Cheng, Gang

    2015-09-15

    Zwitterionic polycarboxybetaine (PCB) materials have attracted noticeable interest for biomedical applications, such as wound healing/tissue engineering, medical implants, and biosensors, due to their excellent antifouling properties and design flexibility. Antifouling materials with buffering capability are particularly useful for many biomedical applications. In this work, an integrated zwitterionic polymeric material, poly(2-((2-hydroxyethyl)(2-methacrylamidoethyl)ammonio)acetate) (PCBMAA-1T), was synthesized to carry desired properties (antifouling, switchability and buffering capability). A tertiary amine was used to replace quaternary ammonium as the cation to endow the materials with buffering capability under neutral pH. Through this study, a better understanding on the structure-property relationship of zwitterionic materials was obtained. The tertiary amine cation does not compromise antifouling properties of zwitterionic materials. The amount of adsorbed proteins on PCBMAA-1T polymer brushes is less than 0.8 ng/cm(2) for fibrinogen and 0.3 ng/cm(2) (detection limit of the surface plasmon resonance sensor) for both undiluted blood plasma and serum. It is found that the tertiary amine is favorable to obtain good lactone ring stability in switchable PCB materials. Titration study showed that PCBMAA-1T could resist pH changes under both acidic (pH 1-3) and neutral/basic (pH 7-9) conditions. To the best of our knowledge, such an all-in-one material has not been reported. We believe this material might be potentially used for a variety of applications, including tissue engineering, chronic wound healing and medical device coating.

  20. Kinetic resolution of acids in acylation reactions in the presence of chiral tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.M.; Dem'yanovich, V.M.; Khlebnikov, V.A.

    1988-07-10

    Asymmetric synthesis has now become an important method for the production of optically active compounds, and its most attractive form is asymmetric catalysis. This work was devoted to an investigation into asymmetric catalysis with chiral tertiary amines in acylation reactions. During the acylation of alcohols and amines by the action of racemic 2-phenylpropionic and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropionic acids in the presence of S-nicotine the initial acids are resolved kinetically. The (R)-2-phenylpropionic acid obtained in this way had an optical purity of 0.5-1.5%.

  1. Determination of tertiary amines and salts of organic acids in acetic acid by catalytic thermometric titration.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Gaál, F F

    1967-03-01

    A new method of determination of tertiary amines and salts of organic adds in acetic acid solution, to which about 2 % of water and 8% acetic anhydride are added, is described. After the equivalence point, the excess of perchloric acid catalyses the exothermic reaction of water with acetic anhydride. The end-point is determined from the graph of temperature against volume of added titrant. If a slightly soluble compound is produced during the titration, the precision of the new method is superior to that of the potentiometric method.

  2. A Highly Active System for the Metal-Free Aerobic Photocyanation of Tertiary Amines with Visible Light: Application to the Synthesis of Tetraponerines and Crispine A.

    PubMed

    Orejarena Pacheco, Julio Cesar; Lipp, Alexander; Nauth, Alexander M; Acke, Fabian; Dietz, Jule-Philipp; Opatz, Till

    2016-04-04

    A highly efficient metal-free catalytic system for the aerobic photocyanation of tertiary amines with visible light is reported. The use of air as terminal oxidant offers an improved safety profile compared with pure oxygen, the used compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light sources are highly economical, and no halogenated solvents are required. This system not only proves to be effective for a wide variety of trialkylamines, pharmaceuticals, and alkaloids but remarkably also allows the lowest catalyst loading (0.00001 mol% or 0.1 ppm) ever reported for an organic dye. Bruylants reactions and C-alkylation/decyanations were performed on the obtained α-aminonitriles to demonstrate the postfunctionalization of complex molecules. The catalytic system is furthermore applied in the short and effective syntheses of the alkaloids (±)-crispine A and the tetraponerines T7 and T8.

  3. PROCESS FOR EXTRACTING NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS OF SAME CONTAINING URANYL NITRATE WITH A TERTIARY AMINE

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1962-07-31

    A process of selectively extracting plutonium nitrate and neptunium nitrate with an organic solution of a tertiary amine, away from uranyl nitrate present in an aqueous solution in a maximum concentration of 1M is described. The nitric acid concentration is adjusted to about 4M and nitrous acid is added prior to extraction. (AEC)

  4. Upregulation of BMSCs Osteogenesis by Positively-Charged Tertiary Amines on Polymeric Implants via Charge/iNOS Signaling Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Na; Shi, Haigang; Liu, Jun; Shi, Lianxin; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Huaiyu; Ji, Junhui; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-03-01

    Positively-charged surfaces on implants have a similar potential to upregulate osteogenesis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) as electromagnetic therapy approved for bone regeneration. Generally, their osteogenesis functions are generally considered to stem from the charge-induced adhesion of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins without exploring the underlying surface charge/cell signaling molecule pathways. Herein, a positively-charged surface with controllable tertiary amines is produced on a polymer implant by plasma surface modification. In addition to inhibiting the TNF-α expression, the positively-charged surface with tertiary amines exhibits excellent cytocompatibility as well as remarkably upregulated osteogenesis-related gene/protein expressions and calcification of the contacted BMSCs. Stimulated by the charged surface, these BMSCs display high iNOS expressions among the three NOS isoforms. Meanwhile, downregulation of the iNOS by L-Can or siRNA inhibit osteogenic differentiation in the BMSCs. These findings suggest that a positively-charged surface with tertiary amines induces osteogenesis of BMSCs via the surface charge/iNOS signaling pathway in addition to elevated ECM protein adhesion. Therefore, creating a positively-charged surface with tertiary amines is a promising approach to promote osseointegration with bone tissues.

  5. Tertiary amines related to brompheniramine: preferred conformations for N-oxygenation by the hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Celestial, J R; Leach, A; Newdoll, J; Park, S B

    1993-08-01

    The metabolism of racemic, (D)- and (L)-brompheniramine, a widely used antihistamine, was studied with microsomes and with highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) from hog liver. In addition, a number of other similar tertiary amines were evaluated as substrates for FMO activity from hog liver and the kinetic constants obtained were compared with brompheniramine. Although some N-demethylation was observed, the major metabolite of brompheniramine and the other tertiary amines examined in hog liver microsomes was the metabolite containing an aliphatic nitrogen N-oxide. Brompheniramine was extensively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. N-Oxygenation of brompheniramine in both microsomes and with highly purified FMO from hog liver was enantioselective. The Km for N-oxygenation of (D)-brompheniramine was markedly lower than the Km for (L)-brompheniramine. (E)- and (Z)-zimeldine are less conformationally flexible model compounds of brompheniramine, and these compounds were also examined and were found to be stereoselectively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. The similarities and differences in Km and Vmax values were evaluated in terms of possible conformations of the substrates determined by SYBYL molecular mechanics calculations. Distance map data indicated that FMO preferentially accommodated selected conformations of tertiary amines. Thus, (D)-brompheniramine and (Z)-zimeldine presumably have the aliphatic tertiary amine nitrogen atom and aromatic ring center at a defined distance and geometry and were more efficiently N-oxygenated than their respective isomers.

  6. Comparison of the microbicidal efficacy on germ carriers of several tertiary amine compounds with ortho-phthalaldehyde and Perasafe.

    PubMed

    Herruzo-Cabrera, R; Vizcaíno-Alcaide, M J; Rodriguez, J

    2006-05-01

    Several tertiary amine formulations have been marketed as high-level disinfectants (HLDs). This study compared some of these formulations with two accepted HLDs [ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and Perasafe] by determining the bactericidal effect on 52 micro-organisms using a metallic germ carrier, determining the sporicidal effect using a commercial germ carrier (3M spores), and performing a corrosion test on surgical blades with human blood. OPA and Perasafe were significantly more effective than all the tertiary amines tested, and acted within a contact time of 10 min compared with 20 min for the other products. For Gram-negative micro-organisms, Instrunet FA showed no significant differences at 20 min compared with OPA and Perasafe at 10 min. The amines tested did not differ significantly in global bactericidal efficacy. Unlike the tertiary amines, OPA and Perasafe were effective against mycobacteria (15-min contact period), but were not sporicidal. All agents (except one tertiary amine) passed the corrosion test. In conclusion, OPA and Perasafe can be considered as HLDs. However, 15-20 min of contact is required and both products have disadvantages.

  7. Regulation of carbon partitioning into carotenes by MPTA, a substituted tertiary amine

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, S.; Rosenfield, C.L.; Benedict, C.R.

    1986-04-01

    In mature citrus fruits, synthesis and turnover of carotenes appears to be low. Treatment of lemon pieces with the substituted tertiary amine, 2-(4-methylphenoxyl)triethylamine, MPTA, induces the synthesis of carotenes. Exposure of tissue slices (lemon flavedo) to MPTA for 72 hrs results in the production of 29.6 ..mu..g gfrwt/sup -1/ lycopene whereas control slices showed only trace amounts of lycopene. An identical incorporation of /sup 14/C-glucose into sugars, amino acids and organic acids, in both treated and control tissue slices indicates the non-disturbance of fruit respiration by MPTA treatment. Incorporation of /sup 14/C-glucose into carotenes is negligible in mature citrus fruits, but in MPTA treated tissue slices there is a pronounced incorporation of /sup 14/C-glucose into carotenes. MPTA treatment induces the synthesis of carotene enzymes, thus effecting an increased partitioning of glucose into the MVA pathway for carotene synthesis.

  8. Thermodynamic and Experimental Study of the Energetic Cost Involved in the Capture of Carbon Dioxide by Aqueous Mixtures of Commonly Used Primary and Tertiary Amines.

    PubMed

    Arcis, Hugues; Coulier, Yohann; Coxam, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-05

    The capture of carbon dioxide with chemical solvents is one solution to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources and thus tackle climate change. Recent research has been focused on optimizing new kinds of advanced absorbents including aqueous amine blends, but critical downsides such as the large energetic cost involved with the industrial process remain. To address this issue, a better understanding of the energetic interactions existing in solution is necessary. In this paper, we report direct experimental measurements of the energy cost involved in the solvation of CO2 in two aqueous amine blends at different temperatures. The chemical solvents were designed as aqueous mixtures of commonly used primary and tertiary amines to study the influence of the different chemical properties inferred by the amine class. We have also applied a thermodynamic model to represent the energetic effects that take place in solution during CO2 dissolution in these mixtures, where all parameters were taken from previous studies focused on single amine absorbents. The noteworthy agreement observed with the reported experimental heats of absorption and with literature vapor liquid equilibrium properties confirmed the relevance of the underlying molecular mechanisms considered in our model, and suggest that this model would prove useful to investigate CO2 dissolution in other amine blends.

  9. Concentration effects in the nucleophilic reactions of tertiary amines in aqueous solutions: Alkylation of amines with chloroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, O. A.; Baruta, D. S.; Shirshin, K. V.; Sivokhin, A. P.; Kamorin, D. M.

    2011-03-01

    In alkylations of tertiary amines with chloroacetic acid in aqueous solutions, an increase in the initial concentrations of reagents to a certain level led to an abrupt increase in the initial rates and conversions attained during the control time. Viscosimetric and refractometric data showed that association with reagents occurred in these systems. The structures of associates that determine the character of the concentration effects of the Menschutkin reaction in water were suggested.

  10. Dipeptide-Based Chiral Tertiary Amine-Catalyzed Asymmetric Conjugate Addition Reactions of 5H-Thiazol/Oxazol-4-Ones.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangtao; Qiu, Shuai; Ye, Xinyi; Zhu, Bo; Liu, Hongjun; Jiang, Zhiyong

    2016-12-02

    Highly enantio- and chemo-selective 1,4-conjugate addition process of 5H-thiazol-4-ones with maleimides or 1,4-naphthoquinones, and 5H-oxazol-4-ones with maleimides were performed under a dipeptide-based tertiary amine (DP-UAA) catalyst. A series of valuable N,S- and N,O-containing heterocyclic compounds with excellent enantio- and disastereo-selectivities (up to >99% ee, > 20:1 dr) were attained.

  11. Site-specific indolation of proline-based peptides via copper(II)-catalyzed oxidative coupling of tertiary amine N-oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dengyou; Zhou, Shengbin; Gao, Feng; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-14

    The first site-specific and purely chemical method for modifying proline-based peptides was developed via a convenient, copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling of tertiary amine N-oxides with indoles. This novel approach features high regioselectivity and diastereoselectivity, mild conditions, and compatibility with various functional groups. In addition, a simplified process was realized in one pot and two steps via in situ oxidative coupling of tertiary amine and indoles.

  12. Selective N-alkylation of amines using nitriles under hydrogenation conditions: facile synthesis of secondary and tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Takashi; Fujita, Yuki; Mizusaki, Tomoteru; Betsuin, Sae; Takamatsu, Haruki; Maegawa, Tomohiro; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2012-01-14

    Nitriles were found to be highly effective alkylating reagents for the selective N-alkylation of amines under catalytic hydrogenation conditions. For the aromatic primary amines, the corresponding secondary amines were selectively obtained under Pd/C-catalyzed hydrogenation conditions. Although the use of electron poor aromatic amines or bulky nitriles showed a lower reactivity toward the reductive alkylation, the addition of NH(4)OAc enhanced the reactivity to give secondary aromatic amines in good to excellent yields. Under the same reaction conditions, aromatic nitro compounds instead of the aromatic primary amines could be directly transformed into secondary amines via a domino reaction involving the one-pot hydrogenation of the nitro group and the reductive alkylation of the amines. While aliphatic amines were effectively converted to the corresponding tertiary amines under Pd/C-catalyzed conditions, Rh/C was a highly effective catalyst for the N-monoalkylation of aliphatic primary amines without over-alkylation to the tertiary amines. Furthermore, the combination of the Rh/C-catalyzed N-monoalkylation of the aliphatic primary amines and additional Pd/C-catalyzed alkylation of the resulting secondary aliphatic amines could selectively prepare aliphatic tertiary amines possessing three different alkyl groups. According to the mechanistic studies, it seems reasonable to conclude that nitriles were reduced to aldimines before the nucleophilic attack of the amine during the first step of the reaction.

  13. beta-Lactamase hydrolysis of cephalosporin 3'-quinolone esters, carbamates, and tertiary amines.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopapadakou, N H; McCaffrey, C

    1994-01-01

    The beta-lactam hydrolysis of five cephalosporin 3'-quinolones (dual-action cephalosporins) by three gram-negative beta-lactamases was examined. The dual-action cephalosporins tested were the ester Ro 23-9424; the carbamates Ro 25-2016, Ro 25-4095, and Ro 25-4835; and the tertiary amine Ro 25-0534. Also tested were cephalosporins with similar side chains (cefotaxime, desacetylcefotaxime, cephalothin, cephacetrile, and Ro 09-1227 [SR 0124]) and standard beta-lactams (penicillin G, cephaloridine). The beta-lactamases used were the plasmid-mediated TEM-1 and TEM-3 enzymes and the chromosomal AmpC. The cephacetrile-related compounds Ro 25-4095 and Ro 25-4835 were hydrolyzed by all three beta-lactamases with catalytic efficiencies (relative to penicillin G) ranging from approximately 5 (TEM-1, AmpC) to approximately 25 (TEM-3). The cephalothin-related Ro 25-2016 was also hydrolyzed by all three beta-lactamases, particularly the AmpC enzyme (relative catalytic efficiency, 110). The cefotaxime-related compounds Ro 25-0534 and Ro 23-9424 were hydrolyzed to any significant extent only by the TEM-3 enzyme (relative catalytic efficiencies, 1.2 and 4.7, respectively. PMID:8067776

  14. GC-IRD methods for the identification of some tertiary amines related to MDMA.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Awad, Tamer; DeRuiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2010-06-15

    Gas chromatography with infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for the identification of the drug of abuse; 3,4-MDMA and its regioisomer; 2,3-MDMA, from a set of seven tertiary amines which have an isobaric or regioisomeric relationship with the MDMAs. These compounds include three ring substituted regioisomers of 2-dimethylamino-1-(methoxyphenyl)ethanone, two ring regioisomers of N,N-dimethyl-2-(methoxymethylphenyl)ethanamine in addition to N,N-dimethyl-2-(2,3- and 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)ethanamine. The major mass spectral fragments for each of these unique isomers occur at equivalent mass and all have equal molecular weight. Thus, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS) does not provide sufficient information for the confirmation of identity of any one of these isomers to the exclusion of the other compounds. The infrared spectra for these compounds allow for identification of any one of these amines. This differentiation is accomplished without the aid of chemical derivatization. The IR spectra served to divide the studied compounds into four groups depending on their absorption bands in the region 2700-3100 cm(-1). Moreover, compounds with different ring substitution pattern within each group can be differentiated by several bands in the 700-1700 cm(-1) region. These regioisomeric substances are well resolved by GC on Rtx-1 stationary phase and the vapor-phase infrared spectra clearly differentiate among this set of compounds.

  15. Enhancing polysaccharide-mediated delivery of nucleic acids through functionalization with secondary and tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Bilal; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Roy, Krishnendu

    2008-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide that has generated significant interest as a non-viral gene delivery vehicle due to its cationic and biocompatible characteristics. However, transfection efficiency of chitosan is significantly lower compared to other cationic gene delivery agents, e.g. polyethyleneimine (PEI), dendrimers or cationic lipids. This is primarily attributed to its minimal solubility and low buffering capacity at physiological pH leading to poor endosomal escape of the gene carrier and inefficient cytoplasmic decoupling of the complexed nucleic acid. Here we have developed an imidazole acetic acid (IAA)-modified chitosan to introduce secondary and tertiary amines to the polymer in order to improve its endosomal buffering and solubility. The modified polymer was characterized by ninhydrin and (1)H NMR assays for degree of modification, while buffering and solubility were analyzed by acid titration. Nanocomplex formation, studied at various polymer-nucleic acid ratios, showed an increase in particle zeta potential for chitosan-IAA, as well as an increase in the effective diameter. Up to 100-fold increase in transfection efficiency of pDNA was seen for chitosan-IAA as compared to native chitosan, nearly matching that of PEI. In addition, transfection of siRNA by the modified polymers showed efficient gene knockdown equivalent to commercially available siPORT Amines. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of the imidazole-grafted chitosan as a biocompatible and effective delivery vehicle for both pDNA and siRNA.

  16. Visual and ocular changes associated with exposure to two tertiary amines

    PubMed Central

    Page, E; Cook, C; Hater, M; Mueller, C; Grote, A; Mortimer, V

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To determine if exposure to dimethylisopropanolamine (DMIPA) and dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) in a label printing plant was associated with visual disturbances and/or ocular changes. Methods: Questionnaires, eye examinations (visual acuity, contrast sensitivity at 2.5% and 1.25% contrast, slit lamp biomicroscopy, and pachymetry), and industrial hygiene monitoring for DMIPA and DMAE were performed over a two week period. Results: Eighty nine per cent of line workers reported having experienced blurry vision while at work in the past 12 months, compared to 12.5% of prime workers. A total of 108 full shift personal breathing zone (PBZ) air samples for the amines were collected. The mean time weighted average (TWA) concentration of DMIPA was significantly higher in the line division than in the prime division, as was the mean TWA concentration for total amines. The mean TWA concentration of DMAE was higher in the prime division than the line division. Higher levels of total amines were associated with increased risk of reporting blurry vision, halo vision, and blue-grey vision. The risk of corneal opacity rose with increasing exposure to total amines. The prevalence of corneal opacity also increased with increasing concentration of total amines. Median corneal thickness increased with increasing grades of corneal opacity. There was a statistically significant relation between total amine concentration and increased risk of reduced bilateral visual acuity and 2.5% contrast sensitivity. Conclusions: Exposure to tertiary amines was associated with blurry, halo, and blue-grey vision, corneal opacity, and decrements in visual acuity and contrast sensitivity at 2.5% contrast. PMID:12499461

  17. Chemoselective Reductive Amination of Carbonyl Compounds for the Synthesis of Tertiary Amines Using SnCl2·2H2O/PMHS/MeOH.

    PubMed

    Nayal, Onkar S; Bhatt, Vinod; Sharma, Sushila; Kumar, Neeraj

    2015-06-05

    Stannous chloride catalyzed chemoselective reductive amination of a variety of carbonyl compounds with aromatic amines has been developed for the synthesis of a diverse range of tertiary amines using inexpensive polymethylhydrosiloxane as reducing agent in methanol. The present method is also applicable for the synthesis of secondary amines including heterocyclic ones.

  18. Squaramide-tertiary amine catalyzed asymmetric cascade sulfa-Michael/Michael addition via dynamic kinetic resolution: access to highly functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Yang, Yi; Du, Da-Ming

    2013-03-15

    An efficient asymmetric cascade sulfa-Michael/Michael addition reaction catalyzed by a chiral bifunctional squaramide-tertiary amine catalyst has been developed. This organocatalytic cascade reaction provides easy access to highly functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereocenters, including one quaternary center. In addition, a novel cascade sulfa Michael/retro-sulfa-Michael/sulfa-Michael/Michael reaction process, involving dynamic kinetic resolution, is described.

  19. Energy-efficient green catalysis: supported gold nanoparticle-catalyzed aminolysis of esters with inert tertiary amines by C-O and C-N bond activations.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yong-Sheng; Baiyin, Menghe; Agula, Bao; Jia, Meilin; Zhaorigetu, Bao

    2014-07-18

    Catalyzed by supported gold nanoparticles, an aminolysis reaction between various aryl esters and inert tertiary amines by C-O and C-N bond activations has been developed for the selective synthesis of tertiary amides. Comparison studies indicated that the gold nanoparticles could perform energy-efficient green catalysis at room temperature, whereas Pd(OAc)2 could not.

  20. Complementation of biotransformations with chemical C-H oxidation: copper-catalyzed oxidation of tertiary amines in complex pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Genovino, Julien; Lütz, Stephan; Sames, Dalibor; Touré, B Barry

    2013-08-21

    The isolation, quantitation, and characterization of drug metabolites in biological fluids remain challenging. Rapid access to oxidized drugs could facilitate metabolite identification and enable early pharmacology and toxicity studies. Herein, we compared biotransformations to classical and new chemical C-H oxidation methods using oxcarbazepine, naproxen, and an early compound hit (phthalazine 1). These studies illustrated the low preparative efficacy of biotransformations and the inability of chemical methods to oxidize complex pharmaceuticals. We also disclose an aerobic catalytic protocole (CuI/air) to oxidize tertiary amines and benzylic CH's in drugs. The reaction tolerates a broad range of functionalities and displays a high level of chemoselectivity, which is not generally explained by the strength of the C-H bonds but by the individual structural chemotype. This study represents a first step toward establishing a chemical toolkit (chemotransformations) that can selectively oxidize C-H bonds in complex pharmaceuticals and rapidly deliver drug metabolites.

  1. Bifunctional heterogeneous catalysis of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines with controlled acid-base interactions for efficient 1,4-addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tanaka, Satoka; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-19

    We report the first tunable bifunctional surface of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines (SA-NEt(2)) active for catalytic 1,4-addition reactions of nitroalkanes and thiols to electron-deficient alkenes. The 1,4-addition reaction of nitroalkanes to electron-deficient alkenes is one of the most useful carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions and applicable toward a wide range of organic syntheses. The reaction between nitroethane and methyl vinyl ketone scarcely proceeded with either SA or homogeneous amines, and a mixture of SA and amines showed very low catalytic activity. In addition, undesirable side reactions occurred in the case of a strong base like sodium ethoxide employed as a catalytic reagent. Only the present SA-supported amine (SA-NEt(2)) catalyst enabled selective formation of a double-alkylated product without promotions of side reactions such as an intramolecular cyclization reaction. The heterogeneous SA-NEt(2) catalyst was easily recovered from the reaction mixture by simple filtration and reusable with retention of its catalytic activity and selectivity. Furthermore, the SA-NEt(2) catalyst system was applicable to the addition reaction of other nitroalkanes and thiols to various electron-deficient alkenes. The solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic analyses, including variable-contact-time (13)C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy, revealed that acid-base interactions between surface acid sites and immobilized amines can be controlled by pretreatment of SA at different temperatures. The catalytic activities for these addition reactions were strongly affected by the surface acid-base interactions.

  2. Simultaneous cell disruption and lipid extraction in a microalgal biomass using a nonpolar tertiary amine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Can; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2017-02-11

    A simultaneous cell disruption and lipid extraction method is developed for microalgal biodiesel production using a triethylamine/methanol solvent system. Individually, the pure solvents, i.e. triethylamine and methanol, do not exhibit significant enhancement in lipid extraction, but a 3:7 (v/v) triethylamine/methanol mixture exhibits the highest lipid extraction, corresponding to 150% of the conventional chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v) solvent extraction. This extraction is equivalent to 92.5% of the total lipids, even when extracted from a wet microalgal biomass with a water content of 80%. The cell surfaces of the microalgae are significantly disrupted without using additional cell disruption reagents and without requiring energy-intensive equipment. The lipid mass transfer coefficient is 1.6 times greater than that of the chloroform/methanol solvent system. It is clearly demonstrated that triethylamine and methanol cooperate well for the cell disruption and lipid extraction.

  3. Asymmetric Michael addition/intramolecular cyclization catalyzed by bifunctional tertiary amine-squaramides: construction of chiral 2-amino-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Du, Da-Ming

    2014-10-01

    The efficient asymmetric Michael addition/intramolecular cyclization of malononitrile with dienones catalyzed by a chiral bifunctional tertiary amine-squaramide catalyst for the synthesis of chiral 2-amino-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile derivatives was developed. The corresponding products were obtained in good to excellent yields (up to 99%) with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 98% ee) for most of the bisarylidenecyclopentanones.

  4. Tertiary amine N-oxides as bioreductive drugs: DACA N-oxide, nitracrine N-oxide and AQ4N.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. R.; Denny, W. A.; Pullen, S. M.; Thompson, K. M.; Li, A. E.; Patterson, L. H.; Lee, H. H.

    1996-01-01

    Tertiary amine N-oxides of DNA intercalators with alkylamino sidechains are a new class of bioreductive drugs. N-oxidation masks the cationic charge of the amines, forming prodrugs with low DNA binding affinity and low toxicity which can be activated selectively by metabolic reduction under hypoxic conditions. This study compares three intercalator N-oxides (NC-NO, DACA-NO and AQ4N), which, respectively, give nitracrine (NC), DACA and AQ4 on reduction. In aerobic cell culture all three N-oxide were much less toxic than the corresponding amines, and showed large increases in cytotoxicity under hypoxia. The topoisomerase poisons DACA and AQ4 (and their N-oxides) were less active against non-cycling than cycling cells. However, only AQ4N was active against the mouse mammary tumour MDAH-MCa-4. This dialkylaminoanthraquinone-di-N-oxide has activity at least as great as the reference bioreductive drug RB 6145 against this tumour, both with and without radiation and when combined with the tumour blood flow inhibitor 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA). It is suggested that the high in vivo activity of AQ4N relative to the other topoisomerase-targeted N-oxide, DACA-NO, may be in part due to release in hypoxic cells of an intracalator with sufficiently high DNA binding affinity that it is retained long enough to kill non-cycling cells when they eventually re-enter the cell cycle. PMID:8763844

  5. Expression in Escherichia coli of the flavin-containing monooxygenase D (form II) from adult human liver: determination of a distinct tertiary amine substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lomri, N; Yang, Z; Cashman, J R

    1993-01-01

    The cDNA for a major component of the family of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) present in adult human liver (i.e., HLFMO-D) has been cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. Escherichia coli strain NM522 was transformed with pTrcHLFMO-D, and the HLFMO-D cDNA was expressed under the control of the Trc promoter. A variety of tertiary amine substrates [i.e., chlorpromazine and 10-[(N,N-dimethylamino)alkyl]- 2-(trifluoromethyl)phenothiazines] were efficiently oxygenated by HLFMO-D cDNA expressed in E. coli or by adult human liver microsomes. Approximate dimensions of the substrate binding channel for both adult human liver microsomal FMO and cDNA-expressed HLFMO-D were apparent from an examination of the N-oxygenation of a series of 10-[(N,N-dimethylamino)alkyl]-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenothiazines. The substrate regioselectivity studies suggest that adult human liver FMO form D possesses a distinct substrate specificity compared with form A FMO from animal hepatic sources. It is likely that the substrate specificity observed for cDNA-expressed adult human liver FMO-D may have consequences for the metabolism and distribution of tertiary amines and phosphorus- and sulfur-containing drugs in humans and may provide insight into the physiologic substrate(s) for adult human liver FMO.

  6. Comparison of the efficacy of disinfectants in automated endoscope reprocessors for colonoscopes: tertiary amine compound (Sencron2®) versus ortho-phthalaldehyde (Cidex®OPA)

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun Il; Lee, Dae Sung; Yoon, Eun Mi; Kwon, Min-Jung; Park, Hyosoon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Sohn, Chong Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To prevent the transmission of pathogens by endoscopes, following established reprocessing guidelines is critical. An ideal reprocessing step is simple, fast, and inexpensive. Here, we evaluated and compared the efficacy and safety of two disinfectants, a tertiary amine compound (TAC) and ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA). Methods A total of 100 colonoscopes were randomly reprocessed using two same automated endoscope reprocessors, according to disinfectant. The exposure time was 10 minutes for 0.55% OPA (Cidex® OPA, Johnson & Johnson) and 5 minutes for 4% TAC (Sencron2®, Bab Gencel Pharma & Chemical Ind. Co.). Three culture samples were obtained from each colonoscope after reprocessing. Results A total of nine samples were positive among the 300 culture samples. The positive culture rate was not statistically different between the two groups (4% for OPA and 2% for TAC, P=0.501). There were no incidents related to safety during the study period. Conclusions TAC was non-inferior in terms of reprocessing efficacy to OPA and was safe to use. Therefore, TAC seems to be a good alternative disinfectant with a relatively short exposure time and is also less expensive than OPA. PMID:27175119

  7. Hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from tertiary amines by benzyloxyl and cumyloxyl radicals: influence of structure on the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-08-05

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from a series of tertiary amines by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. With the sterically hindered triisobutylamine, comparable hydrogen atom abstraction rate constants (k(H)) were measured for the two radicals (k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) = 2.8), and the reactions were described as direct hydrogen atom abstractions. With the other amines, increases in k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios of 13 to 2027 times were observed. k(H) approaches the diffusion limit in the reactions between BnO(•) and unhindered cyclic and bicyiclic amines, whereas a decrease in reactivity is observed with acyclic amines and with the hindered cyclic amine 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethylpiperidine. These results provide additional support to our hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through the rate-determining formation of a C-H/N hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the benzyloxyl α-C-H and the nitrogen lone pair wherein hydrogen atom abstraction occurs, and demonstrate the important role of amine structure on the overall reaction mechanism. Additional mechanistic information in support of this picture is obtained from the study of the reactions of the amines with a deuterated benzyloxyl radical (PhCD(2)O(•), BnO(•)-d(2)) and the 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyloxyl radical.

  8. Determination of secondary and tertiary amines as N-nitrosamine precursors in drinking water system using ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihua; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa; Adams, Craig; Eichholz, Todd; Timmons, Terry; Jiang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    N-Nitrosamines are potent mutagenic and carcinogenic emerging water disinfection by-products (DBPs). The most effective strategy to control the formation of these DBPs is minimizing their precursors from source water. Secondary and tertiary amines are dominating precursors of N-nitrosamines formation during drinking water disinfection process. Therefore, the screening and removal of these amines in source water are very essential for preventing the formation of N-nitrosamines. A rapid, simple, and sensitive ultrafast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) method has been developed in this study to determine seven amines, including dimethylamine, ethylmethylamine, diethylamine, dipropylamine, trimethylamine, 3-(dimethylaminomethyl)indole, and 4-dimethylaminoantipyrine, as major precursors of N-nitrosamines in drinking water system. No sample preparation process is needed except a simple filtration. Separation and detection can be achieved in 11 min per sample. The method detection limits of selected amines are ranging from 0.02 μg/L to 1 μg/L except EMA (5 μg/L), and good calibration linearity was achieved. The developed method was applied to determine the selected precursors in source water and drinking water samples collected from Midwest area of the United States. In most of water samples, the concentrations of selected precursors of N-nitrosamines were below their method detection limits. Dimethylamine was detected in some of water samples at the concentration up to 25.4 μg/L.

