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Sample records for empyema

  1. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  2. Empyema associated with pulmonary sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Fields, C L; Ossorio, M A; Roy, T M

    1989-07-01

    Sporothrix schenckii produces an insidious debilitating illness in humans. The lungs are seldom involved and pleural involvement is distinctly unusual, with only four patients described in the literature. We have described a patient with both parenchymal lung disease and pleural effusion. The characteristics of the pleural fluid were unlike those previously reported, and suggest that the coexistence of a parenchymal Sporothrix infiltrate may alter the nature of the pleural fluid to mimic an empyema rather than a self-limited hypersensitivity reaction.

  3. Parapneumonic Empyema Deaths during Past Century, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Ampofo, Krow; Sheng, Xiaoming; Pavia, Andrew T.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Byington, Carrie L.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia with empyema is a serious complication of influenza and commonly resulted in death during the 1918 influenza pandemic. We hypothesize that deaths caused by parapneumonic empyema are increasing in Utah once again despite advances in critical care and the availability of antimicrobial drugs and new vaccines. In this study, we analyzed the historical relationship between deaths caused by empyema and influenza pandemics by using 100 years of data from Utah. Deaths caused by empyema have indeed increased from 2000–2004 when compared with the historic low death rates of 1950–1975. Vaccine strategies and antimicrobial drug stockpiling to control empyema will be important as we prepare for the next influenza pandemic. PMID:19116048

  4. Empyema

    MedlinePlus

    ... which worsens when you breathe in deeply (pleurisy) Dry cough Excessive sweating , especially night sweats Fever and chills General discomfort, uneasiness, or ill feeling ( malaise ) Shortness of breath Weight loss (unintentional) Exams and Tests The health care provider may note decreased breath ...

  5. Spontaneous Bacterial Empyema in Liver Cirrhosis: An Underdiagnosed Pleural Complication

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Naglaa A. H.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema, defined as spontaneous infection of the pleural fluid, represents a distinct complication of hepatic hydrothorax with a different pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment strategy from those of empyema secondary to pneumonia. Nearly 40% of episodes of spontaneous empyema are not associated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or even ascites. The condition portends a poor prognosis, and is frequently under-diagnosed. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of spontaneous bacterial empyema. PMID:19568497

  6. Spontaneous bacterial empyema in liver cirrhosis: an underdiagnosed pleural complication.

    PubMed

    Allam, Naglaa A H

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema, defined as spontaneous infection of the pleural fluid, represents a distinct complication of hepatic hydrothorax with a different pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment strategy from those of empyema secondary to pneumonia. Nearly 40% of episodes of spontaneous empyema are not associated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or even ascites. The condition portends a poor prognosis, and is frequently under-diagnosed. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of spontaneous bacterial empyema.

  7. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  8. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  9. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection.

  10. Thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones.

    PubMed

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín

    2013-01-01

    Hepatobiliary conditions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right pleural effusion. Here we present the illustrative images of thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones in a woman who was treated for laparoscopic cholecystectomy one year before. The gallstones were obtained unexpectedly during a thoracentesis with aid of an Abrams needle. This rare complication is discussed under current literature review.

  11. Streptococcus intermedius: an unusual cause of a primary empyema.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Said B; Al Hasan, Muhanad A; Roy, Thomas M; Byrd, Ryland P

    2006-02-01

    Despite the evolution of modern antibiotics, pleural space infection remains a common illness with significant morbidity and mortality. Every year up to 60 percent of the 1.2 million patients in the United States who present with community-acquired pneumonia develop parapneumonic pleural effusions. Few of these parapneumonic effusions progress to an empyema. Interestingly, in about 10 percent of the cases of empyema, no underlying pulmonary infection can be identified. These pleural space infections are called primary empyemas. We present a patient with a primary empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius. Relatively few studies have investigated primary empyema caused Streptococcus intermedius. This case presentation serves as a reminder to the clinician about primary empyema caused by this micro-organism.

  12. Subdural empyema associated with an apparent regional hyperperfusion (luxury perfusion).

    PubMed

    DeLong, J F

    1978-12-01

    A patient with a subdural empyema demonstrated a late arterial "blush" during a 99mTc-pertechnetate cerebral dynamic flow study which "washed out" in the delayed images. Cerebral arteriography and subsequent autopsy documented inflammatory tissue surrounding the empyema, resulting in this scintigraphic pattern.

  13. A case of multiple empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akihito; Higo, Ryuzaburo; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Naoko; Haruyama, Takuo; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Yabe, Ayumi; Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2016-11-29

    We report the case of a patient with multiple empyema present throughout his body, including chronic sinusitis and chronic suppurative otitis media, as well as subsequent epidural empyema, all caused by Streptococcus intermedius. A 38-year-old man presented with chief complaints of headache, left ear discharge, and nasal congestion. Imaging studies revealed pansinusitis, soft tissue signs in the mastoid cells, and otitis media. The patient was treated with meropenem hydrate, 6g/day. While clinical findings indicated improvement of the sinusitis, his headache did not improve. Further examination with contrast computerized tomography (CT) 'a chest radiography' blood cultures were performed, and the patient was diagnosed with multiple empyema (with an epidural empyema, pulmonary suppuration) caused by S. intermedius. Subsequent burr hole drainage was implemented to drain the epidural empyema. Long-term administration was required to treat pulmonary suppuration. While they remain rare, there has been a recent upward trend in the frequency of cases in which a young, previously healthy patient has developed multiple empyema throughout their body despite the absence of complicating diseases that pose an immune deficiency risk, such as diabetes or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In order to properly diagnose and treat patients presenting with multiple empyema infection with S. intermedius should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  14. A case study of pediatric pneumonia with empyema.

    PubMed

    Waldrep, Vanessa B; Sloand, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    This case study provides a discussion of the diagnosis, management and comprehensive plan of care for empyema in children for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) working in primary care. The incidence of complicated pneumonias including those progressing to empyema is on the rise among pediatric patients. The ambiguous signs and symptoms of complicated pneumonias create a challenge for the provider when developing an accurate diagnosis and plan of care. Pediatric nurse practitioners must be cognizant of the increased incidence of complicated pneumonias and manage their patients accordingly. If left untreated, empyema may result in severe pulmonary complications.

  15. [Empyema of the knee joint in adults: diagnosis and therapy.].

    PubMed

    Mrácek, D

    2000-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the current diagnostic procedures and the scheme used at the author's Department. The article also deals with therapeutical trends including arthroscopic treatment of empyema. Antibiotics necessary for the treatment of the disease are administered empirically. Most often as antibiotics of "the first choice" are recommended penicilin antibiotics with the inhibitor of beta-lactamase. The author points out the necessity of an early and adequate treatment of the empyema of the knee joint as a prevention of serious sequelae on the affected joint. Key words: empyema of the knee joint, diagnosis, therapy.

  16. [Why are pediatric empyemas on the increase in Spain?].

    PubMed

    Martinón-Torres, F; Bernaola Iturbe, E; Giménez Sánchez, F; Baca Cots, M; de Juan Martín, F; Díez Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Gómez Campderá, J A; Picazo, J J; Pineda Solas, V

    2008-02-01

    There is a widespread perception among Spanish pediatricians that the incidence of empyema has significantly increased in the last few years, even though the objective information available is limited, and there is no specific active epidemiological surveillance system for this condition. In the present article, we review the situation of empyema in Spain, and discuss the main hypotheses put forward in the international literature to explain this increase, as well as the limitations of the sources available. Despite the scarcity of information, we draw the following conclusions: 1) the incidence of pediatric empyema is increasing in Spain, both generally and when caused by pneumococcus in particular; 2) the reason for this increase remains unknown, and to date no firm link has been established between this phenomenon and the heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine; and 3) this situation justifies the establishment of prospective systems for the surveillance and control of empyema and, once again, highlights the importance of developing active surveillance systems for pneumococcal disease.

  17. Rapidly progressive lumbar subdural empyema following acromial bursal injection.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-11-01

    Spinal subdural empyemas are rare. We describe a 53-year-old male who presented with back pain, mental status changes, and sepsis. Five days prior he had undergone a triamcinolone and lidocaine injection of the acromial bursa. He also had a remote history of epidural steroid injection for thoracic back pain. Two lumbar MRI conducted 62 hours apart revealed a newly developed subdural empyema that was successfully treated with surgical evacuation and post-operative antibiotics.

  18. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising from the Pleural Cavity After Pneumonectomy for Chronic Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yeong Jeong; Shin, Sumin; Shim, Young Mog

    2017-01-01

    Malignant tumors associated with chronic empyema have been reported in the literature, and a majority of these tumors are lymphomas. Epithelial tumors originating from the post-pneumonectomy space in patients with chronic empyema are extremely rare. Here, we present the cases of 2 patients with squamous cell carcinoma arising from the pleural cavity after pneumonectomy for chronic empyema. PMID:28382273

  19. Post-tuberculosis chronic empyema of the "forty years after".

    PubMed

    Mancini, P; Mazzei, L; Zarzana, A; Biagioli, D; Sposato, B; Croce, G F

    1998-01-01

    The authors present 110 cases of patients hospitalized in the last 5 years, with long-term disabling sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. Twelve out of them (= 10.9%) suffered from post-tuberculous chronic empyema, with an average latency period of 44.83 years between the acute tuberculous illness and the clinical manifestation of the empyema. Nine of the patients had been treated with collapsotherapy, induced by artificial intrapleural pneumothorax, 1 with thoracoplasty, and 2 only with late and inadequate anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy. Eleven patients (91.6%) also had a cutaneous fistula (7 cases) and/or a bronchopleural fistula (4 cases). The authors show how the issue of tuberculous sequelae is a significant not only from the numerical standpoint, but also for the seriousness of the caused pathological conditions, often posing problems for differential diagnosis. Moreover, they stress how tuberculosis should never be neglected or considered last in the differential diagnosis of empyema and pyopneumothorax.

  20. Bronchopleural Fistula and Empyema After Anatomic Lung Resection.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Giorgio; Mitchell, John D

    2015-11-01

    Empyema after anatomic lung resection is rare but causes serious morbidity, particularly if associated with a bronchopleural fistula. Careful assessment of preoperative risk factors and proper surgical technique can minimize risks. Empyema after segmentectomy or lobectomy may respond to simple drainage and antibiotics, or may require decortication with or without muscle transposition. After pneumonectomy, treatment principles include initial drainage of the intrathoracic space, closure of the fistula if present, and creation of an open thoracostomy, which is packed and later closed. Success rates can exceed 80%.

  1. Mycobacterium fortuitum thoracic empyema: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Tomii, Keisuke

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium. This microorganism is an uncommon etiological agent of lung lesions; among lung lesions caused by M. fortuitum, thoracic empyema is particularly rare. A 61-year-old man who had been treated for chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure with noninvasive ventilation was admitted because of breathing difficulty and was found to have M. fortuitum thoracic empyema. He improved after the administration of amikacin, imipenem/cilastatin, and clarithromycin following sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and clarithromycin. This is the first report of M. fortuitum thoracic empyema in a patient without human immunodeficiency virus infection. The thoracic empyema may have developed via a pulmonary fistula in this case. This case highlights the fact that we must be aware of the possibility of M. fortuitum thoracic empyema, especially in patients with M. fortuitum lung infection and treatment with noninvasive ventilation. Multidrug therapy may be effective and important to the resolution of M. fortuitum thoracic empyema.

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopic decortication for the management of late stage pleural empyema, is it feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, Waseem M.; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Al-Nassar, Sami A.; Alsultan, Rawan K.; Alwgait, Waad A.; Alkhalaf, Hanoof H.; Bisht, Shekhar C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical decortication (VATSD) is widely applicable in fibrinopurulent Stage II empyema. While, more chronic thick walled Stage III empyema (organizing stage) needs conversion to open thoracotomy, and existing reports reveal a lacuna in the realm of late stage empyema patient's management through VATS utilization, particularly Stage III empyema. We prospectively evaluated the application of VATSD regardless of the stage of pleural empyema for the effective management of late stage empyema in comparison to open decortications (ODs) to minimize the adverse effects of the disease. METHODS: All patients with pyogenic pleural empyema (Stage II and Stage III) in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) (admitted from January 2009 to December 2013) who did not respond to chest tube/pigtail drainage and/or antibiotic therapy were treated with VATSD and/or open thoracotomy. Prospective evaluation was carried out, and the effect of this technique on perioperative outcomes was appraised to evaluate our technical learning with the passage of time and experience with VATS for late stage empyema management. RESULTS: Out of total 63 patients, 26 had Stage II empyema and 37 had Stage III empyema. VATSD was employed on all empyema patients admitted in the KKUH. VATSD was successful in all patients with Stage II empyema. Twenty-five patients (67.6%) with Stage III empyema completed VATSD successfully. However, only 12 cases (32.4%) required conversions to open (thoracotomy) drainage (OD). The median hospital stay for Stage III VATSD required 9.65 ± 4.1 days. Whereas, patients who underwent open thoracotomy took longer time (21.82 ± 16.35 days). Similarly, Stage III VATSD and Stage III open surgery cases showed significance difference among chest tube duration (7.84 ± 3.33 days for VATS and 15.92 ± 8.2 days for open thoracotomy). Significantly, lower postoperative complications were detected in patients treated with VATSD in terms of

  3. Pleural empyema caused by Klebsiella oxytoca: a case series.

    PubMed

    Suthers, Elizabeth; Rosenstengel, Andrew; Hart, Julie; Lewis, Joshua R; Kay, Ian; Waterer, Grant; Lee, Y C Gary; Brims, Fraser

    2015-04-01

    We report on 19 patients from Western Australia of pleural empyema with Klebsiella oxytoca, an organism never before reported in association with this condition. Median age was 65 years, 14/17 (83%) had been in hospital within 30 days prior to diagnosis, 12/18 (67%) had active cancer, 9/17 (53%) had been in intensive care and 7/17 (41%) had prior surgery. Nine patients died at the time of censure, five within 90 days of infection.

  4. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  5. Empyema Necessitans Complicating Pleural Effusion Associated with Proteus Species Infection: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Yauba, M. S.; Ahmed, H.; Imoudu, I. A.; Yusuf, M. O.; Makarfi, H. U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species. PMID:25893125

  6. Pleural Empyema in Infants and Children: Analysis of 298 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebayo O.; Adejuyigbe, O.; Taiwo, O. O.

    1984-01-01

    Of 298 infants and children with empyema thoracis seen, 62 percent were under 2 years of age. The majority of the cases had underlying pulmonary infection, and Staphylococcus aureus was dominant among the organisms isolated. The diagnosis was made in all cases on the basis of chest x-ray films and thoracentesis. Full expansion of the lung and resolution of the underlying pneumonia occurred on administration of appropriate antibiotics and catheter drainage in all cases except in two patients who had decortication. The mortality rate was 5 percent; delayed presentation and suboptimal prehospitalization antibiotics influenced the morbidity. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:6471117

  7. Intrapleural administration of DNase alone for pleural empyema

    PubMed Central

    Bobek, Vladimir; Majewski, Andrzej; Kolostova, Katarina; Rzechonek, Adam; Lischke, Robert; Schutzner, Jan; Kacprzak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema is a severe complication of various diseases. The essential is the inserting a drain into the pleural cavity and evacuation of the pus. Sometimes the pus is very thick and its evacuation and re-expansion of the lung is very difficult. Methods: We report a group of 10 patients with intrapleural administration of Pulmozyme (dornase alpha) in dosages of either 2.5 mg once or on two separate occasions. All of the patients had a chest tube inserted into the pleural cavity. Measurement of viscosity was done before and after the instillation of the dornase alpha. Results: In six patients dornase alfa was introduced into the pleural cavity once. Three of them received this on the 4th whilst the rest were treated with the agent on the 6th day. Four patients received the dornase alpha twice because of the small amount of drainage fluid after the previous instillation. Five patients were discharged from hospital with complete re-expansion of their lungs. Two patients were qualified for a surgical operation since the lung was trapped and did not re-expand. Three patients had to be discharged with a drain as a result of incomplete re-expansion of the lung. In all the patients the density of the pus after administering the dornase alpha decreased and the amount of the pus drainage increased. Conclusions: Dornase alpha may be used in some patients with pleural empyema with good results. PMID:26885174

  8. Pleural empyema due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in an immunocompetent elderly patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Karachalios, Kostis; Siagris, Dimitrios; Lekkou, Alexandra; Anastassiou, Evangelos D.; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Gogos, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema as a focal infection due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is rare and most commonly described among immunosuppressed patients or patients who suffer from sickle cell anaemia and lung malignancies. Case presentation: Here, we present an 81-year-old immunocompetent Greek woman with bacteraemia and pleural empyema due to Salmonella Enteritidis without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: In our case, we suggest that patient’s pleural effusion secondary to heart failure was complicated by empyema and that focal intravascular infection was the cause of bacteraemia. PMID:28348773

  9. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  10. Empyema Secondary to Actinomyces meyeri Treated Successfully with Ceftriaxone Followed by Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Piscopo, Tonio; Cassar, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a relatively rare infection caused by Gram-positive bacteria. We present the case of a 54-year-old, previously healthy, male patient with a history of severe penicillin allergy who developed severe pneumonia and empyema caused by Actinomyces meyeri. Presenting symptoms included productive cough, right upper quadrant pain, and chills and rigors. He required drainage of the empyema via tube and prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone for 2 weeks followed by oral doxycycline for 6 months. PMID:27752374

  11. Intracranial subdural empyema: burr hole exploration for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shokunbi, M T; Malomo, A O

    1993-09-01

    An analysis of 19 confirmed cases of subdural empyema treated in our unit during a 29-month period ending in May 1990 revealed that this was a disease of young males (mean age 19.6 yrs: male:female ratio 5:1) that was frequently associated with paranasal sinusitis. We have identified a characteristic symptom complex which when present together with focal neurological deficits makes the diagnosis highly probable. This consists of fever, headache, altered level of consciousness and frontal scalp swelling. In a practice setting where neuroradiological confirmation of the diagnosis is not always practicable, this clinical syndrome is helpful and should prompt early burr hole exploration of the subdural space. The only deaths (2 patients; 11%) occurred in patients who presented in coma. The remaining were either normal (6 patients) or continued to improve after treatment, which consisted of multiple burr hole drainage, broad spectrum antimicrobial treatment and eradication of the source of infection.