  9. Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Munyungano, Brodrick; Feather, Angus; Virnig, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  10. Copper(II)/tertiary amine synergy in photoinduced living radical polymerization: accelerated synthesis of ω-functional and α,ω-heterofunctional poly(acrylates).

    PubMed

    Anastasaki, Athina; Nikolaou, Vasiliki; Zhang, Qiang; Burns, James; Samanta, Shampa R; Waldron, Christopher; Haddleton, Alice J; McHale, Ronan; Fox, David; Percec, Virgil; Wilson, Paul; Haddleton, David M

    2014-01-22

    Photoinduced living radical polymerization of acrylates, in the absence of conventional photoinitiators or dye sensitizers, has been realized in "daylight'"and is enhanced upon irradiation with UV radiation (λ(max) ≈ 360 nm). In the presence of low concentrations of copper(II) bromide and an aliphatic tertiary amine ligand (Me6-Tren; Tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine), near-quantitative monomer conversion (>95%) is obtained within 80 min, yielding poly(acrylates) with dispersities as low as 1.05 and excellent end group fidelity (>99%). The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by polymerization of methyl acrylate to a range of chain lengths (DP(n) = 25-800) and a number of (meth)acrylate monomers, including macromonomer poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGA480), tert-butyl acrylate, and methyl methacrylate, as well as styrene. Moreover, hydroxyl- and vic-diol-functional initiators are compatible with the polymerization conditions, forming α,ω-heterofunctional poly(acrylates) with unparalleled efficiency and control. The control retained during polymerization is confirmed by MALDI-ToF-MS and exemplified by in situ chain extension upon sequential monomer addition, furnishing higher molecular weight polymers with an observed reduction in dispersity (Đ = 1.03). Similarly, efficient one-pot diblock copolymerization by sequential addition of ethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate and PEGA480 to a poly(methyl acrylate) macroinitiator without prior workup or purification is also reported. Minimal polymerization in the absence of light confers temporal control and alludes to potential application at one of the frontiers of materials chemistry whereby precise spatiotemporal "on/off" control and resolution is desirable.

  11. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li+-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs) and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li+ and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well as the CO2 capacity of the chelated ILs obtained were investigated. For example, the CO2 capacity of PEG150MeBu2N increased steadily from 0.10 to 0.66 (mol CO2 absorbed per mol of base) through the formation of zwitterionic adducts being stabilized by Li+. PMID:25246955

  12. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li(+)-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen; He, Liang-Nian

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs) and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li(+) and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well as the CO2 capacity of the chelated ILs obtained were investigated. For example, the CO2 capacity of PEG150MeBu2N increased steadily from 0.10 to 0.66 (mol CO2 absorbed per mol of base) through the formation of zwitterionic adducts being stabilized by Li(+).

  13. Li-Ion Cells Employing Electrolytes With Methyl Propionate and Ethyl Butyrate Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate at low temperatures to satisfy the requirements of such applications as landers, rovers, and penetrators. A number of terrestrial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) also require energy storage devices that can operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 C), while still providing high power capability and long life. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-30 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. These limitations at very low temperatures are due to poor electrolyte conductivity, poor lithium intercalation kinetics over the electrode surface layers, and poor ionic diffusion in the electrode bulk. Two wide-operating-temperature-range electrolytes have been developed based on advances involving lithium hexafluorophosphate-based solutions in carbonate and carbonate + ester solvent blends, which have been further optimized in the context of the technology and targeted applications. The approaches employed include further optimization of electrolytes containing methyl propionate (MP) and ethyl butyrate (EB), which are effective co-solvents, to widen the operating temperature range beyond the baseline systems. Attention was focused on further optimizing ester-based electrolyte formulations that have exhibited the best performance at temperatures ranging from -60 to +60 C, with an emphasis upon improving the rate capability at -20 to -40 C. This was accomplished by increasing electrolyte salt concentration to 1.20M and increasing the ester content to 60 percent by volume to increase the ionic conductivity at low temperatures. Two JPL-developed electrolytes 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MP (20:20:60 v/v %) and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+EB (20:20:60 v/v %) operate effectively over a wide

  14. Concentration Dependent Speciation and Mass Transport Properties of Switchable Polarity Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron D. Wilson; Christopher J. Orme

    2014-12-01

    Tertiary amine switchable polarity solvents (SPS) consisting of predominantly water, tertiary amine, and tertiary ammonium and bicarbonate ions were produced at various concentrations for three different amines: N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine, N,N-dimethyloctylamine, and 1 cyclohexylpiperidine. For all concentrations, physical properties were measured including viscosity, molecular diffusion coefficients, freezing point depression, and density. Based on these measurements a variation on the Mark Houwink equation was developed to predict the viscosity of any tertiary amine SPS as a function of concentration using the amine’s molecular mass. The observed physical properties allowed the identification of solution state speciation of non-osmotic SPS, where the amine to carbonic acid ratio is significantly greater than one. These results indicate that at most concentrations the stoichiometric excess amine is involved in solvating a proton with two amines. The physical properties of osmotic SPS have consistent concentration dependence behavior over a wide range of concentrations; this consistence suggests osmotic pressures based on low concentrations freezing point studies can be reliably extrapolated to higher concentrations.

  15. The two facies of pyrrolizidine alkaloids: the role of the tertiary amine and its N-oxide in chemical defense of insects with acquired plant alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lindigkeit, R; Biller, A; Buch, M; Schiebel, H M; Boppré, M; Hartmann, T

    1997-05-01

    enzyme was partially purified from two other arctiids. The three SNOs show the same general substrate specificity but differ in their affinities towards the main structural types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The enzymes from the two generalists (Creatonotos transiens and Arctia caja) display a broader substrate affinity than the enzyme from the specialist (Tyria jacobaeae). The two molecular forms of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, the lipophilic protoxic tertiary amine and its hydrophilic nontoxic N-oxide are discussed in respect to their bioactivation and detoxification in mammals and their role as defensive chemicals in specialized insects. Pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-sequestering insects store the alkaloids as nontoxic N-oxides which are reduced in the guts of any potential insectivore. The lipophilic tertiary alkaloid is absorbed passively and then bioactivated by cytochrome P-450 oxidase.

  16. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  17. Thermal degradation of the solvent employed in the next-generation caustic-side solvent extraction process and its effect on the extraction, scrubbing, and stripping of cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Benjamin D.; Williams, Neil J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2015-09-02

    As part of the ongoing development of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NGS) process, the thermal stability of the process solvent was investigated and shown to be adequate for industrial application. The solvent was thermally treated at 35 C over a period of 13 months whilst in dynamic contact with each of the aqueous phases of the current NGS process, namely SRS 15 (a highly caustic waste simulant), sodium hydroxide scrub solution (0.025 M), and boric acid strip solution (0.01 M). The effect of thermal treatment was evaluated by assessing batch extract/scrub/strip performance as a function of time, by monitoring the sodium extraction capacity of the solvent, and by analysis of the solvent using electrospray mass spectrometry. Current studies indicate that the NGS solvent should be thermally robust for a period of XXX months at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) pilot plant located at Savannah River Site. Furthermore, the guanidine suppressor appears to be the solvent component most significantly impacted by thermal treatment of the solvent, showing significant degradation over time.

  18. Thermal degradation of the solvent employed in the next-generation caustic-side solvent extraction process and its effect on the extraction, scrubbing, and stripping of cesium

    DOE PAGES

    Roach, Benjamin D.; Williams, Neil J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2015-09-02

    As part of the ongoing development of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NGS) process, the thermal stability of the process solvent was investigated and shown to be adequate for industrial application. The solvent was thermally treated at 35 C over a period of 13 months whilst in dynamic contact with each of the aqueous phases of the current NGS process, namely SRS 15 (a highly caustic waste simulant), sodium hydroxide scrub solution (0.025 M), and boric acid strip solution (0.01 M). The effect of thermal treatment was evaluated by assessing batch extract/scrub/strip performance as a function of time, by monitoringmore » the sodium extraction capacity of the solvent, and by analysis of the solvent using electrospray mass spectrometry. Current studies indicate that the NGS solvent should be thermally robust for a period of XXX months at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) pilot plant located at Savannah River Site. Furthermore, the guanidine suppressor appears to be the solvent component most significantly impacted by thermal treatment of the solvent, showing significant degradation over time.« less

  19. Comparison of two different solvents employed for pressurised fluid extraction of stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana: methanol versus water.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Varadová Ostrá, Elena; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal; Benesová, Karolínka; Kotlaríková, Pavla; Cáslavský, Josef

    2007-08-01

    Pressurised fluid extraction using water or methanol was employed for the extraction of stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni. The extraction method was optimised in terms of temperature and duration of the static or the dynamic step. Extracts were analysed by liquid chromatography followed by UV and mass-spectrometric (MS) detections. Thermal degradation of stevioside was the same in both solvents within the range 70-160 degrees C. Methanol showed better extraction ability for isolation of stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana leaves than water within the range 110-160 degrees C. However, water represents the green alternative to methanol. The limit of detection of stevioside in the extract analysed was 30 ng for UV detection and 2 ng for MS detection.

  20. Simultaneously Enhanced Efficiency and Stability of Polymer Solar Cells by Employing Solvent Additive and Upside-down Drying Method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Fujun; An, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Miao; Ma, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jian

    2017-03-15

    The morphology of active layer plays an important role in determining the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and stability of polymer solar cells (PSCs), which strongly depend on the dynamic drying process of active layer. In this work, an efficient and universal method was developed to let active layer undergo upside-down drying process in a covered glass Petri dish. For the PSCs based on PTB7-Th:PC71BM, the champion PCEs were improved from 8.58% to 9.64% by mixing 3 vol % 1,8-di-iodooctane and further to 10.30% by employing upside-down drying method. The enhanced PCEs of PSCs with active layers undergoing upside-down drying process are mainly attributed to the optimized vertical phase separation, the more ordered and tightly packed π-π stacking of polymer molecules. Meanwhile, PC71BM molecules can be frozen in more ordered and tightly packed π-π stacking polymer network, which lead to the enhanced stability of PSCs. The universality of upside-down drying method can be solidly confirmed from PSCs with PTB7:PC71BM, PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM, or PBDT-TS1:PC71BM as active layers, respectively. The molecular packing and phase separation of blend films with different solvent additives and drying methods were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. Determination of the dissociation constants (pKa) of secondary and tertiary amines in organic media by capillary electrophoresis and their role in the electrophoretic mobility order inversion.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Marcelo Delmar; Hillebranda, Sandro; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2005-03-11

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) may provide a selectivity enhancement in separations since the analyte dissociation constants (pKa) in organic media are different from those in aqueous solutions. In this work, we have studied the inversion in mobility order observed in the separation of tertiary (imipramine (IMI) and amitryptiline (AMI)) and secondary amines (desipramine (DES) and nortryptiline (NOR)) in water, methanol, and acetonitrile. We have determined the pKa values in those solvents and the variation of dissociation constants with the temperature. From these data, and applying the Van't Hoff equation, we have calculated the thermodynamic parameters deltaH and deltaS. The pKa values found in methanol for DES, NOR, IMI, and AMI were 10.80, 10.79, 10.38, and 10.33, respectively. On the other hand, in acetonitrile an opposite relation was found since the values were 20.60, 20.67, 20.74, and 20.81 for DES, NOR, IMI, and AMI. This is the reason why a migration order inversion is observed in NACE for these solvents. The thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and presented a tendency that can be correlated with that observed for pKa values.

  2. Liquefaction process wherein solvents derived from the material liquefied and containing increased concentrations of donor species are employed

    DOEpatents

    Fant, B. T.; Miller, John D.; Ryan, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein a solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material being liquefied is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the solvent or diluent comprises from about 65 to about 85 wt. % hydroaromatic components. The solvent is prepared by first separating a solvent or diluent distillate fraction from the liquefaction product, subjecting this distillate fraction to hydrogenation and then extracting the naphthenic components from the hydrogenated product. The extracted naphthenic components are then dehydrogenated and hydrotreated to produce additional hydroaromatic components. These components are combined with the solvent or diluent distillate fraction. The solvent may also contain hydroaromatic constituents prepared by extracting naphthenic components from a heavy naphtha, dehydrogenating the same and then hydrotreating the dehydrogenated product. When the amount of solvent produced in this manner exceeds that required for steady state operation of the liquefaction process a portion of the solvent or diluent distillated fraction will be withdrawn as product.

  3. Solvent selection for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of synthetic polymers employing solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Heike; Ehmann, Thomas; Otto, Matthias

    2010-08-30

    The principle relating to the selection of a proper matrix, cationization reagent, and solvent for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of synthetic polymers is still a topic of research. In this work we focused on the selection of a suitable MALDI solvent. Polystyrene PS7600 and poly(ethylene glycol) PEG4820 were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS using various solvents which were selected based on the Hansen solubility parameter system. For polystyrene (PS), dithranol was used as the matrix and silver trifluoroacetate as the cationization reagent whereas, for poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), the combination of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and sodium trifluoroacetate was used for all experiments. When employing solvents which dissolve PS and PEG, reliable MALDI mass spectra were obtained while samples in non-solvents (solvents which are not able to dissolve the polymer) failed to provide spectra. It seems that the solubility of the matrix and the cationization reagent are less important than the polymer solubility.

  4. New amine-solvent process for selective hydrogen sulphide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Rescalli, C.; Sguera, O.

    1986-01-01

    The absorbent solution of the Selefining process - a new process for selective H/sub 2/S removal - contains a tertiary amine, an organic solvent and little water. In these reasonably anhydrous conditions the amine cannot react with CO/sub 2/ either to form carbamate because it is tertiary, or to form carbonate because CO/sub 2/ cannot be hydrated to carbonic acid to a sufficient extent. On the contrary, the amine can react with H/sub 2/S according to a neutralization reaction because H/sub 2/S is an acid in itself. The process removes COS, CS/sub 2/ and mercaptans incidental to H/sub 2/S removal. A new unit will go on stream in the summer of 1986; the retrofitting of an old MEA-DEG plant to Selefining is presently under progress.

  5. Purification of zirconyl sulfate by solvent extraction. Report of investigations/1984

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.J.; Henry, H.G.; Bauer, D.J.

    1984-02-01

    The Bureau of Mines has conducted bench-scale investigations leading to the design of an integrated process for producing reactor-grade zirconium oxide (ZrO2) from zircon sand, which avoids the air pollution, water pollution, fire hazard, and odor problems associated with the hexone-thiocyanate process. The integrated process consists of three steps: production of crude zirconyl sulfate solution, solvent extraction, and production of ZrO2 from strip liquor. This report describes the solvent extraction step. Multistage, countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction with a tertiary amine in kerosine was used to separate zirconium from a dilute H2SO4 solution containing hafnium and other impurities. These steps were performed simultaneously in steady-state, bench-scale experiments. Zirconium recovery of up to 93 pct was achieved. Results of an economic evaluation are included.

  6. Switchable-Hydrophilicity Solvents for Product Isolation and Catalyst Recycling in Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Großeheilmann, Julia; Vanderveen, Jesse R; Jessop, Philip G; Kragl, Udo

    2016-04-07

    Switchable-hydrophilicity solvents (SHSs) are solvents that can switch reversibly between a water-miscible state to a state that forms a biphasic mixture with water. In this case study, SHSs have been studied for easy product/catalyst separation as well as catalyst recycling. A series of tertiary amine SHSs have been identified for the extraction of the hydrophilic product from the postreaction mixture. Here, we determined high extraction efficiencies for the product (>84%) and low extraction rates for the catalyst (<0.1%). With the catalyst recycling experiments, we isolated the product in high purity (>98%) without further purification steps. At the same time, the catalyst was reused without any loss of activity (>91% enantiomeric excess, >99% yield) four times. Furthermore, we optimized the extraction efficiency by working with a microextractor. In addition, with the use of a falling-film microreactor, we obtained the product with high enantioselectivity by working at ambient conditions.

  7. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko-Hirata (K-H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K-H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein.

  8. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko-Hirata (K-H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K-H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein.

  9. Aqueous Glycosylation of Unprotected Sucrose Employing Glycosyl Fluorides in the Presence of Calcium Ion and Trimethylamine

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Guillaume; Zwicker, Aaron; Allen, C. Liana; Schepartz, Alanna; Miller, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    We report a synthetic glycosylation reaction between sucrosyl acceptors and glycosyl fluoride donors to yield the derived trisaccharides. This reaction proceeds at room temperature in an aqueous solvent mixture. Calcium salts and a tertiary amine base promote the reaction with high site-selectivity for either the 3′-position or 1′-position of the fructofuranoside unit. Because non-enzymatic aqueous oligosaccharide syntheses are underdeveloped, mechanistic studies were carried out in order to identify the origin of the selectivity, which we hypothesized was related to the structure of hydroxyl group array in sucrose. The solution conformation of various mono-deoxysucrose analogs revealed the cooperative nature of the hydroxyl group in mediating both this aqueous glycosyl bond-forming reaction and the site-selectivity at the same time. PMID:26859619

  10. SWITCHABLE POLARITY SOLVENTS AS DRAW SOLUTES FOR FORWARD OSMOSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Mark L. Stone; Aaron D. Wilson; Cathy Rae

    2013-03-01

    Switchable polarity solvents (SPS), mixtures of carbon dioxide, water, and tertiary amines, are presented as viable forward osmosis (FO) draw solutes allowing a novel SPS FO process. In this study substantial osmotic strengths of SPS are measured with freezing point osmometry and were demonstrated to induce competitive ?uxes at high salt concentrations on a laboratory-scale FO unit utilizing a ?at sheet cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane. Under the experimental conditions the SPS degrades the CTA membrane; however experiments with polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes display stability towards SPS. Once the draw is diluted the major fraction of the switchable polarity solvent can be mechanically separated from the puri?ed water after polar to nonpolar phase shift induced by introduction of 1 atm carbon dioxide to 1 atm of air or nitrogen with mild heating. Trace amounts of SPS can be removed from the separated water with RO in a process that avoids solution concentration polarization. The separated nonpolar phase can be regenerated to a full strength draw and recycled with the re-addition of 1 atm of carbon dioxide.

  11. Halogen- and Hydrogen-Bonded Salts and Co-crystals Formed from 4-Halo-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenol and Cyclic Secondary and Tertiary Amines: Orthogonal and Non-orthogonal Halogen and Hydrogen Bonding, and Synthetic Analogues of Halogen-Bonded Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Akihiro; McAllister, Linda J; Hart, Sam; Pridmore, Natalie E; Karadakov, Peter B; Whitwood, Adrian C; Bruce, Duncan W

    2014-01-01

    Co-crystallisation of, in particular, 4-iodotetrafluorophenol with a series of secondary and tertiary cyclic amines results in deprotonation of the phenol and formation of the corresponding ammonium phenate. Careful examination of the X-ray single-crystal structures shows that the phenate anion develops a C=O double bond and that the C–C bond lengths in the ring suggest a Meissenheimer-like delocalisation. This delocalisation is supported by the geometry of the phenate anion optimised at the MP2(Full) level of theory within the aug-cc-pVDZ basis (aug-cc-pVDZ-PP on I) and by natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses. With sp2 hybridisation at the phenate oxygen atom, there is strong preference for the formation of two non-covalent interactions with the oxygen sp2 lone pairs and, in the case of secondary amines, this occurs through hydrogen bonding to the ammonium hydrogen atoms. However, where tertiary amines are concerned, there are insufficient hydrogen atoms available and so an electrophilic iodine atom from a neighbouring 4-iodotetrafluorophenate group forms an I⋅⋅⋅O halogen bond to give the second interaction. However, in some co-crystals with secondary amines, it is also found that in addition to the two hydrogen bonds forming with the phenate oxygen sp2 lone pairs, there is an additional intermolecular I⋅⋅⋅O halogen bond in which the electrophilic iodine atom interacts with the C=O π-system. All attempts to reproduce this behaviour with 4-bromotetrafluorophenol were unsuccessful. These structural motifs are significant as they reproduce extremely well, in low-molar-mass synthetic systems, motifs found by Ho and co-workers when examining halogen-bonding interactions in biological systems. The analogy is cemented through the structures of co-crystals of 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene with acetamide and with N-methylbenzamide, which, as designed models, demonstrate the orthogonality of hydrogen and halogen bonding proposed in Ho’s biological study. PMID

  12. Secondary organic aerosol formation of primary, secondary and tertiary Amines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amines have been widely identified in ambient aerosol in both urban and rural environments and they are potential precursors for formation of nitrogen-containing secondary organic aerosols (SOA). However, the role of amines in SOA formation has not been well studied. In this wrok, we use UC-Riversid...

  13. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  14. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  15. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  16. Applied biotransformations in green solvents.

    PubMed

    Hernáiz, María J; Alcántara, Andrés R; García, José I; Sinisterra, José V

    2010-08-16

    The definite interest in implementing sustainable industrial technologies has impelled the use of biocatalysts (enzymes or cells), leading to high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivities under mild conditions. As usual substrates are not soluble in water, the employ of organic solvents is mandatory. We will focus on different attempts to combine the valuable properties of green solvents with the advantages of using biocatalysts for developing cleaner synthetic processes.

  17. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  19. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration

  20. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration

  1. Stoddard solvent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    These products contain Stoddard solvent: Dry cleaning fluids Paints Paint thinner Stoddard solvent ( mineral spirits ) Toners used in copy machines This list may not include all products containing Stoddard solvent.

  2. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  3. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  4. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-11-14

    -periodic PB calculations for a given system, its dependence on the box size being analytical. The latter scheme also provides insight into the physical origin of the finite-size effects. These two schemes also encompass a correction for discrete solvent effects that persists even in the limit of infinite box sizes. Application of either scheme essentially eliminates the size dependence of the corrected charging free energies (maximal deviation of 1.5 kJ mol{sup −1}). Because it is simple to apply, the analytical correction scheme offers a general solution to the problem of finite-size effects in free-energy calculations involving charged solutes, as encountered in calculations concerning, e.g., protein-ligand binding, biomolecular association, residue mutation, pK{sub a} and redox potential estimation, substrate transformation, solvation, and solvent-solvent partitioning.

  5. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-01-01

    calculations for a given system, its dependence on the box size being analytical. The latter scheme also provides insight into the physical origin of the finite-size effects. These two schemes also encompass a correction for discrete solvent effects that persists even in the limit of infinite box sizes. Application of either scheme essentially eliminates the size dependence of the corrected charging free energies (maximal deviation of 1.5 kJ mol−1). Because it is simple to apply, the analytical correction scheme offers a general solution to the problem of finite-size effects in free-energy calculations involving charged solutes, as encountered in calculations concerning, e.g., protein-ligand binding, biomolecular association, residue mutation, pKa and redox potential estimation, substrate transformation, solvation, and solvent-solvent partitioning. PMID:24320250

  6. METHOD FOR SOLVENT-ISOSTATIC PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Archibald, P.B.

    1962-09-18

    This invention provides a method for producing densely compacted bodies having relatively large dimensions. The method comprises the addition of a small quantity of a suitable solvent to a powder which is to be compacted. The solvent- moistened powder is placed inside a flexible bag, and the bag is suspended in an isostatic press. The solvent is squeezed out of the powder by the isostatic pressure, and the resulting compacted body is recovered. The presence of the solvent markedly decreases the proportion of void space in the powder, thereby resulting in a denser, more homogeneous compact. Another effect of the solvent is that it allows the isostatic pressing operation to be conducted at substantially lower pressures than are conventionally employed. (AEC)

  7. Solvents in novolak synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobodacha, Chet J.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Durham, Dana L.; Paradis, Valerie R.

    1993-09-01

    Novolac resins may be prepared with or without a solvent present. We have found that solvent power greatly affects the properties of the finished resin and thus gives the resist chemist another variable with which to `fine-tune' resist properties. Using designed experiments, we investigated the effect of solvent power, as measured by Hansen's Solubility Parameters, of a number of solvents and solvent mixtures on the final properties of the novolac resin. We found that the relative molecular weight (RMW) and dissolution rate of a novolac resin can be varied by selection of a solvent or solvent mixture with the appropriate polarity and hydrogen- bonding characteristics. The solvent polarity and hydrogen-bonding characteristics may affect the stability of the cresol/formaldehyde transition state, thus causing the observed changes in RMW and dissolution rate.

  8. Solvent Recycling for Shipyards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    alternatives to solvent cleaning. Typical equipment types that can be effectively cleaned with recycled solvents include spray guns paint hoses pumps...in place of solvent-based coatings; or equipment changes, such as the use of airless or HVLP systems to reduce paint consumption and overspray...Using mechanical cleaning methods instead of solvent cleaning Change from conventional painting to solventless processes such as thermal spray or powder

  9. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  10. Environmental Impacts on Nuclear Reprocessing Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillens, A. R.; Fessenden, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear tests have been employed ever since the first nuclear explosion in Alamogordo, NM during the mid-1940s. Nuclear weapons pose a threat to civil society and result in extensive biological (medical) damages. For this reason, treaties banning nuclear tests and weapons have been employed since the 1960s to cease proliferation of weapons. However, as nuclear tests continue in secrecy and actinides, such as plutonium and uranium, are eligible for theft, nuclear forensics is needed to prevent weapons proliferation. In this study, solvents [tributyl phosphate (TBP), dodecane, decanol] used in reprocessing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, which provides indisputable evidence in identifying the operation in which solvents were used. Solvent samples are observed under variable conditions in the laboratory for different time periods. It is assumed that their carbon isotope values (δ13C) will become more positive (shift heavy) with time. It is found that the solvents are hygroscopic. TBP leaves the most robust signature compared to the other solvents studied and the isotope values for all solvents under all conditions become more positive with time. This study serves as primary research in understanding how solvents behave under variable conditions in the laboratory and how this could be translated to the environment in fate and transport studies.

  11. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change by industry and industry sector over 2010-20 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment for which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  12. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change from an industry perspective over the 2008-2018 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment in which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  13. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  14. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  15. Employment of High-Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography for the Quantification of Oleuropein in Olive Leaves and the Selection of a Suitable Solvent System for Its Isolation with Centrifugal Partition Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boka, Vasiliki-Ioanna; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Gikas, Evangelos; Angelis, Apostolis; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2015-11-01

    A high-performance thin-layer chromatographic methodology was developed and validated for the isolation and quantitative determination of oleuropein in two extracts of Olea europaea leaves. OLE_A was a crude acetone extract, while OLE_AA was its defatted residue. Initially, high-performance thin-layer chromatography was employed for the purification process of oleuropein with fast centrifugal partition chromatography, replacing high-performance liquid-chromatography, in the stage of the determination of the distribution coefficient and the retention volume. A densitometric method was developed for the determination of the distribution coefficients, KC = CS/CM. The total concentrations of the target compound in the stationary phase (CS) and in the mobile phase (CM) were calculated by the area measured in the high-performance thin-layer chromatogram. The estimated Kc was also used for the calculation of the retention volume, VR, with a chromatographic retention equation. The obtained data were successfully applied for the purification of oleuropein and the experimental results confirmed the theoretical predictions, indicating that high-performance thin-layer chromatography could be an important counterpart in the phytochemical study of natural products. The isolated oleuropein (purity > 95%) was subsequently used for the estimation of its content in each extract with a simple, sensitive and accurate high-performance thin-layer chromatography method. The best fit calibration curve from 1.0 µg/track to 6.0 µg/track of oleuropein was polynomial and the quantification was achieved by UV detection at λ 240 nm. The method was validated giving rise to an efficient and high-throughput procedure, with the relative standard deviation % of repeatability and intermediate precision not exceeding 4.9% and accuracy between 92% and 98% (recovery rates). Moreover, the method was validated for robustness, limit of quantitation, and limit of detection. The amount of oleuropein for

  16. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  17. Used lubricating oil recycling using hydrocarbon solvents.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ahmad; Al-Zubaidy, Essam; Fayed, Muhammad E

    2005-01-01

    A solvent extraction process using new hydrocarbon solvents was employed to treat used lubricant oil. The solvents used were liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) condensate and stabilized condensate. A demulsifier was used to enhance the treatment process. The extraction process using stabilized condensate demonstrated characteristics that make it competitive with existing used oil treatment technologies. The process is able to reduce the asphaltene content of the treated lubricating oil to 0.106% (w/w), the ash content to 0.108%, and the carbon residue to 0.315% with very low levels of contaminant metals. The overall yield of oil is 79%. The treated used oil can be recycled as base lubricating oil. The major disadvantage of this work is the high temperature of solvent recovery. Experimental work and results are presented in detail.

  18. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  19. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  20. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  1. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  2. Solvent-cast three-dimensional printing of multifunctional microsystems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang-Zhuang; Gosselin, Frédérick; Guerin, Nicolas; Lanouette, Anne-Marie; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Therriault, Daniel

    2013-12-20

    The solvent-cast direct-write fabrication of microstructures is shown using a thermoplastic polymer solution ink. The method employs the robotically controlled microextrusion of a filament combined with a rapid solvent evaporation. Upon drying, the increased rigidity of the extruded filament enables the creation of complex freeform 3D shapes.

  3. Use of inhibitory solvents in multi-membrane bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Toohyon (Inventor); Shuler, Michael L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An immobilized liquid membrane is employed to allow use of a product-extracting solvent which is normally toxic toward a cell layer which produces the product in a membrane-moderated biological reaction.

  4. CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS USING NON-TRADITIONAL APPROACHES: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED GREENER SYNTHESES IN AQUEOUS MEDIA OR UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave (MW) irradiation in conjunction with water as reaction media has proven to be a 'greener' chemical approach for expeditious N-alkylation reactions of amines and hydrazines wherein the reactions under mildly basic conditions afford tertiary amines and double N<...

  5. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  6. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  7. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  8. Solvent-free fluidic organic dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Young; Mager, Loic; Cham, Tran Thi; Dorkenoo, Kokou D; Fort, Alain; Wu, Jeong Weon; Barsella, Alberto; Ribierre, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-06

    We report on the demonstration of liquid organic dye lasers based on 9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz), so-called liquid carbazole, doped with green- and red-emitting laser dyes. Both waveguide and Fabry-Perot type microcavity fluidic organic dye lasers were prepared by capillary action under solvent-free conditions. Cascade Förster-type energy transfer processes from liquid carbazole to laser dyes were employed to achieve color-variable amplified spontaneous emission and lasing. Overall, this study provides the first step towards the development of solvent-free fluidic organic semiconducting lasers and demonstrates a new kind of optoelectronic applications for liquid organic semiconductors.

  9. Effects of tertiary amine local anesthetics on the assembly and disassembly of brain microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    Genna, J M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1980-09-01

    From kinetic and electron microscopy studies on the effects of procaine, tetracaine and dibucaine on the polymerization and depolymerization of the microtubules isolated from pig and rat brains the following results were obtained. 1. Procaine or tetracaine, at the concentration range of 0.5--20 mM and of 0.5--5 mM respectively, increases the rate of tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and of microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) as a linear function of the concentration of the anesthetics, while identical amounts of microtubules are formed. In the absence of microtubule-associated proteins the polymerization of tubulin is not induced by 10 mM procaine, furthermore, the critical concentration of microtubule proteins necessary for assembly into microtubules is not affected at this concentration level of the anesthetic. This suggests that procaine affects not the nucleation, but rather the elongation process. 2. Dibucaine, from 0.5 mM to 3 mM increases the lag time of the polymerization reaction, while from 0.5 mM to 2 mM it linearly decreases both tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C) and microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) rates. Dibucaine, up to mM concentration, does not affect the extent of tubulin polymerization; however, above this concentration it induces the formation of amorphous aggregates. 3. Procaine or tetracaine enhances the depolymerizing effect of calcium on microtubules. The half-maximal values for the depolymerizing effect of calcium were 0.96, 0.71 and 0.51 mM for the control, in the presence of 10 mM procaine and 5 mM tetracaine respectively.