  12. Delayed Diagnosis of Subdural Empyema in a Septic Child.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Adam; Capraro, Geoffry

    2015-08-03

    The prompt identification of sepsis in children is challenging, but once sepsis is identified, initiation of care and determination of proper disposition may be insufficient to ensure optimal outcomes. The best opportunity for full recovery also requires rapid identification and treatment of the infectious source. Acute bacterial sinusitis is common in the pediatric population, and although intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare, they are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. History and physical examination may be imperfectly sensitive for the presence of acute bacterial sinusitis and its intracranial complications. We present a case of pediatric sepsis in which the diagnosis of intracranial extension of bacterial sinusitis was not made during the first phase of care and describe complications that followed. Emergency physicians should consider subdural empyema in patients presenting with fever, nausea and headache with worrisome vital signs and laboratory values suggestive of a severe infection.

  13. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  14. Empyema of preexisting subdural hemorrhage caused by a rare salmonella species after exposure to bearded dragons in a foster home.

    PubMed

    Tabarani, Christy M; Bennett, Nicholas J; Kiska, Deanna L; Riddell, Scott W; Botash, Ann S; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2010-02-01

    An infant had a subdural empyema caused by the rare Salmonella species enterica subspecies houtenae (IV) serotype 44:z4,z23:- after only indirect exposure to exotic reptiles in her foster home. Infants recovering from preexisting subdural hematoma are at risk for development of empyema.

  15. [Parapneumonic pleural effusions and empyema in adults:current practice].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Light, R W

    2009-11-01

    About 20% of hospitalized patients with bacterial pneumonia have an accompanying pleural effusion. Parapneumonic effusions (PPE) are associated with a considerable morbidity and mortality. The main decision in managing a patient with a PPE is whether to insert a chest tube (complicated PPE). Imaging (i.e., chest radiograph, ultrasound and computed tomography) and pleural fluid analysis (i.e., pH, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, bacterial cults) provide essential information for patient management. Therefore, all PPEs should be aspirated for diagnostic purposes. This may require image-guidance if the effusion is small or heavily loculated. According to the current guidelines, any PPE that fulfills at least one of the following criteria should be drained: size > or = 1/2 of the hemithorax, loculations, pleural fluid pH < 7.20 (or alternatively pleural fluid glucose < 60 mg/dl), positive pleural fluid Gram stain or culture, or purulent appearance. The key components of the treatment of complicated PPE and empyema are the use of appropriate antibiotics, provision of nutritional support, and drainage of the pleural space by one of the following methods: therapeutic thoracentesis, tube thoracostomy, intrapleural fibrinolytics, thoracoscopy with breakdown of adhesions or thoracotomy with decortication. The routine use of intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy remains controversial. (c) 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion and pleural parapneumonic empyema

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Pedro Rodríguez; Gilart, Jorge Freixinet; Pérez, José María Hernández; Serhal, Mohamed Hussein; Artalejo, Antonio López

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We performed this observational prospective study to evaluate the results of the application of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion (CPPE) and pleural parapneumonic empyema (PPE). Material/Methods From 2001 to 2007, 210 patients with CPPE and PPE were confirmed through thoracocentesis and treated with pleural drainage tubes (PD), fibrinolytic treatment or surgical intervention (videothoracoscopy and posterolateral thoracotomy). Patients were divided into 3 groups: I (PD); II (PD and fibrinolytic treatment); IIIa (surgery after PD and fibrinolysis), and IIIb (direct surgery). The statistical study was done by variance analysis (ANOVA), χ 2 and Fisher exact test. Results The presence of alcohol or drug consumption, smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were strongly associated with a great necessity for surgical treatment. The IIIa group was associated with increased drainage time, length of stay and complications. No mortality was observed. The selective use of PD and intrapleural fibrinolysis makes surgery unnecessary in more than 75% of cases. Conclusions The selective use of PD and fibrinolysis avoids surgery in more than 75% of cases. However, patients who require surgery have more complications, longer hospital stay, and more days on PD and they are more likely to require admittance to the Intensive Care Unit. PMID:22739734

  17. Polymicrobial subdural empyema: involvement of Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by lytA PCR and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Greve, Thomas; Clemmensen, Dorte; Ridderberg, Winnie; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Møller, Jens K

    2011-03-01

    The authors report a case of a subdural empyema (SDE) caused by a coinfection with Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus pneumoniae, initially considered a S. intermedius infection only. An otherwise healthy 11-year-old female was admitted to the hospital after 5 days of illness. Symptoms were consistent with classical SDE symptoms and progressed rapidly with finally somnolence before the first neurosurgical procedure despite relevant antibiotic treatment. Primary MRI showed an interhemispheric SDE and a postoperative control CT scan showed progression of the empyema infratentorially. The empyema was evacuated twice, day 8 and 18, with good results. Primary samples showed growth of S. intermedius only. The severity of the clinical picture elicited supplementary samples, which were additionally positive for S. pneumoniae by an in-house specific lytA PCR and/or a commercial antigen test.

  18. Analysis of Outcome of Intraplueral Streptokinase in Pediatric Empyema Thoracis even in Advanced Stages: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Kallol; Saha, Sudip; Mridha, Dhrubojyoti; Das, Kallol; Mondal, Piyasi; Das, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Empyema thoracis in children causes significant morbidity. Standard treatment of Empyema thoracis includes tube drainage and antibiotics. But the tube drainage often fails. Intrapleural Streptokinase has been used in empyema thoracis with good success rate. Objectives: We evaluated the efficacy of intra-pleural Streptokinase in management of empyema thoracis even in advanced stages. Patients and Methods: A total of 28 patients with empyema thoracis requiring intercostal tube drainage aged zero to twelve years were included in the study who were admitted in Pediatric intensive care unit. 15,000 units/kg of Streptokinase was instilled into the pleural cavity. Response was assessed by clinical outcome, after unclamping and subsequent chest radiography and serial chest ultrasounds. Results: Streptokinase enhanced drainage in all patients with complete resolution of empyema thoracis in 26 patients. Two patients were referred for surgery. Only 7.2% required surgery. Streptokinase was equally effective if started before or after seven days. Conclusions: Intrapleural Streptokinase is the preferred treatment for treating pediatric empyema thoracis even in advanced stages and can avoid surgery. PMID:26495096

  19. Vaccine-induced waning of Haemophilus influenzae empyema and meningitis, Angola.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Monteiro, Lurdes; Silvestre, Silvia da Conceição; Anjos, Elizabete; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Pitkäranta, Anne; Roine, Irmeli

    2014-11-01

    In Angola during 2003-2012, we detected Haemophilus influenzae in 18% of 2,634 and 26% of 2,996 bacteriologically positive pleural or cerebrospinal fluid samples, respectively, from children. After vaccination launch in 2006, H. influenzae empyema declined by 83% and meningitis by 86%. Severe H. influenzae pneumonia and meningitis are preventable by vaccination.

  20. Treatment of KPC-2 Enterobacter cloacae empyema with cefepime and levofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cardile, Anthony P; Briggs, Heather; Burguete, S Rodrigo; Herrera, Monica; Wickes, Brian L; Jorgensen, James H

    2014-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections are becoming more common, are associated with high mortality rates, and are difficult to treat due to multiple mechanisms of resistance. We describe the successful treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-expressing Enterobacter cloacae empyema in a lung transplant recipient with cefepime and levofloxacin.

  1. Fatal empyema thoracis caused by Schizophyllum commune with cross-reactive cryptococcal antigenemia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Teng, Jade L L; Li, Iris W S; Wong, Sally C Y; Leung, Sally S M; Ho, Po-On; To, Kelvin K W; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-02-01

    We report a fatal case of Schizophyllum commune empyema thoracis with cross-reactive cryptococcal antigenemia. In vitro testing confirmed the ability of the fungus to cause a positive cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination system (CALAS) test result. Such a result may lead to delay in diagnosis and treatment, as most strains of S. commune are resistant to fluconazole.

  2. A Fishy Tale: a Man with Empyema Caused by Streptococcus halichoeri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, veterinary laboratories in the United Kingdom reported a novel Lancefield group B streptococcus, Streptococcus halichoeri, in seals. We report a case of Streptococcus halichoeri causing postoperative empyema in a patient. A search of the literature revealed that this is the first case of S. halichoeri ever reported in humans. PMID:24478513

  3. Electrolyzed Saline Irrigation for Elimination of Bacterial Colonization in the Empyema Space

    PubMed Central

    Takeshige, Motohiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Hashiyada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kazuya; Kawamoto, Sadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The empyema space is refractory to elimination of bacterial colonization. Electrolyzed saline (ES) was used as intra-pleural irrigation for rapid disinfection of the empyema space. Patients and Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with para-pneumonic empyema were reviewed in this study from 2007 to 2015. The empyema space was irrigated by miniaturized thoracoscopic surgery (mini VATS), and the efficacy and safety of the use of ES were evaluated. Results: Sixteen patients were male and four were female, with a mean age of 66.5 ± 9.5 y (27–90 y). Bacterial cultures of the purulent effusions from all 20 patients had positive results. Seventeen patients subsequently underwent continuous catheter irrigation and drainage. No patient had chest pain during ES irrigation. Fever duration after mini VATS was 2.8 ± 1.8 d (0–5 d). Catheter indwelling time was 10.3 ± 7.2 d (3–33 d). Inflammatory markers significantly improved (p < 0.05) within a week after mini VATS. Eighteen patients achieved pleural disinfection, and two patients had residual pathogens, one of whom later died of lung abscess. Space closure was successful in 14 patients. No patient underwent subsequent open drainage. Nineteen (95%) patients were discharged from the hospital. This treatment was successful in 18 (90%) patients, and one (5.6%) patient experienced recurrence. Conclusions: The ES irrigation facilitates the rapid disinfection and closure of the empyema space. PMID:27513624

  4. [Open drainage with Vacuum Assisted Closure( VAC) therapy for Aspergillus empyema after left upper lobectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Tatsuya; Aoki, Tadashi; Yazawa, Masatomo

    2013-12-01

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed as Aspergillus empyema with fistula after left upper lobectomy and radiation therapy. His pyrexia was continued after conservative treatment with antifungal agents. Initially, fenestration and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy were performed. The Aspergillus terreusdisappeared and inflammatory reactions were normalized. Eight days after fenestration, pectoralis major muscle flap transposition was subsequently performed. His postoperative course was uneventful. No recurrent empyema was found 15 months after surgery.

  5. Is Sinusitis Innocent?--Unilateral Subdural Empyema in an Immunocompetent Child.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Sevim; Yazar, Uğur; Cansu, Ali; Kul, Sibel; Kaya, Selçuk; Özdoğan, Elif Bahat

    2015-11-01

    Subdural empyema related to Streptococcus constellatus is extremely rare in an immunocompetent child, and also there is no reported case along with Staphylococcus lugdunensis infection. Although Streptococcus constellatus has been determined as a co-pathogen with anerobic bacteria in many infections, it has not been reported in combination with Staphylococcus lugdunensis. The authors describe a case of previously healthy 16-y-old child with unilateral subdural empyema due to these bacteria. Sinusitis was the only predisposing factor in the index case. The authors propose that some cases of culture-negative intracranial infections may be due to these infectious agents. Therefore, these agents should be considered as causes of intracranial infection in persistent complaints such as fever and headache after sinusitis in children. It is important to treat them with effective antibiotics and early surgical intervention for favorable outcome, because fatal cases were reported due to Streptococcus constellatus infections.

  6. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  7. Minimally Invasive Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy With Instillation (Mini-VAC-Instill) for Pleural Empyema.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Neu, Reiner; Potzger, Tobias; Schemm, Rudolf; Grosser, Christian; Szöke, Tamas; Sziklavari, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    Enthusiasm for minimally invasive thoracic surgery is increasing. Thoracoscopy plays a significant therapeutic role in the fibrinopurulent stage (stage II) of empyema, in which loculated fluid cannot often be adequately drained by chest tube alone. For some debilitated and septic patients, further procedures such as open-window thoracostomy (OWT) with daily wound care or vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy are necessary. In the present article, we propose a new option of minimally invasive VAC therapy including a topical solution of the empyema without open-window thoracostomy (Mini-VAC-instill). Three patients who underwent surgery using this technique are also presented. The discussion is focused on the advantages and disadvantages of the approach.

  8. Escherichia coli positive infratentorial subdural empyema secondary to mastoiditis and underlying cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Omar; Varadarajan, Vinay; Youshani, Amir Saam; Willatt, David J

    2014-01-01

    Infratentorial subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency that is associated with an alarmingly high morbidity and mortality if appropriate management is delayed. It is an important differential to consider when confronted with a patient with a reduced Glasgow Coma Scale, focal neurology and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure in the presence of a head and neck infection. It is also important that the primary team managing these patients is aware of the many pathogens that may be involved, including Escherichia coli. Early recognition, prompt diagnosis, timely involvement of the appropriate multidisciplinary teams, including neurosurgery, otorhinolaryngology, radiology and microbiology should be sought, and urgent intervention are imperative in avoiding a fatal outcome. This article presents a case of E coli-positive infratentorial subdural empyema secondary to mastoiditis due to underlying cholesteatoma, and a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:24777089

  9. Mycobacterium fortuitum empyema associated with an indwelling pleural catheter: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Blair, Paul; Moshgriz, Mahdi; Siegel, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) that is an uncommon cause of healthcare-associated infections. The most common infections caused by M. fortuitum include skin, soft tissue, and catheter-related infections. Although occasionally cultured from sputum samples, M. fortuitum is a rare cause of pulmonary disease. We report a case of M. fortuitum empyema associated with an infected pleural catheter and review M. fortuitum pulmonary infections.

  10. Surgical management of recalcitrant peripheral bronchopleural fistula with empyema: A preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Kelechi E.; Ocheli, Emmanuel O.; Gbeneol, Tombari J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral bronchopleural fistula (BPF) and empyema from necrotising infections of the lung and pleural is difficult to treat resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of the Latissimus Dorsi muscle (LDM) flap and patch closure techniques in the management of recalcitrant peripheral BPFs with the aid of thoracotomy. Materials and Methods: Five patients with BPF and empyema out of 26 patients who were initially treated for empyema thoracis by single or multiple chest tube insertions and/or ultrasound-guided drainage were prospectively identified and followed up for 2 years, postoperatively. The postoperative hospital stay, dyspnoea score, function of the ipsilateral upper limb and any deformity of chest wall were assessed at follow-up visits by asking relevant questions. Results: The mean age was 46.8 years (23-69 years) (4 males and 1 female). The cause of the BPF in 18 patients was Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 8 was pneumonia. The mean total months of the chest tube insertions was 1.5 months (range 2.5-6 months) prior to the thoracotomy and closure of fistula procedures performed on the 5 patients (with LDM flap in 4 patients and pleural patch in 1 patient). The complications recorded were: subcutaneous emphysema, residual pus and haemothorax in three patients. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 20.8 days (13-28 days);There was improved dyspnoea score to 1 or 2 in the 5 (19.2%) patients. There was no recurrence of BPF or residual pus in all the patients; no loss of function or deformity of the chest wall. Conclusion: The use of LDM Flap was effective in treating peripheral BFP without any adverse long-term outcome. PMID:25657487

  11. Management of an intrapleural foreign body and empyema with video-assisted thoracoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ekeke, Chigozirim; Noble, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Intrapleural foreign bodies are rare and there are few reports on the occurrence and management of this uncommon clinical presentation. We report a case of a patient with a history of ingesting multiple foreign bodies, which resulted in multiple laparotomy procedures for extraction. The patient recently required surgical removal of innumerable ingested foreign bodies from the stomach and developed a left empyema post-operatively. Subsequent imaging studies revealed evidence of a foreign object in the left pleural space without evidence of an esophageal perforation or diaphragm injury. PMID:27621882

  12. Isolation of Brucella melitensis biotype 3 from epidural empyema in a Bosnian immigrant in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Melzer, Falk; Schmoock, Gernot; Elschner, Mandy; Lâm, Thiên-Trí; Abele-Horn, Marianne; Stetter, Christian

    2012-09-01

    Brucellosis is a regionally emerging infectious disease in Mediterranean countries with an increasing number of human cases and high morbidity rates. Here, we describe a case of severe B. melitensis biotype 3 infection in an immigrant who had contact with ruminants during a short-term stay in Bosnia before he returned to Germany. The patient developed thoracic spondylodiscitis accompanied by a large epidural empyema and neurological deficits. The isolated strain was characterized and compared to other strains from the Mediterranean region by multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis, showing minor differences between emerging strains from neighbouring geographical areas.

  13. [The current role of thoracoplasty in treatment of chronic pleural empyema].

    PubMed

    Stamatis, G; Goebel, R; Konietzko, N; Greschuchna, D

    1992-11-01

    To demonstrate the indication for surgery, the preoperative and postoperative course, and to assess the influence of thoracoplasty on respiratory physiology, the data of patients subjected to thoracoplasty during the past 30 years at our hospital were evaluated. Final assessment was performed separately for patients with and without preceding pulmonary resection. In 21 cases there was an unspecific empyema of the pleura and in 6 cases a specific one; in 14 cases there was also a concomitant bronchopleural fistula. After a washing-out period of 92 days (24-283) and after surgery had been unsuccessful in 9 patients, standard thoracoplasty was performed, complemented by a "jalousie" ("Venetian blind") plasty after Heller. Postoperative lethality was 11.1%. 5 patients developed pleuro-cutaneous fistulas that healed by local treatment; in one patient, a small residual cavity remained that required an additional plasty for correction. In 94% of the patients who had been operated upon, scoliosis occurred convex to the thoracoplasty; this was more marked in patients in whom lung resection had been performed than in patients without resection. Restrictive ventilatory disorders were seen in the lung function of 55% of the patients, whereas mixed restrictive-obstructive disorders occurred in 45%. Ergospirometry resulted under load besides in an increased respiratory minute volume (AMV), in a proportionate dead space of the AMV which was significantly higher than preoperatively. Despite the considerable functional and aesthetic consequences resulting therefrom, thoracoplasty still has its justification in refractory pleura empyemas as an ultimate means of cleaning up.