  10. Oxidation of NADH by chloramines and chloramides and its activation by iodide and by tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Prütz, W A; Kissner, R; Koppenol, W H

    2001-09-15

    Irreversible oxidation of reduced nicotinamide nucleotides by neutrophil-derived halogen oxidants (HOCl, chloramines, HOBr, etc.) is likely to be a highly lethal process, because of the essential role of NAD(P)H in important cell functions such as mitochondrial electron transport, and control of the cellular thiol redox state by NADPH-dependent glutathione reductase. Chloramines (chloramine-T, NH(2)Cl, etc.) and N-chloramides (N-chlorinated cyclopeptides) react with NADH to generate the same products as HOCl, i.e., pyridine chlorohydrins, as judged from characteristic changes in the NADH absorption spectrum. Compared with the fast oxidation of NADH by HOCl, k approximately 3 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.2, the oxidation by chloramines is about five orders of magnitude slower; that by chloramides is about four orders of magnitude slower. Apparent rate constants for oxidation of NADH by chloramines increase with increasing proton or buffer concentration, consistent with general acid catalysis, but oxidation by chloramides proceeds with pH-independent kinetics. In presence of iodide the oxidation of NADH by chloramines or chloramides is faster by at least two orders of magnitude; this is due to reaction of iodide with the N-halogen to give HOI/I(2), the most reactive and selective oxidant for NADH among HOX species. Quinuclidine derivatives (QN) like 3-chloroquinuclidine and quinine are capable of catalyzing the irreversible degradation of NADH by HOCl and by chloramines; QN(+)Cl, the chain carrier of the catalytic cycle, is even more reactive toward NADH than HOCl/ClO(-) at physiological pH. Oxidation of NADH by NH(2)Br proceeds by fast, but complex, biphasic kinetics. A compilation of rate constants for interactions of reactive halogen species with various substrates is presented and the concept of selective reactivity of N-halogens is discussed.

  11. Reaction mechanisms of secondary and tertiary amines with OH and NO3 radicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of aliphatic amines are common near agricultural facilities such as animal feed lots. Determining the reactions of these amines with common atmospheric radicals is important to understanding both daytime and nighttime atmospheric chemistry. Several smog chamber experiments were conducted ...

  12. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket".

  13. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  14. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  15. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  16. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  17. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  18. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  19. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Janikowski, Stuart K.

    2006-01-10

    A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

  20. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

    1980-05-21

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by-product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

  1. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Chen, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

  2. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Chen, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

  3. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

    1981-09-24

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium, ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

  4. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  5. Asphaltene aggregation in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyeongseok; Ring, Terry A; Deo, Milind D

    2004-03-01

    Asphaltenic solids formed in the Rangely field in the course of a carbon dioxide flood and heptane insolubles in the oil from the same field were used in this study. Four different solvents were used to dissolve the asphaltenes. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the onset of asphaltene precipitation by heptane titration. When the onset values were plotted versus asphaltene concentrations, distinct break points (called critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) in this paper) were observed. CACs for the field asphaltenes dissolved in toluene, trichloroethylene, tetrahydrofuran, and pyridine occurred at concentrations of 3.0, 3.7, 5.0, and 8.2 g/l, respectively. CACs are observed at similar concentrations as critical micelle concentrations (CMC) for the asphaltenes in the solvents employed and can be interpreted to be the points at which rates of asphaltene aggregations change. CMC values of asphaltenes determined from surface tension measurements (in pyridine and TCE) were slightly higher than the CAC values measured by NIR onset measurements. The CAC for heptane-insoluble asphaltenes in toluene was 3.1 g/l. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental compositions of the two asphaltenes showed that the H/C ratio of the heptane-insoluble asphaltenes was higher and molecular weight (measured by vapor pressure osmometry) was lower.

  6. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  7. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  8. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  9. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  10. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  11. XAFS study of bioactive Cu(II) complexes of 7-hydroxycoumarin derivatives in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepka, M. T.; Wolska, A.; Drzewiecka-Antonik, A.; Rejmak, P.; Hatada, K.; Aquilanti, G.

    2017-04-01

    We characterize the structure of two Cu(II) complexes of 7-hydroxycoumarins in organic solvents. The solvents are, dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethylformamide. X-ray absorption spectroscopy together with density functional theory calculations are employed to identify the structural changes induced by the two solvents in comparison to the solid form of complexes. We show that the structure of the Cu(II) complexes is modified depending on the solvent and we propose the geometry of the complexes molecule.

  12. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-14

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  13. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-14

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  14. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  15. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  16. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  17. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  18. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  19. Occupational exposure to solvents and hairy cell leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J.; Mandereau, L.; Conso, F.; Limasset, J. C.; Pourmir, I.; Flandrin, G.; Hemon, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to solvents other than benzene in hairy cell leukaemia. METHODS: The study included 226 male cases and 425 matched controls, exposure to solvents was evaluated by expert case by case review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by specific interviews. Also, exposure to solvents was evaluated with an independently constructed job exposure matrix (JEM). RESULTS: No association was found between hairy cell leukaemia and previous employment in a job exposed to solvents (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6 to 1.3). ORs for the main occupational tasks exposed to solvents were around 1 and did not increase with the frequency or the duration of the tasks. No specific type of paint or glue was found to be significantly associated with hairy cell leukaemia. No association was found with exposure to solvents, taken as a whole, with either expert assessments or the JEM. No association was found with aromatic, chlorinated, or oxygenated subgroups of solvents. The ORs did not increase with the average intensity of exposure assessed by the experts, with the frequency of use, or with the duration of exposure. Finally, no association was found with non-occupational exposure to solvents. CONCLUSIONS: The study did not show any association between exposure to solvents and hairy cell leukaemia.   PMID:9536165

  20. A continuum theory of solvation in quadrupolar solvents. I. Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Kim, Hyung J.

    2003-10-01

    A continuum theory to describe equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvation in polarizable, nondipolar, quadrupolar solvents is developed. By employing the densities of the solvent quadrupole and induced dipole moments as primary field variables, a reaction field theory formulation for quadrupolar solvents is constructed with account of their electronic polarizability. Nonequilibrium solvation aspects are effected via the solvent coordinate description for the quadrupole moment density. It is found that the theory is consistent with the macroscopic Maxwell equations and satisfies the continuity of the electric potential across the cavity boundaries. Solvation stabilization arising from the solvent quadrupoles is captured via novel reaction field factors analogous to those for dipolar solvents. Comparison is made with the dielectric continuum description of the polarizable, dipolar solvents as well as with previous theories of the quadrupolar solvents. Extensions and applications of the current theoretical formulation to study free energetics and dynamics of reactive and spectroscopic processes in the quadrupolar solvents are reported in the following paper [J. Jeon and H. J. Kim, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 8626 (2003)].

  1. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  2. Neurotoxic effects of solvent exposure on sewage treatment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kraut, A.; Lilis, R.; Marcus, M.; Valciukas, J.A.; Wolff, M.S.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1988-07-01

    Nineteen Sewage Treatment Workers (STWs) exposed to industrial sewage that contained benzene, toluene, and other organic solvents at a primary sewage treatment plant in New York City (Plant A) were examined for evidence of solvent toxicity. Fourteen (74%) complained of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms consistent with solvent exposure, including lightheadedness, fatigue, increased sleep requirement, and headache. The majority of these symptoms resolved with transfer from the plant. Men working less than 1 yr at Plant A were more likely to complain of two or more CNS symptoms than men who were working there longer than 1 yr (p = .055). Objective abnormalities in neurobehavioral testing were found in all 4 men working longer than 9 yr at this plant, but in only 5 of 15 employed there for a shorter period (p = .03). These results are consistent with the known effects of solvent exposure. Occupational health personnel must be aware that STWs can be exposed to solvents and other industrial wastes.

  3. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  4. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  5. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  6. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  7. Evaluating Employability Skills: Employer and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Venetia; Zuzel, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Graduate employability is a key issue for Higher Education. In this two-part study student employability skills have been evaluated from the perspective of sandwich students and graduates in biomolecular science, and their employers. A strong correlation was found between employer and sandwich student/graduate perceptions of the relative…

  8. Effects of Solvent Composition on the Assembly and Relaxation of Triblock Copolymer-Based Polyelectrolyte Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kevin J.; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2012-03-26

    The role of solvent selectivity has been explored extensively with regard to its role in the phase behavior of block copolymer assemblies. Traditionally, thermally induced phase separation is employed for generating micelles upon cooling a block copolymer dissolved in a selective solvent. However few amphiphilic, polyelectrolyte-containing block copolymers demonstrate a thermally accessible route of micellization, and solvent exchange routes are frequently employed instead. Here, we describe the use of mixed solvents for obtaining thermoreversible gelation behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA-PMAA-PMMA) triblock copolymers. One solvent component (dimethyl sulfoxide) is a good solvent for both blocks, and the second solvent component (water) is a selective solvent for the polymer midblock. Rheological frequency sweeps at variable solvent compositions and temperatures demonstrate an adherence to time-temperature-composition superposition, so that changes in the solvent composition are analogous to changes in the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter between end block and solvent. Shift factors used for this superposition are related to the effective activation energy describing the viscosity and stress relaxation response of the triblock copolymer gels. The effectiveness of solvent exchange processes for producing hydrogels with this system is shown to originate from the ability of a small amount of added water to greatly increase the relaxation times of the self-assembled polymer gels that are formed by this process.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of solvent systems for countercurrent separation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, J Brent; Ahmed, Sana; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-01-16

    Rational solvent system selection for countercurrent chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography technology (collectively known as countercurrent separation) studies continues to be a scientific challenge as the fundamental questions of comparing polarity range and selectivity within a solvent system family and between putative orthogonal solvent systems remain unanswered. The current emphasis on metabolomic investigations and analysis of complex mixtures necessitates the use of successive orthogonal countercurrent separation (CS) steps as part of complex fractionation protocols. Addressing the broad range of metabolite polarities demands development of new CS solvent systems with appropriate composition, polarity (π), selectivity (σ), and suitability. In this study, a mixture of twenty commercially available natural products, called the GUESSmix, was utilized to evaluate both solvent system polarity and selectively characteristics. Comparisons of GUESSmix analyte partition coefficient (K) values give rise to a measure of solvent system polarity range called the GUESSmix polarity index (GUPI). Solvatochromic dye and electrical permittivity measurements were also evaluated in quantitatively assessing solvent system polarity. The relative selectivity of solvent systems were evaluated with the GUESSmix by calculating the pairwise resolution (αip), the number of analytes found in the sweet spot (Nsw), and the pairwise resolution of those sweet spot analytes (αsw). The combination of these parameters allowed for both intra- and inter-family comparison of solvent system selectivity. Finally, 2-dimensional reciprocal shifted symmetry plots (ReSS(2)) were created to visually compare both the polarities and selectivities of solvent system pairs. This study helps to pave the way to the development of new solvent systems that are amenable to successive orthogonal CS protocols employed in metabolomic studies.

  10. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  11. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  12. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  13. ACCELERATED SOLVENT EXTRACTION COMBINED WITH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A research project was initiated to address a recurring problem of elevated detection limits above required risk-based concentrations for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds in high moisture content solid samples. This project was initiated, in cooperation with the EPA Region 1 Laboratory, under the Regional Methods Program administered through the ORD Office of Science Policy. The aim of the project was to develop an approach for the rapid removal of water in high moisture content solids (e.g., wetland sediments) in preparation for analysis via Method 8270. Alternative methods for water removal have been investigated to enhance compound solid concentrations and improve extraction efficiency, with the use of pressure filtration providing a high-throughput alternative for removal of the majority of free water in sediments and sludges. In order to eliminate problems with phase separation during extraction of solids using Accelerated Solvent Extraction, a variation of a water-isopropanol extraction method developed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, CO is being employed. The concentrations of target compounds in water-isopropanol extraction fluids are subsequently analyzed using an automated Solid Phase Extraction (SPE)-GC/MS method developed in our laboratory. The coupled approaches for dewatering, extraction, and target compound identification-quantitation provide a useful alternative to enhance sample throughput for Me

  14. A Bioinspired Dinickel(II) Hydrolase: Solvent Vapor-Induced Hydrolysis of Carboxyesters under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Barman, Suman K; Lloret, Francesc; Mukherjee, Rabindranath

    2016-12-19

    From the perspective of synthetic metallohydrolases, a phenoxo-bridged dinickel(II) complex [Ni(II)2(L)(H2O)2(CH3OH)][ClO4]·CH3OH (1) (H3L = 2,6-bis[{{(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzyl)(N',N″-(dimethylamino)ethyl)}amino}methyl]-4-methylphenol) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The presence of a vacant coordination site and a weakly bound water molecule provides the scope for substrate binding to act as a metallohydrolase model. Ethyl acetate vapor diffusion at 298 K to a CH3CN/CH3OH solution of 1 results in the formation of a pentanuclear acetato-bridged complex [Ni(II)5(H2L)2(μ3-OH)2(μ-O2CCH3)4][ClO4]2·CH3CO2C2H5 (2), demonstrating for the first time the metal-coordinated water-promoted hydrolysis of a carboxyester at room temperature. When the crystals of 1, moistened with a few drops of ethyl acetate, were kept for ethyl acetate vapor diffusion, it transforms into a monoacetato-bridged complex [Ni(II)2(HL)(μ-O2CCH3)(H2O)2][ClO4]·4H2O (3). This kind of solvent (vapor)-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal structural transformation concomitant with the hydrolysis of external substrate (ethyl acetate) is unprecedented. Reaction of H3L with 2 equiv of Ni(II)(O2CCH3)2·4H2O, followed by the usual workup, and recrystallization from CH2Cl2 led to the isolation of [Ni(II)2(H2L)(μ-O2CCH3)2][ClO4]·CH2Cl2·2H2O (4). Complex 4 is structurally different from 3, confirming that the reaction of Ni(II)(O2CCH3)2·4H2O with H3L is a different phenomenon from the hydrolysis of ethyl acetate, promoted by Ni(II)-coordinated water in 1. Complex 1 is also capable of hydrolyzing ethyl propionate to a propionato-bridged complex [Ni(II)2(HL)(μ-O2CCH2CH3)(H2O)2][ClO4] (5). For the hydrolytic phenomena mentioned above, the coordinated ligand donor sites (phenolate and tertiary amine) provide a microenvironment around the dinickel(II) center to facilitate efficient stoichiometric hydrolysis of ethyl acetate and ethyl propionate under ambient conditions. Temperature

  15. Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid, as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

    2004-06-22

    A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired co-solvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon, are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

  16. Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid, as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

    2007-03-27

    A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired co-solvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon, are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

  17. Simulations of solvation free energies and solubilities in supercritical solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zemin; Maroncelli, Mark

    2006-04-01

    Computer simulations are used to study solvation free energies and solubilities in supercritical solvents. Solvation free energies are calculated using the particle insertion method. The equilibrium solvent configurations required for these calculations are based on molecular dynamics simulations employing model solvent potentials previously tuned to reproduce liquid-vapor coexistence properties of the fluids Xe, C2H6, CO2, and CHF3. Solutes are represented by all-atom potentials based on ab initio calculations and the OPLS-AA parameter set. Without any tuning of the intermolecular potentials, such calculations are found to reproduce the solvation free energies of a variety of typical solid solutes with an average accuracy of ±2kJ /mol. Further calculations on simple model solutes are also used to explore general aspects of solvation free energies in supercritical solvents. Comparisons of solutes in Lennard-Jones and hard-sphere representations of Xe show that solvation free energies and thus solubilities are not significantly influenced by solvent density fluctuations near the critical point. The solvation enthalpy and entropy do couple to these fluctuations and diverge similarly to solute partial molar volumes. Solvation free energies are also found to be little affected by the local density augmentation characteristic of the compressible regime. In contrast to solute-solvent interaction energies, which often provide a direct measure of local solvent densities, solvation free energies are remarkably insensitive to the presence of local density augmentation.

  18. Parallel Generalized Born Implicit Solvent Calculations with NAMD.

    PubMed

    Tanner, David E; Chan, Kwok-Yan; Phillips, James C; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-11-08

    Accurate electrostatic descriptions of aqueous solvent are critical for simulation studies of bio-molecules, but the computational cost of explicit treatment of solvent is very high. A computationally more feasible alternative is a generalized Born implicit solvent description which models polar solvent as a dielectric continuum. Unfortunately, the attainable simulation speedup does not transfer to the massive parallel computers often employed for simulation of large structures. Longer cutoff distances, spatially heterogenous distribution of atoms and the necessary three-fold iteration over atom-pairs in each timestep combine to challenge efficient parallel performance of generalized Born implicit solvent algorithms. Here we report how NAMD, a parallel molecular dynamics program, meets the challenge through a unique parallelization strategy. NAMD now permits efficient simulation of large systems whose slow conformational motions benefit most from implicit solvent descriptions due to the inherent low viscosity. NAMD's implicit solvent performance is benchmarked and then illustrated in simulating the ratcheting Escherichia coli ribosome involving ~250,000 atoms.

  19. Enzymes from solvent-tolerant microbes: useful biocatalysts for non-aqueous enzymology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Khare, S K

    2009-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microbes are a newly emerging class that possesses the unique ability to thrive in the presence of organic solvents. Their enzymes adapted to mediate cellular and metabolic processes in a solvent-rich environment and are logically stable in the presence of organic solvents. Enzyme catalysis in non-aqueous/low-water media is finding increasing applications for the synthesis of industrially important products, namely peptides, esters, and other trans-esterification products. Solvent stability, however, remains a prerequisite for employing enzymes in non-aqueous systems. Enzymes, in general, get inactivated or give very low rates of reaction in non-aqueous media. Thus, early efforts, and even some recent ones, have aimed at stabilization of enzymes in organic media by immobilization, surface modifications, mutagenesis, and protein engineering. Enzymes from solvent-tolerant microbes appear to be the choicest source for studying solvent-stable enzymes because of their unique ability to survive in the presence of a range of organic solvents. These bacteria circumvent the solvent's toxic effects by virtue of various adaptations, e.g. at the level of the cytoplasmic membrane, by degradation and transformation of solvents, and by active excretion of solvents. The recent screening of these exotic microbes has generated some naturally solvent-stable proteases, lipases, cholesterol oxidase, cholesterol esterase, cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, and other important enzymes. The unique properties of these novel biocatalysts have great potential for applications in non-aqueous enzymology for a range of industrial processes.

  20. Delineating solute-solvent interactions in binary mixtures of ionic liquids in molecular solvents and preferential solvation approach.

    PubMed

    Khupse, Nageshwar D; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-03

    The effect of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions on the preferential solvation of solvatochromic indicators in binary mixtures of ionic liquids with molecular solvents has been investigated. The binary mixtures of the pyridinium-based ionic liquids 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([BP][BF4]), 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([3-MBP][BF4]), and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([4-MBP][BF4]) with molecular solvents like water, methanol, and dichloromethane have been selected for this investigation. The effect of addition of ionic liquids to molecular solvents on the polarity parameters E(T)(N), Kamlet-Taft parameters, hydrogen bond donor ability (HBD) (α), hydrogen bond acceptor ability (HBA) (β), and polarizability (π*) was obtained. The polarity parameters of the mixture display nonideality on addition of ionic liquids to water and dichloromethane. On the other hand, strong synergetic effects were seen in the ionic liquid-methanol binary mixtures. The preferential solvation models have been employed to analyze the collected data in order to achieve information on solute-solvent interactions in these binary mixtures.

  1. Femtosecond transient dichroism/birefringence studies of solute- solvent friction and solvent dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.J.; Castner, E.W. Jr.; Konitsky, W.; Waldeck, D.H.

    1994-02-01

    Ultrafast, heterodyne, polarization spectroscopies are used to measure solute-solvent frictional coupling and characterize the neat solvent`s relaxation dynamics on femtosecond and picosecond timescales.

  2. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915.32 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Surface Preparation...

  3. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  4. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  5. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Employers' Views on Youth Literacy and Employability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macey, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This report looks at whether employers think schools are equipping young people with the literacy skills required for the workplace. It is primarily based on secondary literature sources and introductory conversations with a small sample of key employers and agencies. A complementary report presents evidence on young people's views on literacy and…

  7. Employing Discourse: Universities and Graduate "Employability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boden, Rebecca; Nedeva, Maria

    2010-01-01

    What constitutes graduate employability is discursively framed. In this paper we argue that whilst universities in the UK have long had an involvement in producing useful and productive citizens, the ongoing neoliberalisation of higher education has engendered a discursive shift in definitions of employability. Traditionally, universities regarded…

  8. Switchable Polarity Solvents: Are They Green?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaumann, Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Solvents play an incredibly important role in large scale chemical reactions. Switchable polarity solvents may prove to be a class of solvent that offers energy and material efficiencies greater than existing solvents. This paper examines such solvents and their potential in a variety of chemical reactions.

  9. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  10. Solvent-free and catalyst-free chemistry: A benign pathway to sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade, alternative benign organic methodologies have become an imperative part of organic syntheses and novel chemical reactions. The various new and innovative sustainable organic reactions and methodologies using no solvents or catalysts and employing alternative ...

  11. Learning, Labour and Employability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Malcolm J.

    2009-01-01

    Public policy in the UK has adopted employability to define the relationship of globalisation, work and learning. This article claims that employability serves the interests of capital. It helps capital to exercise its domination/hegemony over labour and employs a redefined vision of learning as its principal vehicle. Employability is a term that…

  12. Becoming Self-Employed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Grant; Cochran, Larry

    1997-01-01

    Explored how persons become self-employed. In critical incident interviews with five self-employed persons the critical events that assisted or hindered progress toward self-employment were listed in chronological order. In general, becoming self-employed involved establishing conditions of action that enhanced a sense of agency, thus enabling…

  13. Solvent extraction of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-08-13

    This patent describes improvement in a process for solvent refining a hydrocarbon based lubricating oil stock containing aromatics and non-aromatics components with an extraction solvent wherein the lubricating oil stock is contacted with the extraction solvent in a first extraction zone at a first extraction temperature in the range of 100{degrees} F to 250{degrees} F and a solvent to oil dosage in the range of 75 to 500 vol % forming an aromatics-rich primary extract and an aromatics-lean primary raffinate of high viscosity index of at least 85. The improvement comprises: withdrawing and cooling the primary extract to a temperature 10{degrees} F to 120{degrees} F below the extraction temperature and admixing with 0.0 vol % to 10 vol % anti-solvent thereby forming a secondary extract and a secondary raffinate, passing the secondary raffinate to a second extraction zone wherein the secondary raffinate is contacted with the extraction solvent at a second extraction temperature in the range of 100{degrees} F to 250{degrees} F and solvent to oil dosage in the range of 75 to 500 vol %, to form an aromatics-lean tertiary raffinate phase of viscosity index 65 or greater.

  14. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  15. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  16. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  17. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: HALOGENATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Halogenated Solvent Degreasing Facilities. These assessments utilize existing models and d...

  18. SOLV-DB: Solvents Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    SOLV-DB provides a specialized mix of information on commercially available solvents. The development of the database was funded under the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) with funds from EPA and DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies in EE. The information includes: • Health and safety considerations involved in choosing and using solvents • Chemical and physical data affecting the suitability of a particular solvent for a wide range of potential applications • Regulatory responsibilities, including exposure and effluent limits, hazard classification status with respect to several key statutes, and selected reporting requirements • Environmental fate data, to indicate whether a solvent is likely to break down or persist in air or water, and what types of waste treatment techniques may apply to it • CAS numbers (from Chemical Abstracts Service) and Sax Numbers (from Sax, et.al., Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials) Supplier Information See help information at http://solvdb.ncms.org/welcome.htm (Specialized Interface)

  19. Solvent effect on the vibrational spectrum of Michler's ketone. Experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Sowula, Marta; Misiaszek, Tomasz; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2014-10-15

    We examined solvent effect on the IR and Raman spectra of MK in several solvents of different polarity and proticity, for understanding of intermolecular interactions, focusing on solvent effect in detail. It has been found that change of solvent polarity has an ambiguous influence on solvatochromism of MK. We have observed that not only vibrations of carbonyl group are affected by the solvent polarity, but also mode ν(CN) and ν(CC) in IR and Raman spectra of MK. Experimental investigations have been supported by the quantum-mechanical computations to gain more insight into the solvatochromic behavior of Michler's ketone. Calculations have been carried using Kohn-Sham formulation of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) was employed to account for solute solvent interactions.

  20. Youth Employment. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on youth employment from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). An introduction briefly explains the role of the NCY with regard to youth employment and describes the types of programs and services supported by NCY. A section on background provides statistics on teenagers and employment from the Bureau…

  1. The New Employment Contract?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, David I.

    2002-01-01

    In the classic employment contract, especially at large companies, wages were not strongly responsive to the labor market. Instead, individual companies had distinctive company wage levels and patterns. An exhaustive study of employers and employees in the United States and Japan examined whether the "old employment contract" has been…

  2. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  3. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  4. Employers Roundtable: Employer Supported Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Valley Child Care Council, Philadelphia, PA.

    This booklet outlines a number of options available to employers to enable them to better cope with child care issues that they and their employees face. Major options include: (1) flexible work policies, such as flexible scheduling, alternate work places, shorter work weeks, and the consolidating of sick leave, holidays, and vacation time into…

  5. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  6. Method of treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, W.; Mallek, H.; Plum, W.

    1981-07-07

    A method of and apparatus for treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste are claimed. The solvent waste is supplied to material such as peat, vermiculite, diaton, etc. This material effects the distribution or dispersion of the solvent and absorbs the foreign substances found in the solvent waste. Air or an inert gas flows through the material in order to pick up the solvent portions which are volatile as a consequence of their vapor pressure. The thus formed gas mixture, which includes air or inert gas and solvent portions, is purified in a known manner by thermal, electrical, or catalytic combustion of the solvent portions.

  7. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  8. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  9. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  10. Regeneration of AlH3 studied with Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacina, David; Wegrzyn, J.; Reilly, J. J.; Graetz, Jason

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum hydride compounds are known to exhibit a 10% by weight hydrogen storage capacity that makes them suited for technologies that require hydrogen as a fuel. The current challenge associated with this material is how to regenerate the hydride from the spent fuel and H2 gas. We employ a two-step process to regenerate the hydride compound which first requires the formation of a stable aluminum hydride adduct using a tertiary amine. This is followed by a second step consisting of adduct separation and hydride recovery, involving transamination to create a less stable adduct. We present results which show that alane-amines can be formed by hydrogenation of catalyzed aluminum in a solvent at low pressures using one of several tertiary amines. Raman and infrared spectroscopy was performed on the products of these reactions to better understand the structure of the alane amines that are formed, as well as the hydrogenation reactions that take place. A vibrational analysis of the regeneration products performed with Raman and infrared spectroscopy is presented and will help clarify the molecular and vibrational structures of these alane amine adducts.

  11. Further investigation of the N-demethylation of tertiary amine alkaloids using the non-classical Polonovski reaction.

    PubMed

    Thavaneswaran, Shanti; Scammells, Peter J

    2006-06-01

    The iron salt-mediated Polonovski reaction efficiently N-demethylates certain opiate alkaloids. In this process, the use of the hydrochloride salt of the tertiary N-methyl amine oxide was reported to give better yields of the desired N-demethylated product. Herein, we report further investigation into the use of N-oxide salts in the iron salt-mediated Polonovski reaction. An efficient approach for the removal of iron salts that greatly facilitates isolation and purification of the N-nor product is also described.

  12. N(+)-glucuronidation of aliphatic tertiary amines, a general phenomenon in the metabolism of H1-antihistamines in humans.

    PubMed

    Luo, H; Hawes, E M; McKay, G; Korchinski, E D; Midha, K K

    1991-10-01

    1. Representative drugs of the various structural classes of H1 antihistamines were chosen for study. The drugs chosen (class name in parentheses) were chlorpheniramine maleate and pheniramine maleate (alkylamines), diphenhydramine hydrochloride and doxylamine succinate (ethanolamines), pyrilamine maleate and tripelennamine hydrochloride (ethylenediamines), promethazine hydrochloride (phenothiazine), cyclizine lactate (piperazine) and terfenadine (miscellaneous). In each case oral dose(s) were administered over no more than 6 h to two healthy volunteers and the total urine collected for 36 h. 2. Metabolites from urine were separated by h.p.l.c. and individually collected prior to mass spectrometric analysis in the fast atom bombardment mode. The structure of each metabolite identified as a quaternary ammonium-linked glucuronide metabolite was confirmed by direct comparison of its mass spectrum and chromatographic behaviour with that of a synthetic authentic compound. 3. For eight of the nine drugs studied, metabolism by the N(+)-glucuronidation pathway was observed in each of the volunteers. Terfenadine was the exception. 4. The amount of each N(+)-glucuronide in the urine was estimated by h.p.l.c. analysis. The mean proportion of dose excreted as the metabolite was 14.3%, 6.5% and 4.0% for cyclizine, tripelennamine and diphenhydramine, respectively. Promethazine was the only case where the N(+)-glucuronide accounted for less than 1.0% of the administered dose in both volunteers examined.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of injectable, water-soluble copolymers of tertiary amine methacrylates and poly(ethylene glycol) containing methacrylates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian C; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2002-11-01

    Several homopolymers and copolymers of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEM) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) were synthesized using anionic polymerization initiated by potassium t-butoxide. The polymers were characterized by average molecular weight, polydispersity and monomeric unit composition. A very narrow molecular weight distribution was achieved with a well-controlled composition. The glass transition temperatures and compositions of the copolymers followed a Gordon-Taylor relationship. The water solubility and biocompatibility of the copolymers was compared to their parent homopolymers to determine if the addition of a poly(ethylene glycol) group was sufficient to solubilize the polymers in aqueous buffer solutions and to increase the biocompatibility of the polymers. These water-soluble, injectable cationic copolymers have potential applications in gene delivery as well as other biomaterial applications.

  14. Helpful hints for physical solvent absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.

    1982-11-01

    Review of experience with natural gas treatment using physical solvents points to design and operating suggestions. Experiences with three plants using either Selexol or Sepasolv MPE solvent shows that both solvents perform well. The solvents offer economical and problem-free purification of natural gas. The Sepasolv MPE and Selexol solvents are very similar in chemical structure and physical properties. Thus, their application range is almost similar. An exchange is possible in most plants without equipment modification and/or process data.

  15. Dramatic enhancement of enzymatic activity in organic solvents by lyoprotectants

    SciTech Connect

    Dabulis, K.; Klibanov, A.M. )

    1993-03-05

    When seven different hydrolytic enzymes (four proteases and three lipases) were lyophilized from aqueous solution containing a ligand, N-Ac-L-Phe-NH[sub 2], their catalytic activity in anhydrous solvents was far greater (one to two orders of magnitude) than that of the enzymes lyophilized without the ligand. This ligand-induced activation was expressed regardless of whether the substrate employed in organic solvents structurally resembled the ligand. Furthermore, nonligand lyoprotectants [sorbitol, other sugars, and poly(ethylene glycol)] also dramatically enhanced enzymatic activity in anhydrous solvents when present in enzyme aqueous solution prior to lyophilization. The effects of the ligand and of the lyoprotectants were nonadditive, suggesting the same mechanism of action. Excipient-activated and nonactivated enzymes exhibited identical activities in water. Also, addition of the excipients directly to suspensions of nonactivated enzymes in organic solvents had no appreciable effect on catalytic activity. These observations indicate that the mechanism of the excipient-induced activation is based on the ability of the excipients to alleviate reversible denaturation of enzymes upon lyophilization. Activity enhancement induced by the excipients is displayed even after their removal by washing enzymes with anhydrous solvents. Subtilisin Carlsberg, lyophilized with sorbitol, was found to be a much more efficient practical catalyst than its regular' counterpart.

  16. Chimeric behavior of excited thioxanthone in protic solvents: II. Theory.

    PubMed

    Rai-Constapel, Vidisha; Villnow, Torben; Ryseck, Gerald; Gilch, Peter; Marian, Christel M

    2014-12-18

    The chimeric behavior of thioxanthone in protic solvents has been investigated employing computational chemistry methods. In particular, methanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol have been chosen in this study. The solvent environment has been modeled using microsolvation in combination with a conductor-like screening model. The vertical excitation spectrum within the same solvent is seen to depend on the number of specific bonds formed between the chromophore and the solvent molecules. Two different models have been discussed in this work, namely, one and two H-bond models. In particular, the formation of the second H-bond causes the energy gap between the πHπL* and nOπL* states to increase further. Excited-state absorption spectra for the photophysically relevant electronic states have been theoretically determined for comparison with the time-resolved spectra recorded experimentally [Villnow, T.; Ryseck, G.; Rai-Constapel, V.; Marian, C. M.; Gilch, P. J. Phys. Chem. A 2014]. The equilibration of the 1(πHπL*) and 3(nOπL*) states holds responsible for the chimeric behavior. This equilibrium sets in with a calculated time constant of 23 ps in methanol and 14 ps in TFE (5 and 10 ps in experiment, respectively). The radiative decay from the optically bright 1(πHπL*) state is computed to occur with a time constant of 25 ns in both solvents (14–25 ns in experiment).