  14. [REACTIVATION OF TUBERCULOSIS PRESENTING WITH EMPYEMA DUE TO ANTICANCER CHEMOTHERAPY FOR DIFFUSE LARGE B CELL LYMPHOMA].

    PubMed

    Yuba, Tatsuya; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Kodama, Mai; Uda, Sayaka; Yoshimura, Akihiro; Kurisu, Naoko

    2016-04-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis was found to have chronic empyema in the right lung and was diagnosed with malignant diffuse large-cell lymphoma (Ann Arbor stage IIE). After completion of one course of rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy, the patient developed lung abscess and sepsis caused by Streptococcus intermedius. This condition was treated with antimicrobial agents, and chemotherapy was resumed. After the second course, the chemotherapy regimen was continued without prednisolone, and after administration of the third course, a chest wall mass was found in the right lung. An acid-fast bacillus smear test of the abscess aspirate was positive, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in a polymerase chain reaction assay, leading to a diagnosis of perithoracic tuberculosis. Chemotherapy for the lymphoma was discontinued, and treatment with four oral antitubercular agents was started. This treatment led to remission of perithoracic tuberculosis. In Japan, tuberculous scar and chronic empyema are relatively common findings, and relapse of tuberculosis should always be considered for patients with these findings during chemotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy.

  15. Subdural empyema following lumbar facet joint injection: An exceeding rare complication.

    PubMed

    Fayeye, Oluwafikayo; Silva, Adikarige Haritha Dulanka; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Furtado, Navin Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is extremely common with a life time prevalence estimated at greater than 70%. Facet joint arthrosis is thought to be the causative aetiological substrate in approximately 25% of chronic low back pain cases. Facet joint injection is a routine intervention in the armamentarium for both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic low back pain. In fact, a study by Carrino et al. reported in excess of 94,000 facet joint injection procedures were carried out in the US in 1999. Although generally considered safe, the procedure is not entirely without risk. Complications including bleeding, infection, exacerbation of pain, dural puncture headache, and pneumothorax have been described. We report a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who developed a left L4/5 facet septic arthrosis with an associated subdural empyema and meningitis following facet joint injection. This case is unique, as to the best of our knowledge no other case of subdural empyema following facet joint injection has been reported in the literature. Furthermore this case serves to highlight the potential serious adverse sequelae of a routine and apparently innocuous intervention. The need for medical practitioners to be alert to and respond rapidly to the infective complications of facet joint injection cannot be understated.

  16. Reconstructive Surgery for Bronchopleural Fistula and Empyema: New Application of Free Fascial Patch Graft Combined with Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Shimpei; Fujiki, Masahide; Higashino, Takuya; Oshima, Azusa; Tsuboi, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postoperative bronchopleural fistula (BPF) and empyema are not uncommon after lung cancer surgery. Some patients require reconstructive surgery to achieve wound healing. In this report, we describe a novel method of reconstructive surgery for BPF and empyema. Methods: From 1996 through 2014, we performed reconstructive surgery for the treatment of BPF and empyema in 13 cases. BPF or a pulmonary fistula was present in 11 patients at the time of reconstruction. Of these, a free fascial patch graft combined with a free soft tissue flap was used to close the fistula in 6 cases. In the other 5 cases, primary fistula closure or direct coverage of the fistula with a transferred flap was performed. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and postoperative results were compared for these methods. Results: All the flaps were transferred successfully except in 1 case. Although postoperative air leakage was observed in 5 cases, most of these healed with conservative management. Of 11 fistulas, 8 were successfully controlled. Although differences were not statistically significant, a higher success rate of fistula closure was obtained in patients with a fascial patch graft (100% vs 40%). As a result, 9 patients could be discharged from the hospital, but 4 died during their hospital stay. Conclusion: Although the incidence of in-hospital mortality was high, fistula closure with a fascial patch graft combined with free flap transfer was effective for the treatment of BPF and empyema, compared with other procedures. PMID:28203500

  17. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Paolo; Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-10-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections.

  18. Empyema and bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in children under five years of age*, **

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria Costa; Ferrero, Fernando; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ruvinsky, Raul; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Maggi, Ruben; Feris-Iglesias, Jesus; Benguigui, Yehuda; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    We compared bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and pneumococcal empyema (PE), in terms of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings, in under-fives. A cross-sectional nested cohort study, involving under-fives (102 with PE and 128 with BPP), was conducted at 12 centers in Argentina, Brazil, and the Dominican Republic. Among those with PE, mean age was higher; disease duration was longer; and tachypnea, dyspnea, and high leukocyte counts were more common. Among those with BPP, fever and lethargy were more common. It seems that children with PE can be distinguished from those with BPP on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Because both conditions are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, prompt diagnosis is crucial. PMID:24626272

  19. [Fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating thoracic empyema].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Ottó; Szántó, Zoltán; Krasznai, Géza

    2016-03-01

    Authors introduce the case of a 64-year-old male patient with fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating empyema thoracis of unknown origin. The patient's co-morbidities were hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation with oral anticoagulation. The real etiology was revealed post mortem, due to the rapid progression. The autopsy demonstrated that the fasciitis was caused by a small blunt thoracic trauma (haematoma), not emerged from patient's history and was not visible during physical examination. Authors review diagnostic pitfalls, leading to delayed recognition in addition to this very case. After quick diagnosis surgical debridement, targeted wide spectrum antibiotics and maximal intensive care are the basic pillars of the management of necrotizing fasciitis.

  20. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; García-Clemente, Marta; Fernández, Ramón; Casan, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  1. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; García-Clemente, Marta; Fernández, Ramón; Casan, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient. PMID:26634165

  2. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections. PMID:27703619

  3. Empyema due to Streptococcus Pneumoniae Serotype 9V in a Child Immunized with 13-Valent Conjugated Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sütçü, Murat; Aktürk, Hacer; Karagözlü, Fatih; Somer, Ayper; Gürler, Nezahat; Salman, Nuran

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinical vaccine failure is the occurence of the specific vaccine-preventable disease in an appropriately and fully vaccinated person after enough time has elapsed for protection against the antigens of the vaccine to develop. Fully immunized cases with pneumoccal vaccine may sometimes develop a complicated pneumonia with empyema caused by a vaccine serotype. Case Report: A 2 year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of fever. On the basis of findings and laboratory results, the patient was diagnosed as having empyema. He was successfully treated with parenteral antibiotics and chest tube drainage. The pleural fluid culture and hemoculture of the patient yielded penicillin-susceptible pneumococci and the isolate was identified as serotype 9V. The patient had been vaccinated with a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine according to the Turkish national immunization schedule at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. His medical history and basic immunological profile were inconsistent with a primary immunodeficiency. Conclusion: The failure of the PCV13 vaccine may results in a complicated pneumonia with empyema. It is important to investigate serotypes of pneumococci in these cases to determine other possible vaccine failures due to PCV13 and to study the underlying mechanisms. PMID:28251028

  4. Conservative management of empyema-complicated post-lobectomy bronchopleural fistulas: experience of consecutive 13 cases in 9 years

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Rui; Ying, Peng-Qing; Xie, Dong; Dai, Chen-Yang; Zha, Jun-Yan; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Ge-Ning; Fei, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchopleural fistula (BPF) is an infrequent but life-threatening complication after lung surgery. Tentative closure of the fistula and irrigation have been the conventional treatments, but are also surgically challenging and associated with a considerable failure rate. This study reports on a conservative practice of this difficult issue, in aim to examine its outcomes. Method All enrolled cases were handled consecutively from September 2006 to June 2015. The empyema was first properly drained till disseminated pneumonia controlled. After conducting lavage, tube drainage was gradually transited to postural drainage. During the follow-up, information on tube removal, fistula healing, and survival were recorded. Results Thirteen cases were enrolled, including 9 rights and 4 lefts. The primary diseases were lung cancer [10], lung abscess [1], organizing pneumonia [1], and aspergillosis [1]. Early fistula (≤30 days postoperatively) occurred in 8 cases and late fistula (>30 days postoperatively) in 5 cases. Two patients underwent debridement to ascertain complete drainage. Chest tubes retained from 7 to 114 days (mean 40.54±30.49 days) before removal. At follow-up, we observed gradually narrowing-down of all residual cavities, and symptoms of fistula and empyema eventually disappeared in all patients. No complication or death occurred during the follow-up. Conclusions Conservative management by a combination of tube and postural drainage provides an effective and safe treatment for empyema-complicated post-lobectomy BPFs. PMID:27499946

  5. Association of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Infection and Increased Hospitalization With Parapneumonic Empyema in Children in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Ampofo, Krow; Herbener, Amy; Blaschke, Anne J.; Heyrend, Caroline; Poritz, Mark; Korgenski, Kent; Rolfs, Robert; Jain, Seema; Carvalho, Maria da Glória; Pimenta, Fabiana C.; Daly, Judy; Mason, Edward O.; Byington, Carrie L.; Pavia, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    Background During previous influenza pandemics, many deaths were associated with secondary bacterial infection. In April 2009, a previously unknown 2009 influenza A virus (2009 H1N1) emerged, causing a global influenza pandemic. We examined the relationship between circulating 2009 H1N1 and the occurrence of secondary bacterial parapneumonic empyema in children. Methods Children hospitalized with parapneumonic empyema from August 2004 to July 2009, including a period when the 2009 H1N1 circulated in Utah, were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. We compared the average number of children diagnosed with influenza A and the number of admissions for empyema per month for the previous 4 seasons to rates of empyema during the 2009 H1N1 outbreak. We identified causative bacteria using culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results We observed an increase in hospitalization of children with pneumonia complicated by empyema during a severe outbreak of 2009 H1N1 during the spring and summer of 2009, compared with historical data for the previous 4 seasons. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes were the predominant bacteria identified. Conclusions Similar to previous pandemics, secondary bacterial infection with S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes were associated with the 2009 H1N1 outbreak. There is an urgent need to better understand bacterial complications of pandemic influenza. In the interim, influenza vaccines, antiviral agents, and pneumococcal vaccines should be used to prevent cases of secondary bacterial pneumonia whenever possible. PMID:20407400

  6. Which should be appropriate surgical treatment for subtentorial epidural empyema? Burr-hole evacuation versus decompressive craniectomy: Review of the literature with a case report

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Vaner; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Terzi, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Subtentorial empyema is a rare intracranial complication of chronic otitis media. Moreover, if not correctly treated, it is a life-threatening infection. Epidural and subdural empyemas on subtentorial space have different effects. This difference is not mentioned in literature. If the distinction can be made, surgical treatment method will be different, and the desired surgical treatment may be less minimal invasive. A 26-year-old male patient was found to have developed epidural empyema in the subtentorial space. We performed a burr-hole evacuation in this case because there was low cerebellar edema, Also, the general condition of the patient was good, the empyema was a convex image on the lower surface of tentorium on magnetic resonance images, and when the dura mater base is reached during mastoidectomy for chronic otitis media, we were observed to drain a purulent material through the epidural space. After 10 days from surgery increased posterior fossa edema caused hydrocephalus. Therefore, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The patient fully recovered and was discharged after 6 weeks. Complete correction in the posterior fossa was observed by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Burr-hole evacuation from inside of the mastoidectomy cavity for subtentorial epidural empyema is an effective and minimal invasive surgical treatment. PMID:27057210

  7. A new predisposing factor for trigemino-cardiac reflex during subdural empyema drainage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The trigemino-cardiac reflex is defined as the sudden onset of parasympathetic dysrhythmia, sympathetic hypotension, apnea, or gastric hypermotility during stimulation of any of the sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. Clinically, trigemino-cardiac reflex has been reported to occur during neurosurgical skull-base surgery. Apart from the few clinical reports, the physiological function of this brainstem reflex has not yet been fully explored. Little is known regarding any predisposing factors related to the intraoperative occurrence of this reflex. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man who demonstrated a clearly expressed form of trigemino-cardiac reflex with severe bradycardia requiring intervention that was recorded during surgical removal of a large subdural empyema. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intracranial infection leading to perioperative trigemino-cardiac reflex. We therefore add a new predisposing factor for trigemino-cardiac reflex to the existing literature. Possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of the relevant literature. PMID:21118536

  8. Potential implication of new torque teno mini viruses in parapneumonic empyema in children

    PubMed Central

    Galmès, Johanna; Li, Yongjun; Rajoharison, Alain; Ren, Lili; Dollet, Sandra; Richard, Nathalie; Vernet, Guy; Javouhey, Etienne; Wang, Jianwei; Telles, Jean-Noël; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2013-01-01

    An unexplained increase in the incidence of parapneumonic empyema (PPE) in pneumonia cases has been reported in recent years. The present study investigated the genetic and biological specifications of new isolates of torque teno mini virus (TTMV) detected in pleural effusion samples from children hospitalised for severe pneumonia with PPE. A pathogen discovery protocol was applied in undiagnosed pleural effusion samples and led to the identification of three new isolates of TTMV (TTMV-LY). Isolated TTMV-LY genomes were transfected into A549 and human embryonic kidney 293T cells and viral replication was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and full-length genome amplification. A549 cells were further infected with released TTMV-LY virions and the induced-innate immune response was measured by multiplex immunoassays. Genetic analyses of the three TTMV-LY genomes revealed a classic genomic organisation but a weak identity (<64%) with known sequences. We demonstrated the in vitro replication of TTMV-LY in alveolar epithelial cells and the effective release of infectious viral particles. We also showed a selective production of inflammatory mediators in response to TTMV infection. This study reports the description of replicative TTMV-LY isolated from parapneumonic effusions of children hospitalised with PPE, suggesting a potential role of the virus in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. PMID:23060626

  9. Suspected involvement of EPTFE membrane in sterile intrathoracic abscess and pericardial empyema in a multi-allergic LVAD recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kornberger, A; Walter, V; Khalil, M; Therapidis, P; Assmus, B; Moritz, A; Beiras-Fernandez, A; Stock, U A

    2015-07-17

    Device-related infections in recipients of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have been recognized as a major source of morbidity and mortality. They require a high level of diagnostic effort as part of the overall burden resulting from infectious complications in LVAD recipients. We present a multi-allergic patient who was treated for persistent sterile intrathoracic abscess formation and pericardial empyema following minimally invasive LVAD implantation including use of a sheet of e-polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane to restore pericardial integrity. Sterile abscess formation and pericardial empyema recurred after surgical removal until the ePTFE membrane was removed, suggesting that in disposed patients, ePTFE may be related to sterile abscess formation or sterile empyema.

  10. Pneumonia and empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius that shows the diagnostic importance of evaluating the microbiota in the lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Naito, Keisuke; Akata, Kentarou; Nagata, Shuya; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial species in the Streptococcus anginosus group (S. constellatus, S. anginosus, S. intermedius) are important causative pathogens of bacterial pneumonia, pulmonary abscesses and empyema. However, the bacteria in this group are primarily oral resident bacteria and unable to grow significantly on ordinary aerobic culture media. We experienced a case of pneumonia and empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius detected using a 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and pleural effusion, but not sputum. Even when applying the molecular method, sputum samples are occasionally unsuitable for identifying the causative pathogens of lower respiratory tract infections.

  11. [Treament using a free omental flap for pulmonary Aspergillosis with chronic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus( MRSA) empyema after fenestration].

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Hiroshi; Tabata, Toshiharu; Sugawara, Takafumi; Fukaya, Ken; Fujimura, Shigefumi

    2013-08-01

    A case is 48-year-old man who had a history of Blalock-Taussig shunt and the radical operation for Fallot's tetralogy, had been performed cavernostomy and fenestration operation for aspergilloma of left upper lobe in the previous hospital due to control blood spitting. Although the contents of the abscess cavity were removed, the opened cavity was again infected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and he was referred to our hospital. The plombage of free omental flap with vascular anastomosis was performed. He has been well without any symptoms or recurrence of empyema for 6 years after surgery.

  12. Management of pleural empyema with a vacuum-assisted closure device and reconstruction of open thoracic window in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Munguía-Canales, Daniel Alejandro; Vargas-Mendoza, Gary Kosai; Alvarez-Bestoff, Gustavo; Calderón-Abbo, Moisés Cutiel

    2013-10-01

    The patient is a 21-year-old female, diagnosed with cryptogenic cirrhosis at the age of 9. She presented with left post-pneumonic empyema that did not remit with conventional medical management and evolved with fistulization to the skin in the 7th intercostal space in the left subscapular region. We performed an open thoracic window procedure, and on the 6th day the patient was sent home with a portable vacuum-assisted closure device, with changes of the material every 4 days until the cavity was completed obliterated (92 days). Imaging tests showed full expansion of the lung, and chest wall reconstruction was performed with titanium rods. The high mortality of empyema in patients with liver disease requires both implementing and searching for new adjuvant therapies, like the use of vacuum-assisted closure systems and reconstruction with titanium rods. Controlled studies with a wide range of cases are needed for proper evaluation.

  13. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Citrobacter koseri in a Patient With Spina Bifida, an Ileal Conduit and Renal Caluli Progressing to Peri-nephric Abscess and Empyema.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Zachary E; Shaker, Mohammed; Baxter, J David

    2017-02-01

    Urological problems are common in spina bifida and are often treated with urinary diversions. Spina bifida and ileal conduits put patients at increased risk for ascending urinary tract infections. Here we present a novel case of a Citrobacter koseri urinary tract infection complicated by a perinephric abscess with pleural extension. To our knowledge, no case of an ascending C. koseri UTI progressing to peri-nephric abscess and empyema by direct extension exists in the literature.

  14. Hippocrates (ca 460-375 bc), Introducing Thoracotomy Combined With a Tracheal Intubation for the Parapneumonic Pleural Effusions and Empyema Thoracis.

    PubMed

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Sgantzos, Markos

    2016-12-01

    Hippocrates was the first physician to describe in accuracy pleural effusion and pneumonia. To treat empyema thoracis he had introduced a combined method of tracheal intubation with a simultaneously thoracotomy. The surgical incision was used for the pus to be progressively drainaged. If the patient was too weak to eat, he had suggested for nutritional mixtures to be administered through an oral-gastric tube. Thus Hippocrates composed in his operating theatre, an icon similar to modern surgical operations.