  17. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Employment specialist competencies as predictors of employment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Amanda C; Bond, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Employment specialist competencies were examined as predictors of employment outcomes for consumers with serious mental illness participating in supported employment. Self-report and supervisor-rated performance measures from 57 employment specialists were correlated with three consumer employment outcomes (i.e., competitive employment rate, 90-day employment rate, and dropout rate). Employment specialists varied from 0 to 80 % in the competitive employment rates for their caseloads. Supervisor ratings of job performance and employment specialist efficacy, percentage of time in the community, and frequency of contacts with consumers were associated with employment outcomes. Employment specialist self-report measures were unrelated to employment outcomes. Surprisingly, employment specialists with larger caseload sizes had higher employment rates. Employment specialists vary widely in their effectiveness. Behavioral measures and supervisory ratings of employment specialists were most predictive of employment outcomes. Direct observation of employment specialist job performance appears to be the most promising method for identifying competencies predictive of employment outcome.

  19. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  20. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes.

  1. Youth-Education-Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirtz, Willard; And Others

    The document presents the proceedings of an international symposium analyzing the relationship among youth, education, and employment, with emphasis on youth employment trends and the need to find solutions for unemployment problems. The objectives are to evaluate the existing relationship in the light of changing values and expectations of young…

  2. Addressing Employer Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perspective: Essays and Reviews of Issues in Employment Security and Employment and Training Programs, 1986

    1986-01-01

    This volume of an annual journal contains 21 articles focusing on the many services that state Employment Security (ES) agencies are providing to improve outreach to employers who pay for the programs through the dedicated revenues of the Federal Unemployment Tax Act and state benefit taxes and to improve their own staff ability to deliver…

  3. Employment and Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul. Program Evaluation Div.

    This report examines the effectiveness of employment and training programs in Minnesota and discusses the impact of the 1985 Jobs Bill state legislation. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to Minnesota's programs and to studies of employment and training programs conducted nationwide. Chapter 2 studies the use of Job Training Partnership Act funds…

  4. Maine's Employability Skills Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, John M.; Wolffe, Karen E.; Wolfe, Judy; Brooker, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    This Practice Report describes the development and implementation of the "Maine Employability Skills Program," a model employment program developed by the Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DBVI). The program was designed to support the efforts of the chronically unemployed or underemployed. These consumers were either…

  5. Employment and Unemployment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simler, N. J.

    Three sections of information are presented in this report on employment and unemployment. Section 1 discusses how the concepts of employment, unemployment, and the labor force are defined and measured. Included in the discussion is an explanation of the current population survey. Section 2 examines the principal trends and cyclical movements of…

  6. Employment Policy and Territories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthet, Thierry; Cuntigh, Philippe; Guitton, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    France's employment policy has historically been governed by a strategy of interventions aimed at specific categories of individuals, including victims of industrial restructuring, entry workers, the long-term unemployed, and the disabled. Since the 1980s, France has had the following main lines of employment policy: (1) assistance to victims of…

  7. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area.

  8. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  9. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hie, Liana; Chang, Jonah J.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki-Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a "green" alcohol solvent. The…

  10. A generic analysis of energy use and solvent selection for CO2 separation from post-combustion flue gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic calculation was performed to determine the theoretical minimum energy used to separate CO2 from a coal combustion flue gas in a typical adsorption-desorption system. Under ideal conditions, the minimum energy required to separate CO2 from post-combustion flue gas and produce pure CO2 at 1 atmospheric pressure was only about 1183 kJ/kg CO2. This amount could double with the addition of the driving forces of mass and heat transfer and the adverse impacts of absorption heat release on adsorption capacity. Thermodynamic analyses were also performed for the aqueous amine-based absorption process. Two CO2 reaction mechanisms, the carbamate formation reaction with primary/secondary amines and the CO2 hydration reaction with tertiary amines, were included in the absorption reaction. The reaction heat, sensible heat, and stripping heat were all important to the total heat requirement. The heat use of an ideal tertiary amine amounted to 2786 kJ/kg, compared to 3211 kJ/kg for an ideal primary amine. The heat usage of an ideal amine was about 20% lower than that of commercially available amines. Optimizing the absorption process configuration could further reduce energy use. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2008 AIChE Spring National Meeting (New Orleans, LA 4/6-10/2008).

  11. Energy and employment

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, W.J.; Robson, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship of energy and employment is an essential ingredient of the current energy-policy debate. Energy, in its various forms, is an almost universal input to the production and consumption of goods and services in modern society, yet little attention is paid to its employment impacts. Far too little attention is being paid to the impact that changes in the sources, uses, and prices of energy will have on the level, location, and structure of employment in the U.S. economy. Unless their consequences are foreseen, energy solutions may have profound and sometimes devastating effects upon regions, industries, and jobs. This study addresses eight areas of this relationship: labor supply and demand in the energy sector; socio-economic impacts of energy development; coal, electricity, and employment; energy as a factor in the production/consumption process; alternative technologies and employment; developing an energy/employment modeling capability; research priorities; and policy recommendations related to energy/employment relationships. 40 references, 7 figures, 22 tables.

  12. [A case of volatile solvent psychosis accompanied with multiple neurological and psychological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Miyashita, H; Saito, T; Sasaki, Y; Ishigaki, H; Ikemoto, M; Nakano, N; Midorikawa, Y; Toki, S; Watanabe, M; Takahata, N

    1996-04-01

    A case of psychosis accompanied with variable symptoms induced by chronic volatile solvent inhalation is reported in this study. The patient was a 27-year-old male who had abused volatile solvents for 15 years, and was sent to the hospital because of a tonic-clonic seizure. Severe psychomotor excitement was observed on the first day and the 7th day after admission. After 10 days of admission, we observed visual transformation and hyperthermia, which suggested acute toxic symptoms due to a volatile solvent. Furthermore, symptoms such as incoherence, delusions of persecution, and catalepsy were also observed in this case. There have been few reports of multiple neurological and mental symptoms appearing in cases of volatile solvent psychosis. Although we sometimes experience cases of solvent abuse with acute mental symptoms and recurrent excitement after sedation, such symptoms are not always observed because of flashback in the strict sense. Therefore, careful early treatment should be employed to prevent 'secondary excitement'.

  13. Solvent properties governing solute partitioning in polymer/polymer aqueous two-phase systems: nonionic compounds.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Pedro P; Reis, Celso A; Rodrigues, Alírio E; Mikheeva, Larissa M; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2010-01-14

    The solvatochromic solvent parameters characterizing the solvent polarity (pi*), solvent hydrogen-bond donor acidity (alpha), and solvent hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity (beta) of aqueous media were measured in the coexisting phases of nine different aqueous polymer/polymer two-phase systems (ATPS), containing 0.15 M NaCl in 0.01 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Partitioning coefficients of six neutral compounds were measured in the nine ATPS at particular polymer concentrations. The solvatochromic equation was used to describe the partitioning of each compound. Three descriptors of the solvent properties of the phases could describe adequately the partitioning of the solutes in all the ATPS employed.

  14. Farm Employment Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Manpower Developments, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The heavy spring rains of 1973 led to delays and reduced acreage in planting, resulting in a sharp decline in vegetable and cotton employment. Seasonal farmworker job levels are reported by state and activity. (MS)

  15. Placement: The Employer's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teff, Donald R.

    1979-01-01

    A bank vice president reviews three barriers to the employment of handicapped persons: misunderstanding and lack of knowledge concerning the handicapped, the traditional lag between recognition of a problem and its solution, and apathy and disinterest. (CL)

  16. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  17. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  18. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  19. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  20. Kinetic solvent effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with tertiary amides. Control over the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity through solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-01-16

    A laser flash photolysis study on the role of solvent effects on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-formylpyrrolidine (FPRD), and N-acetylpyrrolidine (APRD) to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. From large to very large increases in the HAT rate constant (kH) were measured on going from MeOH and TFE to isooctane (kH(isooctane)/kH(MeOH) = 5-12; kH(isooctane)/kH(TFE) > 80). This behavior was explained in terms of the increase in the extent of charge separation in the amides determined by polar solvents through solvent-amide dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding, where the latter interactions appear to play a major role with strong HBD solvents such as TFE. These interactions increase the electron deficiency of the amide C-H bonds, deactivating these bonds toward HAT to an electrophilic radical such as CumO(•), indicating that changes in solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding can provide a convenient method for deactivation of the C-H bond of amides toward HAT. With DMF, a solvent-induced change in HAT selectivity was observed, suggesting that solvent effects can be successfully employed to control the reaction selectivity in HAT-based procedures for the functionalization of C-H bonds.

  1. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  2. Solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in the preferential solvation of 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide in 24 binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Tharly; Gonçalves, Thaini F; Venturini, Cristina de G; Machado, Vanderlei G

    2006-11-01

    The molar transition energy (E(T)) polarity values for the dye 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide were collected in binary mixtures comprising a hydrogen-bond accepting (HBA) solvent (acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)) and a hydrogen-bond donating (HBD) solvent (water, methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and butan-1-ol). Data referring to mixtures of water with alcohols were also analyzed. These data were used in the study of the preferential solvation of the probe, in terms of both solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. These latter interactions are of importance in explaining the synergistic behavior observed for many mixed solvent systems. All data were successfully fitted to a model based on solvent-exchange equilibria. The E(T) values of the dye dissolved in the solvents show that the position of the solvatochromic absorption band of the dye is dependent on the medium polarity. The solvation of the dye in HBA solvents occurs with a very important contribution from ion-dipole interactions. In HBD solvents, the hydrogen bonding between the dimethylamino group in the dye and the OH group in the solvent plays an important role in the solvation of the dye. The interaction of the hydroxylic solvent with the other component in the mixture can lead to the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes, which solvate the dye using a lower polar moiety, i.e. alkyl groups in the solvents. The dye has a hydrophobic nature and a dimethylamino group with a minor capability for hydrogen bonding with the medium in comparison with the phenolate group present in Reichardt's pyridiniophenolate. Thus, the probe is able to detect solvent-solvent interactions, which are implicit to the observed synergistic behavior.

  3. Behavioural evaluation of workers exposed to mixtures of organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, N A; Langolf, G D; Whitehead, L W; Fine, L J; Albers, J W; Goldberg, J; Smith, P

    1985-09-01

    Reports from Scandinavia have suggested behavioural impairment among long term workers exposed to solvents below regulatory standards. A cross sectional study of behavioural performance was conducted among printers and spray painters exposed to mixtures of organic solvents to replicate the Scandinavian studies and to examine dose-response relationships. Eligible subjects consisted of 640 hourly workers from four midwestern United States companies. Of these, 269 responded to requests to participate and 240 were selected for study based on restrictions for age, sex, education, and other potentially confounding variables. The subjects tested had been employed on average for six years. Each subject completed an occupational history, underwent a medical examination, and completed a battery of behavioural tests. These included the Fitts law psychomotor task, the Stroop colour-word test, the Sternberg short term memory scanning test, the short term memory span test, and the continuous recognition memory test. Solvent exposure for each subject was defined as an exposed or non-exposed category based on a plant industrial hygiene walk-through and the concentration of solvents based on an analysis of full shift personal air samples by gas chromatography. The first definition was used to maintain consistency with Scandinavian studies, but the second was considered to be more accurate. The average full shift solvent concentration was 302 ppm for the printing plant workers and 6-13 ppm for the workers at other plants. Isopropanol and hexane were the major components, compared with toluene in Scandinavian studies. Performance on behavioural tests was analysed using multiple linear regression with solvent concentration as an independent variable. Other relevant demographic variables were also considered for inclusion. No significant (p greater than 0.05) relation between solvent concentration and impairment on any of the 10 behavioural variables was observed after controlling for

  4. Behavioural evaluation of workers exposed to mixtures of organic solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Maizlish, N A; Langolf, G D; Whitehead, L W; Fine, L J; Albers, J W; Goldberg, J; Smith, P

    1985-01-01

    Reports from Scandinavia have suggested behavioural impairment among long term workers exposed to solvents below regulatory standards. A cross sectional study of behavioural performance was conducted among printers and spray painters exposed to mixtures of organic solvents to replicate the Scandinavian studies and to examine dose-response relationships. Eligible subjects consisted of 640 hourly workers from four midwestern United States companies. Of these, 269 responded to requests to participate and 240 were selected for study based on restrictions for age, sex, education, and other potentially confounding variables. The subjects tested had been employed on average for six years. Each subject completed an occupational history, underwent a medical examination, and completed a battery of behavioural tests. These included the Fitts law psychomotor task, the Stroop colour-word test, the Sternberg short term memory scanning test, the short term memory span test, and the continuous recognition memory test. Solvent exposure for each subject was defined as an exposed or non-exposed category based on a plant industrial hygiene walk-through and the concentration of solvents based on an analysis of full shift personal air samples by gas chromatography. The first definition was used to maintain consistency with Scandinavian studies, but the second was considered to be more accurate. The average full shift solvent concentration was 302 ppm for the printing plant workers and 6-13 ppm for the workers at other plants. Isopropanol and hexane were the major components, compared with toluene in Scandinavian studies. Performance on behavioural tests was analysed using multiple linear regression with solvent concentration as an independent variable. Other relevant demographic variables were also considered for inclusion. No significant (p greater than 0.05) relation between solvent concentration and impairment on any of the 10 behavioural variables was observed after controlling for

  5. Phase behavior and second osmotic virial coefficient for competitive polymer solvation in mixed solvent solutions.

    PubMed

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-11-21

    We apply our recently developed generalized Flory-Huggins (FH) type theory for the competitive solvation of polymers by two mixed solvents to explain general trends in the variation of phase boundaries and solvent quality (quantified by the second osmotic virial coefficient B2) with solvent composition. The complexity of the theoretically predicted miscibility patterns for these ternary mixtures arises from the competitive association between the polymer and the solvents and from the interplay of these associative interactions with the weak van der Waals interactions between all components of the mixture. The main focus here lies in determining the influence of the free energy parameters for polymer-solvent association (solvation) and the effective FH interaction parameters {χαβ} (driving phase separation) on the phase boundaries (specifically the spinodals), the second osmotic virial coefficient B2, and the relation between the positions of the spinodal curves and the theta temperatures at which B2 vanishes. Our classification of the predicted miscibility patterns is relevant to numerous applications of ternary polymer solutions in industrial formulations and the use of mixed solvent systems for polymer characterization, such as chromatographic separation where mixed solvents are commonly employed. A favorable comparison of B2 with experimental data for poly(methyl methacrylate)/acetonitrile/methanol (or 1-propanol) solutions only partially supports the validity of our theoretical predictions due to the lack of enough experimental data and the neglect of the self and mutual association of the solvents.

  6. Phase behavior and second osmotic virial coefficient for competitive polymer solvation in mixed solvent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-11-01

    We apply our recently developed generalized Flory-Huggins (FH) type theory for the competitive solvation of polymers by two mixed solvents to explain general trends in the variation of phase boundaries and solvent quality (quantified by the second osmotic virial coefficient B 2 ) with solvent composition. The complexity of the theoretically predicted miscibility patterns for these ternary mixtures arises from the competitive association between the polymer and the solvents and from the interplay of these associative interactions with the weak van der Waals interactions between all components of the mixture. The main focus here lies in determining the influence of the free energy parameters for polymer-solvent association (solvation) and the effective FH interaction parameters {χαβ} (driving phase separation) on the phase boundaries (specifically the spinodals), the second osmotic virial coefficient B 2 , and the relation between the positions of the spinodal curves and the theta temperatures at which B 2 vanishes. Our classification of the predicted miscibility patterns is relevant to numerous applications of ternary polymer solutions in industrial formulations and the use of mixed solvent systems for polymer characterization, such as chromatographic separation where mixed solvents are commonly employed. A favorable comparison of B 2 with experimental data for poly(methyl methacrylate)/acetonitrile/methanol (or 1-propanol) solutions only partially supports the validity of our theoretical predictions due to the lack of enough experimental data and the neglect of the self and mutual association of the solvents.

  7. Critical Casimir interactions and colloidal self-assembly in near-critical solvents.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Nikos; Edison, John R; van Roij, René; Evans, Robert; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-28

    A binary solvent mixture close to critical demixing experiences fluctuations whose correlation length, ξ, diverges as the critical point is approached. The solvent-mediated (SM) interaction that arises between a pair of colloids immersed in such a near-critical solvent can be long-ranged and this so-called critical Casimir interaction is well-studied. How a (dense) suspension of colloids will self-assemble under these conditions is poorly understood. Using a two-dimensional lattice model for the solvent and hard disks to represent the colloids, we perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the phase behaviour of this model colloidal suspension as a function of colloid size and wettability under conditions where the solvent reservoir is supercritical. Unlike most other approaches, where the solvent is modelled as an implicit background, our model employs an explicit solvent and treats the suspension as a ternary mixture. This enables us to capture important features, including the pronounced fractionation of the solvent in the coexisting colloidal phases, of this complex system. We also present results for the partial structure factors; these shed light on the critical behaviour in the ternary mixture. The degree to which an effective two-body pair potential description can describe the phase behaviour and structure of the colloidal suspension is discussed briefly.

  8. Measurement and prediction of aromatic solute distribution coefficients for aqueous-organic solvent systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental and modeling activities were performed to assess techniques for measurement and prediction of distribution coefficients for aromatic solutes between water and immiscible organic solvents. Experiments were performed to measure distribution coefficients in both clean water and wastewater systems, and to assess treatment of a wastewater by solvent extraction. The theoretical portions of this investigation were directed towards development of techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Experiments were performed to assess treatment of a phenolic-laden coal conversion wastewater by solvent extraction. The results showed that solvent extraction for recovery of phenolic material offered several wastewater processing advantages. Distribution coefficients were measured in clean water and wastewater systems for aromatic solutes of varying functionality with different solvent types. It was found that distribution coefficients for these compounds in clean water systems were not statistically different from distribution coefficients determined in a complex coal conversion process wastewater. These and other aromatic solute distribution coefficient data were employed for evaluation of modeling techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Eight solvents were selected in order to represent various chemical classes: toluene and benzene (aromatics), hexane and heptane (alkanes), n-octanol (alcohols), n-butyl acetate (esters), diisopropyl ether (ethers), and methylisobutyl ketone (ketones). The aromatic solutes included: nonpolar compounds such as benzene, toluene and naphthalene, phenolic compounds such as phenol, cresol and catechol, nitrogenous aromatics such as aniline, pyridine and aminonaphthalene, and other aromatic solutes such as naphthol, quinolinol and halogenated compounds. 100 references, 20 figures, 34 tables.

  9. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  10. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    PubMed

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of κ-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to κ-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts.

  11. Technology and employment

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.H.

    1983-07-22

    The influence of technology on today's high unemployment picture is discussed. Employment in the high-technology sector is seen by some to be a panacea for workers who have lost their jobs due to irreversible structural causes. Some federal, regional, state, and local efforts being made to ease structural adjustment are included. 28 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Employer Engagement in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Anthony; Dawkins, James

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is employer engagement in education as it supports the learning and progression of young people through activities including work experience, job shadowing, workplace visits, career talks, mock interviews, CV workshops, business mentoring, enterprise competitions and the provision of learning resources. Interest has grown…

  13. Westchester County Employers Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Marcia M.

    The Westchester County Employers Survey was done in May 2003 in order learn more about employee training needs, how they accomplished these needs, and how it would be possible for the Westchester Community College to fulfill these needs. Out of the 639 surveys sent, 145 were returned in a satisfactory format, which produces a 22.6% return rate.…

  14. Employer Satisfaction Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William A.

    A three-part, state-wide survey was conducted in Spring 1979, to determine employer satisfaction with the vocational programs offered at Hawaii's high schools and community colleges. Three populations were involved in the survey: (1) the personnel directors of 29 firms representing approximately 25% of the businesses in Hawaii with 250 or more…

  15. Employers, Families and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Family involvement in education is good for business, critical to children's school achievement, and important in creating strong and vibrant communities. This report discusses the role of businesses and employers in helping partners and family members be more involved in children's learning. Throughout the report, programs at specific companies…

  16. Should Universities Promote Employability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Employability is becoming increasingly central to the mission and functioning of universities, spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketisation. This article provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and…

  17. The Employment Mismatch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Employers value a four-year college degree, many of them more than ever. Yet half of those surveyed recently by "The Chronicle" and American Public Media's "Marketplace" said they had trouble finding recent graduates qualified to fill positions at their company or organization. Nearly a third gave colleges just fair to poor marks for producing…

  18. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the…

  19. A Stochastic Employment Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Teng

    2013-01-01

    The Stochastic Employment Problem(SEP) is a variation of the Stochastic Assignment Problem which analyzes the scenario that one assigns balls into boxes. Balls arrive sequentially with each one having a binary vector X = (X[subscript 1], X[subscript 2],...,X[subscript n]) attached, with the interpretation being that if X[subscript i] = 1 the ball…

  20. Employer Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Richard A.

    In 1990, Cuesta College (CC) conducted a needs assessment of local employers to determine the type of work done by their employees, number of employees, hiring plans, the current level of employee training, and training needs. The mailed survey had 266 usable responses for a 40.9% return rate. Study findings included the following: (1) 31% of the…

  1. Employment Prospects for Biologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korschgen, Ann J.; Davis, Jerry D.

    1983-01-01

    Assesses the results of a survey of organizations which hire individuals with a biological background, focusing on future hiring plans, level of education, employment selection factors, typical positions, and where jobs are listed. Recommends developing communication skills, maintaining high grades, and relevant work experience as keys to…

  2. Declining Black Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard; Gallaway, Lowell

    1993-01-01

    Explores income inequality during declining African-American employment, examines current welfare systems, and suggests ways to improve the economic disadvantages of minority groups. Letting markets work can improve the economic status of African Americans. The present dual African-American economy, a market economy and an entitlement economy, is…

  3. Engaging Employers in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gary; DesRosier, Theron; Peterson, Nils; Chida, Meriem; Lagier, Randy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a pilot project in which formative feedback from industry professionals creates a genuine learning experience for students. Industry is giving feedback to higher education that many graduates are not employable or that they need substantial postcollegiate on-the-job training. Higher education is struggling to…

  4. Vietnamese Students Employability Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Nguyen Minh

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to investigate if the International University (IU) students' core competencies can meet the requirements set by employers, what are the differences in core competencies in final year students (or undergraduates), and how they view themselves compared with ex-students after one or two years in working environment, how…

  5. Industrialisation, Exports and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabolo, Yves

    1980-01-01

    After reviewing trends in industrial production, exports, and employment in the Third World since 1960, the author discusses industrialization strategies based on the local processing of raw materials for export. Such processing has proved to be a major factor in job creation. (Author/SK)

  6. The Employability Skills Portfolio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stemmer, Paul; And Others

    1992-01-01

    During 1990-91, Michigan schools piloted an innovative portfolio approach enabling students to discover, document, and develop employability skills in academics, personal management, and teamwork. Not an improved sorting system, the project encourages students to recognize successes, seek opportunities to improve skills, and gain confidence in…

  7. Equal Opportunity in Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Paul

    This book focuses on discrimination in employment, defined as the denial of equal opportunity in the labor market to qualified persons on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, or any other factor not related to their individual qualifications for work. The average nonwhite college graduate can expect to earn less during…

  8. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2013-08-01

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation.

  9. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  10. [Low-density solvent-based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Benqiong; Chen, Hao; Li, Shengqing

    2012-02-01

    A novel method of low-density solvent-based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SD-DLLME) was developed for the determination of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Conventional DLLME methods usually employ organic solvents heavier than water as the extraction solvents and achieve the phase separation through centrifugation. On the contrary, in this proposed extraction procedure, a mixture of low-density extraction solvent (toluene) and dispersive solvent (acetone) was injected into the aqueous sample solution to form an emulsion. A demulsification solvent (acetonitrile) was then injected into the aqueous solution to break up the emulsion, which turned clear quickly and was separated into two layers. The upper layer (toluene) was collected and analyzed by GC. No centrifugation was required in this procedure. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of dispersive solvent, extraction solvent and de-emulsifier were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method provided a good linearity in the range of 20 - 500 microg/L (r2 = 0.994 2 - 0.999 9). The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were in the range of 0.52 - 5.11 microg/L. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the determination of 40 microg/L PAHs were in the range of 2.2% - 13.6% (n = 5). The proposed method is fast, efficient and convenient. It has been successfully applied to the determination of PAHs in natural water samples with the spiked recoveries of 80.2% - 115.1%.

  11. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  12. The influence of organic sample solvents on the separation efficiency of basic compounds under strong cation exchange mode.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhen; Yu, Dongping; Liu, Yanfang; Du, Nana; Tao, Yanduo; Mei, Lijuan; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-05-04

    This study investigated the influence of organic sample solvents on separation efficiency of basic compounds under strong cation exchange (SCX) mode. The mixtures of acidic aqueous solution and organic solvent such as acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were tested as sample solvents. For later-eluting analytes, the increase of sample solvent elution strength was responsible for the decrease of separation efficiency. Thus, sample solvents with weak elution strength could provide high separation efficiencies. For earlier-eluting analytes, the retention of organic sample solvents was the main factor affecting separation efficiency. Weakly retained solvents could provide high separation efficiency. In addition, an optimized approach was proposed to reduce the effect of organic sample solvent, in which low ionic solvent was employed as initial mobile phase in the gradient. At last, the analysis of impurities in hydrophobic drug berberine was performed. The results showed that using acidic aqueous methanol as sample solvents could provide high separation efficiency and good resolution (R>1.5).

  13. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  14. Dynamics around solutes and solute-solvent complexes in mixed solvents.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Sungnam; Fayer, M D

    2007-09-04

    Ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo experiments, IR pump-probe experiments, and FT-IR spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of phenol-OD in three solvents, CCl4, mesitylene (1, 3, 5 trimethylbenzene), and the mixed solvent of mesitylene and CCl4 (0.83 mole fraction CCl4), are used to study solute-solvent dynamics via observation of spectral diffusion. Phenol forms a complex with Mesitylene. In the mesitylene solution, there is only complexed phenol; in the CCl4 solution, there is only uncomplexed phenol; and in the mixed solvent, both phenol species are present. Dynamics of the free phenol in CCl4 or the mixed solvent are very similar, and dynamics of the complex in mesitylene and in the mixed solvent are very similar. However, there are differences in the slowest time scale dynamics between the pure solvents and the mixed solvents. The mixed solvent produces slower dynamics that are attributed to first solvent shell solvent composition variations. The composition variations require a longer time to randomize than is required in the pure solvents, where only density variations occur. The experimental results and recent MD simulations indicate that the solvent structure around the solute may be different from the mixed solvent's mole fraction.

  15. The solvent dependent shift of the amide I band of a fully solvated peptide in methanol/water mixtures as a local probe for the solvent composition in the peptide/solvent interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanakaran, S

    2008-01-01

    We determine the shift and line-shape of the amide I band of a model AK-peptide from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptide dissolved in methanol/water mixtures with varying composition. The IR-spectra are determined from a transition dipole coupling exciton model. A simplified empirical model Hamiltonian is employed, taking both the effect of hydrogen bonding, as well as intramolecular vibrational coupling into account. We consider a single isolated AK-peptide in a mostly helical conformation, while the solvent is represented by 2600 methanol or water molecules, simulated for a pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 300 K. Over the course of the simulations minor reversible conformational changes at the termini are observed, which are found to only slightly affect the calculated spectral properties. Over the entire composition range, varying from pure water to the pure methanol solvent, a monotonous blue-shift of the IR amide I band of about 8 wavenumbers is observed. The shift is found to be caused by two counter-compensating effects: An intramolecular red-shift of about 1.2 wavenumbers, due to stronger intramolecular hydrogen-bonding in a methanol-rich environment. Dominating, however, is the intermolecular solvent-dependent blue-shift of about 10 wavenumbers, being attributed to the less effective hydrogen bond donor capabilities of methanol compared to water. The importance of solvent-contribution to the IR-shift, as well as the significantly different hydrogen formation capabilities of water and methanol make the amide I band sensitive to composition changes in the local environment close the peptide/solvent interface. This allows, in principle, an experimental determination of the composition of the solvent in close proximity to the peptide surface. For the AK-peptide case they observe at low methanol concentrations a significantly enhanced methanol concentration at the peptide/solvent-interface, supposedly promoted by the partially hydrophobic

  16. Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

  17. Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandratos, S.D.; Brown, G.M.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Moyer, B.A.

    2000-05-09

    Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium as pertechnetate anion, TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

  18. Full Employment in Industrialized Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Argues that full employment must be acceptable on both social and economic grounds. Examines profound changes in industrialized economies since the 1970s and the diversity of employment contracts. Suggests that difficult policy decisions surround full employment. (SK)

  19. Prediction of the solubility in lipidic solvent mixture: Investigation of the modeling approach and thermodynamic analysis of solubility.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shruti V; Patel, Sarsvatkumar

    2015-09-18

    Self-micro emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) is one of the methods to improve solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drug(s). The knowledge of the solubility of pharmaceuticals in pure lipidic solvents and solvent mixtures is crucial for designing the SMEDDS of poorly soluble drug substances. Since, experiments are very time consuming, a model, which allows for solubility predictions in solvent mixtures based on less experimental data is desirable for efficiency. Solvents employed were Labrafil® M1944CS and Labrasol® as lipidic solvents; Capryol-90®, Capryol-PGMC® and Tween®-80 as surfactants; Transcutol® and PEG-400 as co-solvents. Solubilities of both drugs were determined in single solvent systems at temperature (T) range of 283-333K. In present study, we investigated the applicability of the thermodynamic model to understand the solubility behavior of drugs in the lipiodic solvents. By using the Van't Hoff and general solubility theory, the thermodynamic functions like Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of solution, mixing and solvation for drug in single and mixed solvents were understood. The thermodynamic parameters were understood in the framework of drug-solvent interaction based on their chemical similarity and dissimilarity. Clotrimazole and Fluconazole were used as active ingredients whose solubility was measured in single solvent as a function of temperature and the data obtained were used to derive mathematical models which can predict solubility in multi-component solvent mixtures. Model dependent parameters for each drug were calculated at each temperature. The experimental solubility data of solute in mixed solvent system were measured experimentally and further correlated with the calculates values obtained from exponent model and log-linear model of Yalkowsky. The good correlation was observed between experimental solubility and predicted solubility.

  20. Solvent recovery system provides timely compliance solution

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Coventry, Rhode Island) faced the challenge of meeting an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) deadline for solvent recovery within one year. The company also had to ensure that a new solvent recovery system would satisfy Rhode Island state requirements. An initial search for the required technology was fruitless. Finally, MG Industries (Saint Charles, Missouri), an industrial gas supplier, was chosen for the job. Using CRYOSOLV, as the waste stream cools in the cryogenic condenser (heat exchanger), the solvents condense at temperatures below the dewpoint. The recovered solvent can be recycled into the process, while clean gas is vented to the atmosphere.