  15. Comparison of the methods of fibrinolysis by tube thoracostomy and thoracoscopic decortication in children with stage II and III empyema: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Ufuk; Sayir, Fuat; Bilici, Salim; Melek, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Today, in spite of the developments in imaging methods and antibiotherapy, childhood pleural empyema is a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality. In recent years, it has been shown that there has been an increase in the frequency of pleural empyema in children, and antibiotic resistance in microorganisms causing pleural empyema has made treatment difficult. Despite the many studies investigating thoracoscopic debridement and fibrinolytic treatment separately in the management of this disease, there is are not enough studies comparing these two treatments. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the efficacy of two different treatment methods in stage II and III empyema cases and to present a perspective for treatment options. We excluded from the study cases with: i) thoracoscopic intervention and fibrinolytic agent were contraindicated; ii) immunosuppression or additional infection focus; iii) concomitant diseases, those with bronchopleural fistula diagnosed radiologically, and Stage I cases. This gave a total of 54 cases: 23 (42.6%) in stage II, and 31 (57.4%) cases in stage III. These patients were randomized into two groups of 27 cases each for debridement or fibrinolytic agent application by video-assisted thoracoscopic decortication (VATS). The continuity of symptoms after the operation, duration of thoracic tube in situ, and the length of hospital stay in the VATS group were of significantly shorter duration than in the streptokinase applications (P=0.0001). In 19 of 27 cases (70.37%) in which fibrinolytic treatment was applied and in 21 cases of 27 (77.77%) in which VATS was applied, the lung was fully expanded and the procedure was considered successful. There was no significant difference with respect to success rates between the two groups (P=0.533). The complication rate in our cases was 12.96% and no mortality was observed. Similar success rates in thoracoscopic drainage and enzymatic debridement, and the low cost of enzymatic drainage

  16. Pneumonia and Pleural Empyema due to a Mixed Lactobacillus spp. Infection as a Possible Early Esophageal Carcinoma Signature

    PubMed Central

    Chaini, Eleftheria; Chainis, Nikolaos D.; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Magana, Maria; Nikolaou, Chryssoula; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Liakata, Melina-Vassiliki; Katopodis, Panagiotis; Papastavrou, Leonidas; Tegos, George P.; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are human commensals found in the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract. Although generally conceived as non-pathogenic microorganisms, the existence of several reports implicating them in certain severe pathological entities renders this species as opportunistic pathogens. The case of a 58-year-old woman with mixed Lactobacillus infection is described. The patient was admitted in an outpatient clinic with community acquired pneumonia, and on the third day of hospitalization she presented rapid pneumonia deterioration. Subsequent imaging techniques revealed increased pleural empyema in alignment with the general deterioration of her clinical condition. Pleural fluid culture revealed the presence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus gasseri and the infection was successfully treated with clindamycin. Five months after hospital discharge and an overall good condition, the patient developed signs of dysphagia and upon re-admission an inoperable esophageal carcinoma was diagnosed. The patient succumbed to the cancer 11 months later. Herein, we report for the first time a mixed respiratory infection due to lactobacilli, possibly associated with a formerly unveiled esophageal malignancy. PMID:27734016

  17. An unusual case of thoracic empyema caused by Granulicatella elegans (nutritionally variant streptococci) in a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Marajh, Kanitha; Hattingh, Olga; Mlisana, Koleka P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nutritionally variant streptococci (NVS) are an infrequent cause of human infection with Granulicatella elegans being the least encountered species in clinical specimens. The most common infection caused by NVS is infective endocarditis. Case Presentation: We report an unusual case of thoracic empyema due to G. elegans in a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The patient responded favourably to drainage and penicillin. Conclusion: This case illustrates that even though TB is responsible for the majority of pleural effusions in this setting, other rare opportunistic bacteria may cause infection in susceptible patients. Therefore, microbiological investigations should be performed in all patients presenting with pleural effusion. PMID:28348783

  18. Successful antibiotic treatment for subdural empyema and seizure due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a complication of halo orthosis usage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Akira; Miyamoto, Kei; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Hosoe, Hideo; Shinoda, Jun; Iwama, Toru; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2012-11-01

    Halo orthosis is used for cervical spine fixation after spinal surgery or injury. Although superficial infection at pin sites occurs frequently, intracranial development of infection, including brain abscesses, is very rare. We experienced subdural empyema due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused by intracranial penetration of halo pins. A 38-year-old woman with a 4-year history of rheumatoid arthritis experienced severe myelopathy due to atlanto-axial dislocation and vertical subluxation. Reduction and immobilization using a halo vest resulted in neurologic improvement; she later underwent occipital bone to C2 fusion using posterior instrumentation. Three months after halo orthosis fixation, she complained of a headache, experienced a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and became unconscious for 10 min. Computed tomography revealed pneumoencephalus, and Gd-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed edema, enhancement of the overlying dura in the left partial lobe, and subdural and subarachnoidal empyema. Following removal of the halo vest, there was a purulent discharge from the left-posterior pin site. Culture of the discharge was positive for MRSA. The patient was treated with intravenous vancomycin for 2 weeks, followed by cefozopran hydrochloride for 4 weeks. Her symptoms improved, and additional surgery was not required. At latest follow-up, 10 years after the seizure, she is neurologically stable without any recurrence of the infection.

  19. Capsular serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal disease from 2009-2012 with an emphasis on serotype 19A in bacteraemic pneumonia and empyema and β-lactam resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Chen, Chung-Ming; Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2013-11-01

    Capsular serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that cause invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) were studied and the role of serotype 19A in the development of bacteraemic pneumonia and empyema was investigated. Subjects comprised 98 patients (56 adults and 42 children) who were treated for IPD at a university-affiliated tertiary referral centre in Taiwan during 2009-2012. Serotypes of the isolates were identified using the latex agglutination method. In vitro susceptibilities of the isolates to 13 antimicrobial agents were determined using the broth microdilution method and were interpreted as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. During the study period, bacteraemic pneumonia was the most common type of infection (43/98; 43.9%), followed by primary bacteraemia (30/98; 30.6%). Serotype 19A was the most common serotype (23/98; 23.5%) in all patients. Fourteen (70.0%) of 20 children (47.6% of all children) with serotype 19A infection had pneumonia with empyema, whilst eight patients had concomitant bacteraemia. 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV-7), PCV-10, PCV-13 and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) had coverage rates of 37.8%, 38.8%, 79.6% and 77.6%, respectively. A substantial increase in the proportion of serotype 15A (6.1%) and 6A (8.2%) was found. In addition, there was a significant reduction in rates of susceptibility of serotype 19A isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime and ceftriaxone but not to azithromycin or any quinolone tested compared with those of non-19A isolates. The prevalence of serotypes 19A, 15A and 6A in patients with IPD increased markedly during the period, especially in children with bacteraemic pneumonia and empyema.

  20. Core curriculum illustration: necrotizing pneumonia and empyema.

    PubMed

    Pawley, Barbara; Smith, Melissa; Nickels, David

    2016-04-01

    This is the 18th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.erad.org/?page=CCIP_TOC .

  1. Abscess and empyema caused by Legionella micdadei.

    PubMed Central

    Halberstam, M; Isenberg, H D; Hilton, E

    1992-01-01

    Legionella micdadei is the second most common species implicated in the occurrence of Legionella pneumonia (D. J. Bremer, Semin. Respir. Infect. 4:190-205, 1987). Although there has been a reported lung abscess caused by dual infection (L. micdadei and L. pneumophila), there are no known cases of L. micdadei as the only causative organism. We report a case of a patient with a lung abscess from which L. micdadei was the sole organism isolated. PMID:1537927

  2. New Tetratrichomonas Species in Two Patients with Pleural Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Escamilla, Eduardo; Sanchez-Aguillon, Fabiola; Alatorre-Fernandez, Cynthia Pamela; Aguilar-Zapata, Daniel; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Arellano, Teresa; Moncada-Barron, David; Romero-Valdovinos, Mirza; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando; Rodriguez-Zulueta, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Two unusual occurrences of pleural trichomonosis due to a new Tetratrichomonas species previously reported but not named were confirmed. In one patient, Trichomonas tenax and a Tetratrichomonas species were also detected in the oral cavity by molecular methods. We suggest that this new Tetratrichomonas species be named Tetratrichomonas empyemagena. PMID:23784131

  3. Streptococcal pharyngitis: an uncommon cause of subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Walden, Jeffrey Howard; Hess, Bryan; Rigby, Michael

    2015-09-18

    A 7-year-old girl with an unremarkable medical history presented to a local paediatric emergency department with a 7-day history of fever, sore throat and vomiting, and a 1-day history of rash. She was admitted to the hospital, with presumed Kawasaki disease. A few hours after admission, the patient had sudden onset of two witnessed tonic-clonic seizures and subsequent decreased mental status. She was transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit and started on broad-spectrum antibiotics. On hospital day 2, cerebral spinal fluid cultures and blood cultures grew Streptococcus pyogenes, and repeat physical examination was consistent with acute streptococcal pharyngitis. On hospital day 3, the patient developed left-sided hemiparesis and had another witnessed seizure. A CT scan was obtained and revealed a subdural abscess. She was transferred to a tertiary care centre and underwent craniotomy with evacuation of her subdural abscess. Surgical cultures eventually grew S. pyogenes.

  4. Chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula and gallstone empyema due to retained gallstones.

    PubMed

    Gaster, Richard S; Berger, Aaron J; Ahmadi-Kashani, Mastaneh; Shrager, Joseph B; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-08-14

    We report a case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a persistent pleural effusion and painful abscess in the right lower chest wall 6 months following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient subsequently developed a chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula requiring a large resection and complex closure. The complication was likely secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. While previous reports describe gallstone spillage in the abdominal cavity as benign, this case illustrates that stones left in the abdominal cavity can potentially lead to significant morbidity. Therefore, stones should be diligently removed from the abdominal cavity when spillage occurs. In addition, it is important that operative notes reflect the occurrence of stone spillage so stones may be suspected when a patient presents with an abdominal or thoracic infection following a cholecystectomy.

  5. [Endovascular management of a left subclavian artery lesion following thoracoplasty for bronchopleural fistula and empyema secondary to aspergillus fumigatus].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Ricard; Rodríguez, Laura; Saumench, Josep; Iborra, Elena; Cairols, Marc Antoni; Dorca, Jordi

    2008-06-01

    Massive and/or recurrent hemoptysis is a clear indication for surgical treatment of pleuropulmonary aspergilloma, despite the incidence of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Thoracoplasty has been widely used for 20 years and is still indicated in these cases, following lobectomy, even though the procedure is not free of complications. We report the case of a patient who required thoracoplasty to treat a pleuropulmonary aspergilloma invading the chest wall. Subsequent placement of an aortic stent-graft was required due to tearing of the left subclavian artery.

  6. Differential ventilation with spontaneous respiration for bilateral emphysema.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Jawali, Vivek

    2007-06-01

    In patients with bilateral bullous disease and empyema in one lung, controlled ventilation may be hazardous and result in severe hypoxia. A 50-year-old man with bullous disease and thoracic empyema on the left side was operated on under general anesthesia with spontaneous respiration using differential lung ventilation.

  7. Pulmonary actinomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Destruction of parts of the lungs Emphysema Meningitis Osteomyelitis (bone infection) When to Contact a Medical Professional ... More Brain abscess Dental care - adult Empyema Meningitis Osteomyelitis Pleural effusion Tooth abscess Review Date 3/13/ ...

  8. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear ... empyema occurring at the same time. Sinus and ear infections are usually mild and are much more common ...

  9. Granulomatous pleuritis caused by histoplasmosis in a healthy child.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Matt; Hesson, Michael; Morton, Ronald; Wheat, L Joseph

    2011-07-01

    Pneumonia with pleuritis is a rare presentation of histoplasmosis infection. We present a 12-year old previously healthy boy in whom histoplasmosis presented with pleuritis, confirmed by detection of antigen in empyema fluid.

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Information Related Topics COPD Cough Cystic Fibrosis Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Ventilator/Ventilator Support Send ... to remove the pus. Pleural effusions, empyema, and pleurisy. These painful or even potentially fatal complications can ...

  11. Acute cholecystitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver (may occur after gallbladder surgery) Pancreatitis Perforation Peritonitis (inflammation of the lining of the abdomen) When ... Abdominal pain Bile Empyema Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic Gallstones Peritonitis Patient Instructions Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic - discharge Gallbladder removal - ...

  12. Successful Closure of A Bronchopleural Fistula by Intrapleural Administration of Fibrin Sealant: A Case Report With Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pranabh; Safdar, Syed Aatif; Jawad, Sami Abdul; Shaaban, Hamid; Dieguez, Javier; Elberaqdar, Enas; Rai, Srijana; Adelman, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Context: There are no established guidelines for the proper treatment of patients with bronchopleural fistulas (BPFs). Apart from attempts to close the fistula, emphasis of treatment and management is placed on preventive measures, early administration of antibiotics, drainage of the empyema and aggressive nutritional and rehabilitative support. Case Report: A 53-year-old male presented with nausea, vomiting, and dry cough with eventual respiratory failure. He was found to have an empyema of the left hemithorax which was managed with thoracostomy drainage and antibiotics. However, he had persistent air leak through the chest tube due to a BPF. Bronchoscopy failed to localize the involved segment. Application of fibrin glue through the chest tube succeeded in completely sealing the leak. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first case report in which fibrin glue was successfully used intrapleurally to close a BPF related to an empyema. PMID:25317397

  13. Complications of bush thoracotomy in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J; Tharion, J

    1995-03-01

    Bush thoracotomy is still practised in the South Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea, by traditional bush doctors. These bush thoracotomies are performed with the aim of letting out the 'bad blood' that is believed to have collected in the body cavities following injuries. During a 3 year period between 1989 and 1992, 183 patients with complications of bush thoracotomy were treated at the Sopas Hospital in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Of these patients, 55 had chest wall infections only, without any pleural involvement. Of the patients with empyemas, 14 were treated by decortication of the empyema with one death and all remaining patients were treated by drainage procedures with one death. We recommend early treatment by adequate drainage of the empyema and, where feasible, early decortication. Continuing education to eradicate the procedure, and provision of adequate surgical facilities for management of complications, should be the long-term aim for this continuing problem.

  14. Surgical Treatment of Facial Abscesses and Facial Surgery in Pet Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Odontogenic facial abscesses associated with periapical infections and osteomyelitis of the jaw represent an important part of the acquired and progressive dental disease syndrome in pet rabbits. Complications such as retromasseteric and retrobulbar abscesses, extensive osteomyelitis of the mandible, and empyemas of the skull are possible sequelae. Standard and advanced diagnostic imaging should be pursued to make a detailed and proper diagnosis, and plan the most effective surgical treatment. This article reviews the surgical anatomy, the pathophysiology, and the classification of abscesses and empyemas of the mandible, the maxilla, and the skull. It also discusses surgical techniques for facial abscesses.

  15. Tactical Surgical Intervention with Temporary Shunting of Peripheral Vascular Trauma Sustained during Operation Iraqi Freedom: One Unit’s Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Lymphocele 18 Failed limb salvage due to extensive soft tissue necrosis Wound infection at subsequent BKA site 19 Thrombosis of vein graft Sacral decubitus ... ulcer Empyema Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia 20 Initial graft thrombosis BKA, below knee amputation. The Journal of TRAUMA Injury, Infection, and

  16. Cerebral and subdural abscess with spatio-temporal multiplicity 12 years after initial craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Daisuke; Nagashima, Goro; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Itoh, Hidemichi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with a case of subdural empyema and cerebral abscess that developed 12 years after initial neurosurgical intervention for a traffic accident in 1998. Under a diagnosis of acute subdural hematoma and cerebral contusion, several neurosurgical procedures were performed at another hospital, including hematoma removal by craniotomy, external decompression, duraplasty, and cranioplasty. The patient experienced an epileptic seizure, and was referred to our hospital in March 2010. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cerebral abscess extending to the subdural space just under the previous surgical field. Surgical intervention was refused and antimicrobial treatment was initiated, but proved ineffective. Surgical removal of artificial dura and cranium with subdural empyema, and resection of a cerebral abscess were performed on May 12, 2010. No organism was recovered from the surgical samples. Meropenem and vancomycin were selected as perioperative antimicrobial agents. No recurrence of infection has been observed. Postneurosurgical subdural empyema and cerebral abscess are recently emerging problems. Infections of neurosurgical sites containing implanted materials occur in 6% of cases, usually within several months of the surgery. Subdural empyema and cerebral abscess developing 12 years after neurosurgical interventions are extremely rare. The long-term clinical course suggests less pathogenic organisms as a cause of infection, and further investigations to develop appropriate antimicrobial selection and adequate duration of antimicrobial administration for these cases are needed.

  17. [Emergency Surgery and Treatments for Pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    The primary care in terms of emergency for pneumothorax is chest drainage in almost cases. The following cases of pneumothorax and the complications need something of surgery and treatments. Pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema often needs small skin incisions around the drainage tube. Tension pneumothorax often needs urgent chest drainage. Pneumothorax with intractable air leakage often needs interventional treatments like endobroncheal occlusion (EBO) or thoracographic fibrin glue sealing method (TGF) as well as urgent thoracoscopic surgery. Pneumothorax with acute empyema also often needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery within 2 weeks if chest drainage or drug therapy are unsuccessful. It will probably become chronic empyema of thorax after then. Pneumothorax with bleeding needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery in case of continuous bleeding over 200 ml/2 hours. In any cases of emergency for pneumothorax, respiratory physicians should collaborate with respiratory surgeons at the 1st stage because it is important to timely judge conversion of surgical treatments from medical treatments.

  18. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  19. [Joint infections. Known facts and new trends].

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, M; Abitzsch, D; Hofmann, G O

    2012-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a surgical emergency because rapid septic destruction of articular cartilage can lead to impairment or even loss of joint function. Diagnosis consists of patient history, clinical examination, laboratory results, (sonography- guided) joint aspiration and radiography. Emergency therapy is based on arthroscopic or open joint debridement and lavage combined with systemic antibiotic therapy. No data are available for the recommendation of local antibiotics but antiseptic solutions are not recommended because of cartilage damage. New trends in diagnostics are positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), urine sticks for analysis of joint fluid and molecular pathology. Chronic joint empyema is more diagnostically demanding and is difficult to treat. In cases of necrotic and infected articular cartilage, joint resection has to be performed for quiescence of infection. Options following successful treatment of empyema are arthroplasty, arthrodesis or permanent resection.

  20. Incomplete Kawasaki disease associated with complicated Streptococcus pyogenes pneumonia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Timothy Ronan; Cohen, Eyal; Allen, Upton D

    2012-01-01

    A three-year-old boy presented with community-acquired pneumonia complicated by empyema. Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) was identified on culture of the pleural fluid. The patient improved with antibiotic therapy and drainage of the empyema. During his convalescence, the patient developed persistent fever, lethargy and anorexia. His inflammatory markers were elevated, and repeat cultures were negative. Although the patient had none of the classical mucocutaneous features of Kawasaki disease, an echocardiogram was performed, which revealed coronary artery dilation. The patient was diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and high-dose acetylsalicylic acid. The fever subsided within 48 h. To the authors' knowledge, the present report is the first report of Kawasaki disease associated with complicated S pyogenes pneumonia. It emphasizes the importance of considering incomplete Kawasaki disease among children with persistent fever, the role of echocardiography in diagnosis, and the potential link between Kawasaki disease and superantigen-producing organisms such as S pyogenes.

  1. A Rare Case of Glossitis due to Pasteurella multocida after a Cat Scratch

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Thien; Revere, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella is one of the zoonotic pathogens that can cause variety of serious infections in animals and humans such as bacteremia, septic shock, endocarditis, meningitis, prosthetic and native valve infections, osteomyelitis, skin and soft tissue infections, abscesses, and even pneumonia with empyema. However, there have been few reports of upper respiratory involvements like tonsillitis and epiglottitis in humans. We present a case of recurrent Pasteurella glossitis after a cat scratch which has not been reported in humans. PMID:27840749

  2. Chylothorax following anterior thoraco-lumbar spine exposure. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mora de Sambricio, A; Garrido Stratenwerth, E

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a possible complication of the thoraco-abdominal approach to the spine. It is more commonly a reactive effusion, but it also may be caused by hemothorax, empyema or, less commonly, a chylothorax. The case of a chylothorax is reported as a late onset complication of a double anterior and posterior instrumented fusion of the lumbar spine. Its management and clinical outcome, and a review of the literature is presented.

  3. Microbiology and antimicrobial treatment of orbital and intracranial complications of sinusitis in children and their management.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2009-09-01

    This review describes the microbiology, and medical management of orbital and intracranial complications of sinusitis in children. The most common complications are orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess, brain abscess, subdural empyema and meningitis. The predominate organisms recovered from these infection are anaerobic, aerobic, and microaerophilic bacteria of oral flora origin. Establishing the microbiology by obtaining appropriate cultures for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria are essential for proper antimicrobial selection. Early recognition and appropriate surgical and medical therapy are essential to ensure recovery.

  4. A Rare Case of Glossitis due to Pasteurella multocida after a Cat Scratch.

    PubMed

    Niknam, Negin; Doan, Thien; Revere, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella is one of the zoonotic pathogens that can cause variety of serious infections in animals and humans such as bacteremia, septic shock, endocarditis, meningitis, prosthetic and native valve infections, osteomyelitis, skin and soft tissue infections, abscesses, and even pneumonia with empyema. However, there have been few reports of upper respiratory involvements like tonsillitis and epiglottitis in humans. We present a case of recurrent Pasteurella glossitis after a cat scratch which has not been reported in humans.

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Deficiency Diminishes Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clearance Due to Reduced TLR9 Expression in Pleural Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gahlot, Satindra; Nasreen, Najmunnisa; Johnson, Judith A.; Sahn, Steven A.; Mohammed, Kamal A.

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cause pneumonia and empyema thoraces. TLR9 activation provides protection against bacterial infections and Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known to enhance host innate immunity against bacterial infections. However, it is still unclear whether HO-1 regulates TLR-9 expression in the pleura and modulates the host innate defenses during MRSA empyema. In order to determine if HO-1 regulates host innate immune functions via modulating TLR expression, in MRSA empyema, HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- mouse pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) were infected with MRSA (1:10, MOI) in the presence or absence of Cobalt Protoporphyrin (CoPP) and Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZnPP) or CORM-2 (a Carbon monoxide donor) and the expression of mTLR9 and mBD14 was assessed by RT-PCR. In vivo, HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- mice were inoculated with MRSA (5x106 CFU) intra-pleurally and host bacterial load was measured by CFU, and TLR9 expression in the pleura was determined by histochemical-immunostaining. We noticed MRSA inducing differential expression of TLR9 in HO-1+/+ and HO-1 -/- PMCs. In MRSA infected HO-1+/+ PMCs, TLR1, TLR4, and TLR9 expression was several fold higher than MRSA infected HO-1-/- PMCs. Particularly TLR9 expression was very low in MRSA infected HO-1-/- PMCs both in vivo and in vitro. Bacterial clearance was significantly higher in HO-1+/+ PMCs than compared to HO-1-/- PMCs in vitro, and blocking TLR9 activation diminished MRSA clearance significantly. In addition, HO-1-/- mice were unable to clear the MRSA bacterial load in vivo. MRSA induced TLR9 and mBD14 expression was significantly high in HO-1+/+ PMCs and it was dependent on HO-1 activity. Our findings suggest that HO-1 by modulating TLR9 expression in PMCs promotes pleural innate immunity in MRSA empyema. PMID:28052108

  6. The UK Military Experience of Thoracic Injury in the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    advances in surgical technique.4 Haemorrhage and sepsis have remained the main causes of mortality throughout twentieth century warfare.1,6 In the...World War I, chest injuries were 6% of all combat wounds,1 with a mortality of 24– 27%2; haemorrhage and empyema were the leading causes of death...such as endotracheal intubation , mechanical ventilation, the use of antimicrobial agents and improved pulmonary toilet techniques removing retained

  7. [The causes of death of pulmonary tuberculosis: late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tomono, K

    1998-12-01

    We investigated the causes of death of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. Chronic respiratory failure is one of the most frequent cause of death in the patients of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. We compared the long term prognosis of chronic respiratory failure in case of emphysema and pulmonary tuberculosis. In the patients with chronic respiratory failure by pulmonary emphysema, the prognosis was poor in those with pulmonary hypertension. But in case of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, prognosis was not affected by presence or absence of pulmonary hypertension. The determinants of prognosis of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis are the indication of home oxygen therapy, malnutrition, and hypoxemia. Fungal infection, especially aspergilloma, is a common secondary infection of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. We investigated forty-two cases of aspergilloma as late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, and of those 15 patients died. The causes of death were pneumonia and respiratory failure. Measurement of galactomannan antigen of aspergillus in serum using ELISA or PCR, it was apparent that the outcome was poor in the patients positive for antigen. It suggested that the prognosis of the patients with aspergilloma related with some degree of invasion of Aspergillus in parenchyma. It was reported that neoplasm is closely related to chronic tuberculous empyema. Lymphoma is most frequently complicated with chronic tuberculous empyema, and squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, sarcoma and carcinoid were reported as complication of chronic empyema. We reported the case of angiosarcoma, originated from chronic empyema in left thoracic cavity formed after being treated for tuberculosis with artificial pneumothorax. Recently, the number of patients with late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis have been decreased, but some severe cases of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis will suffer from late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, and

  8. Late results.

    PubMed

    Daly, B D

    1999-08-01

    Pneumonectomy is performed for a number of benign and malignant conditions. It is most commonly performed for lung cancer. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant protocols have increased the number of these operations being performed and the long-term results are improving. Pneumonectomy may also be performed for metastases to lung and for mesothelioma with encouraging results. Some bronchial adenomas require pneumonectomy. Treatment of resistant mycobacteria or the complications of tuberculosis frequently require pneumonectomy. Late bronchopleural fistulae, esophagopleural fistulae, and empyema may occur.

  9. An interesting thinner intoxication case: intrathoracic injection.

    PubMed

    Solak, Ilhami; Cankayali, Ilkin; Aksu, Hasim; Moral, Ali Resat

    2006-01-01

    Thinners, including aromatic hydrocarbons such as toluene, xylene, and N-hexane, are widely used in industry for the production of plastics, varnish, paint, and glue. Use of these toxic agents frequently leads to chronic intoxication caused by abuse or misuse of solvents, which are usually taken in through inhalation. Thinners may have neurotoxic, myotoxic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, and cardiotoxic systemic effects. The patient described in this report attempted to commit suicide by injecting 10 cc thinner into the left hemithorax. Acute chemical empyema developed at the left hemithorax. No bacterial growth was noted in empyema liquid and blood samples. Empyema was treated with tube thoracostomy, and full remission was observed after 33 d. No systemic toxic signs were noted, other than a low level of hepatotoxicity. Although pleural effusion, atelectasis, and pleural thickening were observed at the acute phase on computed tomography (CT) of the thorax, only pleural thickening persisted on CT of the thorax after 1 y. Investigators could not find a documented case of parenteral use of thinners in the medical literature.

  10. Clinical manifestations of Kingella kingae infections: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Morrison, V A; Wagner, K F

    1989-01-01

    A patient with antecedent coccidioidal pulmonary cavitary disease who developed an empyema due to Kingella kingae prompted our analysis of the literature regarding this unusual bacterial pathogen. Formerly classified among other genera and considered a nonpathogen, K. kingae has been increasingly recognized as a cause of human infection. While the most commonly diagnosed infections due to this organism are endocarditis and septic arthritis, there have also been isolated reports of bacteremia, diskitis, abscesses, meningitis, and oropharyngeal infections. The treatment of choice is penicillin, to which K. kingae strains are uniformly susceptible. Recognition of the potential pathogenicity of this microorganism in appropriate clinical settings will probably result in more prompt and specific therapy.

  11. Safety of reduced antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections in primary care: cohort study using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael V; Little, Paul; Hay, Alastair D; Fox, Robin; Prevost, A Toby; Juszczyk, Dorota; Charlton, Judith; Ashworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre’s syndrome is higher in general practices that prescribe fewer antibiotics for self limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Design Cohort study. Setting 610 UK general practices from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Participants Registered patients with 45.5 million person years of follow-up from 2005 to 2014. Exposures Standardised proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed for each general practice, and rate of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 registered patients. Main outcome measures Incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre’s syndrome, adjusting for age group, sex, region, deprivation fifth, RTI consultation rate, and general practice. Results From 2005 to 2014 the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed decreased from 53.9% to 50.5% in men and from 54.5% to 51.5% in women. From 2005 to 2014, new episodes of meningitis, mastoiditis, and peritonsillar abscess decreased annually by 5.3%, 4.6%, and 1.0%, respectively, whereas new episodes of pneumonia increased by 0.4%. Age and sex standardised incidences for pneumonia and peritonsillar abscess were higher for practices in the lowest fourth of antibiotic prescribing compared with the highest fourth. The adjusted relative risk increases for a 10% reduction in antibiotic prescribing were 12.8% (95% confidence interval 7.8% to 17.5%, P<0.001) for pneumonia and 9.9% (5.6% to 14.0%, P<0.001) for peritonsillar abscess. If a general practice with an average list size of 7000 patients reduces the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed by 10%, then it might observe 1.1 (95% confidence interval 0.6 to 1.5) more cases of pneumonia each year and 0.9 (0.5 to 1.3) more cases of peritonsillar abscess each decade

  12. Laparoscopic retrosternal gastric pull-up for fistulized mediastinal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mungo, Benedetto; Barbetta, Arianna; Lidor, Anne O; Stem, Miloslawa; Molena, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient successfully reconstructed with laparoscopic retrosternal gastric pull-up after esophagectomy for unresectable posterior mediastinal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, eroding into the esophagus and compressing the airways. A partial esophagectomy with esophagostomy was performed for treatment of esophageal pleural fistula and empyema, while the airways were managed with the placement of an endobronchial stent. Gastrointestinal reconstruction was performed using a laparoscopic approach to create a retrosternal tunnel for gastric conduit pull-up and cervical anastomosis. The patient was discharged uneventfully after 6 d, and has done very well at home with normal diet.

  13. [Treatment of acute pyoinflammatory diseases of the lungs and pleura under control of microorganism persistence factors].

    PubMed

    Abramzon, O M; Bukharin, O V; Kurlaev, P P

    2004-01-01

    Results of treatment of patients with acute pulmonary abscess, acute empyema of the pleura and pyopneumothorax were analyzed. The local treatment of the main group of patients consisting of 50 persons included oxitocin in combination with antiseptics and antibiotics which facilitated maximal reduction of the persistent potential of the pathogenic agent, its rapid elimination from the purulent focus and allowed to get better results using conservative therapy. The obtained clinical effect confirmed the experimental data on pronounced inhibition of persistent properties of the bacterial pathogens with the complexes "antibiotic-oxitocin".

  14. Pneumococcal Disease in the Era of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Inci; Shea, Kimberly M; Pelton, Stephen I

    2015-12-01

    Universal immunization of infants and toddlers with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines over the last 15 years has dramatically altered the landscape of pneumococcal disease. Decreases in invasive pneumococcal disease, all-cause pneumonia, empyema, mastoiditis, acute otitis media, and complicated otitis media have been reported from multiple countries in which universal immunization has been implemented. Children with comorbid conditions have higher rates of pneumococcal disease and increased case fatality rates compared with otherwise healthy children, and protection for the most vulnerable pediatric patients will require new strategies to address the underlying host susceptibility and the expanded spectrum of serotypes observed.

  15. Antigenemia detected by radioimmunoassay in systemic aspergillosis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, M.H.

    1980-06-01

    Because of difficulties in antemortem diagnosis of systemic aspergillosis, a radioimmunoassay to an Aspergillus fumigatus carbohydrate was developed and evaluated in patients with mycotic or bacterial infections. Antigenemia was detected in sera obtained antemortem from four of seven patients with systemic aspergillosis and in pleural fluid from an Aspergillus empyema but not in control sera or pleural fluid from 43 patients or 27 normal donors. When characterized with reference to onset of disease, antigenemia was an early sign of infection. This study shows the usefulness of the Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay for early, specific immunodiagnosis of systemic aspergillosis.

  16. [PECULIARITES OF SIMULTANT INTERVENTIONS FOR SOME TYPES OF CHRONIC PHTHISIC PLEURITIS, COEXISTENT WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS].

    PubMed

    Duzhiy, I D; Grehsko, I Ya; Kravets, O V; Oleshchenko, G P; Glazunova, N I

    2016-01-01

    In coincidence of chronic phthisic pleuritis in a rigid stage with pulmonary tuberculosis operative intervention is indicated of a pleuropulmonectomy type, what is a complex situation for performance and preservation of the patient's functional state. Pleuropulmonectomy in some patients is complicated by empyema and pathological processes in bronchi. Possibilities of operative interventions application, alternative to pleuropulmonectomy, were studied. Of 48 patients, to whom pleuropulmonectomy is indicated in accordance to data of clinic-roentgenological investigations, in 7--simultant operative treatment were conducted with positive results.

  17. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  18. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2015-09-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus.

  19. Deranged liver function tests following laparoscopic cholecystectomy: What would Occam have to say?

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, S

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative complications can pose a significant obstacle in the ongoing management of surgical patients. However, it is pertinent to remember that postoperative events are not always complications of the preceding operation. We present the case of a patient with calculous cholecystitis and gallbladder empyema who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Postoperatively, he continued to have right upper quadrant pain associated with abnormal liver function tests. Ultimately, the cause of his postoperative symptoms was rather prosaic and ran counter to Occam’s razor, the relevance of which is discussed below. PMID:27310811

  20. Infections in Combat Casualties During Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    2 482.31 Group A Streptococcus pneumonia 1 482.41 Pneumonia Staphylococcus aureus 1 482.82 E. coli pneumonia 1 482.83 Gram-negative pneumonia 10...Bacterial meningitis 2 322.9 Meningitis unspecified 4 Lung 465.9 Acute upper respiratory infection 3 481 Pneumococcal pneumonia 9 482.1 Pseudomonas pneumonia ...482.89 Bacterial pneumonia 11 486 Pneumonia organism unspecified 35 510.9 Empyema without fistula 10 V46.1 Dependence on respirator 12 Skin/wound 519.01

  1. Neonatal opaque right lung: delayed fluid resorption

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, K.; Richardson, J.

    1981-12-01

    Eight newborn infants with opaque right lungs were examined. Clinically, the main problem associated with the opaque right lung is mild respiratory distress, and radiographyically, the findings consist of (a) a totally opaque right lung, (b) a semiopaque right lung, or (c) an opaque right upper lobe only. These findings are usually interpreted as representing pneumonia, empyema, or hydrochlothorax, but the fact that they clear within 24 to 48 hours indicates that none of these diseases is the cause. It is thought that neonatal opaque right lung results from the transient retention of normal fetal fluid in the right lung.

  2. Traumatic false aneurysms of the left ventricle after an attempt at video-thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Guihaire, Julien; Flecher, Erwan; de Latour, Bertrand; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2012-07-01

    OBJECTIVES Video-thoracoscopic surgery (VTS) has been accepted as a safe and credible technique since 1990. Lung injury is one of the main perioperative complications. Few data are available about cardiac trauma and VTS-related false aneurysm of the left ventricular (LV) wall has not yet been reported. METHODS A 62-year old woman presented with a left thoracic empyema. Video-thoracoscopy was attempted for bacterial sampling and surgical drain of the pleura. A rapid conversion to open thoracotomy was necessary to control massive bleeding after the first thoracic port intrusion. An apical systolic murmur was found 2 weeks later during a systematic clinical examination. The patient was asymptomatic and had no personal history of cardiac disease. RESULTS Colour Doppler imaging showed two spurious aneurysms on the LV wall without any haemopericardium. Pericardial enhancement around the left ventricle was observed on the chest computerized tomography scan with the injection of contrast. After the careful excision of the two false aneurysms, a surgical repair was strengthened with a suture under a cardiopulmonary bypass. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was safe at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS This is the first report of LV traumatic false aneurysms secondary to an attempt of a video-thoracoscopic procedure. This is a rare but life-threatening complication because of the risk of spontaneous rupture. Left persistent thoracic empyemas associated with the ipsilateral mediastinum deviation carry a high risk of myocardial damage related to the trocar port intrusion.