  1. Organic solvent use in enterprises in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yasuhiro; Ukai, Hirohiko; Okamoto, Satoru; Samoto, Hajime; Itoh, Kenji; Moriguchi, Jiro; Sakuragi, Sonoko; Ohashi, Fumiko; Takada, Shiro; Kawakami, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    This study was initiated to elucidate possible changes in types of organic solvents (to be called solvents in short) used in enterprises in Japan through comparison of current solvent types with historical data since 1983. To investigate current situation in solvent use in enterprises, surveys were conducted during one year of 2009 to 2010. In total, workroom air samples in 1,497 unit workplaces with solvent use were analyzed in accordance with regulatory requirements. Typical use pattern of solvents was as mixtures, accounting for >70% of cases. Adhesives spreading (followed by adhesion) was relatively common in small-scale enterprises, whereas printing and painting work was more common in middle-scale ones, and solvent use for testing and research purpose was basically in large-scaled enterprises. Through-out printing, painting, surface coating and adhesive application, toluene was most common (being detected in 49 to 82% of workplaces depending on work types), whereas isopropyl alcohol was most common (49%) in degreasing, cleaning and wiping workplaces. Other commonly used solvents were methyl alcohol, ethyl acetate and acetone (33 to 37%). Comparison with historical data in Japan and literature-retrieved data outside of Japan all agreed with the observation that toluene is the most commonly used solvent. Application of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, once common in 1980s, has ceased to exist in recent years.

  2. Special Issue: "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents".

    PubMed

    Sperry, Jonathan; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    To overcome the well-established drawbacks of conventional organic solvents (toxicity, non-biodegradability, flammability, accumulation in the atmosphere) remarkable research efforts have been recently devoted to the replacement of traditional organic reaction media by the so-called Green Solvents. In this sense, the choice of a safe, non-toxic, biorenewable and cheap reaction media is a crucial goal in organic synthesis. Thus, this Special Issue on "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents" has been aimed to showcase a series of stimulating contributions from international experts within different sub-areas of organic synthesis in Green Solvents (ranging from metal- to organo-catalyzed organic reactions).

  3. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  4. A solvent tolerant isolate of Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Singh, Rajni; Khare, S K; Gupta, M N

    2006-01-01

    A solvent tolerant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from soil by cyclohexane enrichment. Presence of cyclohexane (20%) in culture media prolonged the lag phase and caused reduction in biomass. Transmission electron micrographs showed convoluted cell membrane and accumulation of solvent in case of the cells grown in cyclohexane. The Enterobacter isolate was able to grow in the range of organic solvents having log P above 3.2 and also in presence of mercury, thus showing potential for treatment of solvent rich wastes.

  5. Droplet formation and lateral migration via solvent shifting in a microfluidic setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, Ramin; Hardt, Steffen

    2014-11-01

    When a non-solvent is added to a solvent/solute mixture and if the solvent and the non-solvent are miscible, a part of the solute transforms to tiny (i.e. micron-/submicron-sized) droplets when the solvent concentration reduces. This phenomenon, resulting from supersaturation, is termed solvent shifting or Ouzo effect. Here we investigate this process in a co-flow microfluidic device. Thanks to the laminar nature of the flow, the mass transfer is mainly diffusive and can be analyzed employing (semi)analytical models. Using the resulting concentration profiles along with the ternary phase diagram (TPD) we analyze droplet formation and their lateral migration in the channel. The ternary system consists of a binary mixture (0.5wt% divinyle benzene (DVB) + 95.5wt% ethanol) and deionized water (non-solvent). Plotting concentration trajectories in the TPD we show that they hit the binodal curve in a region in which droplets of DVB form via nucleation, as opposed to spinodal decomposition. The lateral migration of droplets is partially attributed to the Marangoni effect induced by concentration gradients. However, the main effect governing droplet migration appears to be the phase-separation front (separating the one-phase and two-phase regions) moving toward the center of the channel.

  6. Evaluation of Co-solvents with supercritical fluid extraction of atrazine from soil.

    PubMed

    Senseman, S A; Ketchersid, M L

    2000-04-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO(2) has been successfully applied to herbicide extractions from soil. The objectives of this work were to compare extraction efficiency of atrazine from soil using different types and quantities of co-solvent modifiers under a specified set of SFE instrument conditions and to determine the ruggedness of an optimized extraction program and co-solvent on several soils with varying characteristics. The effect of 18 co-solvents on atrazine extraction from Lufkin fine sandy loam was determined using a completely randomized design with six replications. Extractions of Lufkin soil using the more nonpolar co-solvents had recovery similar to extractions where no co-solvent was added. The co-solvents that showed high extraction efficiency, low incidences of restrictor plugging, and ease of cleaning extraction cells were acetone, acetone:water mixtures (with and without 1% triethylamine), and acetonitrile. The addition of 1% triethylamine (TEA) did not increase recovery significantly. The 9:1 acetone:water mixture with 1% TEA was used for the soil comparison because of the high atrazine recovery and low water content. No differences in atrazine recovery were detected between extractions of the four representative soils when the same extraction conditions were employed. No cleanup steps were included in the procedure, yet adequate chromatography results were obtained suggesting some selectivity for this procedure. These data indicate that SFE with optimized conditions and appropriate co-solvents is a relatively robust method that can effectively be used in soil extractions of atrazine.

  7. The use of carrier solvents in regulatory aquatic toxicology testing: practical, statistical and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Green, John; Wheeler, James R

    2013-11-15

    Solvents are often used to aid test item preparation in aquatic ecotoxicity experiments. This paper discusses the practical, statistical and regulatory considerations. The selection of the appropriate control (if a solvent is used) for statistical analysis is investigated using a database of 141 responses (endpoints) from 71 experiments. The advantages and disadvantages of basing the statistical analysis of treatment effects to the water control alone, solvent control alone, combined controls, or a conditional strategy of combining controls, when not statistically significantly different, are tested. The latter two approaches are shown to have distinct advantages. It is recommended that this approach continue to be the standard used for regulatory and research aquatic ecotoxicology studies. However, wherever technically feasible a solvent should not be employed or at least the concentration minimized.

  8. The synthesis of compatible solute analogues-solvent effects on selective glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Eva C; Ventura, M Rita

    2011-02-01

    Ethyl 6-O-acetyl-2,3,4-tribenzyl-1-d-thioglucoside and ethyl 6-O-acetyl-2,3,4-tribenzyl-1-d-thiogalactoside, as a mixture of anomers, were employed in the study of the influence of solvent in the stereoselectivity of the glycosylation reaction with small and reactive acceptors. High α-selectivities were obtained in the glycosylation reactions using NIS/TfOH as activator and ethyl ether as the solvent at -60°C. Other solvent mixtures such as dichloromethane, THF, THF/ethyl ether and toluene/dioxane were not nearly as selective. The corresponding thiogalactoside underwent similar glycosylations with the same solvents but with low anomer selectivity. These glycosides are key intermediates for the synthesis of new analogues of compatible solutes.

  9. Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

    2006-07-11

    A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. This solvent is substantially devoid of mono-alkyl amines and alcohols. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired cosolvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon which forms an azeotrope with water are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

  10. Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. This solvent is substantially devoid of mono-alkyl amines and alcohols. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired cosolvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon which forms an azeotrope with water are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

  11. Solvent-driven chemical motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumata, Tetsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1998-10-01

    A solvent-driven chemical motor using amphiphilic polymer gel has been fabricated. The driving force of the gel originates from the surface tension of spreading organic fluid which is pumped out by osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in the gel. A tetrahydrofurane-swollen gel equipped with a spouting hole made a controlled translational motion with a velocity of 77 mm/s or rotational motion with a maximum speed of 400 rpm and a torque of 10-9-10-7 Nm on the water surface. A generator to produce an electric power with a maximum electromotive force of 15 mV and electric power of 0.2 μW has also been constructed. The successful fabrication of gel motor may produce a new era of soft machine systems which work without pollution and unnecessary intermediates.

  12. Employment security and health

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, P; Vahtera, J; Kivimaki, M; Pentti, J; Ferrie, J

    2002-01-01

    Design: Cross sectional survey. Setting: Municipal sector employees in eight Finnish towns. Participants: 5981 employees with a permanent contract and 2786 employees with a non-permanent contract (2194 fixed term contract, 682 government subsidised contract). Outcome measures: Poor self rated health, chronic disease, and psychological distress. Results: Compared with permanent employees, fixed term men and women had better self rated health (men odds ratio 0.70; 95% confidence intervals 0.50 to 0.98, women 0.70 (0.60 to 0.82) and less chronic disease (men 0.69; 0.52 to 0.91; women 0.89; 0.79 to 1.02), but women had more psychological distress (1.26; 1.09 to 1.45). The only difference between subsidised employees and permanent employees was the high level of psychological distress in women (1.35; 1.09 to 1.68). Low perceived employment security was associated with poor health across all three indicators. The association of low perceived security with psychological distress was significantly stronger in permanent employees than among fixed term and subsidised employees, indicating that perceived security is more important for mental health among employees with a permanent contract. Conclusions: Contractual security and perceived security of employment are differently associated with health. It is therefore important to distinguish between these aspects of employment security in studies of labour market status and health. Such studies will also need to control for health selection, which is unlikely to operate in the same way among permanent and non-permanent employees. PMID:12118045

  13. Graduate Employability: A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Employers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yuzhuo

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding what employers think about the value of graduates with similar educational credentials in the workplace (their employability), using insights from the new institutionalism. In this framework, the development of employers' beliefs about graduates' employability is broken into a number of…

  14. Organic solvent-tolerant bacterium which secretes an organic solvent-stable proteolytic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Shiotani, Takashi

    1995-12-01

    A bacterial strain which can be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and can secrete a proteolytic enzyme was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain was derived by the following two-step procedures: high proteolytic enzyme producers were first isolated by the usual method, and then the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism was selected from these high-rate proteolytic enzyme producers. The proteolytic activity of the supernatant of the culture was stable in the presence of various organic solvents. The stability of the enzyme in the presence of organic solvents, of which the values of the logarithm of the partition coefficient (log P) were equal to or more than 3.2, was almost the same as that in the absence of organic solvents. It is expected that both the solvent-tolerant microorganism and the solvent-stable enzyme produced by this strain can be used as catalysts for reactions in the presence of organic solvents.

  15. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  16. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  17. Explicit solvent simulations of the aqueous oxidation potential and reorganization energy for neutral molecules: gas phase, linear solvent response, and non-linear response contributions.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Jennifer J; Tentscher, Peter R; Seijo, Marianne; Samuel Arey, J

    2015-06-14

    First principles simulations were used to predict aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox) and associated half-cell reorganization energies (λaq) for aniline, phenol, methoxybenzene, imidazole, and dimethylsulfide. We employed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the oxidized and reduced species in an explicit aqueous solvent, followed by EOM-IP-CCSD computations with effective fragment potentials for diabatic energy gaps of solvated clusters, and finally thermodynamic integration of the non-linear solvent response contribution using classical MD. A priori predicted Eox and λaq values exhibit mean absolute errors of 0.17 V and 0.06 eV, respectively, compared to experiment. We also disaggregate Eox into several well-defined free energy properties, including the gas phase adiabatic free energy of ionization (7.73 to 8.82 eV), the solvent-induced shift in the free energy of ionization due to linear solvent response (-2.01 to -2.73 eV), and the contribution from non-linear solvent response (-0.07 to -0.14 eV). The linear solvent response component is further apportioned into contributions from the solvent-induced shift in vertical ionization energy of the reduced species (ΔVIEaq) and the solvent-induced shift in negative vertical electron affinity of the ionized species (ΔNVEAaq). The simulated ΔVIEaq and ΔNVEAaq are found to contribute the principal sources of uncertainty in computational estimates of Eox and λaq. Trends in the magnitudes of disaggregated solvation properties are found to correlate with trends in structural and electronic features of the solute. Finally, conflicting approaches for evaluating the aqueous reorganization energy are contrasted and discussed, and concluding recommendations are given.

  18. Phenolic content and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus cannabinus L. seed extracts after sequential solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Yusri, Noordin Mohd; Chan, Kim Wei; Iqbal, Shahid; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-10-25

    A sequential solvent extraction scheme was employed for the extraction of antioxidant compounds from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seeds. Yield of extracts varied widely among the solvents and was the highest for hexane extract (16.6% based on dry weight basis), while water extract exhibited the highest total phenolic content (18.78 mg GAE/g extract), total flavonoid content (2.49 mg RE/g extract), and antioxidant activities (p < 0.05). DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching, metal chelating activity, ferric thiocyanate and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assays were employed to comprehensively assess the antioxidant potential of different solvent extracts prepared sequentially. Besides water, methanolic extract also exhibited high retardation towards the formation of hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the total antioxidant activity tests (p < 0.05). As conclusion, water and methanol extracts of kenaf seed may potentially serve as new sources of antioxidants for food and nutraceutical applications.

  19. Unexpected low-dose toxicity of the universal solvent DMSO.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Joana; Davis, Benjamin; Tilley, Mark; Normando, Eduardo; Duchen, Michael R; Cordeiro, M Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an important aprotic solvent that can solubilize a wide variety of otherwise poorly soluble polar and nonpolar molecules. This, coupled with its apparent low toxicity at concentrations <10%, has led to its ubiquitous use and widespread application. Here, we demonstrate that DMSO induces retinal apoptosis in vivo at low concentrations (5 μl intravitreally dosed DMSO in rat from a stock concentration of 1, 2, 4, and 8% v/v). Toxicity was confirmed in vitro in a retinal neuronal cell line, at DMSO concentrations >1% (v/v), using annexin V, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and AlamarBlue cell viability assays. DMSO concentrations >10% (v/v) have recently been reported to cause cellular toxicity through plasma membrane pore formation. Here, we show the mechanism by which low concentrations (2-4% DMSO) induce caspase-3 independent neuronal death that involves apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation from mitochondria to the nucleus and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP) activation. These results highlight safety concerns of using low concentrations of DMSO as a solvent for in vivo administration and in biological assays. We recommend that methods other than DMSO are employed for solubilizing drugs but, where no alternative exists, researchers compute absolute DMSO final concentrations and include an untreated control group in addition to DMSO vehicle control to check for solvent toxicity.

  20. Dispersing nanoparticles in a polymer film via solvent evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-05-19

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dispersion of nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer film during solvent evaporation. As the solvent evaporates, a dense polymer-rich skin layer forms at the liquid/vapor interface, which is either NP rich or poor depending on the strength of the NP/polymer interaction. When the NPs are strongly wet by the polymer, the NPs accumulate at the interface and form layers. However, when the NPs are only partially wet by the polymer, most NPs are uniformly distributed in the bulk of the polymer film, with the dense skin layer serving as a barrier to prevent the NPs from moving to the interface. Furthermore, our results point to a possible route to employ less favorable NP/polymer interactions and fast solvent evaporation to uniformly disperse NPs in a polymer film, contrary to the common belief that strong NP/polymer attractions are needed to make NPs well dispersed in polymer nanocomposites.

  1. Dispersing nanoparticles in a polymer film via solvent evaporation

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-05-19

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dispersion of nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer film during solvent evaporation. As the solvent evaporates, a dense polymer-rich skin layer forms at the liquid/vapor interface, which is either NP rich or poor depending on the strength of the NP/polymer interaction. When the NPs are strongly wet by the polymer, the NPs accumulate at the interface and form layers. However, when the NPs are only partially wet by the polymer, most NPs are uniformly distributed in the bulk of the polymer film, with the dense skin layer serving as a barrier tomore » prevent the NPs from moving to the interface. Furthermore, our results point to a possible route to employ less favorable NP/polymer interactions and fast solvent evaporation to uniformly disperse NPs in a polymer film, contrary to the common belief that strong NP/polymer attractions are needed to make NPs well dispersed in polymer nanocomposites.« less

  2. TERRA-KLEEN RESPONSE GROUP, INC. SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of a field demonstration conducted under the SITE program. The technology which was demonstrated was a solvent extraction technology developed by Terra-Kleen Response Group. Inc. to remove organic contaminants from soil. The technology employs...

  3. Undergraduates' Perceptions of Employer Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPre, Carrie; Williams, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Research conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicates that employers across industries seek similar skills in job applicants; yet employers often report finding these desired skills lacking in new hires. This study closes the gap in understanding between employer expectations and student perceptions regarding…

  4. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  5. Employability. NIACE Briefing Sheet 88

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute of Adult Continuing Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Employability skills are central to gaining and keeping employment (e.g. whether paid or unpaid, as an employee or self employed) as well as career progression. The lack of such skills is regularly referred to as one reason for the United Kingdom's often cited long tail of underachievement. Employability skills are at the forefront of government…

  6. Mechanisms of solute rejection in solvent resistant nanofiltration: the effect of solvent on solute rejection.

    PubMed

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Degrève, Jan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-10-28

    The separation performance of solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) membranes was studied in a systematic way to elucidate the complex mechanisms involved in rejection of solutes. Rejection of three dyes (Sudan II, Sudan Black, Sudan 408) from common organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene and n-hexane) through a polyimide based SRNF membrane, STARMEM™122, was studied. It was found that the rejection of the STARMEM™122 membrane was lower than that indicated by the manufacturer. The experimental observations for Sudan II were not promising for the rejection study as they were lower than expected. Sudan Black and Sudan 408, which are larger solutes than Sudan II, provided more interesting insights. The effects of the solvent on the membrane and solute were studied separately. A higher permeation rate of ketones and alcohols was observed, while permeabilities of non-polar solvents were low which shows that this membrane shows higher affinity toward semi-polar solvents (alcohols, ketones). The effect of the solvent on the solute's rejection, based on the results for Sudan Black and Sudan 408, was studied for solvents in the same chemical groups, since the membrane showed a similar separation performance for solvents with similar functional groups (e.g. alcohols). The effect of solvent on solute molecular size was investigated by using simulation with Molecular Dynamics. It was shown that the effective size of a molecule is dependent on the solvent due to solvation and hydration of the solute by the solvent. The size of the solute in the solvent belonging to a similar family was studied separately. It was clear that the rejection was influenced by molecular size of the solute in the same group of solvents. A surprising negative rejection of solutes was achieved for n-hexane. Although solutes in n-hexane have higher volume compared to those in other solvents, the affinity between the solute and membrane increases the solute

  7. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  8. Coal mining with a liquid solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    Study suggests carbonated water can dissolve or suspend coal and carry it to surface. Mixture of carbon dioxide and water may be coal solvent that will make unmanned mining reality. When used with proposed process monitoring coal solubility with conventional strain gage, solvent is basis for rapid cost effective extraction of coal from underground seams.

  9. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Cytotoxic effects of gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, S V; Burkard, D H; Spångberg, L S

    1994-01-01

    Cytotoxicity of commonly used gutta-percha solvents was evaluated. Gutta-percha dissolved by chloroform, halothane, or turpentine was evaluated with the radiochromium release method using L929 mouse fibroblast cells. All solvents were toxic. Turpentine was most toxic followed by halothane and chloroform, which caused similar levels of cell injury.

  11. Evaluation of Gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1990-11-01

    Five solvents (rectified white turpentine, oil of melaleuca, eucalyptol, white pine oil, and pine needle oil) were compared with chloroform for their ability to dissolve gutta-percha. All solvents dissolved at least 50% of the gutta-percha in 15 min at 37 degrees C with chloroform and rectified white turpentine dissolving the gutta-percha completely.

  12. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  13. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-10-05

    While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

  14. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  15. A spreadsheet algorithm for stagewise solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  16. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  17. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  18. SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest results on microwave-expedited solvent-free approach as applied to the assembly of organic molecules will be presented. The salient features of this expeditious methodology such as solvent conservation and ease of manipulation etc. will be described in the context of r...

  19. Solvent effect in the Walden inversion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Oliva, A.; Bertrán, J.

    1984-04-01

    The solvent effect on the fluoride exchange reaction has been studied by means of ab initio calculations using the 3-21G basis set. It is shown that the motion of the solvent molecules is an important part of the reaction coordinate.

  20. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  1. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  2. Employment Trajectories Beyond Retirement.

    PubMed

    Burkert, Carola; Hochfellner, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Within the political and academic debate on working longer, post-retirement employment is discussed as an alternative to maintain older workers in the labor market. Our article enhances this discussion by studying determinants of transitions into post-retirement jobs within differing work environments of birth cohorts 1940-1942. We estimate proportional subhazard models accounting for competing risks using unique German social security data linked to pension accounts. Our findings suggest that individuals' preferences to take up post-retirement jobs are not mutually exclusive. Our study provides evidence that taking up post-retirement jobs is related to seeking financial security, continuity, and work ability, suggesting that public policy has to develop target-oriented support through a public policy mix of different measures aligned to the different peer groups in the labor market.

  3. Thermoplastic composite matrices with improved solvent resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve solvent resistance of aromatic thermoplastic polymers, ethynyl-terminated aromatic sulfone polymers (ETS), sulfone/ester polymers (SEPE) containing pendent ethynyl groups, and phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups are synthesized. Cured polysulfones and phenoxy resins containing ethynyl groups on the ends or pendent on the molecules exhibited systematic behavior in solvent resistance, film flexibility, and toughness as a function of crosslink density. The film and composite properties of a cured solvent-resistant ETS were better than those of a commercially available solvent sensitive polysulfone. The study was part of a NASA program to better understand the trade-offs between solvent resistance, processability and mechanical properties which may be useful in designing composite structures for aerospace vehicles.

  4. Stabilization of Underground Solvent Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, T.R.

    2003-08-15

    The Old Solvent Tanks (OST), located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are comprised of 22 underground storage tanks that were used to store spent radioactive solvent and aqueous wastes generated from the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process. The OSTs were installed at various dates between 1955 and 1968 and used to store the spent solvents until 1974. The spent solvents stored in the OSTs were transferred out from 1976 through 1981 leaving only residual liquids and sludges that could not be pumped out.Final remediation goals include an overlying infiltration control system. If the tanks were to structurally fail, they would collapse causing potential for onsite worker exposure and release of tank contents to the environment. Therefore, as an interim action, methods for stabilizing the tanks were evaluated. This paper will discuss the systems designed to perform and monitor the grouting operation, the grouting process, and the radiological controls and wastes associated with grouting the Old Solvent Tanks.

  5. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  6. Assessment of solvents for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mohammad; Tsianou, Marina; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2017-03-01

    A necessary step in the processing of biomass is the pretreatment and dissolution of cellulose. A good solvent for cellulose involves high diffusivity, aggressiveness in decrystallization, and capability of disassociating the cellulose chains. However, it is not clear which of these factors and under what conditions should be improved in order to obtain a more effective solvent. To this end, a newly-developed phenomenological model has been applied to assess the controlling mechanism of cellulose dissolution. Among the findings, the cellulose fibers remain crystalline almost to the end of the dissolution process for decrystallization-controlled kinetics. In such solvents, decreasing the fiber crystallinity, e.g., via pretreatment, would result in a considerable increase in the dissolution rate. Such insights improve the understanding of cellulose dissolution and facilitate the selection of more efficient solvents and processing conditions for biomass. Specific examples of solvents are provided where dissolution is limited due to decrystallization or disentanglement.

  7. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  8. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  9. Competitive Employment and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Employer Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckey, Wanietta C.

    2016-01-01

    Competitive employment for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is important because this group is described as the most employable, yet least employed. Historically, females have been more likely to hire/work with individuals with disabilities than males but the gap between the sexes has been closing. A survey focusing on work…

  10. Consumer and Employer Strategies for Overcoming Employment Barriers. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crudden, Adele; Williams, Wendy; McBroom, Lynn W.; Moore, J. Elton

    This report on strategies for overcoming employment barriers for persons with visual impairments summarizes comments and suggestions of 7 focus groups comprised of either consumers (n=49) or employers (n=19). The report first reviews the literature concerning employment barriers and how consumers in previous studies suggested these barriers be…

  11. Barriers to Employment: Personality and Cognitive Predictors of Employment Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTurk, Carolyn; Shakespeare-Finch, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Barriers to employment are linked to individual factors such as thinking styles and personality traits. Personality and cognitive differences between employed (n = 55) and unemployed (n = 57) cohorts were analysed to quantify the association between these variables and employment status. Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the…

  12. Disability and Supported Employment: Impact on Employment, Income, and Allowances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germundsson, Per; Gustafsson, Johanna; Lind, Martin; Danermark, Berth

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine supported employment and its impact on the level of employment, disposable income, and sum of allowances, targeting a group of individuals with disabilities. We have particularly focused on individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Supported employment is a vocational rehabilitation service with an empowerment approach…

  13. A Conceptual Understanding of Employability: The Employers' View in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamwesiga, Penelope Mbabazi

    2013-01-01

    Many governments believe that investing in human capital should increase citizens' employability, which is why it is often presented as a solution to the problems of knowledge-based economies and societies, rising unemployment rates and economic competiveness. The aim of this study is to understand employers' views regarding the employability of…

  14. Differential response of marine diatoms to solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Phillips, J.; Patel, H.; Pandiripally, V.

    1995-06-01

    Unicellular algae in aquatic ecosystems are subjected to a variety of pollutants from sources such as runoff from agricultural lands and industrial outfalls. Organic solvents are natural components of oil deposits and commonly find their way into surface waters as a result of discharges from refineries, waste oil, disposal, and accidental spills. Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes. Because of their carcinogenic potential, contamination of soil and water by solvents is cause for serious concern. Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these dealt primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. However, only few data of toxicity effects of solvents on algae have been published. Phytoplankton species vary in their tolerance to trace metals. Diatoms in particular are able to detoxify trace metals by the excretion of organic compounds. A previous study reported that diatoms collected form different sites in the Gulf of Mexico varied in their physiological characteristics. Algae have been considered to be good indicator s of bioactivity of industrial wastes. Unicellular algae vary in their response to a variety of toxicants. Little is known, however, about toxicity of solvents to marine diatoms. The work reported here was done to examine the effect of selected solvents on seven diatom species to determine whether they differed in their responses to these chemicals. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  16. Polar Solvents Trigger Formation of Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-06-09

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and molecular thermodynamics to investigate the formation of reverse micelles in a system of surfactants and nonpolar solvents. Since the early observation of reverse micelles, the question has been whether the existence of polar solvent molecules such as water is the driving force for the formation of reverse micelles in nonpolar solvents. In this work, we use a simple coarse-grained model of surfactants and solvents to show that a small number of polar solvent molecules triggers the formation of large permanent aggregates. In the absence of polar molecules, both the thermodynamic model and molecular simulations show that small aggregates are more populated in the solution and larger ones are less frequent as the system evolves over time. The size and shape of reverse micelles depend on the size of the polar core: the shape is spherical for a large core and ellipsoidal for a smaller one. Using the coarse-grained model, we also investigate the effect of temperature and surfactant tail length. Our results reveal that the number of surfactant molecules in the micelle decreases as the temperature increases, but the average diameter does not change because the size of the polar core remains invariant. A reverse micelle with small polar core attracts fewer surfactants when the tail is long. The uptake of solvent particles by a micelle of longer surfactant tail is less than shorter ones when the polar solvent particles are initially distributed randomly.

  17. Solvent Effect on the Photolysis of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Ahmed, Sofia; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Bano, Raheela; Hafeez, Ambreen

    2015-10-01

    The kinetics of photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in water (pH 7.0) and in organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, ethyl acetate) has been studied using a multicomponent spectrometric method for the assay of RF and its major photoproducts, formylmethylflavin and lumichrome. The apparent first-order rate constants (k obs) for the reaction range from 3.19 (ethyl acetate) to 4.61 × 10(-3) min(-1) (water). The values of k obs have been found to be a linear function of solvent dielectric constant implying the participation of a dipolar intermediate along the reaction pathway. The degradation of this intermediate is promoted by the polarity of the medium. This indicates a greater stabilization of the excited-triplet states of RF with an increase in solvent polarity to facilitate its reduction. The rate constants for the reaction show a linear relation with the solvent acceptor number indicating the degree of solute-solvent interaction in different solvents. It would depend on the electron-donating capacity of RF molecule in organic solvents. The values of k obs are inversely proportional to the viscosity of the medium as a result of diffusion-controlled processes.

  18. Development of a supported liquid membrane as a nickel-zinc secondary battery separator

    SciTech Connect

    Poa, D.S.; Miller, J.F.; Yao, N.P.

    1985-05-01

    A liquid tertiary amine complexing agent is dissolved in an organic solvent and absorbed into and held within the pores of a microporous polymeric film (Celanese Celgard 2400 polypropylene) by either capillary or surface force. Screening tests were performed to identify the optimum tertiary amine/organic solvent combinations, as well as the optimum concentration range of the amine solutions. The treatment of Celgard 2400 microporous film with certain tertiary amine/organic solvent solutions, such as triethylamine/xylene or tripropylamine/xylene, had no significant effect on either zinc penetration resistivity (ZPR) or electrolytic resistivity of the membrane. When the film was treated with tri-n-octylamine solutions of very high amine concentration (above 75 vol %), the potential difference between the zinc cathode and the Ni(OH)/sub 2/ counter electrode, as well as the electrolytic resistance of the membrane, increased sharply (from 300 to 700%). Among the tertiary amine solutions tested in this study, trihexylamine/xylene, tri-n-octylamine (10 to 30 vol %)/toluene, and tri-n-octylamine (10 to 30 vol %)/xylene appeared to be the most promising, especially the last one. The treatment of the Celgard 2400 film with that solution increased the zinc penetration resistivity of the membrane by as much as 400%. Furthermore, this solution treatment also improved the electrolytic conductivity of the Celgard 2400 film.

  19. Development of a supported liquid membrane as a nickel-zinc secondary battery separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poa, D. S.; Miller, J. F.; Yao, N. P.

    1985-05-01

    A liquid tertiary amine complexing agent was dissolved in an organic solvent and absorbed into and held within the pores of a microporous polymeric film by either capillary or surface force. Screening tests were performed to identify the optimum tertiary amine/organic solvent combinations, and the optimum concentration range of the amine solutions. The treatment of Celgard 2400 microporous film with certain tertiary amine/organic solvent solutions, such as triethylamine/xylene or tripropylamine/xylene, had no significant effect on either zinc penetration resistivity (ZPR) or electrolytic resistivity of the membrane. When the film was treated with tri-n-octylamine solutions of very high amine concentration, the potential difference between the zinc cathode and the Ni(OH)2 counter electrode, the electrolytic resistance of the membrane, increased sharply. Among the tertiary amine solutions tested in this study, trihexylamine/xylene, tri-n-octylamine/toluene, and tri-n-octylamine/xylene appeared to be the most promising, especially the last one. The treatment of the Celgard 2400 film with that solution increased the zinc penetration resistivity of the membrane by as much as 400%. This solution treatment also improved the electrolytic conductivity of the Celgard 2400 film.

  20. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  1. Energy requirements for wet solvent extraction of lipids from microalgal biomass.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory J O

    2016-04-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae requires energy efficient processes for extracting and converting triacylglyceride lipids to fuel, compatible with coproduction of protein feeds and nutraceuticals. Wet solvent extraction involves mechanical cell rupture, lipid extraction via solvent contacting, physical phase separation, thermal solvent recovery, and transesterification. A detailed analysis of the effect of key process parameters on the parasitic energy demand of this process was performed. On a well-to-pump basis, between 16% and 320% of the resultant biodiesel energy was consumed depending solely on the process parameters. Highly positive energy balances can be achieved, but only if a correctly designed process is used. This requires processing concentrated biomass (ca 25%w/w) with a high triacylglyceride content (ca 30%w/w), and an efficient extraction process employing a non-polar solvent, low solvent-to-paste ratio, and efficient energy recovery. These requirements preclude many laboratory scale processes and polar co-solvents as viable options for large-scale biofuel production.

  2. Genomic and Genetic Approaches to Solvent Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

    2005-06-10

    The proposed research is to understand and exploit the molecular basis that determines tolerance of the industrially important anaerobic clostridia to solvents. Furthermore, we aim to develop general genomic and metabolic engineering strategies for understanding the molecular basis of tolerance to chemicals and for developing tolerant strains. Our hypothesis is that the molecular basis of what makes bacterial cells able to withstand high solvent concentrations can be used to metabolically engineer cells so that they can tolerate higher concentrations of solvents and related chemicals.

  3. Exploring Hamiltonian dielectric solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Hamiltonian dielectric solvent (HADES) is a recent method [7,25], which enables Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric continua. Sample simulations of an α-helical decapeptide with and without explicit solvent demonstrate the high efficiency of HADES-MD. Addressing the folding of this peptide by replica exchange MD we study the properties of HADES by comparing melting curves, secondary structure motifs and salt bridges with explicit solvent results. Despite the unoptimized ad hoc parametrization of HADES, calculated reaction field energies correlate well with numerical grid solutions of the dielectric Poisson equation.

  4. A Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-08-01

    The material balance and equilibrium equations for solvent extraction processes have been combined with computer spreadsheets in a new way so that models for very complex multicomponent multistage operations can be setup and used easily. A part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  5. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  6. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  7. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  8. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2011-07-19

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  9. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  10. Interaction of organic solvents with protein structures at protein-solvent interface.

    PubMed

    Khabiri, Morteza; Minofar, Babak; Brezovský, Jan; Damborský, Jiří; Ettrich, Rudiger

    2013-11-01

    The effect of non-denaturing concentrations of three different organic solvents, formamide, acetone and isopropanol, on the structure of haloalkane dehalogenases DhaA, LinB, and DbjA at the protein-solvent interface was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of B-factors revealed that the presence of a given organic solvent mainly affects the dynamical behavior of the specificity-determining cap domain, with the exception of DbjA in acetone. Orientation of organic solvent molecules on the protein surface during the simulations was clearly dependent on their interaction with hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface patches, and the simulations suggest that the behavior of studied organic solvents in the vicinity of hyrophobic patches on the surface is similar to the air/water interface. DbjA was the only dimeric enzyme among studied haloalkane dehalogenases and provided an opportunity to explore effects of organic solvents on the quaternary structure. Penetration and trapping of organic solvents in the network of interactions between both monomers depends on the physico-chemical properties of the organic solvents. Consequently, both monomers of this enzyme oscillate differently in different organic solvents. With the exception of LinB in acetone, the structures of studied enzymes were stabilized in water-miscible organic solvents.

  11. Third Annual Employer Satisfaction Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William A.

    A study was conducted in 1980 to ascertain employer attitudes toward and satisfaction with the performance of graduates of vocational education programs in Hawaii. Interviews with 41 employers, who employed an average of 132 workers, sought general perceptions of the knowledge, quality of work, written and oral skills, dependability, adaptability,…

  12. Employment Impact of Electronic Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecker, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic business is stimulating employment in some sectors across industries, such as computer-related and customer service occupations, and diminishing employment in others, such as administrative support and marketing/sales. Similarly, employment impacts will vary by industry. (Contains 56 notes and references.) (SK)

  13. Spectroscopy of tryptophan derivatives in supersonic expansions: Addition of solvent molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipior, Jeffrey; Sulkes, Mark

    1988-05-01

    The addition of solvent molecules, primarily water and some alcohols, to isolated tryptophan derivative molecules has been carried out using supersonic free jet techniques. The derivatives studied include 3-indole acetic acid, 3-indole propionic acid, N-acetyltryptophan ethyl ester, tryptamine, and tryptophol. The primary spectroscopic method employed was laser induced fluorescence, with some individual bands also characterized by fluorescence lifetime measurements or dispersed emission spectra. Unlike solvent addition to indoles already studied, these tryptophan derivatives also offer polar addition sites on the 3-indole chain. Addition to these sites, further removed from the electronic transition, produces solvent shifts of the complex origins that are small compared to the red shifts observed in indoles; small blueshifts occur in some instances. Competition between binding at the 3-indole polar group and the indole moiety nitrogen sites is strongly unequal, with the polar 3-indole chain sites favored, especially for larger solvent molecules. In tryptamine, which was studied most extensively, a variety of -OH-bearing solvents were able to collapse the multiple origin bands, due to different conformers, to only one prominent solvent conformer feature. Similar though less pronounced effects were seen in trytophol. Growth of solvent bands was more indiscriminate for the other derivatives studied and was consistent with formation of complexes separately with each bare molecule conformer. The observation of a solvent induced conformation brings up the question of whether tryptophan itself may be ``steered'' predominantly to one conformation by solution interactions and, if so, whether this plays a role in the molecule's fluorescence probe properties.

  14. Solvent, temperature and concentration effects on the optical rotatory dispersion of (R)-3-methylcyclohexanone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenaizan, Asem; Al-Basheer, Watheq; Musa, Musa M.

    2017-02-01

    Optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) spectra are reported for isolated and solvated (R)-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3MCH) in 10 solvents, of wide polarity range, and over the spectral range 350-650 nm. Sample concentration effects on ORD spectra of R-3MCH were also recorded and investigated over widely varying concentrations from 2.5 × 10-3 to 2.5 × 10-1 g/mL where an observed sensitivity of optical rotation (OR) to incident light wavelength at low concentrations is correlated to solvent effects. Temperature effects were also studied by recording ORD spectra over the temperature range 0-65 °C in toluene. Recorded specific OR was plotted against various solvent parameters, namely, dipole moment, polarity, refractive index and polarizability to probe solvent effects. Furthermore, solvent effects were studied by incorporating Kamlet's and Taft's solvent parameters in the multi-parametric linear fitting. Theoretically, ORD spectra and populations of optimized geometries of equatorial and axial conformers of R-3MCH were calculated in the gas and solvated phases. All theoretical calculations were performed employing the polarizable continuum model using density functional theoretical and composite scheme (G4) methods with aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Net ORD spectra of R-3MCH were generated by the Boltzmann-weighted sum of the contributions of the dominant conformers. Upon comparing theoretical and experimental ORD spectra, a very good agreement is observed for the ORD spectra in the gas phase and high polarity solvents compared to relatively lesser agreement in low polarity solvents.

  15. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  16. [Shoe factory workers, solvents and health].

    PubMed

    Foà, Vito; Martinotti, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to organic solvents in footwear manufacturing industry came from the glues used adhering the shoe parts to each other. Benzene was the first solvent used in shoe factories until the evidence of its capacity to cause leukaemia. Then, the demonstration that exposure to n-hexane was related to distal polyneuropathy limited the use of this substance. After that, results of neurotoxicological studies conducted on workers exposed to different mixtures of organic solvents make necessary prevention measure directed to a progressive reduction of air dispersion of these chemicals. Today exposure to solvents in workplaces is regulated by health based exposure limit values that should warranty absence of central nervous system effects. One of the most important rules of occupational medicine is verify that these exposure levels are really health protective also for workers with increased susceptibility.

  17. Deasphalted oil -- A natural asphaltene solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Nazarko, T.W.; Sills, S.; Fuhr, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    Asphaltene deposition in the near-wellbore region can block pore throats, change wettability characteristics and relative-permeability relationships, and therefore, reduce oil production. Conventional aromatic solvents (e.g., toluene, xylene) alone or in combination with various dispersants are used to remove asphaltene damage from the near-wellbore region. However, these aromatic solvents are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate the asphaltene-solvating power of various non conventional solvents, including deasphalted oil, using a light-scattering technique. Experimental results suggest that deasphalted oil is a strong asphaltene solvent presumably because of its native resin and aromatic contents. Addition of asphaltene dispersants also increases the solubilizing power of the deasphalted oil. Furthermore, various refinery and heavy oil upgrader streams show strong ability to solubilize asphaltenes.

  18. Deasphalted oil: A natural asphaltene solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Nazarko, T.W.; Sills, S.; Fuhr, B.J.

    1996-08-01

    Asphaltene deposition in the near-wellbore region can block pore throats, change wettability characteristics and relative-permeability relationships, and therefore, reduce oil production. Conventional aromatic solvents (e.g., toluene and xylene) alone or in combination with various dispersants are used to remove asphaltene damage from the near-wellbore region. However, these aromatic solvents are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate the asphaltene-solvating power of various nonconventional solvents, including deasphalted oil, using a light-scattering technique. Experimental results suggest that deasphalted oil is a strong asphaltene solvent presumably because of its native resin and aromatic contents. Addition of asphaltene dispersants also increases the solubilizing power of the deasphalted oil. Furthermore, various refinery and heavy oil upgrader streams show strong ability to solubilize asphaltenes.

  19. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  20. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  1. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  2. Wetting of polymers by their solvents.

    PubMed

    Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence; Verneuil, Emilie; Delannoy, Guillaume; Valois, Pauline

    2016-02-01

    We review the studies on the wetting of soluble polymeric substrates by their solvents, both in the literature and conducted in our group in the past decade. When a droplet of solvent spreads on a soluble polymer layer, its wetting angle can strongly vary with the contact line velocity even at capillary numbers smaller than unity, in contrast to non-soluble substrates. The solvent content in the polymer is a key parameter for the spreading dynamics; that content is set by the initial conditions, but also by the transfers occurring from the droplet to the polymer layer during spreading. We focus on hydrophilic amorphous polymers that are glassy at room temperature, and we discuss the consequences on wetting of the very large changes in the polymer physical properties induced by solvent sorption. We finally present new results on polymers of varying molar masses, and show how they open new perspectives for a better understanding of powder dissolution.

  3. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  4. Recovery, Reuse, and Recycle of Solvents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    So. San Francisco, CA 94080 (513) 771-2300 (415) 589-9600 Buflovak Division Safety-Kleen Corp. Blaw - Knox food and Chimical Eq. Co. 655 Big Timber Rd...ing, oil and grease removal for cleanup, protective surface removal, and cleaning of wheel bearings. Both hydrocarbon solvents and halogenated solvents...fluid but it could still be blended and downgraded for use as a metal cleaner, - such as using it to clean wheel bearings. Heptane is also an excellent

  5. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  6. Water as a Solvent for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    "Follow the water" is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.

  7. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate. PMID:27708264

  8. Microencapsulation of advanced solvents for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Ye, Congwang; Oakdale, James S; Baker, Sarah E; Smith, William L; Nguyen, Du T; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Aines, Roger D

    2016-10-20

    Purpose-designed, water-lean solvents have been developed to improve the energy efficiency of CO2 capture from power plants, including CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) and ionic liquids (ILs). Many of these solvents are highly viscous or change phases, posing challenges for conventional process equipment. Such problems can be overcome by encapsulation. Micro-Encapsulated CO2 Sorbents (MECS) consist of a CO2-absorbing solvent or slurry encased in spherical, CO2-permeable polymer shells. The resulting capsules have diameters in the range of 100-600 μm, greatly increasing the surface area and CO2 absorption rate of the encapsulated solvent. Encapsulating these new solvents requires careful selection of shell materials and fabrication techniques. We find several common classes of polymers are not compatible with MECS production, but we develop two custom formulations, a silicone and an acrylate, that show promise for encapsulating water-lean solvents. We make the first demonstration of an encapsulated IL for CO2 capture. The rate of CO2 absorption is enhanced by a factor of 3.5 compared to a liquid film, a value that can be improved by further development of shell materials and fabrication techniques.

  9. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  10. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  11. Effect of Organic Solvents on the Yield of Solvent-Tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    PubMed Central

    Isken, Sonja; Derks, Antoine; Wolffs, Petra F. G.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microorganisms are useful in biotransformations with whole cells in two-phase solvent-water systems. The results presented here describe the effects that organic solvents have on the growth of these organisms. The maximal growth rate of Pseudomonas putida S12, 0.8 h−1, was not affected by toluene in batch cultures, but in chemostat cultures the solvent decreased the maximal growth rate by nearly 50%. Toluene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, xylene, hexane, and cyclohexane reduced the biomass yield, and this effect depended on the concentration of the solvent in the bacterial membrane and not on its chemical structure. The dose response to solvents in terms of yield was linear up to an approximately 200 mM concentration of solvent in the bacterial membrane, both in the wild type and in a mutant lacking an active efflux system for toluene. Above this critical concentration the yield of the wild type remained constant at 0.2 g of protein/g of glucose with increasing concentrations of toluene. The reduction of the yield in the presence of solvents is due to a maintenance higher by a factor of three or four as well as to a decrease of the maximum growth yield by 33%. Therefore, energy-consuming adaptation processes as well as the uncoupling effect of the solvents reduce the yield of the tolerant cells. PMID:10347053

  12. Influence of solute-solvent coordination on the orientational relaxation of ion assemblies in polar solvents.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W; Sung, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2012-01-07

    We have investigated the rotational dynamics of lithium thiocyanate (LiNCS) dissolved in various polar solvents with time and polarization resolved vibrational spectroscopy. LiNCS forms multiple distinct ionic structures in solution that can be distinguished with the CN stretch vibrational frequency of the different ionic assemblies. By varying the solvent and the LiNCS concentration, the number and type of ionic structures present in solution can be controlled. Control of the ionic structure provides control over the volume, shape, and dipole moment of the solute, critical parameters for hydrodynamic and dielectric continuum models of friction. The use of solutes with sizes comparable to or smaller than the solvent molecules also helps amplify the sensitivity of the measurement to the short-ranged solute-solvent interaction. The measured orientational relaxation dynamics show many clear and distinct deviations from simple hydrodynamic behavior. All ionic structures in all solvents exhibit multi-exponential relaxation dynamics that do not scale with the solute volume. For Lewis base solvents such as benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, the observed dynamics strongly show the effect of solute-solvent complex formation. For the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane, we see no evidence for solute-solvent complex formation, but still see strong deviation from the predictions of simple hydrodynamic theory.

  13. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  14. Enhanced solvent extraction of polar lipids associated with rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bonfils, Frederic; Ehabe, Eugene Ejolle; Aymard, Christian; Vaysse, Laurent; Sainte-Beuve, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    Biochemical studies of lipids bound to rubber particles have been complicated due to the solubility of polyisoprene chains in most extracting solvents and the rather delicate nature of polar lipids that are often denatured when traditional solvent extraction techniques are employed. In this paper, we describe a traditional technique and accompanying solvents that permit optimal extraction of rubber particle bound lipids. The technique, which is validated after characterizing the lipid extracts by elemental analysis, silica column adsorption and thin layer chromatography, appeared more suitable for extracting total lipids with optimal glycolipid and phospholipid contents. This technique is proposed as an alternative to traditional extraction methods used for solid natural rubber as it offers advantages with respect to ease of application, extract quality, extraction yields and reproducibility.

  15. Preferential Solvation of a Highly Medium Responsive Pentacyanoferrate(II) Complex in Binary Solvent Mixtures: Understanding the Role of Dielectric Enrichment and the Specificity of Solute-Solvent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello

    2016-09-08

    In this work, the preferential solvation of an intensely solvatochromic ferrocyanide(II) dye involving a 4,4'-bipyridine-based ligand was examined in various binary solvent mixtures. Its solvatochromic behavior was rationalized in terms of specific and nonspecific solute-solvent interactions. An exceptional case of solvatochromic inversion was observed when going from alcohol/water to amide/water mixtures. These effects were quantified using Onsager's solvent polarity function. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the solvatochromism of the dye was determined using various solvatochromic parameters such as π* expressing the dipolarity/polarizability of solvents and α expressing the hydrogen-bond-donor acidity of solvents. This analysis was useful for the rationalization of the selective solvation phenomena occurring in the three types of alcohol/water and amide/water mixtures studied. Furthermore, two preferential solvation models were employed for the interpretation of the experimental spectral results in binary solvent mixtures, namely, the model of Suppan on dielectric enrichment [J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 1 1987, 83, 495-509] and the model of Bosch, Rosés, and co-workers [J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1995, 8, 1607-1615]. The first model successfully predicted the charge transfer energies of the dye in formamide/water and N-methylformamide/water mixtures, but in the case of MeOH/water mixtures, the prediction was less accurate because of the significant contribution of specific solute-solvent interactions in that case. The second model gave more insights for both specific solute-solvent as well as solvent-solvent interactions in the cybotactic region. The role of dielectric enrichment and specific interactions was discussed based on the findings.

  16. Young People and Employment (1): Employers' Use of Educational Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Eileen

    1980-01-01

    A survey of recruitment officers in England and Wales concerning the entry to employment of young people who leave school with no formal qualifications or with qualifications below the GCE A level is discussed. Findings suggest that employers are not dissatisfied with their recruits. (Author/MLW)

  17. 29 CFR 1607.10 - Employment agencies and employment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... these guidelines. An employment agency is not relieved of its obligation herein because the user did not... other user of its responsibilities under Federal law to provide equal employment opportunity or its obligations as a user under these guidelines. B. Where selection procedures are devised elsewhere. Where...

  18. Conceptualizing Learning and Employability "Learning and Employability Framework"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumanasiri, Erabaddage Gishan Tharanga; Yajid, Mohd Shukri Ab; Khatibi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies have been done on employability and the factors that lead to employability. Previous studies have focused on career development programs, internships, work experience programs, soft-skill development programs, and even university admission criteria which can be considered external factors to university student learning…

  19. Graduates' Employment and the Discourse of Employability: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Marie-Pierre; Leathwood, Carole

    2006-01-01

    In a context of considerable changes in the labour market and higher education sector in the UK, a discourse of employability has become increasingly dominant. Universities are urged to ensure that they produce "employable" graduates, and graduates themselves are exhorted to continually develop their personal skills, qualities and…

  20. Linking with Employment: Training from the Perspective of Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschbach, Dennis R.

    Employers need training, want it, and are willing to pay for it providing it is relevant to their requirements, results in improved product quality, and fosters increased productivity. Firm characteristics make a difference not only with regard to the kinds of skills wanted by employers but also with regard to how training can best be delivered.…

  1. Scale-up of recovery process for waste solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carey, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Recycling of spent cleaning solvents, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and trichlorotrifluoroethane at KCP was evaluated. Gas chromatography was used to identify stabilization levels in virgin and recycled solvent. Segregation, pretreatment and distillation processes were defined. Existing distillation equipment was modified and a solvent drying process was added. Recycled solvent quality of several production lots is also presented. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Solvent disperser for removing oil from sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Di Foggio, R.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes method for dispersing solvent for use in determining the oil saturation of an earth formation by means of sponge coring, comprising: (a) receiving solvent dripping downwardly, and (b) conducting the received solvent by means of capillary action to an application zone located and dimensioned for passing such solvent to the sponge in a sponge core barrel.

  3. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    MedlinePlus

    ... First Policy & Data Platform "Who I Am” Public Service Announcement Advisory Committee on Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities Policy Development & Technical ...

  4. Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment program--self-employment. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-01-20

    This document amends the vocational rehabilitation and employment regulations of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) concerning self-employment for individuals with qualifying disabilities. We are making changes to conform VA's regulations for self-employment programs for veterans, and for servicemembers awaiting discharge, to statutory provisions, including provisions limiting eligibility for certain supplies, equipment, stock, and license fees to individuals with the most severe service-connected disabilities. We are also making related changes in VA's regulations affecting eligibility for such assistance for certain veterans' children with birth defects in self-employment programs. In addition, we are amending our regulations regarding the approval authority for self-employment plans to make certain requirements less restrictive and less burdensome, to remove a vague and overly broad requirement, to make changes to reflect longstanding VA policy, and to make nonsubstantive clarifying changes.

  5. Breastfeeding and employment: an assessment of employer attitudes.

    PubMed

    Libbus, M Kay; Bullock, Linda F C

    2002-08-01

    Both research and anecdotal reports suggest that maternal employment is associated with failure to initiate breastfeeding and early breastfeeding attrition. The objective of this study was to describe the experience with and attitudes toward breastfeeding of a sample of employers in a small Midwestern city in the United States. Based on an analysis of 85 mail-out questionnaires, we found that less than half of the employers had personal experience with breastfeeding. A large percentage of the sample, however, indicated that they would be willing to facilitate women who wished to breastfeed or express milk in the workplace. However, these employers also stated that they saw little value to their business of supporting breastfeeding in the work environment. Thus, enhancement of breastfeeding opportunity in the work environment may come as a result of public and employer education but, more likely, will require some type of directive from official sources.

  6. Quantification of Solvent Contribution to the Stability of Noncovalent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Tan, Tianwei; Hetényi, Csaba; van der Spoel, David

    2013-10-08

    We introduce an indirect approach to estimate the solvation contributions to the thermodynamics of noncovalent complex formation through molecular dynamics simulation. This estimation is demonstrated by potential of mean force and entropy calculations on the binding process between β-cyclodextrin (host) and four drug molecules puerarin, daidzin, daidzein, and nabumetone (guest) in explicit water, followed by a stepwise extraction of individual enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) terms from the total free energy. Detailed analysis on the energetics of the host-guest complexation demonstrates that flexibility of the binding partners and solvation-related ΔH and ΔS need to be included explicitly for accurate estimation of the binding thermodynamics. From this, and our previous work on the solvent dependency of binding energies (Zhang et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 12684-12693), it follows that calculations neglecting host or guest flexibility, or those employing implicit solvent, will not be able to systematically predict binding free energies. The approach presented here can be readily adopted for obtaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms governing noncovalent associations in solution.

  7. Association between maternal occupational exposure to organic solvents and congenital heart defects, National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997–2002

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa, SM; Desrosiers, TA; Lawson, CC; Lupo, PJ; Riehle-Colarusso, T; Stewart, PA; van Wijngaarden, E; Waters, MA; Correa, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation between congenital heart defects (CHDs) in offspring and estimated maternal occupational exposure to chlorinated solvents, aromatic solvents, and Stoddard solvent during the period from one month before conception through the first trimester. Methods The study population included mothers of infants with simple, isolated CHDs and mothers of control infants who delivered from 1997 through 2002 and participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Two methods to assess occupational solvent exposure were employed: an expert consensus-based approach and a literature-based approach. Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between solvent classes and CHDs. Results 2,951 control mothers and 2,047 CHD case mothers were included. Using the consensus-based approach, associations were observed for exposure to any solvent and any chlorinated solvent with perimembranous ventricular septal defects (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.6 and OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.8 respectively). Using the literature-based approach, associations were observed for: any solvent exposure with aortic stenosis (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.1); and Stoddard solvent exposure with d-transposition of the great arteries (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.0 to 4.2), right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.3), and pulmonary valve stenosis (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.8). Conclusions We found evidence of associations between occupational exposure to solvents and several types of CHDs. These results should be interpreted in light of the potential for misclassification of exposure. PMID:22811060

  8. Organic-solvent-tolerant bacterium which secretes organic-solvent-stable lipolytic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruo )

    1994-10-01

    A bacterial strain which could be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and which could secrete lipolytic enzyme was isolated. The stability of the lipolytic activity of the supernatant of the culture increased significantly in the presence of organic solvents such as toluene, cyclohexane, ethanol, and acetone. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Effect of solvents, solvent mixture and silver nanoparticles on photophysical properties of a ketocyanine dye.

    PubMed

    Thipperudrappa, J; Deepa, H R; Raghavendra, U P; Hanagodimath, S M; Melavanki, R M

    2017-02-01

    The effect of solvents of varying polarity and hydrogen bonding ability, solvent mixture and silver nanoparticles on the photophysical properties of a ketocyanine dye, 2,5-di[(E)-1-(4-diethylaminophenyl) methylidine]-1-cyclopentanone (2,5-DEAPMC), is investigated at room temperature. Solvent effect is analyzed using Lippert-Mataga bulk polarity function, Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter, and Kamlet's and Catalan's multiple linear regression approaches. The spectral properties better follow Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter than the Lippert-Mataga bulk polarity function. This indicates that both general and specific solute-solvent interactions are operative. Kamlet's and Catalan's multiple linear regression approaches indicate that polarizability/dipolarity solvent influences are greater than hydrogen bond donor and hydrogen bond acceptor solvent influences. The solvatochromic correlations are used to estimate excited state dipole moment using the experimentally determined ground state dipole moment. The excited state dipole moment of the dye is found to be larger than its corresponding ground state dipole moment and ground and excited state dipole moments are not parallel, but subtend an angle of 77°. The absorption and emission spectra are modulated in the presence silver nanoparticles. The fluorescence of 2,5-DEAPMC is quenched by silver nanoparticles. The possible fluorescence quenching mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Changes in psychological performances of solvent-poisoned and solvent-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in psychological performances associated with long-term exposure to organic solvents and solvent mixtures were studied in a group of 56 male workers diagnosed as having an occupational disease caused by solvents. Their mean duration of exposure was 9.1 +/- SD 8.3 years, and they were exposed mainly to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons and to mixtures of paint solvents. The psychological performances of these solvent-exposed patients were compared with those of 98 styrene-exposed workers and a nonexposed group of 43 construction workers. The applied psychological test variables were factor analyzed, before other statistical analysis, in order to clarify what they measured in the present study. The solvent-exposed group was characterized by a decline in visuomotor performance and decreased freedom from distractibility. The poor visuomotor performances were also related to the long duration of solvent exposure in this group of patients. The index applied for the exposure level revealed no significant relationships to psychological performances among the solvent-exposed patients. The psychological performances of the styrene-exposed group differed only very slightly from those of the nonexposed workers.

  11. Towards ultra-fast solvent evaporation, the development of a computer controlled solvent vapor annealing chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gunnar; Wong, J.; Drapes, C.; Grant, M.; Baruth, A.

    Despite the promise of cheap and fast nanoscale ordering of block polymer thin films via solvent vapor annealing, a standardized, scalable production scheme remains elusive. Solvent vapor annealing exposes a nano-thin film to the vapors of one or more solvents with the goal of forming a swollen and mobile state to direct the self-assembly process by tuning surface energies and mediating unfavorable chain interactions. We have shown that optimized annealing conditions, where kinetic and thermal properties for crystal growth are extremely fast (<1s), exist at solvent concentrations just below the order-disorder transition of the film. However, when investigating the propagation of a given morphology into the bulk of a film during drying, the role of solvent evaporation comes under great scrutiny. During this process, the film undergoes a competition between two fronts; phase separation and kinetic trapping. Recent results in both theory and experiment point toward this critical element in controlling the resultant morphologies; however, no current method includes a controllable solvent evaporation rate at ultra-fast time scales. We report on a computer-controlled, pneumatically actuated chamber that provides control over solvent evaporation down to 15 ms. Furthermore, in situ spectral reflectance monitors solvent concentration with 10 ms temporal resolution and reveals several possible evaporation trajectories, ranging from linear to exponential to logarithmic. Funded by Dr. Randolph Ferlic Summer Research Scholarship and NASA Nebraska Space Grant.

  12. Solvent System Selection Strategies in Countercurrent Separation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Friesen, J. Brent; McAlpine, James B.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of applications in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography, collectively known as countercurrent separation, are dedicated to medicinal plant and natural product research. In countercurrent separation, the selection of the appropriate solvent system is of utmost importance as it is the equivalent to the simultaneous choice of column and eluent in liquid chromatography. However, solvent system selection is often laborious, involving extensive partition and/or analytical trials. Therefore, simplified solvent system selection strategies that predict the partition coefficients and, thus, analyte behavior are in high demand and may advance both the science of countercurrent separation and its applications. The last decade of solvent system selection theory and applications are critically reviewed, and strategies are classified according to their data input requirements. This offers the practitioner an up-to-date overview of rationales and methods for choosing an efficient solvent system, provides a perspective regarding their accuracy, reliability, and practicality, and discusses the possibility of combining multiple methods for enhanced prediction power. PMID:26393937

  13. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Gerald J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, was selected as the solvent of choice, and it was found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally-safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  14. Solvent extraction of phenols from water

    SciTech Connect

    Greminger, D.C.; Burns, G.P.; Lynn, S.; Hanson, D.H.; King, C.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE) have been evaluated as solvents for extraction of phenols, at high dilution, from water. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (K/sub D/) have been measured for phenol, dihydroxybenzenes and trihydroxybenzenes in both solvents as a function of pH. Particularly for the multihydric phenols, MIBK gives substantially higher values of K/sub D/ than does DIPE. The effect of pH can be described quantitatively through a simple ionization model, using published values of dissociation constants for the various phenols. Some method for removal of residual dissolved solvent must ordinarily be included in any extraction process for phenols. Possibilities include atmospheric-steam or inert-gas stripping, vacuum-steam stripping, and extraction with a second solvent. Vacuum-steam stripping is a particularly attractive choice for removal of MIBK; this reinforces the utility of MIBK as a solvent. The optimal temperature for vacuum stripping is generally the temperature of the extraction operation, which in turn is related to the effect of temperature on K/sub D/. Values of K/sub D/ for phenol-water-MIBK were determined at 30, 50, and 75/sup 0/C, and were found to decrease with increasing temperature at all concentrations.

  15. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Solvent response of mixed polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kai; Chapman, Walter G.

    2011-12-01

    We have performed classical density functional theory calculations to study the behavior of mixed polymer brushes tethered to a planar surface. We assume no lateral segregation of the polymer at the grafting density studied and consider an implicit solvent. For a binary mixture of short and long athermal polymer chains, the short chain is compressed while the long chain is stretched compared with corresponding pure polymer chains at the same grafting density, which is consistent with simulation. This results from configurational entropy effects. Furthermore, we add a mean-field interaction for each polymer brush to simulate their different response towards a solvent. The long chain is forced to dislike the solvent more than the short chain. Through the interplay between the solvent effects and configurational entropy effects, a switch of the polymer brush surface (or outer) layer is found with increasing chain length of the long chain. The transition chain length (long chain) increases with increasing the solvent selectivity, and decreases with increasing the grafting density of the long chain. These results can provide guidance for the design of smart materials based on mixed polymer brushes.

  17. Development of deep eutectic solvents applied in extraction and separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Row, Kyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as an alternative to ionic liquids, have greener credentials than ionic liquids, and have attracted considerable attention in related chemical research. Deep eutectic solvents have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of various target compounds from natural products. This review highlights the preparation of deep eutectic solvents, unique properties of deep eutectic solvents, and synthesis of deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials. On the other hand, application in the extraction and separation of deep eutectic solvents is also included in this report. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the applications and developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, an exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep eutectic solvents-based materials is expected to diversify into extraction and separation.

  18. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. ); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  19. Improving the Efficiency of Non-equilibrium Sampling in the Aqueous Environment via Implicit-Solvent Simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Fu; Sun, Huiyong; Li, Dan; Hou, Tingjun

    2017-04-11

    By means of estimators based on non-equilibrium work, equilibrium free energy differences or potentials of mean force (PMFs) of a system of interest can be computed from biased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach, however, is often plagued by slow conformational sampling and poor convergence, especially when the solvent effects are taken into account. Here, as a possible way to alleviate the problem, several widely used implicit-solvent models, which are derived from the analytic generalized Born (GB) equation and implemented in the AMBER suite of programs, were employed in free energy calculations based on non-equilibrium work and evaluated for their abilities to emulate explicit water. As a test case, pulling MD simulations were carried out on an alanine polypeptide with different solvent models and protocols, followed by comparisons of the reconstructed PMF profiles along the unfolding coordinate. The results show that when employing the non-equilibrium work method, sampling with an implicit-solvent model is several times faster and, more importantly, converges more rapidly than that with explicit water due to reduction of dissipation. Among the assessed GB models, the Neck variants outperform the OBC and HCT variants in terms of accuracy, whereas their computational costs are comparable. In addition, for the best-performing models, the impact of the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) dependent nonpolar solvation term was also examined. The present study highlights the advantages of implicit-solvent models for non-equilibrium sampling.

  20. Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction: Supramolecular Aspects of Solvent Exchange Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Gloe, Karsten; Tasker, Peter A; Oshima, Tatsuya; Watarai, Hitoshi; Nilsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    inverse micelles swollen with water molecules. Extraction systems involving long-chain cations such as alkylammonium species or long-chain anions such as sulfonates or carboxylates proved especially prone to extensive aggregate formation. The related phenomenon of third-phase formation in SX systems, long misunderstood, is now yielding to spectroscopic and scattering techniques showing extensive long-range organization. Over the last 50 years, tools for studying the structure and thermodynamics of aggregation have grown increasingly sophisticated, leading to a rich and detailed understanding of what we can now recognize as SC phenomena in SX. In the 1970s and 1980s, the rapid growth of SC elicited a paradigm shift in SX. The influence of SC principles had two major effects on the course of SX research. First, it provided a framework for understanding the supramolecular behavior that was already well appreciated in the field of SX, though earlier without the SC terminology. Second, it provided the conceptual tools to control supramolecular behavior in SX, direct it for intended functionality, and to simplify it. Extraction by designed reagents has been steadily progressing ever since, with commercial applications emerging to successfully validate this approach. With the discovery of crown ethers in the late 1960s, the advancement of extractant design has fruitfully employed the concept of inclusion. While considerable initial progress occurred with such molecules, especially because of their affinity and selectivity for alkali and alkaline earth metals, other molecular platforms such as calixarenes have proven more versatile. Multidentate receptors for partial to full inclusion of cations, anions, ion pairs, as well as neutral species, have now become commonplace for selective extraction. This volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction examines how the principles of SC are being employed both in advancing the design of new highly selective SX systems and in

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  4. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  5. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  6. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  9. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  10. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  12. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  20. Photochemistry of 5-aminoquinoline in protic and aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Bridhkoti, Jagat P; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Joshi, H C; Pant, Sanjay

    2011-08-01

    Photophysical properties of 5-aminoquinoline (5AQ) have been investigated in various non-polar and polar (protic and aprotic) solvents using steady state and time resolved fluorescence. In aprotic solvents, the spectral maxima depend on the polarity. However, in protic solvents both the fluorescence intensity as well decay time show decrease depending on the hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. The results suggest that photochemistry 5AQ is quite sensitive towards the polarity as well as protic character of the solvent.