  3. A novel management of post-oesophagectomy gastro-pleural fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jonathan; Ahmed, Waqar

    2016-01-01

    Oesophageal anastomotic leak and fistula are major and life-threatening complications of oesophagectomy with resultant increased mortality. Non-operative approach of such cases should be the initial strategy. Re-operative surgery and/or stent insertion are considered if conservative measures failed. Although oesophageal stenting is a safe option for the leaks, stent migration and failure to completely cover large anastomotic leaks are the main complications and pitfalls of the procedure. These can be overcome by using multiple or larger stents. We describe a case of a 73-year-old man who underwent a laparoscopic oesophagectomy for an oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The procedure was complicated by a large gastro-pleural fistula and anastomotic leak, resulting into a chronic empyema. The initial conservative treatment and a conventional oesophageal stent insertion failed to heal the fistula and to resolve the empyema. Re-operative surgery was ruled out because of the patient’s poor general health and high surgical risk. Due to the changed oesophago-gastric anatomy and a potential risk of migration of the additional conventional stent, a mega stent was deployed with successful closure of the oesophageal leak. Post-stenting contrast studies and an out-patient follow up review of the case confirmed no further anastomotic leakage. PMID:28078131

  4. Occurrence and significance of Cryptococcus neoformans in the respiratory tract of patients with bronchopulmonary disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, H S; Pal, M

    1977-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans was cultured from 13 (3%) of 469 clinical specimens examined from the respiratory tract of patients with bronchopulmonary diseases. These isolations came from 5 (2%) of 207 patients; 11 isolates were from sputum and 1 each were from bronchoscopic aspirate and empyema pus. The fungus was not cultured from the oropharyngeal washings of 101 apparently healthy volunteers. Of the 5 patients, 3 had pulmonary tuberculosis, including one with pyopneumothorax and 2 with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis as the underlying disease. In the tuberculosis patient with pyopneumothorax and C. neoformans in empyema pus, the fungus was presumably a tissue invader, whereas its role could not be unequivocally ascertained in the remaining 4 patients from whom it was isolated from sputum or bronchial aspirate on at least two consecutive occasions. The question of C. neoformans being a transient resident, commensal, or incitant of benign minimal lesions in the tracheobronchial tree is discussed. A comprehensive laboratory and clinical follow-up is warranted in patients from whose sputum or bronchial aspirate C. neoformans may be cultured even though definitive signs of cryptococcosis may be lacking. PMID:319109

  5. [Optimization of surgical strategy in complications after thoracic operations demanding recurrent surgical interventions].

    PubMed

    Plaksin, S A; Petrov, M E

    2014-01-01

    A frequency of postoperative complications varied from 1-2% after endoscopic thoracal operations to 4-12% after open operations using thoracotomic access. There isn't any common approach to indications and terms of the recurrent endoscopic intervention. An analysis of postoperative complications was made after 2795 thoracothomies and 3632 videothoracoscopies required the recurrent operation in 139 patients (2.2%). The rethoracoscopies were performed on 62 patients (44.6%), thoracoscopies were carried out after thoracotomies in 40 cases (28.8%) and rethoracotomies were in 37 cases (26.6%). The more frequent indication to recurrent operation was bleeding (26.6%), pleural empyema (20.9%), fragmented pleuritis (11.5%). It was shown that thoracoscopy was an alternative to rethoracotomy as the rethoracoscopy in case of nonmassive intrapleural bleeding, clotted hemothorax, postoperative fragmented pleuritis, non-sanitized empyema region, the presence of sequestrums in this area, limited postoperative pleuritis, chylothorax, bronchopleural fistula of the size of 1-2 mm, leakage of the lung, a foreign body in pleural cavity. The lethality consisted of 35.1% after rethoracotomies and it was 12.7% after recurrent endoscopic operations.

  6. Re-discovering the Heimlich valve: Old wine in a new bottle

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Ajay; Ayyanathan, Shivanraj; Krishnamoorthy, (Late) Rajavenkatesh

    2017-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy came to our outpatient department with pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. He was found to have a loculated empyema on the right side. He was taken up for surgery and decortication was done. He developed air leak in the postoperative period. When the air leak did not settle until the 10th day, we decided to attach the atrium Pneumostat™, a modified version of the Heimlich valve to his Intercostal drainage tube and sent him home. On further follow-up, his lung expanded, and ICD could be removed. The patient remains well until the current follow-up. We present this case in an attempt to change the perceptions about various options available to drain the chest. The Heimlich valve appears to be a more compliant option than the conventional underwater seal drainage in terms of early mobility, reduced length of stay, and patient compliance. PMID:28144064

  7. Talc pleurodesis through indwelling pleural catheters for malignant pleural effusions: retrospective case series of a novel clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Liju; Ip, Hugh; Rao, Deepak; Patel, Nishil; Noorzad, Farinaz

    2014-12-01

    Malignant pleural effusions cause significant morbidity, but there is no gold standard minimally invasive treatment. A new therapeutic approach combines talc pleurodesis and indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) to enable outpatient management. This case series summarizes the safety and efficacy data of all patients (24) with a symptomatic malignant pleural effusion who underwent talc pleurodeses via IPCs between December 2010 and July 2013. Successful pleurodesis was achieved in 22 procedures (92%). There was one empyema, one hydropneumothorax, one recurrent effusion, and two minor complications: one drain site wound infection and one complaint of chest pain. Twenty-two procedures (92%) were performed in the outpatient setting. This report confirms the safety and efficacy of administering talc slurry through IPCs in an outpatient setting. Studies in a larger cohort are necessary to define the role of this novel approach in the treatment algorithm of patients with this condition.

  8. Circulating Aneuploid Cells Detected in the Blood of Patients with Infectious Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hongsun; Cho, Jong Ho; Sonn, Chung-Hee; Kim, Jae-Won; Choi, Yul; Lee, Jinseon; Kim, Jhingook

    2017-01-01

    The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is clinically important for diagnosing cancer. We have previously developed a size-based filtration platform followed by epithelial cell adhesion molecule immunofluorescence staining for detecting CTCs. To characterize CTCs independently of cell surface protein expression, we incorporated a chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay to detect abnormal copy numbers of chromosomes in cells collected from peripheral blood samples by the size-based filtration platform. Aneuploid cells were detected in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer. Unexpectedly, aneuploid cells were also detected in the control group, which consisted of peripheral blood samples from patients with benign lung diseases, such as empyema necessitatis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease. These findings suggest that chromosomal abnormalities are observed not only in tumor cells, but also in benign infectious diseases. Thus, our findings present new considerations and bring into light the possibility of false positives when using FISH for cancer diagnosis. PMID:28382274

  9. Re-discovering the Heimlich valve: Old wine in a new bottle.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Ajay; Ayyanathan, Shivanraj; Krishnamoorthy, Late Rajavenkatesh

    2017-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy came to our outpatient department with pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. He was found to have a loculated empyema on the right side. He was taken up for surgery and decortication was done. He developed air leak in the postoperative period. When the air leak did not settle until the 10(th) day, we decided to attach the atrium Pneumostat(™), a modified version of the Heimlich valve to his Intercostal drainage tube and sent him home. On further follow-up, his lung expanded, and ICD could be removed. The patient remains well until the current follow-up. We present this case in an attempt to change the perceptions about various options available to drain the chest. The Heimlich valve appears to be a more compliant option than the conventional underwater seal drainage in terms of early mobility, reduced length of stay, and patient compliance.

  10. Focus on treatment complications and optimal management surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Jeroen M.; Lauwers, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic surgery comprises major procedures which may be challenging, not only from a technical point of view but also regarding anesthetic and postoperative management. Complications are common occurrences which are also related to the comorbidity of the patients. After major lung resections pulmonary and pleural complications are often encountered. In this overview more surgically related complications are discussed, focusing on postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, thromboembolic disease including pulmonary embolism, prolonged air leak, lobar torsion, persistent pleural space, empyema and bronchopleural fistula. Prevention, timely recognition, and early adequate treatment are key points as complications initially considered to be minor, may suddenly turn into life-threatening events. To this end multidisciplinary cooperation is necessary. Preoperative smoking cessation, adequate pain control, attention to nutritional status, incentive spirometry and early mobilization are important factors to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. PMID:25806298

  11. Esophageal perforation caused by fish vertebra ingestion in a seven-month-old infant demanded surgical intervention: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Yu; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Chang-Teng

    2006-01-01

    A seven-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with a 1-wk history of shortness of breath, dysphagia, and fever. Diagnosis of esophageal perforation following fish vertebra ingestion was made by history review, pneumomediastinum and an irregular hyperdense lesion noted in initial chest radiogram. Neck computed tomo-graphy (CT) confirmed that the foreign body located at the cricopharyngeal level and a small esophageal tracheal fistula was shown by esophagogram. The initial response to treatment of fish bone removal guided by panendoscopy and antibiotics administration was poor since pneumothorax plus empyema developed. Fortunately, the patient’s condition finally improved after decortication, mediastinotomy and perforated esophagus repair. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of esophageal perforation due to fish bone ingestion in infancy. In addition to particular caution that has to be taken when feeding the innocent, young victim, it may indicate the importance of surgical intervention for complicated esophageal perforation in infancy. PMID:17131491

  12. [Ludwig's angina].

    PubMed

    De Bast, Y; Appoloni, O; Firket, C; Capello, M; Rocmans, P; Vincent, J L

    2000-06-01

    Ludwig's angina is a rare infectious condition originating in the oropharyngeal region, most commonly from the teeth. The principal symptoms consist of cervical pain, dyspnea, dysphagia, symmetrical neck swelling and fever. Serious complications include respiratory collapses, mediastinitis, pleural empyema, pericarditis and pericardial tamponade, and may result in the death of the patient. The most useful investigations in patients with suspected Ludwig's angina are clinical assessment, a cervico-thoracic CT-scan to determine the extent of the lesions, microbiological examination and panoramic radiography to detect possible dental focuses of infection. Treatment consists of ensuring adequate ventilation by securing the upper airways, broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, eradication of the source of infection, and often early surgical decompression may be necessary. Rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment can reduce the mortality rate to 10%.

  13. Pott's puffy tumour: still not an eradicated entity.

    PubMed

    Guillén, A; Brell, M; Cardona, E; Claramunt, E; Costa, J M

    2001-05-01

    Pott's puffy tumour is an infrequent entity characterised by one or more subperiosteal abscesses associated with frontal bone osteomyelitis. Although cases in patients of all ages have been reported, teenagers are the most frequently affected. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential because of the high risk of severe neurological complications, such as epidural abscess, subdural empyema, and secondary septic thrombosis of the dural sinuses. This paper describes the case of a patient with a subperiosteal abscess resulting from sinusitis, with orbital and intracranial extension, and subsequent neurological complications. Despite modern methods of diagnosis and treatment, 13 new cases have been published in the last 5 years; in at least 3 (23%) of these cases there were serious neurological complications. Upper respiratory infections and sinusitis are leading causes of visits to the emergency department in the paediatric age group; however, no risk factors for poor outcome have so far been identified in any of these patients.

  14. Parasitic diseases of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; Huggins, John Terrill; Sahn, Steven A

    2013-05-01

    Parasitic infections are prevalent in certain parts of the world and may cause pleural involvement, which often goes unrecognized. Common parasites involving the pleura include Entamoeba histolytica, Echinococcus granulosus and Paragonimus westermani. Amebiasis can cause empyema with "anchovy sauce" pus, reactive pleural effusions and bronchopleural fistula with hydropneumothorax. Echinococcosis may result in pleural thickening, pneumothorax, secondary pleural hydatidosis and pleural effusions. Paragonimiasis may cause chylous and cholesterol pleural effusions, pleural thickening and pneumothorax. Less commonly, pulmonary eosinophilia, or Loeffler's syndrome, caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus and tropical pulmonary eosinophilia caused by Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi may involve the pleura. This article provides a comprehensive review of parasitic infections involving the pleura. A high index of suspicion in the appropriate clinical setting is required to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment of these diseases.

  15. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-04-13

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6-12 months of oral therapy.

  16. Noncongenital central nervous system infections in children: radiology review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Jorge Humberto Davila; Rantes, Claudia Isabel Lazarte; Arbelaez, Andres; Restrepo, Feliza; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are a very common worldwide health problem in childhood with significant morbidity and mortality. In children, viruses are the most common cause of CNS infections, followed by bacterial etiology, and less frequent due to mycosis and other causes. Noncomplicated meningitis is easier to recognize clinically; however, complications of meningitis such as abscesses, infarcts, venous thrombosis, or extra-axial empyemas are difficult to recognize clinically, and imaging plays a very important role on this setting. In addition, it is important to keep in mind that infectious process adjacent to the CNS such as mastoiditis can develop by contiguity in an infectious process within the CNS. We display the most common causes of meningitis and their complications.

  17. Audit of surgical and pneumatic/hydrostatic treatment of achalasia in a defined population.

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, J F; Smart, H L; Atkinson, M

    1986-01-01

    A retrospective survey was made of all the patients resident in the Nottingham area who presented with achalasia between 1959 and 1983. Initial treatment consisted of pneumatic bag dilatation in 26, hydrostatic bag dilatation in one and surgical cardiomyotomy in 22. Those treated by dilatation were older (mean age 52 years) than those treated by cardiomyotomy (mean age 42 years). Seven patients died without receiving active treatment because of old age and infirmity and in 6 this occurred before the introduction of endoscopic dilatation to the area. Initial treatment by cardiomyotomy was associated with a lower recurrence rate than treatment by bag dilatation but with a longer stay in hospital and a higher incidence of complications including empyema, chest infections and oesophageal stricture. PMID:3806541

  18. Retroperitoneal abscess and acute acalculous cholecystitis after iatrogenic colon injury: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chengwei; Wang, Yuxu; Hu, Sanyuan; Du, Futian; Ding, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis has a high mortality rate due to the difficulties in early diagnosis and high rate of complications like empyema, gangrene and perforation. We report a case of 20-year-old male with acute severe pancreatitis, acute renal failure and acute peripancreatic fluid collection who was transferred to our department after blood filtration treatment in ICU. After percutaneous catheter drainage for 20 hours, the patient got a high fever. Computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal colon injury. In this case, percutaneous catheter drainage was performed again and the pus cavity was flushed regularly, after which the patient’s state gradually improved. Unpredictably, septic shock appeared on the 51st day. Repeated computed tomography revealed acute acalculous cholecystitis and abscess formation. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder catheterization and drainage, the patient got better gradually. Three months later the retroperitoneal catheter was removed. Four months later, ultrasound examination showed normal gallbladder and the catheter was removed. PMID:26131252

  19. Isolation of gram-positive rods that resemble but are clearly distinct from Actinomyces pyogenes from mixed wound infections.

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, J; Lucchini, G M; Lüthy-Hottenstein, J; Brun, F; Altwegg, M

    1993-01-01

    Beginning in 1990, gram-positive rods resembling Actinomyces pyogenes were found with increasing frequency in mixed cultures from various infectious processes, most of them from patients with otitis, empyema, pilonidal cysts, perianal abscesses, and decubitus ulcers. Ribotyping and hybridization showed that these gram-positive rods could be divided into five groups not related to known Actinomyces species. Biochemical markers for reliable differentiation into these groups, however, could not be found. Therefore, naming new species is not warranted unless parameters are discovered that allow identification without DNA hybridization. These gram-positive rods have been isolated only in mixed cultures with anaerobes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus "milleri," enterococci, and gram-negative rods. Their exact role in these possibly synergistic infections needs further investigation. Images PMID:8501213

  20. Video assisted thoracic surgery in children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rasik; Reddy, A Suyodhan; Dhende, Nitin P

    2007-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery, i.e., video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been in use in children for last 98 years. Its use initially was restricted to the diagnostic purposes. However, with the improvement in the optics, better understanding of the physiology with CO2 insufflation, better capabilities in achieving the single lung ventilation and newer vessel sealing devices have rapidly expanded the spectrum of the indication of VATS. At present many complex lung resections, excision of mediastinal tumors are performed by VATS in the experienced centre. The VATS has become the standard of care in empyema, lung biopsy, Mediastinal Lymphnode biopsy, repair of diaphragmatic hernia, etc. The article discusses the indications of VATS, techniques to achieve the selective ventilation and surgical steps in the different surgical conditions in children. PMID:19789677

  1. Pneumococcal Disease in the Era of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Inci; Shea, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Universal immunization of infants and toddlers with PCVs over the past 15 years has dramatically altered the landscape of pneumococcal disease. Decreases in IPD, all cause pneumonia, empyema, mastoiditis, acute otitis media and complicated otitis media have been reported from multiple countries where universal immunization has been implemented. The introduction of the vaccine has also led to expanded understanding of pneumococcal disease; observations have confirmed that most pneumococci are transmitted from children to adults, not all pneumococcal serotypes are equal in terms of common clinical syndromes, likelihood of antibiotic resistance, or likelihood of progression to disease once colonization occurs. Children with comorbid conditions have higher rates of pneumococcal disease and increased case fatality rates compared to otherwise healthy children, and protection for the most vulnerable pediatric patients will require new strategies to address the underlying host susceptibility and the expanded spectrum of serotypes observed. PMID:26610421

  2. Benign emptying of the post-pneumonectomy space: recognizing this rare complication retrospectively.

    PubMed

    Kanakis, Meletios A; Misthos, Panagiotis A; Tsimpinos, Michalis D; Rapti, Nicoletta G; Chatzis, Andrew C; Lioulias, Achilleas G

    2015-11-01

    Patients presenting with a sudden drop in the pleural fluid level after a pneumonectomy in the absence of a recognizable bronchopleural fistula (BPF) have been classified as cases of benign emptying of the post-pneumonectomy space (BEPS). A retrospective study of 1378 pneumonectomies identified 4 cases of BEPS (0.29%). The patients were men; median age 64 years and all had undergone a right pneumonectomy. The median time at diagnosis was 31 days postoperatively and the median follow-up time was 31 months. None of the patients experienced a documented BPF or empyema. Although BEPS is an extremely rare complication, early recognition and close patient monitoring will prevent unnecessary interventional strategies.