  1. Ionic liquid solutions as extractive solvents for value-added compounds from biomass

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Helena; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, the number of studies regarding the application of ionic liquids (ILs) as alternative solvents to extract value-added compounds from biomass has been growing. Based on an extended compilation and analysis of the data hitherto reported, the main objective of this review is to provide an overview on the use of ILs and their mixtures with molecular solvents for the extraction of value-added compounds present in natural sources. The ILs (or IL solutions) investigated as solvents for the extraction of natural compounds, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, lipids, among others, are outlined. The extraction techniques employed, namely solid–liquid extraction, and microwave-assisted and ultrasound-assisted extractions, are emphasized and discussed in terms of extraction yields and purification factors. Furthermore, the evaluation of the IL chemical structure and the optimization of the process conditions (IL concentration, temperature, biomass–solvent ratio, etc.) are critically addressed. Major conclusions on the role of the ILs towards the extraction mechanisms and improved extraction yields are additionally provided. The isolation and recovery procedures of the value-added compounds are ascertained as well as some scattered strategies already reported for the IL solvent recovery and reusability. Finally, a critical analysis on the economic impact versus the extraction performance of IL-based methodologies was also carried out and is here presented and discussed. PMID:25516718

  2. Neurologic effects of solvents in older adults. (UW retired worker study). Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, W.E.

    1993-11-12

    The possibility that previous occupational exposure to solvents might be associated with clinically significant neurological dysfunction in older adults was investigated in a cross-sectional study. Subjects included 67 painters, 22 aerospace painters and fuel cell sealers, and a comparison group of 126 carpenters. All subjects had retired from regular employment at least 1 year prior to the study. As measured by semiquantitative exposure index, the cumulative histories of lifetime occupational solvent exposure were on the average comparable in the two exposed study groups, painters and aerospace workers. The carpenters differed from the other groups in solvent exposure by several orders of magnitude. The painters had a significantly higher history of consuming alcoholic beverages than did the other two study groups. The painters had a significantly higher score on the Beck Depression Inventory, a measure of current depressive symptoms. The painters reported significantly more general neurologic symptoms than did the other two groups. The aerospace workers showed much greater evidence of possible adverse effects from former solvent exposure on current neuropsychological function than did the painters when determined by reasoning and memory tests, memory visual motor speed and motor tests. No evidence of persistent effects on liver or renal excretory function was seen in solvent exposed subjects.

  3. Ionic liquid solutions as extractive solvents for value-added compounds from biomass.

    PubMed

    Passos, Helena; Freire, Mara G; Coutinho, João A P

    2014-12-01

    In the past few years, the number of studies regarding the application of ionic liquids (ILs) as alternative solvents to extract value-added compounds from biomass has been growing. Based on an extended compilation and analysis of the data hitherto reported, the main objective of this review is to provide an overview on the use of ILs and their mixtures with molecular solvents for the extraction of value-added compounds present in natural sources. The ILs (or IL solutions) investigated as solvents for the extraction of natural compounds, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, lipids, among others, are outlined. The extraction techniques employed, namely solid-liquid extraction, and microwave-assisted and ultrasound-assisted extractions, are emphasized and discussed in terms of extraction yields and purification factors. Furthermore, the evaluation of the IL chemical structure and the optimization of the process conditions (IL concentration, temperature, biomass-solvent ratio, etc.) are critically addressed. Major conclusions on the role of the ILs towards the extraction mechanisms and improved extraction yields are additionally provided. The isolation and recovery procedures of the value-added compounds are ascertained as well as some scattered strategies already reported for the IL solvent recovery and reusability. Finally, a critical analysis on the economic impact versus the extraction performance of IL-based methodologies was also carried out and is here presented and discussed.

  4. Preselection: How Students Prescreen Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Thomas

    1979-01-01

    College relations personnel can no longer afford to ignore the factors which attract college grads to employers. Top-notch college students may be less impressed by traditional recruiting incentives as they research and prescreen employers. The article reviews the current incentives for average and above-average students. (Author/CMG)

  5. Leading Gainful Employment Metric Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristina; MacPherson, Derek

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will address the importance of intercampus involvement in reporting of gainful employment student-level data that will be used in the calculation of gainful employment metrics by the U.S. Department of Education. The authors will discuss why building relationships within the institution is critical for effective gainful employment…

  6. Employer Demands from Business Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Stephen; Dutton, Matthew; McQuaid, Ronald; Richard, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on research carried out with employers to determine demand for business and management skills in the Scottish workforce. Design/methodology/approach: The research used a questionnaire in which employers were interviewed (either telephone or face to face), completed themselves and returned by e-mail,…

  7. Survey of Auto Mechanic Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Charles; Scott, David C.

    In order to build auto mechanics curricula and instructional programs responsive to the needs of employers, Bakersfield College (BC) sent a questionnaire to all employers listed under "Automobile Repairing and Services" in the yellow pages of the local telephone book. Only 43 (20 percent) of the 215 questionnaires sent out were returned;…

  8. Employment Survey 1976. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    This document presents the summary results of the 1976 employment survey of physics and astronomy graduates of the class of 1975-76 as conducted by the American Institute of Physics (AIP). Data presented include employment status 6-18 months after graduation; background characteristics of doctoral, master's and bachelor's level physicists; time…

  9. Employment Survey 1980. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    The employment status of 1980 degree recipients in physics and astronomy was surveyed. For physics degree recipients, the majority of bachelors and masters required two months or less to accept suitable employment, while the majority of doctoral graduates required three months or longer. Information is presented on changes in occupational status…

  10. Employability: Review and Research Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbert, Laure; Bernaud, Jean-Luc; Gouvernet, Brice; Rossier, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Professional transition, employment, and reemployment are major concerns for nations facing adverse economic situations. The employability construct represents a scientific challenge in order to better understand the relationship between the job seekers' issues and the expectations of the world of work. This paper presents a review of the concept…

  11. Employability Skills. At a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wibrow, Bridget

    2011-01-01

    In a competitive workforce it is not just having the right qualification or technical skills that will land an individual a job; it could very well be their interpersonal skills. How someone communicates is often the first impression an employer has of a possible worker. Yet, it is precisely communication skills that employers feel applicants are…

  12. Employability and Finnish University Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhakka, Antero; Rautopuro, Juhani; Tuominen, Visa

    2010-01-01

    In this article the authors concentrate on the change in the concept of employability during the Bologna process. They show that employability has gradually moved from a peripheral to a core presence in the most recent Bologna process documents. Using a Finnish university merger (University of Eastern Finland) as an example, the authors…

  13. Employment and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue offers six articles on employment of people with disabilities. "Employment and People with Disabilities: Challenges for the Nineties" (Frank Bowe) discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act, issues in unemployment and under-education, earnings, and implications for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative…

  14. Employer Evaluation of Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.; Piland, William E.

    In an effort to meet the need for a more comprehensive program evaluation, staff at Moraine Valley Community College developed a questionnaire and interview schedule to obtain feedback from employers concerning career programs. Questionnaires were sent to all employers who hired graduates of occupational programs between 1969-71; over 80% returned…

  15. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to…

  16. Employment Obtaining and Business Starting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Jian

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of business starting education in higher vocational colleges is of important and realistic meanings for cultivating advanced technology application-type talents and for releasing the employment obtaining pressure of higher vocational students. Based on the analysis on the employment situation of higher vocational graduates, this…

  17. Employment Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustoles, Thomas P.; Griffin, Oren R.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court decisions related to employment discrimination in higher education. The most significant development was a series of cases affirming that Eleventh Amendment immunity from private money damage claims brought pursuant to various federal employment discrimination statutes applied to state colleges and universities. (SLD)

  18. Maternal Employment and Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montemayor, Raymond; Clayton, Mark D.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between maternal employment and adolescent development is enormously complex, and no simple generalizations are possible. Many intervening variables alter the impact that maternal employment has on adolescent development. There is an urgent need to discover what impact this arrangement has on adolescent development. (CJ)

  19. Consumer Leadership in Supported Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inge, Katherine J., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter issue provides rehabilitation professionals with various information pieces concerning consumer leadership in supported employment of people with disabilities. First, a chart lists five questions concerning self advocacy and supported employment, and provides consumer responses to the questions. A second item describes…

  20. Employment Survey 1984. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    The employment status of 1984-1985 degree recipients in physics and astronomy was surveyed. Information is presented on changes in occupational status of physics and astronomy degree recipients between summer of 1984 and the following winter. The characteristics of graduates of both fields who were employed full-time or undertaking postdoctoral…

  1. Special Issue on Casual Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Bulletin of Labour, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes "Editor's Introduction" (Cully); "A New Estimate of Casual Employment?" (Campbell, Burgess); "A New Estimate of Casual Employment?: Reply" (Murtough, Waite); "The 'Long-term or Permanent Casual'--An Oxymoron or 'A Well Enough Understood Australianism' in the Law?" (Owens); and "The ACTU's…

  2. Simple model of membrane proteins including solvent.

    PubMed

    Pagan, D L; Shiryayev, A; Connor, T P; Gunton, J D

    2006-05-14

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two-dimensional model, similar to the one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three-dimensional model.

  3. Relative efficiency of solvents used in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M G

    1998-01-01

    A root canal model was used to test the relative efficiency of various commonly used endodontic solvents including eucalyptol, eucalyptus oil, orange oil, chloroform, and xylene to dissolve or soften gutta-percha and several different types of sealers (Proco-Sol, AH26, and Sealapex). There was no significant difference in the ability of the solvents to dissolve gutta-percha and the zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer Proco-Sol. The resin-based sealer, AH26, was only dissolved in chloroform and took considerable time (> 30 min). The calcium hydroxide-based sealer, Sealapex, could not be tested because it was found not to set at all unless in contact with air. All of the solvents for both Proco-Sol and gutta-percha produced clinically acceptable dissolving times.

  4. Solvent-assisted lipid bilayer formation on silicon dioxide and gold.

    PubMed

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Haw Zan, Goh; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2014-09-02

    Planar lipid bilayers on solid supports mimic the fundamental structure of biological membranes and can be investigated using a wide range of surface-sensitive techniques. Despite these advantages, planar bilayer fabrication is challenging, and there are no simple universal methods to form such bilayers on diverse material substrates. One of the novel methods recently proposed and proven to form a planar bilayer on silicon dioxide involves lipid deposition in organic solvent and solvent exchange to influence the phase of adsorbed lipids. To scrutinize the specifics of this solvent-assisted lipid bilayer (SALB) formation method and clarify the limits of its applicability, we have developed a simplified, continuous solvent-exchange version to form planar bilayers on silicon dioxide, gold, and alkanethiol-coated gold (in the latter case, a lipid monolayer is formed to yield a hybrid bilayer) and varied the type of organic solvent and rate of solvent exchange. By tracking the SALB formation process with simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) and ellipsometry, it was determined that the acoustic, optical, and hydration masses along with the acoustic and optical thicknesses, measured at the end of the process, are comparable to those observed by employing conventional fabrication methods (e.g., vesicle fusion). As shown by QCM-D measurements, the obtained planar bilayers are highly resistant to protein adsorption, and several, but not all, water-miscible organic solvents could be successfully used in the SALB procedure, with isopropanol yielding particularly high-quality bilayers. In addition, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements demonstrated that the coefficient of lateral lipid diffusion in the fabricated bilayers corresponds to that measured earlier in the planar bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. With increasing rate of solvent exchange, it was also observed that the bilayer became incomplete and a phenomenological

  5. Modeling solvatochromism of a quinolinium betaine dye in water solvent using sequential hybrid QM/MM and semicontinuum approach.

    PubMed

    Murugan, N Arul

    2011-02-10

    We have investigated the ambient temperature structure of 1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine (MOQB) in water solvent and compared to its gas-phase structure. We have employed Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations within hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) framework to study MOQB in water while CPMD technique has been used for the gas phase. We report significant solvent-induced geometrical changes in MOQB. The dipole moment of MOQB in water is 2 times larger than the gas-phase value. The average absorption spectra calculated from gas-phase configurations using Coulomb attenuated-B3LYP (CAMB3LYP) level of theory is comparable with experimental spectra reported in benzene (λ(max) = 590 nm), a nonpolar solvent. We have also computed the absorption spectra of MOQB in water solvent using continuum and semicontinuum solvent models. Based on this, we have calculated contributions from solvent-induced geometrical changes, hydrogen bonding, and intermolecular charge transfer to the solvatochromic shift and absorption spectra of MOQB in water. Absorption spectra calculations for MOQB in water with a semicontinuum approach for solvents using CAMB3LYP level of theory excellently reproduce the experimental spectra in water, where the theoretical λ(max) is 433 nm and the experimental λ(max) is around 440 nm.

  6. A green chemistry approach to a more efficient asymmetric catalyst: solvent-free and highly concentrated alkyl additions to ketones.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang-Jin; Li, Hongmei; Walsh, Patrick J

    2005-11-30

    There is a great demand for development of catalyst systems that are not only efficient and highly enantioselective but are also environmentally benign. Herein we report investigations into the catalytic asymmetric addition of alkyl and functionalized alkyl groups to ketones under highly concentrated and solvent-free conditions. In comparison with standard reaction conditions employing toluene and hexanes, the solvent-free and highly concentrated conditions permit reduction in catalyst loading by a factor of 2- to 40-fold. These new conditions are general and applicable to a variety of ketones and dialkylzinc reagents to provide diverse tertiary alcohols with high enantioselectivities. Using cyclic conjugated enones, we have performed a tandem asymmetric addition/diastereoselective epoxidation using the solvent-free addition conditions followed by introduction of a 5.5 M decane solution of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to generate epoxy alcohols. This one-pot procedure allows access to syn epoxy alcohols with three contiguous stereocenters with excellent enantio- and diastereoselectivities and high yields. Both the solvent-free asymmetric additions and asymmetric addition/diastereoselective epoxidation reactions have been conducted on larger scale (5 g substrate) with 0.5 mol % catalyst loadings. In these procedures, enantioselectivities equal to or better than 92% were obtained with isolated yields of 90%. The solvent-free and highly concentrated conditions are a significant improvement over previous solvent-based protocols. Further, this chemistry represents a rare example of a catalytic asymmetric reaction that is highly enantioselective under more environmentally friendly solvent-free conditions.

  7. Effect of solvents on the electrochemical properties of binder-free sulfur cathode films in lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Ho-Suk; Kim, Byeong-Wook; Park, Jin-Woo; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The binder-free sulfur electrode with high sulfur contents of 75 wt.% was fabricated. • The binder-free sulfur electrode using NMP solvents showed 784 mAh g{sup −1} after 40 cycles. • The solvent affect the electrochemical properties of binder-free sulfur electrode films. - Abstract: The effects of solvents on the preparation of sulfur cathodes were investigated by fabricating binder-free sulfur electrode films using three different solvents: 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), acetonitrile, and deionized water. These solvents are commonly employed to dissolve binders used to prepare sulfur cathodes for lithium–sulfur batteries. The sulfur electrode fabricated with NMP had a higher discharge capacity and longer cycle life than the ones fabricated with acetonitrile and deionized water. Better adhesion between the current collector and the sulfur electrode accounted for the improved capacity and cycle life of the battery. In addition, the stability of the electrode in the electrolyte was a result of the solubility of sulfur in the solvent. We thus concluded that the solvents used in the fabrication of sulfur electrodes had a positive influence on the electrochemical properties of Li–S batteries.

  8. A comprehensive classification of solvent systems used for natural product purifications in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Garrard, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Using both library paper copies and modern electronic copies, every known, published, English-language journal paper that employs either countercurrent or centrifugal partition chromatography solvent systems for natural product purifications has been studied and the solvent systems classified in a comprehensive database. Papers were studied from the earliest found examples containing natural product separations in 1984 until the end of 2014. In total, 2594 solvent systems have been classified, of which 272 are gradient systems. To observe any trends or patterns in the data, the natural product solutes were divided into 21 classes and the solvent systems into 7 different types. The complete database, sorted according to natural product class, is available for download to assist separation scientists in future liquid-liquid chromatography purifications.

  9. The Generally Useful Estimate of Solvent Systems (GUESS) method enables the rapid purification of methylpyridoxine regioisomers by countercurrent chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Friesen, J. Brent; Klein, Larry L.; McAlpine, James B.; Lankin, David C.; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2016-01-01

    The TLC-based Generally Useful Estimate of Solvent Systems (GUESS) method was employed for countercurrent chromatography solvent system selection, in order to separate the three synthetic isomers: 3-O-methylpyridoxine, 4′-O-methylpyridoxine (ginkgotoxin) and 5′-O-methylpyridoxine. The Rf values of the three isomers indicated that ChMWat +2 (chloroformmethanol-water 10:5:5, v/v/v) was appropriate for the countercurrent chromatography. The isomer separation was highly selective and demonstrated that the TLC-based GUESS method can accelerate solvent system selection for countercurrent chromatography. Accordingly, the study re-emphasizes the practicality of TLC as a tool to facilitate the rapid development of new countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography methods for this solvent system. Purity and structure characterization of all samples was performed by quantitative 1H NMR. PMID:26680272

  10. The Generally Useful Estimate of Solvent Systems (GUESS) method enables the rapid purification of methylpyridoxine regioisomers by countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Friesen, J Brent; Klein, Larry L; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2015-12-24

    The TLC-based Generally Useful Estimate of Solvent Systems (GUESS) method was employed for countercurrent chromatography solvent system selection, in order to separate the three synthetic isomers: 3-O-methylpyridoxine, 4'-O-methylpyridoxine (ginkgotoxin), and 5'-O-methylpyridoxine. The Rf values of the three isomers indicated that ChMWat+2 (chloroform-methanol-water 10:5:5, v/v/v) was appropriate for the countercurrent separation. The isomer separation was highly selective and demonstrated that the TLC-based GUESS method can accelerate solvent system selection for countercurrent separation. Accordingly, the study re-emphasizes the practicality of TLC as a tool to facilitate the rapid development of new countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography methods for this solvent system. Purity and structure characterization of all samples was performed by quantitative (1)H NMR.

  11. Solvent effects on the optical properties of two-level systems with permanent dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrodomenico, A.; Izquierdo, M. A.; Paz, J. L.; Colmenares, P.

    2013-11-01

    The inclusion of the permanent dipole moments and the solvent on the optical conventional Bloch equations (OCBE) allowed us to obtain analytical expressions for the optical properties of a two-level molecular system. We employed the methodology developed by Colmenares et al.1, in which they model the collisional effect of the solvent through a stochastical function, ξ(t) = ω0 + σ(t), so the OCBE become a set of coupled integro-differential stochastical equations that we solved, up to third order in the incident field, employing the perturbation theory. Once obtained the analytical expressions for the density matrix elements, macroscopic polarization and effective susceptibility of the system, we studied the optical properties derived in the frequency space, inside and outside the rotating wave approximation.

  12. Lysozyme gelation in mixtures of tetramethylurea with protic solvents: Use of solvatochromic indicators to probe medium microstructure and solute solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Marcelo A.; El Seoud, Omar A.; Arêas, Elizabeth P. G.

    2007-09-01

    This work investigated the relationship between the structure of binary mixtures of tetramethylurea and protic solvents and their capacity to induce lysozyme gelation. In order to get an insight into the mechanism of gel formation, the solvatochromic behavior of zwitterionic probes, employed as simple models for the protein, was investigated. We studied two probes of similar p Ka's, but different hydrophobic character, namely 2,6-diphenyl-4-(2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium-1-yl) phenolate, RB, and 4-[2-(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl) ethenyl] phenolate, MC. The protic solvents used included water, 1-propanol and 2- n-butoxyethanol in the temperature range from 10 to 60 °C, and methanol, from 10 to 40 °C. In all cases, the dependence of the empirical solvent polarity parameter, ET, on mixture composition was non-ideal with negative deviation for TMU-water and positive deviation for TMU-organic solvent. For all binary mixtures, the deviation from linearity decreased as a function of increasing the temperature. In TMU/alcohol, the effect became more pronounced with increasing alcohol hydrophobicity.

  13. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Warren K.; McCray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1998-01-01

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  14. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.K.; McCray, S.B.; Friesen, D.T.

    1998-03-10

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  15. Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witter, William D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Beginning with a conceptual introduction which covers the topics of work in the United States, why people work, the labor force, labor markets, unemployment, and work and the young, this document goes on to offer four instructional units for preschool through sixth grade students. The preschool and kindergarten unit called "Earning More than…

  16. Equal Employment Law and the Employer--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levins, Will

    1979-01-01

    Sets forth in simple terms some of the requirements of the Equal Employment Opportunities Act of 1972. Available from the New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, N.Y. 12207; sc $2.00. (Author/IRT)

  17. Fluorometric assay protocol for protease-catalyzed transesterification reactions in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Han, Min Su; Jung, Sang Oh; Kim, Mahn-Joo; Kim, Dong H

    2004-04-16

    A flourometric assay protocol for a subtilisin-catalyzed transesterification reaction in n-hexane has been developed. The method makes use of a Michael acceptor that forms a fluorescent adduct with thiophenol, one of the products generated in the transesterification reaction. The method may be employed for screening a biocatalyst useful for transesterification reactions in organic solvents and for optimizing the transesterification reaction conditions.

  18. Preparation of Solvent-Dispersible Graphene and its Application to Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    been used as an organic solvent that is able to dissolve natural polymers in the industry of man-made regenerated cellulose fibers using the so-called...optovoltaic cell, organic light-emitting diodes, and touch screen panels. To demonstrate the application of the DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release...find many applications for nanocomposites with water-soluble polymers . The aqueous PEDOT:PSS system was employed to demonstrate the improvement of

  19. Toward the Employability-Link Model: Current Employment Transition to Future Employment Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thijssen, Johannes G. L.; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2008-01-01

    This article goes into a critical analysis of the concept of employability, its development across historical periods, its components, and different strategic approaches to enhance workers' employability throughout their career. Given the need for a systematic analysis and more empirical research in the field, the authors come up with the…

  20. Solvent and solvent isotope effects on the vibrational cooling dynamics of a DNA base derivative.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Chris T; Cohen, Boiko; Kohler, Bern

    2007-10-25

    Vibrational cooling by 9-methyladenine was studied in a series of solvents by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Signals at UV and near-UV probe wavelengths were assigned to hot ground state population created by ultrafast internal conversion following electronic excitation by a 267 nm pump pulse. A characteristic time for vibrational cooling was determined from bleach recovery signals at 250 nm. This time increases progressively in H2O (2.4 ps), D2O (4.2 ps), methanol (4.5 ps), and acetonitrile (13.1 ps), revealing a pronounced solvent effect on the dissipation of excess vibrational energy. The trend also indicates that the rate of cooling is enhanced in solvents with a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The faster rate of cooling seen in H2O vs D2O is noteworthy in view of the similar hydrogen bonding and macroscopic thermal properties of both liquids. We propose that the solvent isotope effect arises from differences in the rates of solute-solvent vibrational energy transfer. Given the similarities of the vibrational friction spectra of H2O and D2O at low frequencies, the solvent isotope effect may indicate that a considerable portion of the excess energy decays by exciting relatively high frequency (>/=700 cm-1) solvent modes.

  1. Diffusion of aromatic compounds in nonaqueous solvents: a study of solute, solvent, and temperature dependences.

    PubMed

    Chan, T C; Tang, W K

    2013-06-14

    Tracer diffusivities (limiting mutual diffusion coefficients) of nonassociated aromatic compounds in n-hexane and cyclohexane have been measured at 298.2 K by Taylor's dispersion method. These new data, together with other diffusivities of nonassociated pseudoplanar solutes reported in the literature, are used to determine the separate effects of solute and solvent on tracer diffusion. The data show that for a given pseudoplanar solute diffusing in different solvents at 298.2 K, the tracer diffusivity is dependent not only on the fractional viscosity of the solvent but also on a function of the solvent's molar density, molecular mass, and free volume fraction. For different pseudoplanar aromatic solutes diffusing in a particular solvent at a constant temperature, there is a linear relationship between the reciprocal of the tracer diffusivity and the molecular volume of the solutes. The results are discussed in respect to relevant theories and experimental studies in the literature. An idealized relation, developed on the basis of the Einstein equation by incorporating the newly found solute and solvent dependences, is capable of describing a total of 176 diffusivities of nonassociated pseudoplanar solutes in various solvents at different temperatures to within an average error of ±2.8%.

  2. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tara E.; Scherman, Carl; Martin, David; Suggs, Patricia

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  3. DEGRADED TBP SOLVENT REGENERATION TECHNOLOGY USING BUTYLAMINE AS A SOLVENT WASHING TO REDUCE SOLID SALT WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, T.; Itoh, Y.; Hotoku, S.; Morita, Y.; Uchiyama, G.

    2003-02-27

    Normal butylamine compounds are studied as salt-free wash reagents for degraded solvent used in PUREX process in spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent wash tests were carried out with two types of butylamine compounds, n-butylamine oxalate and n-butylamine bicarbonate, by counter-current mode using a small size mixer-settler composed of two 4-stage wash steps. Di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), the main degradation product from TBP, was removed from real degraded solvent with decontamination factor of 2.5 {approx} 7.9. The study on electrolytic decomposition of butylamine compounds was also conducted for waste treatment.

  4. Controlling Actinide Hydration in Mixed Solvent Systems: Towards Tunable Solvent Systems to Close the Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Sue B.

    2016-10-31

    The goal of this project has been to define the extent of hydration the f-elements and other cations in mixed solvent electrolyte systems. Methanol-water and other mixed solvent systems have been studied, where the solvent dielectric constant was varied systematically. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic studies provide details concerning the energetics of complexation and other reactions of these cations. This information has also been used to advance new understanding of the behavior of these cations in a variety of systems, ranging from environmental studies, chromatographic approaches, and ionization processes for mass spectrometry.

  5. Structure and Solvent Properties of Microemulsions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Civia A.; Calzola, Zachary J.; Mbindyo, Jeremiah K. N.

    2008-01-01

    A microscale laboratory experiment to investigate the formation and utility of microemulsions is described. Microemulsions are technologically important fluids that can reduce the use of toxic organic solvents. In the experiment, students prepare a microemulsion and compare the solubility of sudan III dye in the microemulsion and in dodecane. They…

  6. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.; Lazarov, L.; Amui, J.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stage of direct coal liquefaction.

  7. REPLACING SOLVENT CLEANING WITH AQUEOUS CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents actions taken by Robert Bosch Corp., Charleston, SC, in replacing the cleaning solvents 1, 1, 2- trichloro-1, 2, 2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene (TCE) with aqueous solutions. Bosch has succeeded in eliminating all their CFC-113 use and so f...

  8. Solvent treatment of coal for improved liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Appell, Herbert R.; Narain, Nand K.; Utz, Bruce R.

    1986-05-06

    Increased liquefaction yield is obtained by pretreating a slurry of solid carbonaceous material and a liquid hydrocarbonaceous solvent at a temperature above 200.degree. C. but below 350.degree. C. for a period of 10 minutes to four hours prior to exposure to liquefaction temperatures.

  9. SOLVENT FREE CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION USING MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-expedited solvent-free synthetic processes will be described that involve the exposure of neat reactants to microwave (MW) irradiation in the presence of supported reagents or catalysts on mineral oxides. Recent developments will be presented on the synthetic utility o...

  10. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  11. ESES: Software for Eulerian solvent excluded surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Beibei; Wang, Bao; Zhao, Rundong; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2017-03-15

    Solvent excluded surface (SES) is one of the most popular surface definitions in biophysics and molecular biology. In addition to its usage in biomolecular visualization, it has been widely used in implicit solvent models, in which SES is usually immersed in a Cartesian mesh. Therefore, it is important to construct SESs in the Eulerian representation for biophysical modeling and computation. This work describes a software package called Eulerian solvent excluded surface (ESES) for the generation of accurate SESs in Cartesian grids. ESES offers the description of the solvent and solute domains by specifying all the intersection points between the SES and the Cartesian grid lines. Additionally, the interface normal at each intersection point is evaluated. Furthermore, for a given biomolecule, the ESES software not only provides the whole surface area, but also partitions the surface area according to atomic types. Homology theory is utilized to detect topological features, such as loops and cavities, on the complex formed by the SES. The sizes of loops and cavities are measured based on persistent homology with an evolutionary partial differential equation-based filtration. ESES is extensively validated by surface visualization, electrostatic solvation free energy computation, surface area and volume calculations, and loop and cavity detection and their size estimation. We used the Amber PBSA test set in our electrostatic solvation energy, area, and volume validations. Our results are either calibrated by analytical values or compared with those from the MSMS software. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. CO-SOLVENT BASED SOURCE REMEDIATION APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field pilot scale studies have demonstrated that co-solvent-enhanced in situ extraction can remove residual and free-phase nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), but may leave levels of contaminants in the ground water and subsurface formation higher than regulatory requirements for c...

  13. Deep eutectic solvents: syntheses, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Royer, Sébastien; Jérôme, François

    2012-11-07

    Within the framework of green chemistry, solvents occupy a strategic place. To be qualified as a green medium, these solvents have to meet different criteria such as availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability, recyclability, flammability, and low price among others. Up to now, the number of available green solvents are rather limited. Here we wish to discuss a new family of ionic fluids, so-called Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES), that are now rapidly emerging in the current literature. A DES is a fluid generally composed of two or three cheap and safe components that are capable of self-association, often through hydrogen bond interactions, to form a eutectic mixture with a melting point lower than that of each individual component. DESs are generally liquid at temperatures lower than 100 °C. These DESs exhibit similar physico-chemical properties to the traditionally used ionic liquids, while being much cheaper and environmentally friendlier. Owing to these remarkable advantages, DESs are now of growing interest in many fields of research. In this review, we report the major contributions of DESs in catalysis, organic synthesis, dissolution and extraction processes, electrochemistry and material chemistry. All works discussed in this review aim at demonstrating that DESs not only allow the design of eco-efficient processes but also open a straightforward access to new chemicals and materials.

  14. EXXON donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperly, W. R.; Swabb, L. E., Jr.; Tauton, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    A solvent coal liquefaction process to produce low-sulfur liquid products from a wide range of coals is described. An integrated program of laboratory and engineering research and development in conjunction with operation of a 250 T/D pilot plant is discussed.

  15. Temporal and spatial imaging of hydrogen storage materials: watching solvent and hydrogen desorption from aluminium hydride by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Shane D; Humphries, Terry; Weaver, Louise; McGrady, G Sean

    2008-10-07

    An in situ thermal desorption study of solvated aluminum hydride (alane) by transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction has permitted characterisation of the structural and morphological changes during desorption of solvent and hydrogen in real-time; this powerful technique for studying hydrogen storage materials complements several others already employed.

  16. Selling College Graduates to Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Daniel R.; Biehl, Kimberly A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a University of Pittsburgh placement office program to increase placement of graduates with local businesses. To challenge the employment agencies' monopoly on this market, an advertising and direct communications program was launched with continuing good results. (JAC)

  17. Are Sanctions on Employers Constitutional?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollobin, Ira

    1988-01-01

    Questions the constitutional validity of employer sanctions used to deter illegal immigration under the Immigration Reform and Control Act. Points out the anomaly of using criminal penalties to deter a civil, administrative violation. (FMW)

  18. A comparison of implicit- and explicit-solvent simulations of self-assembly in block copolymer and solute systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaeth, Justin R.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed explicit- and implicit-solvent models for the flash nanoprecipitation process, which involves rapid coprecipitation of block copolymers and solutes by changing solvent quality. The explicit-solvent model uses the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method and the implicit-solvent model uses the Brownian dynamics (BD) method. Each of the two models was parameterized to match key properties of the diblock copolymer (specifically, critical micelle concentration, diffusion coefficient, polystyrene melt density, and polyethylene glycol radius of gyration) and the hydrophobic solute (aqueous solubility, diffusion coefficient, and solid density). The models were simulated in the limit of instantaneous mixing of solvent with antisolvent. Despite the significant differences in the potentials employed in the implicit- and explicit-solvent models, the polymer-stabilized nanoparticles formed in both sets of simulations are similar in size and structure; however, the dynamic evolution of the two simulations is quite different. Nanoparticles in the BD simulations have diffusion coefficients that follow Rouse behavior (D ∝ M-1), whereas those in the DPD simulations have diffusion coefficients that are close to the values predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation (D ∝ R-1). As the nanoparticles become larger, the discrepancy between diffusion coefficients grows. As a consequence, BD simulations produce increasingly slower aggregation dynamics with respect to real time and result in an unphysical evolution of the nanoparticle size distribution. Surface area per polymer of the stable explicit-solvent nanoparticles agrees well with experimental values, whereas the implicit-solvent nanoparticles are stable when the surface area per particle is roughly two to four times larger. We conclude that implicit-solvent models may produce questionable results when simulating nonequilibrium processes in which hydrodynamics play a critical role.

  19. A comparison of implicit- and explicit-solvent simulations of self-assembly in block copolymer and solute systems.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Justin R; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2011-04-28

    We have developed explicit- and implicit-solvent models for the flash nanoprecipitation process, which involves rapid coprecipitation of block copolymers and solutes by changing solvent quality. The explicit-solvent model uses the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method and the implicit-solvent model uses the Brownian dynamics (BD) method. Each of the two models was parameterized to match key properties of the diblock copolymer (specifically, critical micelle concentration, diffusion coefficient, polystyrene melt density, and polyethylene glycol radius of gyration) and the hydrophobic solute (aqueous solubility, diffusion coefficient, and solid density). The models were simulated in the limit of instantaneous mixing of solvent with antisolvent. Despite the significant differences in the potentials employed in the implicit- and explicit-solvent models, the polymer-stabilized nanoparticles formed in both sets of simulations are similar in size and structure; however, the dynamic evolution of the two simulations is quite different. Nanoparticles in the BD simulations have diffusion coefficients that follow Rouse behavior (D ∝ M(-1)), whereas those in the DPD simulations have diffusion coefficients that are close to the values predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation (D ∝ R(-1)). As the nanoparticles become larger, the discrepancy between diffusion coefficients grows. As a consequence, BD simulations produce increasingly slower aggregation dynamics with respect to real time and result in an unphysical evolution of the nanoparticle size distribution. Surface area per polymer of the stable explicit-solvent nanoparticles agrees well with experimental values, whereas the implicit-solvent nanoparticles are stable when the surface area per particle is roughly two to four times larger. We conclude that implicit-solvent models may produce questionable results when simulating nonequilibrium processes in which hydrodynamics play a critical role.

  20. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  1. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  2. Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents in natural products research: mixtures of solids as extraction solvents.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-11-22

    Mixtures of solid chemicals may become liquid under certain conditions. These liquids are characterized by the formation of strong ionic (ionic liquids) or hydrogen bonds (deep eutectic solvents). Due to their extremely low vapor pressure, they are now widely used in polymer chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry, yet little attention has been paid to their use as extraction solvents of natural products. This review summarizes the preparation of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents with natural product components and recent progress in their applications to the extraction and analysis of natural products as well as the recovery of extracted compounds from their extracts. Additionally, various factors affecting extraction features of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents, as well as potential useful technologies including microwave and ultrasound to increase the extraction efficiency, are discussed.

  3. Ruthenium-catalyzed alkylation of indoles with tertiary amines by oxidation of a sp3 C-H bond and Lewis acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Zhong; Zhou, Cong-Ying; Wong, Man-Kin; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-05-17

    Ruthenium porphyrins (particularly [Ru(2,6-Cl(2)tpp)CO]; tpp=tetraphenylporphinato) and RuCl(3) can act as oxidation and/or Lewis acid catalysts for direct C-3 alkylation of indoles, giving the desired products in high yields (up to 82% based on 60-95% substrate conversions). These ruthenium compounds catalyze oxidative coupling reactions of a wide variety of anilines and indoles bearing electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents with high regioselectivity when using tBuOOH as an oxidant, resulting in the alkylation of N-arylindoles to 3-{[(N-aryl-N-alkyl)amino]methyl}indoles (yield: up to 82%, conversion: up to 95%) and the alkylation of N-alkyl or N-H indoles to 3-[p-(dialkylamino)benzyl]indoles (yield: up to 73%, conversion: up to 92%). A tentative reaction mechanism involving two pathways is proposed: an iminium ion intermediate may be generated by oxidation of an sp(3) C-H bond of the alkylated aniline by an oxoruthenium species; this iminium ion could then either be trapped by an N-arylindole (pathway A) or converted to formaldehyde, allowing a subsequent three-component coupling reaction of the in situ generated formaldehyde with an N-alkylindole and an aniline in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst (pathway B). The results of deuterium-labeling experiments are consistent with the alkylation of N-alkylindoles via pathway B. The relative reaction rates of [Ru(2,6-Cl(2)tpp)CO]-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions of 4-X-substituted N,N-dimethylanilines with N-phenylindole (using tBuOOH as oxidant), determined through competition experiments, correlate linearly with the substituent constants sigma (R(2)=0.989), giving a rho value of -1.09. This rho value and the magnitudes of the intra- and intermolecular deuterium isotope effects (k(H)/k(D)) suggest that electron transfer most likely occurs during the initial stage of the oxidation of 4-X-substituted N,N-dimethylanilines. Ruthenium-catalyzed three-component reaction of N-alkyl/N-H indoles, paraformaldehyde, and anilines gave 3-[p-(dialkylamino)benzyl]indoles in up to 82% yield (conversion: up to 95%).

  4. Effect of hydroxyl and amino groups on electrochemiluminescence activity of tertiary amines at low tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuang; Niu, Wenxin; Li, Haijuan; Hu, Lianzhe; Yuan, Yali; Xu, Guobao

    2010-04-15

    ECL of several amines containing different numbers of hydroxyl and amino groups was investigated. N-butyldiethanolamine is found to be more effective than 2-(dibutylamino)ethanol at gold and platinum electrodes, and is the most effective coreactant reported until now. Surprisingly, ECL intensities of monoamines, such as 2-(dibutylamino)ethanol and N-butyldiethanolamine, are much stronger than that of diamines including N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediamine and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-hydroxypropyl)ethlenediamine. The striking contrast between ECL signals of the investigated monoamines and diamines may result from more significant side reactions of diamines, such as the intramolecular side reactions between oxidative amine cation radicals and reductive amine free radicals.

  5. Fundamental studies on the feasibility of deep eutectic solvents for the selective partition of glaucarubinone present in the roots of Simarouba glauca.

    PubMed

    Kholiya, Faisal; Bhatt, Nidhi; Rathod, Meena R; Meena, Ramavatar; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2015-07-14

    Several deep eutectic solvents prepared by the complexation of choline chloride as the hydrogen bond acceptor and hydrogen bond donors such as urea, thiourea, ethylene glycol, and glycerol were employed to partition glaucarubinone, an antimalarial compound present in roots of the plant, Simarouba glauca. Among all the solvents, the deep eutectic solvent consisting of the mixture of choline chloride and urea the most suitable to partition the antimalarial compound from the extract selectively. Analytical tools such as high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were used for characterizations, and glaucarubinone extracted from the roots of the plant by conventional solvent extraction method was used as a reference for comparison. The hydrogen and noncovalent bonds formed between glaucarubinone and the deep eutectic solvents could be responsible for the selective partition of the drug molecule.

  6. Effect of solvent volume on the physical properties of aluminium doped nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin films deposited using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabena Begum, N.; Mohan, R.; Ravichandran, K.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited by employing a low cost and simplified spray technique using a perfume atomizer from starting solutions having different volumes (10, 20, … , 50 mL) of solvent. The effect of solvent volume on the structural, electrical, optical, photoluminescence (PL) and surface morphological properties was studied. The electrical resistivity of the AZO films is remarkably influenced by the variation in the solvent volume. The X-ray diffraction profiles clearly showed that all the films have preferential orientation along the (0 0 2) plane irrespective of the solvent volume. The crystallite size was found to be in the nano range of 35-46 nm. The optical transmittance in the visible region is desirably high (>85%). The AFM images show columnar morphology with varying grain size. The PL studies revealed that the AZO film deposited from 50 mL of solvent volume has good quality with lesser defect density.

  7. Solvent-based nanocomposite coatings I. Dispersion of organophilic montmorillonite in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Burgentzlé, D; Duchet, J; Gérard, J F; Jupin, A; Fillon, B

    2004-10-01

    This study aims to determine the relevant parameters controlling the organophilic montmorillonite dispersion in various organic solvents which can be used as dispersion media for polymer coatings. These suspensions were studied at three scales: At nanometer scale by looking to interlayer distance: When the solvent surface energy is higher than the organophilic clay surface energy, i.e., gamma solvent > or = gamma montmorillonite, the intercalated organic chains of the quaternary ammonium modifier swell, leading to an increase of the interlayer distance. The balance between hydrophilic and hydrophobic character is the key to dispersion of nanoclays. At micrometer scale by studying the rheological behaviour of clay suspensions: Gels are formed by percolation of microgels, based on swollen 3-4 platelet tactoids. The viscoelastic properties and the flow behavior reveal the gel structuration by measuring the gel stiffness and the flowing stress. At macroscopic scale analyzed from the swelling of the nanoclay into solvents: The compatibility between solvent and organophilic clay governs the macroscopic swelling, i.e., interactions between organic chains borne by the intercalated ions and solvents govern the final suspension morphologies. The same methodology can be adopted for monomers or prepolymers selected for one in situ intercalation/exfoliation processing route.

  8. Effectiveness of three solvents and two associations of solvents on gutta-percha and resilon.

    PubMed

    Faria-Júnior, Norberto Batista de; Loiola, Livia Etchebehere de; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Berbert, Fábio Luis Camargo Villela; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of 3 solvents (Citrol orange oil, Eucalyptol and Tetrachloroethylene) and 2 associations of solvents (Citrol orange oil+Tetrachloroethylene and Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene) on 3 types of gutta-percha (conventional, thermoplastic and EndoREZ) and Resilon. Ten discs (10 mm diameter x 1 mm thick) from each material were prepared using standard metallic molds. Each specimen was weighed to determinate its initial mass. The specimens were immersed in the solvents for 10 min, followed by immersion in distilled water for 20 min, and were then reweighed to obtain the final mass. The mean weight loss determined the solvent capacity. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Tetrachloroethylene was the most effective on conventional gutta-percha (p<0.05). Tetrachloroethylene was also the most effective on thermoplastic gutta-percha, but it was not significantly different (p>0.05) from Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene, Citrol+Tetrachloroethylene, and Citrol. All solvents and associations presented little effectiveness on Resilon. The association Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene was the most effective on EndoREZ, but it did not differ significantly (p>0.05) from Citrol+Tetrachloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene. All evaluated substances presented solvent action. Tetrachloroethylene improved the effectiveness of both Citrol and Eucalyptol.

  9. Numerical Treatment of Stokes Solvent Flow and Solute-Solvent Interfacial Dynamics for Nonpolar Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhou, Shenggao; Moore, David K; Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo

    2016-05-01

    We design and implement numerical methods for the incompressible Stokes solvent flow and solute-solvent interface motion for nonpolar molecules in aqueous solvent. The balance of viscous force, surface tension, and van der Waals type dispersive force leads to a traction boundary condition on the solute-solvent interface. To allow the change of solute volume, we design special numerical boundary conditions on the boundary of a computational domain through a consistency condition. We use a finite difference ghost fluid scheme to discretize the Stokes equation with such boundary conditions. The method is tested to have a second-order accuracy. We combine this ghost fluid method with the level-set method to simulate the motion of the solute-solvent interface that is governed by the solvent fluid velocity. Numerical examples show that our method can predict accurately the blow up time for a test example of curvature flow and reproduce the polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of some simple model molecular systems.

  10. The effect of pressure, isotopic (H/D) substitution, and other variables on miscibility in polymer-solvent systems. The nature of the demixing process; dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A research program examining the effects of pressure, isotope substitution and other variables on miscibility in polymer solvent systems is described. The techniques employed included phase equilibrium measurements and dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering.

  11. Development of solvent-free ambient mass spectrometry for green chemistry applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyuan; Forni, Amanda; Chen, Hao

    2014-04-15

    Green chemistry minimizes chemical process hazards in many ways, including eliminating traditional solvents or using alternative recyclable solvents such as ionic liquids. This concept is now adopted in this study for monitoring solvent-free reactions and analysis of ionic liquids, solids, and catalysts by mass spectrometry (MS), without using any solvent. In our approach, probe electrospray ionization (PESI), an ambient ionization method, was employed for this purpose. Neat viscous room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in trace amounts (e.g., 25 nL) could be directly analyzed without sample carryover effect, thereby enabling high-throughput analysis. With the probe being heated, it can also ionize ionic solid compounds such as organometallic complexes as well as a variety of neat neutral solid chemicals (e.g., amines). More importantly, moisture-sensitive samples (e.g., [bmim][AlCl4]) can be successfully ionized. Furthermore, detection of organometallic catalysts (including air-sensitive [Rh-MeDuPHOS][OTf]) in ionic liquids, a traditionally challenging task due to strong ion suppression effect from ionic liquids, can be enabled using PESI. In addition, PESI can be an ideal approach for monitoring solvent-free reactions. Using PESI-MS, we successfully examined the alkylation of amines by alcohols, the conversion of pyrylium into pyridinium, and the condensation of aldehydes with indoles as well as air- and moisture-sensitive reactions such as the oxidation of ferrocene and the condensation of pyrazoles with borohydride. Interestingly, besides the expected reaction products, the reaction intermediates such as the monopyrazolylborate ion were also observed, providing insightful information for reaction mechanisms. We believe that the presented solvent-free PESI-MS method would impact the green chemistry field.

  12. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Cyclohexane as a Cryoscopic Solvent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffel, Margaret J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that cyclohexane be used as a solvent in experiments usually using benzene, which has been placed on the list of chemicals that are confirmed carcinogens. Reasons for selection of cyclohexane and experimental procedures using this solvent are described. (CS)

  13. The Ideal Solvent for Paper Chromatography of Food Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.

    1988-01-01

    Uses paper chromatography with food dyes to provide a simple and inexpensive basis for teaching chromatography. Provides experimental methodology and tabled results. Includes a solvent system comparison (Rf) for seven dyes and twenty-two solvents. (MVL)

  14. Organic Solvent Tropical Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-06-21

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines.

  15. TGA and DTA studies of solvent-exchanged gels

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, K.; Durakpasa, H.; Breiter, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    Sols were prepared in the system TMOS:H{sub 2}O:SOLV:HCl with molar ratios of 1:4:3:0.0005 for SOLV = MEOH, ETOH and DMF. The gelation and aging of these sols took place in cuvettes covered by parafilm. The gels were removed from the cuvettes 14 days after gelation. Solvent exchange was carried out in each of the three solvents for a period of 14 days. Starting with fresh solvent, the exchange was repeated three times. TGA and DTA curves were taken with pieces of the original gels and of gels after the 2nd and 3rd solvent exchange. The TGA curves display a considerable weight loss in the temperature range of solvent evaporation. A small step is observed at higher temperatures if MEOH or ETOH represent the exchange solvent. The DTA curves allow a distinction what mixtures of solvents are present. The effectiveness of the solvent exchange can be evaluated.

  16. Final Report of the Study on Spent Solvents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a final report of the study on spent solvents and discusses the wastes associated with the use of the materials as solvents, the toxicity of the wastes, and the management practices for the wastes.

  17. Employer's Pocket Guide on Youth Employment. Youth Rules!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Labor, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Through the YouthRules! initiative, the U.S. Department of Labor and its strategic partners seek to promote positive and safe work experiences for young workers. YouthRules! strives to educate teens, parents, educators, employers and the public on Federal and State rules regarding young workers. Components of the initiative include a website…

  18. 29 CFR 779.19 - Employer, employee, and employ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 331 U.S. 704; Rutherford Food Corp. v. McComb, 331 U.S. 722). An “employer”, as defined in section 3(d... Act's major provisions impose certain requirements and prohibitions on every “employer” subject to... of oppressive child labor. The Act provides its own definitions of “employer,” “employee”,...

  19. Employability and Employment Outcomes of No-Fee Preservice Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Yule; Li, Ling; Ding, Shujing; Li, Zhichao

    2013-01-01

    This study used interviews and questionnaires to survey 770 no-fee preservice students. Its findings were as follows: (1) Their employability encompasses five dimensions: teaching skills, ability to learn specialized knowledge, ability to grasp elementary and secondary teaching materials and methods, communication skills, and ability to apply for…

  20. Graduates' Employability: What Do Graduates and Employers Think?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsouka, Kyriaki; Mihail, Dimitrios M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the views of university graduates and human resource managers (HRMs) on graduates' employability in terms of the soft skills required by the labour market. Soft skills (personal attributes that enhance an individual's interactions, job performance and career prospects) are necessary in the labour…

  1. Local solvent density augmentation around a solute in supercritical solvent bath: 1. A mechanism explanation and a new phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2005-04-21

    A recently proposed partitioned density functional (DF) approximation (Phys. Rev. E 2003, 68, 061201) and an adjustable parameter-free version of a Lagrangian theorem-based DF approximation (LTDFA: Phys. Lett. A 2003, 319, 279) are combined to propose a DF approximation for nonuniform Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid. Predictions of the present DF approximation for local LJ solvent density inhomogeneity around a large LJ solute particle or hard core Yukawa particle are in good agreement with existing simulation data. An extensive investigation about the effect of solvent bath temperature, solvent-solute interaction range, solvent-solute interaction magnitude, and solute size on the local solvent density inhomogeneity is carried out with the present DF approximation. It is found that a plateau of solvent accumulation number as a function of solvent bath bulk density is due to a coupling between the solvent-solute interaction and solvent correlation whose mathematical expression is a convolution integral appearing in the density profile equation of the DF theory formalism. The coupling becomes stronger as the increasing of the whole solvent-solute interaction strength, solute size relative to solvent size, and the closeness to the critical density and temperature of the solvent bath. When the attractive solvent-solute interaction becomes large enough and the bulk state moves close enough to the critical temperature of the solvent bath, the maximum solvent accumulation number as a function of solvent bath bulk density appears near the solvent bath critical density; the appearance of this maximum is in contrast with a conclusion drawn by a previous investigation based on an inhomogeneous version of Ornstein-Zernike integral equation carried out only for a smaller parameter space than that in the present paper. Advantage of the DFT approach over the integral equation is discussed.

  2. Research on population and employment under the world employment program.

    PubMed

    1974-01-01

    In 1972 the ILO launched a comprehensive research project to: 1) for mulate a series of economic-demographic simulation models dealing with the direct and indirect effects of population on employment, output, and income distribution, and vice versa; 2) fund empirical studies dealing with important elements in the relationship between population and employment growth and focusing on policy issues. The project has 2 special features, the feedback between the empirical research and the model activity and the joint participation of the ILO with national research organizations in different regions. A large number of economic-demographic models have been developed in recent years. However, most of them take demographic variables as exogenous and analyze consequences in a neoclassical framework or they seek to analyze demographic responses to economic and social changes which are treated as exogenous variables. Interaction among different sets of variables is closer to reality, not uni-directional causation. Effective demand is as important as the increase in resource inputs. The situation in de veloping economies is further complicated by the coexistence of modern and traditional sectors which show many fundamental differences. Detail ed descriptions of several models under development are given. Studies being conducted include: labor force analysis, with special emphasis on developing countries; the socioeconomic determinants of fertility; studies on population, consumption patterns, and savings; an analysis of the extent to which the labor market signals through wage adjustments the rapid growth of population and labor force and the resulting excess supply of labor in relation to modern sector jobs; capital accumulation and employment in a labor-surplus situation; and the effects of population pressure on land tenure, agricultural productivity, and employment. It is hoped this research will suggest possible optimal mixes of demographic, economic, and social policies

  3. The Concept of Solid Solvent as Processing Aid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-20

    such concept was examined using acetanilid p as a potential solid solvent for polystyrene (PS) and Kraton 1101, a block copolymer containing PS blocks... Acetanilide demon- strated the essential features required of a solid solvent supporting the concept of solid solvent. It had a high solubility in PS...properties of the polymer. The feasibility of such concept was examined using acetanilide as a potential solid solvent for polystyrene (PS) and Iraton 1101, a

  4. Electrochemical instability of solvent membranes during electrodialytic cation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, V.N.; Kontush, A.S.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental data are reported concerning the uptake of water by solvent membranes during dialysis and electrodialysis when the solvent is nonaqueous and a macrocyclic carrier is present. Aspects of the electrochemical instability of solvent membranes are discussed, and particularly the discontinuous conductivity fluctuations and the three stages of development of electric breakdown. The cationic selectivity of the macrocyclic carrier, the amount of water present in the solvent membrane, and the character of electrochemical instability of the membrane are shown to be interrelated.

  5. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  6. Production of biodiesel using expanded gas solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M; Fox, Robert V; Petkovic, Lucia M

    2009-04-07

    A method of producing an alkyl ester. The method comprises providing an alcohol and a triglyceride or fatty acid. An expanding gas is dissolved into the alcohol to form a gas expanded solvent. The alcohol is reacted with the triglyceride or fatty acid in a single phase to produce the alkyl ester. The expanding gas may be a nonpolar expanding gas, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene, propylene, butylene, pentene, isomers thereof, and mixtures thereof, which is dissolved into the alcohol. The gas expanded solvent may be maintained at a temperature below, at, or above a critical temperature of the expanding gas and at a pressure below, at, or above a critical pressure of the expanding gas.

  7. Gamma Ray Radiolysis of the FPEX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    B. J. Mincher; S. P. Mezyk; D. R. Peterman

    2006-09-01

    Slide presentation. FPEX contains a calixarene for Cs extraction, a crown ether for Sr extraction, Cs7SB modifier, and TOA to aid in stripping, in Isopar L diluent. The radiation stability FPEX must be evaluated prior to process use. Radiolytic degradation of species in solution are due to reaction with the direct radiolysis products of the diluent. In Isopar L, the reactive species produced include e-, •H and alkane radicals, resulting in a reducing environment. However, in nitric acid, oxidizing hydroxyl (•OH) and nitro (•NO2) radicals dominate system chemistry. Thus, the nature of diluent and the presence of radical scavengers affect the results of irradiation. We report the preliminary results of a new program to investigate the radiolysis of FPEX using the 60Co irradiation of FPEX neat solvent, acid pre-equilibrated solvent and mixed aerated phases. The Cs and Sr distribution ratios were used as metrics.

  8. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  9. Development of a solvent processed insensitive propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trask, R.; Costa, E.; Beardell, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of low vulnerability propellants are studied which are distinguished by whether the binder is a rubber, such as polyurethane or CTBN, or a plasticizable polymer such as ethyl cellulose or cellulose acetate. The former propellants are made by a partial cure extrusion process while the latter are made by the conventional solvent process. Emphasis is given to a cellulose binder (plasticizer) RDX composition. The type of binder used, the particle size of the RDX and the presence of small quantities of nitrocellulose in the solvent processed compositions have important influences on the mechanical and combustion characteristics of the propellant. The low temperature combustion is of particular concern because of potential breakup of the grains that can lead to instability.

  10. Solvent Stokes' Shifts Revisited: Application and Comparison of Thompson-Schweizer-Chandler-Song-Marcus Theories with Ooshika-Bakshiev-Lippert Theories

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, William

    2009-01-01

    The ‘classical’ treatment of solvent Stokes' shifts has been with us for fifty years or more. Twenty-five years ago, aided by new statistical mechanical underpinnings of liquid-state theory, Chandler and others(1,2,3) developed newer approaches to predicting solvent shifts. We employ these here in a direct comparison with the older methods, for three molecules of general interest in four different solvents. We also suggest new routes to future methods that may retain the advantages of both methods. PMID:19053549

  11. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  12. Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qianwen; Pu, Yu; Li, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhen; Hu, Xinzhong

    2017-03-13

    This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs) of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC), 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC), 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC), 5% Na₂CO₃ SRC (SCASRC), NaCl SRC (SCSRC), CaCl₂ SRC (CCSRC), FeCl₃ SRC (FCSRC), sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC), NaOH (pH 10) SRC (SHSRC), Na₂CO₃ (pH 10) SRC (SCABSRC) and SDS (pH 10) SRC (SDSSRC) values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl) to acidic (5% lactic acid) or alkaline (5% Na₂CO₃, CaCl₂, FeCl₃, NaOH and pH 10 Na₂CO₃), and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl₂ and FeCl₃) increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**), CCSRC (0.82**), SCHSRC (0.80**) and FCSRC (0.78*). SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64*) but not related with protein and starch. CaCl₂ could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay.

  13. Design of lattice proteins with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, G.; Mölbert, S.; de Los Rios, P.

    2002-12-01

    Protein design is important to develop new drugs. As such, a knowledge of the correct model to use to design novel proteins is of the utmost importance. Here we show that a simple model where the solvent degrees of freedom are (semi)explicitly taken into account performs better than other existing models when compared to real data. Some consequences on the criteria to be used for protein design are discussed.

  14. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  15. ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE METAL SOLVENT EXTRACTANTS AND PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the recovery of uranium from aqueous mineral acidic solutions by solvent extraction. The extractant is a synmmetrical dialkyl pyrophosphate in which the alkyl substituents have a chain length of from 4 to 17 carbon atoms. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dioctyl pyrophosphate. The uranium is precipitated irom the organic extractant phase with an agent such as HF, fluoride salts. alcohol, or ammonia.

  16. Coupling of protein dynamics with the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Gokhan; Sauzan, Azzam; Mehtani, Disha; Sokolov, Alexei

    2003-03-01

    Glycerol and trehalose are among the many viscous solvents that are widely used for biostabilization and controlling the dynamics of proteins. It is believed that the suppression of the structural relaxations by high viscosity of solvent is responsible for improved stability in proteins. However, results of [1] and [2] demonstrate stronger suppression of biochemical activity and dynamics of proteins by liquid glycerol than by solid trehalose in a wide temperature range. The authors tried to explain the counterintuitive observations by a possible decoupling of the dynamics of the protein from trehalose. In order to test the validity of this assumption and to investigate the influence of the fast dynamics in proteins, the low frequency Raman scattering spectroscopy technique is used. Both relaxational and vibrational dynamics of glycerol, trehalose, and lysozyme in glycerol and in trehalose are studied in a wide temperature range. Dynamics of lysozyme in glycerol follows the strong temperature dependence of relaxational and vibrational dynamics of the bulk glycerol. On the other hand, the weak temperature dependence of dynamics of lysozyme in trehalose follows exactly the behavior of pure trehalose. This proves that there is a strong dynamic coupling between the protein and the solvents used. Interestingly, stronger relaxations in solid trehalose as compared to liquid glycerol are observed in the GHz region at low temperatures. This could be the reason for the enhanced protein activity observed in trehalose, compared to that in glycerol in this temperature range. Suppression of these fast relaxations should be the key for providing long-term stability to proteins. 1. Sastry, G.M. and N. Agmon, Trehalose prevents myoglobin collapse and preserves its internal mobility. BIOCHEMISTRY, 1997, 36(23): p. 7097-108. 2. Caliskan, G., et al., Influence of solvent on dynamics and stability of a protein. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, 2002, 307-310: p. 887-893.

  17. Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qianwen; Pu, Yu; Li, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhen; Hu, Xinzhong

    2017-01-01

    This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs) of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC), 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC), 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC), 5% Na2CO3 SRC (SCASRC), NaCl SRC (SCSRC), CaCl2 SRC (CCSRC), FeCl3 SRC (FCSRC), sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC), NaOH (pH 10) SRC (SHSRC), Na2CO3 (pH 10) SRC (SCABSRC) and SDS (pH 10) SRC (SDSSRC) values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl) to acidic (5% lactic acid) or alkaline (5% Na2CO3, CaCl2, FeCl3, NaOH and pH 10 Na2CO3), and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3) increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**), CCSRC (0.82**), SCHSRC (0.80**) and FCSRC (0.78*). SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64*) but not related with protein and starch. CaCl2 could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay. PMID:28335393

  18. Estimation of the nucleation kinetics for the anti-solvent crystallisation of paracetamol in methanol/water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó'Ciardhá, Clifford T.; Frawley, Patrick J.; Mitchell, Niall A.

    2011-08-01

    In this work the primary nucleation kinetics have been estimated for the anti-solvent crystallisation of paracetamol in methanol-water solutions from metastable zone widths (MSZW) and induction times at 25 °C. Laser back-scattering via a focused beam reflectance Measurement (FBRM ®) is utilised to detect the onset of nucleation. The theoretical approach of Kubota was employed to estimate the nucleation kinetics, which accounts for the sensitivity of the nucleation detection technique. This approach is expanded in this work to analyse the induction time for an anti-solvent crystallisation process. Solvent composition is known to have a significant impact on the measured induction times and MSZW. The induction time in this paper was measured from 40% to 70% mass water and the MSZW is measured from 40% to 60% mass water. The primary focus of the paper was to gauge the extent of how solvent composition affects nucleation kinetics so that this effect may be incorporated into a population balance model. Furthermore, the effects of solvent composition on the estimated nucleation rates are investigated. The primary nucleation rates were found to decrease with dynamic solvent composition, with the extent of their reduction linked to the gradient of the solubility curve. Finally, both MSZW and induction time methods have been found to produce similar estimates for the nucleation parameters.

  19. Extraction of Tetra-oxo Anions into a Hydrophobic, Ionic Liquid-Based Solvent Without Concomitant Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Stepinski, D.C.; Wishart, J.; Vandegrift, III, G.F.; Shkrob, I.A.; Kerr, K.; Dietz, M.L.; Qadah, D.T.D.; Garvey, S.L.

    2010-06-10

    Hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) have the potential to simplify certain separations by serving as both an extraction solvent and an electrolyte for subsequent electrochemical reductions. While IL-based solvents are known to be efficient media for metal ion extraction, separations employing these solvents are frequently complicated by the loss of constituent IL ions to the aqueous phase, resulting in deteriorating performance. In this study, we have examined the extraction of pertechnetate and related tetra-oxo anions from aqueous solutions into IL-based solvents incorporating tetraalkylphosphonium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide and a crown ether. In contrast to various previously studied IL-based cation extraction systems, facile anion extraction without significant transfer of the IL ions to the aqueous phase has been observed. In addition, the solvents exhibit high distribution ratios (100-500 for pertechnetate), significant electrical conductivity (>100 {micro}S/cm), and a wide ({approx}4 V) electrochemical window. The results suggest that these solvents may provide the basis for improved approaches to the extraction and recovery of a variety of anions.

  20. Extraction of tetra-oxo anions into a hydrophobic, ionic liquid-based solvent without concomitant ion exchange.

    SciTech Connect

    Stepinski, D. C.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Shkrob, I. A.; Wishart, J. F.; Kerr, K.; Dietz, M. L.; Qadah, D. T. D.; Garvey, S. L.; BNL; Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee

    2010-06-16

    Hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) have the potential to simplify certain separations by serving as both an extraction solvent and an electrolyte for subsequent electrochemical reductions. While IL-based solvents are known to be efficient media for metal ion extraction, separations employing these solvents are frequently complicated by the loss of constituent IL ions to the aqueous phase, resulting in deteriorating performance. In this study, we have examined the extraction of pertechnetate and related tetra-oxo anions from aqueous solutions into IL-based solvents incorporating tetraalkylphosphonium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide and a crown ether. In contrast to various previously studied IL-based cation extraction systems, facile anion extraction without significant transfer of the IL ions to the aqueous phase has been observed. In addition, the solvents exhibit high distribution ratios (100-500 for pertechnetate), significant electrical conductivity (>100 ?S/cm), and a wide (4 V) electrochemical window. The results suggest that these solvents may provide the basis for improved approaches to the extraction and recovery of a variety of anions.