  3. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  4. Emergencies and acute diseases in the collected works of Hippocrates: observation, examination, prognosis, therapy.

    PubMed

    Askitopoulou, Helen; Stefanakis, Georgios; Astyrakaki, Elisabeth E; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Agouridakis, Panagiotis

    2016-12-01

    The collected works οf Hippocrates include a wealth of references to emergencies and acute conditions; if the physician could treat these, he would be considered superior to his colleagues. Works most relevant to current Emergency Medicine are presented. They indicate Hippocrates' remarkable insight and attention to the value of close observation, meticulous clinical examination, and prognosis. Hippocrates and his followers disdained mystery and were not satisfied until they had discovered a rational cause to diseases. They assigned great significance to distressing signs and symptoms - the famous Hippocratic face, the breathing pattern, pain, seizures, opisthotonus - pointing to a fatal outcome, which they reported to their patient. The principles of treatment of emergencies, such as angina, haemorrhage, empyema, ileus, shoulder dislocations and head injuries, are astonishingly similar to the ones used nowadays.

  5. Right upper quadrant pain and raised alkaline phosphatase is not always a hepatobiliary problem.

    PubMed

    Cheyne, G; Runau, F; Lloyd, D M

    2014-01-01

    Right upper quadrant pain is a common presenting complaint to the general and hepatobiliary surgical team. Differential diagnoses include gallstones, cholecystitis, liver and pancreatic pathology. A 64-year-old man presented to our general surgical unit with right upper quadrant pain and deranged liver function tests. He underwent ultrasonography several times as well as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in pursuit of hepatobiliary pathology. However, it was the identification of an empyema on MRCP that led to computed tomography of the thorax and the eventual discovery of the cause of the pain: a paraspinal abscess causing T10/T11 discitis. Right upper quadrant pain and deranged liver function tests justify hepatobiliary investigation. Nevertheless, after several negative tests, the differential diagnoses should be broadened and referred pain considered.

  6. Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation in a Patient with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, David

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal perforation is a rare and life-threatening disorder. Failure to diagnosis within the first 24-48 hours of presentation portends a poor prognosis. A patient with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) on low-dose prednisone and methotrexate presented moribund with chest and shoulder pain, a left hydropneumothorax, progressive respiratory failure and shock. Initial management focussed on presumed community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a patient on immunosuppressants. Bilateral yeast empyemas were treated and attributed to immunosuppression. On day 26, the patient developed mediastinitis, and the diagnosis of esophageal perforation was first considered. A review of the literature suggests that the diagnosis and management of spontaneous esophageal perforation could have been more timely and the outcome less catastrophic. PMID:22279514

  7. Transdiaphragmatic abscess: late thoracic complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Preciado, A; Matthews, B D; Scarborough, T K; Marti, J L; Reardon, P R; Weinstein, G S; Bennett, M

    1999-12-01

    Spillage of gallstones into the peritoneal cavity is a frequent problem during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (as much as 30%) and is frequently dismissed as a benign occurrence. However, several complications associated with spillage of gallstones have been reported recently. Most of these complications presented late after the original procedure, many with clinical pictures not related to biliary etiology, confounding and delaying adequate management. For patients presenting with intraabdominal or thoracic abscesses of unknown etiology, if there is a history of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, regardless of the time interval, certain evaluations should be considered. A sonogram and a CT scan are advisable to detect retained extraluminal gallstones, as most patients will require, not only drainage of fluid collections, but also removal of the stones. A case is described of a patient who presented with a right empyema and transdiaphragmatic abscess 18 months after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Treatment included decortication, enbloc resection of the abscess, repair of the diaphragm, and drainage.

  8. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  9. (Video Assisted) thoracoscopic surgery: Getting started.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Tamas F

    2007-10-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery without or with video assistance (VATS) is simpler and easier to learn as it seems to be. Potential benefits of the procedure in rural surgical environment are outlined while basic requirements and limitations are listed. Thoracoscopy kit, thoracotomy tray at hand, patient monitoring, proper drainage system, pain control and access to chest physiotherapy are the basic requirements. Having headlight, bronchoscope, Ligasure and mechanical staplers offer clear advantages but they are not indispensable. Exploration and evacuation of pleural space, pleurodesis, surgery for Stage I and II thoracic empyema are evidenced fields of VATS procedures. Some of the cases can be performed under controlled local anesthesia. Acute chest trauma cannot be recommended for VATS treatment. Lung cancer is out of the scope of rural surgery.

  10. Cardiac disturbances after pneumonectomy--the value of prophylactic digitalization.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, A; Mattila, T; Appelqvist, P; Meurala, H; Mattila, S

    1978-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative cardiac disturbances and the value of prophylactic digitalization were studied retrospectively in 143 patients undergoing pneumonectomy for carcinoma of the lung. Cardiac arrhythmias occurred in 29% and tachycardia episodes in 30% of the patients. The incidence of myocardial infarction was 2%. Operative mortality was 4%. The cardiac disturbances developed more often after left than after right pneumonectomy. The age of the patients, a history of angina pectoris or hypertension did not markedly increase the incidence of cardiac disturbances, neither did operative factors, such as pericardiotomy, left atrial resection, major bleeding nor postoperative empyema. Prophylactic digitalization significantly reduced postoperative cardiac disorders, their frequency being 33% in the group of patients who received prophylactic digitalis compared with 65% in the group that did not.

  11. Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease in Children: Definition and Spectrum of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Gregory J.; Carter, Edward R.

    2017-01-01

    The most common clinical suppurative lung conditions in children are empyema, lung abscess, and bronchiectasis, and to a less often necrotizing pneumonia. Until recently, bronchiectasis was the most common form of persistent suppurative lung disease in children. Protracted bacterial bronchitis is a newly described chronic suppurative condition in children, which is less persistent but more common than bronchiectasis (1). In addition, the term “chronic suppurative lung disease” has been used recently to describe the clinical features of bronchiectasis when the radiographic features needed to make a diagnosis of bronchiectasis are absent. Webster’s New College Dictionary defines suppuration as the process of forming and/or discharging pus. Pus is a body fluid resulting from intense inflammation in response to infection that leads to neutrophil influx and apoptosis, microbial clearance, and often necrosis of nearby tissue. Pus is primarily composed of white blood cell debris. PMID:28289673

  12. A mistaken case of tension pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michael Joseph

    2014-05-16

    The patient was an otherwise usually fit and well 25-year-old man who presented to A&E department in extremis. The initial working diagnosis was a tension pneumothorax, and he was subsequently treated with needle thoracocentesis causing a release of air. A chest radiograph was taken, after which a chest drain was inserted. Bilious fluid was drained from the chest drain. The patient was taken for an emergency CT, which demonstrated a Bochdalek diaphragmatic hernia, with the spleen and bowel found to be causing a near total left lung collapse. He was taken to the theatre to return the bowel to the correct anatomical position, in addition to undergoing a sleeve gastrectomy, and diaphragmatic defect repair. The patient has had a complex and protracted recovery in the intensive therapy unit (ITU) with complications including wound dehiscence, gastrectomy leak requiring additional surgical repair, fluid overload and bilateral pleural empyema.

  13. A mistaken case of tension pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michael Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The patient was an otherwise usually fit and well 25-year-old man who presented to A&E department in extremis. The initial working diagnosis was a tension pneumothorax, and he was subsequently treated with needle thoracocentesis causing a release of air. A chest radiograph was taken, after which a chest drain was inserted. Bilious fluid was drained from the chest drain. The patient was taken for an emergency CT, which demonstrated a Bochdalek diaphragmatic hernia, with the spleen and bowel found to be causing a near total left lung collapse. He was taken to the theatre to return the bowel to the correct anatomical position, in addition to undergoing a sleeve gastrectomy, and diaphragmatic defect repair. The patient has had a complex and protracted recovery in the intensive therapy unit (ITU) with complications including wound dehiscence, gastrectomy leak requiring additional surgical repair, fluid overload and bilateral pleural empyema. PMID:24835806

  14. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Gemella morbillorum.

    PubMed

    Borro, Paolo; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Testino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Even though Gemella morbillorum infection (GMI) is rare in humans, it may nevertheless, cause endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, pleural empyema, nephritis, mediastinitis, and--occasionally--liver abscess. We are describing the case of a 64-years-old Caucasian male admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory parameters revealed inflammation signs, and instrumental examinations showed the presence of diverticula in the ascending colon. Abdominal ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) showed two focal lesions in the right liver lobe. One had the characteristics of a simple cyst; the second was hypoechoic with a low density area, possibly containing necrotic material. US-guided needle biopsy was found negative for neoplastic cells, showing purulent infiltrate. Pus culture was found positive for GMI. Systemic antibiotic therapy coupled with repeated US-guided needle aspiration, induced the resolution of the hepatic abscess. Few cases have been reported of hepatic abscess caused by GMI in immunocompetent non-cirrhotic subjects.

  15. Pleural effusion in an immunocompetent woman caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Pala, M; Fratti, Daniela; Contini, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium that can cause pneumonia, abscess and empyema in subjects with predisposing lung diseases. However, pleurisy with effusion is rare. Herein, we report the case of a 74-year-old immunocompetent female patient without apparent risk factors, who suffered haemorrhagic pleural effusion as the main clinical manifestation. Pleural nodules were detected by computed tomography scan, and microbiological analysis revealed M. fortuitum in the absence of other pathogens. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin, and full recovery ensued in 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of haemorrhagic pleural effusion in an immunocompetent patient without underlying diseases. Although non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement, M. fortuitum should be considered in such cases, especially when microbiology fails to detect the usual pathogens, and when the clinical picture is unclear.

  16. Anaerobes: a new aetiology in cavitary pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, J M; Hitado, J; Gea, G; Colmeiro, A; Lanza, A M; Muñoz, J A; Mosquera, J A

    1982-01-01

    The role of mycobacteria in the cavitation of large pneumoconiotic masses is well established. In other cases softness is attributed to an ischaemic or aseptic necrosis. Five cases are described in which cavitation of the pulmonary masses was caused by anaerobic bacteria, confirmed by the growth of such bacterial in cultures after transtracheal or transpleural puncture. Repeated cultures for mycobacteria gave negative results. Two cases were acute, having serious complications such as bronchopleural fistula, empyema, and serious respiratory insufficiency. The role of anaerobes in cavitary pneumoconiosis has not been recognised previously, probably because of the special conditions required to culture these bacteria and the infrequent use of transtracheal puncture in the diagnosis of this entity. The prevalence of anaerobes as agents capable of cavitating pneumoconiotic masses remains to be established. Images PMID:6128024

  17. Esophageal perforation caused by fish vertebra ingestion in a seven-month-old infant demanded surgical intervention: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Yu; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Chang-Teng

    2006-11-28

    A seven-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with a 1-wk history of shortness of breath, dysphagia, and fever. Diagnosis of esophageal perforation following fish vertebra ingestion was made by history review, pneumomediastinum and an irregular hyperdense lesion noted in initial chest radiogram. Neck computed tomography (CT) confirmed that the foreign body located at the cricopharyngeal level and a small esophageal tracheal fistula was shown by esophagogram. The initial response to treatment of fish bone removal guided by panendoscopy and antibiotics administration was poor since pneumothorax plus empyema developed. Fortunately, the patient's condition finally improved after decortication, mediastinotomy and perforated esophagus repair. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of esophageal perforation due to fish bone ingestion in infancy. In addition to particular caution that has to be taken when feeding the innocent, young victim, it may indicate the importance of surgical intervention for complicated esophageal perforation in infancy.

  18. Pleural effusion in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José Castellote

    2010-12-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is the paradigmatic pleural effusion in liver cirrhosis. It is defined as a pleural effusion in a patient with portal hypertension and no cardiopulmonary disease. The estimated prevalence of this complication in patients with liver cirrhosis is 5 to 6%. Its pathophysiology involves movement of ascitic fluid from the peritoneal cavity into the pleural space through diaphragmatic defects. Thoracentesis and pleural fluid analysis are necessary for diagnosis. Initial management consists of sodium restriction, diuretics, and therapeutic thoracentesis. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may provide a bridge prior to liver transplantation. Spontaneous bacterial empyema is the infection of a preexisting hydrothorax. The more frequent bacteria involved are ENTEROBACTERIACEAE and gram-positive cocci. Antibiotic therapy is the cornerstone of therapy. This article reviews etiology, clinical manifestations, and therapy of these two complications of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

  19. Case of a cerebral abscess caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a subject with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Grisar, Koenraad; Maes, Honorine; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man presenting with generalised seizures after developing a right frontal brain abscess. Stereotactic aspiration and subsequent matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry revealed Porphyromonas gingivalis as the only causative anaerobe microorganism. Secondary incision and drainage was required due to neurological deterioration with increased dimensions of the abscess, intracranial pressure and formation of a subdural occipitoparietal empyema. Oral imaging was positive for apical periodontitis of multiple elements; therefore, the remaining dentition was removed. Targeted antibiotic treatment included intravenous ceftriaxone and ornidazole. The patient was discharged to our revalidation unit 59 days after admission to make a full recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of P. gingivalis causing an intracranial abscess and the third case of a true intracerebral parenchymal abscess caused by this bacterium. PMID:28228396

  20. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression.

  1. Uncomplicated pneumonia in healthy Canadian children and youth: Practice points for management

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Nicole; Robinson, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    Although immunization has decreased the incidence of bacterial pneumonia in vaccinated children, pneumonia remains common in healthy children. Symptoms of bacterial pneumonia frequently overlap those present with viral infections or reactive airway disease. Optimally, the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia should be supported by a chest radiograph before starting antimicrobials. Factors such as age, vital signs and other measures of illness severity are critical when deciding whether to admit a patient to hospital. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae continues to be the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia in children, prescribing amoxicillin or ampicillin for seven to 10 days remains the mainstay of empirical therapy for nonsevere pneumonia. If improvement does not occur, consideration should be given to searching for complications (empyema or lung abscess). Routine chest radiographs at the end of therapy are not recommended unless clinically indicated. PMID:26744558

  2. [The immediate and late results of the surgical treatment of patients with complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kerimov, R V; Badalov, R K; Medzhidov, F A; Mamedov, R I

    1996-01-01

    Immediate and long-term outcomes of repeated and multistage operations were analyzed in 190 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. The aspects of work rehabilitation were studied in these patients. The efficiency of repeated and stage surgical interventions in patients both with disseminated and complicated types of tuberculosis and with pleural empyemas and in those with uncomplicated postoperative disease is 87.5 and 92.2%, respectively. The long-term results indicated that the complete clinical effect preserved in 79.2% of patients. Work rehabilitation was achieved in 64.8% of the examinees in the long-term postoperative period. The use of repeated and stage surgical interventions in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis may rehabilitate a rather large proportion of those operated on, assuming a great socioeconomic significance.

  3. A ray of hope for a woman with Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti

    2013-02-04

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a history of secondary amenorrhoea for the last 3 years, coinciding with her delivery. She delivered at home and had massive postpartum haemorrhage. She was brought in a state of circulatory collapse to the nearest teaching hospital, where she was resuscitated. She developed anaemia, septicaemia and extradural empyema. The complications were managed and the woman improved. Presently, she approached us for infertility. She was investigated and diagnosed with postpartum hypopituitarism, that is, Sheehan's syndrome. Her gonadotrophin levels, luteinising hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone, were normal, serum oestradiol was low and serum prolactin was also on the lower side. She had started with genital atrophy and was given three cycles of cyclic oestrogen +progesterone combination. Ovulation was induced. She conceived and her antenatal period was uneventful. She delivered a full-term baby vaginally. However, she had inadequate lactation after delivery and lost the baby at one-and-a-half months' age due to gastroenteritis.

  4. Recurrent Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children: Underlying Clinical Conditions, and Immunological and Microbiological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Laia; Basteiro, Maria G.; de Paz, Hector D.; Iñigo, Melania; de Sevilla, Mariona F.; Triviño, Miriam; Juan, Manel; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical, immunological and microbiological characteristics of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children were evaluated, differentiating relapse from reinfection, in order to identify specific risk factors for both conditions. Methods All patients <18 years-old with recurrent IPD admitted to a tertiary-care pediatric center from January 2004 to December 2011 were evaluated. An episode of IPD was defined as the presence of clinical findings of infection together with isolation and/or pneumococcal DNA detection by Real-Time PCR in any sterile body fluid. Recurrent IPD was defined as 2 or more episodes in the same individual at least 1 month apart. Among recurrent IPD, we differentiated relapse (same pneumococcal isolate) from reinfection. Results 593 patients were diagnosed with IPD and 10 patients died. Among survivors, 23 episodes of recurrent IPD were identified in 10 patients (1.7%). Meningitis was the most frequent form of recurrent IPD (10 episodes/4 children) followed by recurrent empyema (8 episodes/4 children). Three patients with recurrent empyema caused by the same pneumococcal clone ST306 were considered relapses and showed high bacterial load in their first episode. In contrast, all other episodes of recurrent IPD were considered reinfections. Overall, the rate of relapse of IPD was 0.5% and the rate of reinfection 1.2%. Five out of 7 patients with reinfection had an underlying risk factor: cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 3), chemotherapy treatment (n = 1) and a homozygous mutation in MyD88 gene (n = 1). No predisposing risk factors were found in the remainder. Conclusions recurrent IPD in children is a rare condition associated with an identifiable risk factor in case of reinfection in almost 80% of cases. In contrast, recurrent IPD with pleuropneumonia is usually a relapse of infection. PMID:25738983

  5. Sustained release of bactericidal concentrations of penicillin in the pleural space via an antibiotic-eluting pigtail catheter coated with electrospun nanofibers: results from in vivo and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yin-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Chuan; Wang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate intrapleural drug concentrations caused by poor penetration of systemic antibiotics into the pleural cavity is a major cause of treatment failure in empyema. Herein, we describe a novel antibiotic-eluting pigtail catheter coated with electrospun nanofibers used for the sustained release of bactericidal concentrations of penicillin in the pleural space. Methods Electrospun nanofibers prepared using polylactide-polyglycolide copolymer and penicillin G sodium dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol were used to coat the surface of an Fr6 pigtail catheter. The in vitro patterns of drug release were tested by placing the catheter in phosphate-buffered saline. In vivo studies were performed using rabbits treated with penicillin either intrapleurally (Group 1, 20 mg delivered through the catheter) or systemically (Group 2, intramuscular injection, 10 mg/kg). Penicillin concentrations in the serum and pleural fluid were then measured and compared. Results In vitro studies revealed a burst release of penicillin (10% of the total dose) occurring in the first 24 hours, followed by a sustained release in the subsequent 30 days. Intrapleural drug levels were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P<0.001). In the former, penicillin concentrations remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoint throughout the entire study period. In contrast, serum penicillin levels were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P<0.001). Notably, all Group 2 rabbits showed signs of systemic toxicity (paralytic ileus and weight loss). Conclusion We conclude that our antibiotic-eluting catheter may serve as a novel therapeutic option to treat empyema. PMID:26005344

  6. Co-Transcriptomes of Initial Interactions In Vitro between Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Human Pleural Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Claire J.; del Mar Cendra, Maria; Watson, Alastair; Auger, Jean-Philippe; Pandey, Anish; Tighe, Paddy; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) is a major causative organism of empyema, an inflammatory condition occurring in the pleural sac. In this study, we used human and Spn cDNA microarrays to characterize the transcriptional responses occurring during initial contact between Spn and a human pleural mesothelial cell line (PMC) in vitro. Using stringent filtering criteria, 42 and 23 Spn genes were up-and down-regulated respectively. In particular, genes encoding factors potentially involved in metabolic processes and Spn adherence to eukaryotic cells were up-regulated e.g. glnQ, glnA, aliA, psaB, lytB and nox. After Spn initial contact, 870 human genes were differentially regulated and the largest numbers of significant gene expression changes were found in canonical pathways for eukaryotic initiation factor 2 signaling (60 genes out of 171), oxidative phosphorylation (32/103), mitochondrial dysfunction (37/164), eIF4 and p70S6K signaling (28/142), mTOR signaling (27/182), NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (20/177), epithelial adherens junction remodeling (11/66) and ubiquitination (22/254). The cellular response appeared to be directed towards host cell survival and defense. Spn did not activate NF-kB or phosphorylate p38 MAPK or induce cytokine production from PMC. Moreover, Spn infection of TNF-α pre-stimulated PMC inhibited production of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by >50% (p<0.01). In summary, this descriptive study provides datasets and a platform for examining further the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of empyema. PMID:26566142

  7. A Rare Case of Acute Phlegmonous Esophagogastritis Complicated with Hypopharyngeal Abscess and Esophageal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan-Chun; Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Liao, Chiung-Ying; Hsueh, Ching; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Ho, Shang-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis complicated with hypopharyngeal abscess • esophageal perforation Symptoms: Fever • painful swallowing • chest pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Drainage • debridement • esophageal reconstruction Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis is a life-threatening disease that may be combined with serious complications. We present the classical radiological and endoscopic features and treatment strategy of a middle-aged female patient suffering from acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis complicated with hypopharyngeal abscess, esophageal perforation, mediastinitis, and empyema. Case Report: A 60-year-old Taiwanese female presented at our hospital due to fever, fatigue, painful swallowing, and vague chest pain for 5 days. She had a past history of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. On physical examination, general weakness, chest pain, odynophagia, and a fever up to 38.9°C were found. Positive laboratory findings included leukocytosis (leukocyte count of 14.58×103/μL, neutrophils 76.8%) and serum glucose 348 mg/dL (HbA1c 11.3%). A diagnosis of acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis with hypopharyngeal abscess was made based on typical computed tomography image features and clinical signs of infection. The patient received empirical antibiotic therapy initially; however, esophageal perforation with mediastinitis and empyema developed after admission. Emergency surgery with drainage and debridement was performed and antibiotics were administered. She was discharged in a stable condition on the 56th day of hospitalization. Six months later, a delayed esophageal reconstruction was performed. The patient has performed well for 9 months to date since the initial diagnosis. Conclusions: Acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis complicated with hypopharyngeal abscess and esophageal perforation is extremely rare, and requires immediate medical

  8. Iatrogenic gall bladder perforations in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an audit of 200 cases.

    PubMed

    Zubair, M; Habib, L; Mirza, M R; Channa, M A; Yousuf, M

    2010-07-01

    This study was done to evaluate the frequency of iatrogenic gall bladder perforation (IGBP) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy and to determine its association with gender, adhesions in right upper quadrant and types of gall bladder. This retrospective descriptive study included 200 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis at Jamal Noor Hospital and Hamdard University Hospital, Karachi from January 2007 to January 2009. Video recording of all 200 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were analyzed for the IGBP. The different factors; sex of the patient, type of gall bladder, presence of adhesions in the right upper quadrant, timing of perforation, site of perforation, cause of perforation and spillage of stones were recorded. Data was entered and analyzed on SPSS 15. Pearson Chi Square test was applied to check the significance of these factors in IGBP where applicable. In this study there were 173 females and 27 male patients. IGBP occurred in 51 patients (25.5%) and among them 40(23.12%) were females and 11(40.74%) males. Statistical analysis failed to prove male gender a significant factor in the IGBP (p=0.051). Spillage of stones occurred in 23 patients (11.5% in total study population). In 32(18.49%) patients with chronic calculus cholecystitis IGBP occured while in other cluster of 27 patients suffering from acute cholecystitis, empyema & mucocele, 19(70.37%) had IGBP. Hence the condition of gall bladder (acute cholecystitis, empyema and mucocele) was proved statistically a significant factor in IGBP (p=0.000). Adhesiolysis in right upper quadrant was required in 109 patients in whom 31 patients (28.44%) had IGBP while in 91 patients in whom no adhesiolysis was required, 20 patients (21.98%) had IGBP. Statistically no significant difference was present regarding this factor (p=0.296). In total of 51 patients of IGBP, fundus of gall bladder was the commonest site of perforation in 21(41.18%), followed by body of gall bladder in

  9. Active α-macroglobulin is a reservoir for urokinase after fibrinolytic therapy in rabbits with tetracycline-induced pleural injury and in human pleural fluids

    PubMed Central

    Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali; Karandashova, Sophia; Kurdowska, Anna K.; Idell, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Intrapleural processing of prourokinase (scuPA) in tetracycline (TCN)-induced pleural injury in rabbits was evaluated to better understand the mechanisms governing successful scuPA-based intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT), capable of clearing pleural adhesions in this model. Pleural fluid (PF) was withdrawn 0–80 min and 24 h after IPFT with scuPA (0–0.5 mg/kg), and activities of free urokinase (uPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and uPA complexed with α-macroglobulin (αM) were assessed. Similar analyses were performed using PFs from patients with empyema, parapneumonic, and malignant pleural effusions. The peak of uPA activity (5–40 min) reciprocally correlated with the dose of intrapleural scuPA. Endogenous active PAI-1 (10–20 nM) decreased the rate of intrapleural scuPA activation. The slow step of intrapleural inactivation of free uPA (t1/2β = 40 ± 10 min) was dose independent and 6.7-fold slower than in blood. Up to 260 ± 70 nM of αM/uPA formed in vivo [second order association rate (kass) = 580 ± 60 M−1·s−1]. αM/uPA and products of its degradation contributed to durable intrapleural plasminogen activation up to 24 h after IPFT. Active PAI-1, active α2M, and α2M/uPA found in empyema, pneumonia, and malignant PFs demonstrate the capacity to support similar mechanisms in humans. Intrapleural scuPA processing differs from that in the bloodstream and includes 1) dose-dependent control of scuPA activation by endogenous active PAI-1; 2) two-step inactivation of free uPA with simultaneous formation of αM/uPA; and 3) slow intrapleural degradation of αM/uPA releasing active free uPA. This mechanism offers potential clinically relevant advantages that may enhance the bioavailability of intrapleural scuPA and may mitigate the risk of bleeding complications. PMID:23997178

  10. Noncardiac thoracic surgery in Abidjan, from 1977 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Kendja, Flavien; Yangni-Angate, Hervé; Demine, Blaise; Ouédé, Raphaël; Kouacou, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Background To report and analyze noncardiac thoracic operations performed at the Cardiology Institute of Abidjan (Institut de Cardiologie d’Abidjan) from 1977 to 2015. Methods This is a retrospective and descriptive study covering 39 years, from 1977 to 2015. This study period was divided into three periods of 13 years each: P1 from 1977 to 1989, P2 from 1990 to 2002 and P3 from 2003 to 2015. Medical records of 2014 operated patients were analyzed: 414 patients for P1, 464 patients for P2, 1,136 patients for P3. The records destroyed in a fire in 1997 were not included in the study. The age, sex, pathologies, types of operations, post-operative complications and mortality were analyzed with usual statistical tests. Results The average age varied from 35 years in P1 to 31.6 years in P3. Men predominate in all periods. Distribution of important groups of pathologies observed varies significantly over the three periods; In particular, we note an increase in trauma cases (tripling between P1 and P2, 140% between P2 and P3), and a decrease in tumors percentages, and infections and pulmonary sequelae of tuberculosis. Surgical management of thoracic trauma has increased (56.9% in P3) followed by the pleural surgery (21.3%) and pulmonary resections (13.9%). Persistent air leak >7 days was the predominant complication over the three periods. Postoperative empyema increased in P3 (14.7%). Close chest drainage-irrigation is the most frequent procedure performed to sterilize a major complication like postoperative empyema without bronchopleural fistula. Overall mortality decreased from 5.3% in P1 to 3.4% in P3. Conclusions Noncardiac thoracic surgery operations still concern infections, pulmonary sequelae of tuberculosis, thoracic tumors and many more thoracic trauma caused by current armed conflicts and terrorist attacks. But access to thoracic surgical care remains difficult for our population secondary to low economic status, and lack of a health insurance system

  11. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruolin; Wang, Junli; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1) patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2) patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01) at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%); a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%); positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

  12. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  13. [Risk factors of suppurative complications in case of thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Danielian, Sh N; Abakumov, M M; Vil'k, A P; Saprin, A A; Tatarinova, E V

    2015-01-01

    It was performed retrospective analysis of 463 cases of suppurative thoracic complications after injury (232) and closed thoracic trauma (231) for 20-year period. Incidence of purulent complications was 3.2% and 1.6% in case of injury and closed thoracic trauma respectively including pleural empyema in 1.5 and 1.3%, pulmonary abscess in 0.3 and 0.4%, mediastinitis in 0.35 and 0.12%, pericarditis in 1.5 and 0.26%, osteomyelitis in 0.4 and 0.18% respectively. Factors preceding suppurative complications in case of injuries and closed trauma have been considered as predictors. Multivariant regression analysis established significant risk factors of suppurative thoracic complications. Clotted hemothorax, mediastinal hemorrhage, heart injury, late appeal for medical assistance and mechanical ventilation over 5 days were identified irrespective of character of trauma. In case of thoracic injury there were damage of osteochondrous frame, hollow thoracic and abdominal organs, gunshot wound of lung, delirium and injuries severity over 20 scores according to ISS scale. Pulmonary bleeding, sternal fracture and Glasgow Coma Scale rate<12 scores were identified as risk factors in case of closed trauma.

  14. Successful Treatment of Recurrent Pulmonary Mucormycosis in a Renal Transplant Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Morgan S.; Lobo, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Background. We describe the unusual case of a recently transplanted cadaveric renal transplant recipient who presented with recurrent pulmonary mucormycosis. Case Report. An 18-year-old man with end stage renal disease secondary to congenital renal agenesis status after cadaveric kidney transplant 4 months before presented with acute onset of fever, hemoptysis, and back pain. The patient underwent an emergent left lower lobectomy due to the critical nature of his illness. He was also treated with amphotericin with resolution of his symptoms. One week later, he had evidence of recurrent disease on imaging with a surgical site infection. He underwent reexploration with evacuation of an empyema and debridement of a surgical site infection. He was continued on IV antifungal therapy with isavuconazonium and amphotericin. Radiographic clearance of disease with three months of treatment was apparent with no evidence of recurrence at seven-month follow-up. Discussion. Opportunistic infections in solid organ transplant patients represent a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Most patients are treated with prophylactic anti-infective agents. However, rare infections such as pulmonary mucormycosis remain a risk. The transplant physician must be aware of these uncommon infections and their treatment strategies, including the management of uncommon recurrent disease. PMID:28386509

  15. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6–12 months of oral therapy. PMID:25870213

  16. Identification and clinical significance of Helcococcus species, with description of Helcococcus seattlensis sp. nov. from a patient with urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Clarridge, Jill E

    2014-03-01

    Helcococcus spp. are Gram-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic cocci that are associated with wound and prosthetic joint infections as well bacteremia and empyema. Five Helcococcus spp. strains were isolated from our patient population, including 2 strains of Helcococcus kunzii from trauma-associated wounds, 2 Helcococcus sueciensis strains from blood and abscess, and a novel Helcococcus spp. strain from blood associated with urosepsis. Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, we propose that the unknown bacterium be classified as Helcococcus seattlensis sp. nov. We found that all 5 tested Helcococcus strains grew as satellite colonies around Staphylococcus aureus and, interestingly, both H. kunzii strains were isolated together with S. aureus. In addition to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, conventional methods for leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR) testing can be cost-effective and efficient for differentiation of Helcococcus spp. from Abiotrophia and Granulicatella species. Using nonstandard methods, we found that all tested Helcococcus spp. had high MICs of >4/76 μg/ml for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, an antibiotic commonly used to treat urinary tract infections. High MICs for erythromycin, azithromycin, and clindamycin, and intermediate to high MICs for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and gentamicin were also observed among the Helcococcus strains.

  17. Surgery and pleuro-pulmonary tuberculosis: a scientific literature review

    PubMed Central

    Subotic, Dragan; Yablonskiy, Piotr; Sulis, Giorgia; Cordos, Ioan; Petrov, Danail; Centis, Rosella; D’Ambrosio, Lia; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health concern, mostly affecting resource-constrained settings and marginalized populations. The fight against the disease is hindered by the growing emergence of drug-resistant forms whose management can be rather challenging. Surgery may play an important role to support diagnosis and treatment of the most complex cases and improve their therapeutic outcome. We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature based on relevant keywords through PubMed database. Papers in English and Russian were included. The search was focused on five main areas of intervention as follows: (I) diagnosis of complicated cases; (II) elimination of contagious persisting cavities, despite appropriate chemotherapy; (III) treatment of destroyed lung; (V) resection of tuberculomas; (VI) treatment of tuberculous pleural empyema. Although specific practical guidelines concerning surgical indications and approaches are currently unavailable, a summary of the evidence emerged from the scientific literature was elaborated to help the clinician in the management of severely compromised TB patients. The decision to proceed to surgery is usually individualized and a careful assessment of the patient’s risk profile is always recommended before performing any procedure in addition to appropriate chemotherapy. PMID:27499980

  18. Esophageal rupture caused by explosion of an automobile tire tube: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There have been no reports in the literature of esophageal rupture in adults resulting from an explosion of an automobile tire. We report the first case of just such an occurrence after an individual bit into a tire, causing it to explode in his mouth. Case presentation A 47-year-old Han Chinese man presented with massive hemorrhage in his left eye after he accidentally bit an automobile tire tube which burst into his mouth. He was diagnosed with esophageal rupture based on a chest computed tomography scan and barium swallow examination. Drainage of empyema (right chest), removal of thoracic esophagus, exposure of cervical esophagus, cardiac ligation and gastrostomy were performed respectively. After that, esophagogastrostomy was performed. Conclusions Successful anastomosis was obtained at the neck with no postoperative complications 3 months after the surgery. The patient was discharged with satisfactory outcomes. We present this case report to bring attention to esophageal rupture in adults during the explosion of an automobile tire tube in the mouth. PMID:23972148

  19. Necrotizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Elitsa V; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia refers to the development of necrosis, liquefication, and cavitation of the lung parenchyma from an infectious pathogen. Nearly 4% of all community-acquired pneumonias are necrotizing, although studies retrospectively evaluating the incidence have found it to be increasing during the past 20 years. Common presenting symptoms include fever, tachypnea, and cough, and most of those afflicted also develop complications such as parapneumonic effusions, empyemas, or bronchopleural fistulae. When compared to age-matched controls with parapneumonic effusions or severe pneumonias without a necrotizing component, those with necrotizing pneumonia have been shown to have more elevated white blood cell counts and inflammatory markers that take longer to normalize, a longer duration of symptoms despite initiation of therapy, and a longer hospital stay. Despite the high incidence of complications during the acute phase of illness, the overall prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia has been shown to be promising, with nearly all children surviving the illness. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e65-e68.].

  20. "To afford the wounded speedy assistance": Dominique Jean Larrey and Napoleon.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Lainas, Panagiotis; Zoras, Odyseas; Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2006-08-01

    Dominique Jean Larrey (1766-1842) has been described as the father of modern military surgery and is considered even today as the model military surgeon. He developed a plan of rapid evacuation of wounded soldiers from the battlefield during combat, using flexible medical units which he named ambulances volantes ("flying ambulances"). He won the admiration of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was amazed by the results of Larrey's sanitary system. Larrey spent almost 18 years with Napoleon, accompanying him in 25 campaigns, 60 battles, and more than 400 engagements. Napoleon's enormous military success was due not only to his strategy and skill but also to the medical services provided by Larrey. The surgeon became a master of wound management and limb amputation. In his vivid battlefield journals, Larrey documented the course of tetanus, the pathophysiology of cold injury, the effective control of hemorrhage, the drainage of empyema and hemothorax, the aspiration of pericardial effusion or hemopericardium, and the packing of sucking chest wounds. Larrey established a categorical rule for the triage of war casualties, treating the wounded according to the observed gravity of their injuries and the urgency for medical care, regardless of their rank or nationality.

  1. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  2. Stenting of the Cystic Duct in Benign Disease: A Definitive Treatment for the Elderly and Unwell

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, N.; Goode, S. D.; Peck, R. J. Lee, F.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThere have been few case reports describing cystic duct stent insertion in the management of acute cholecystitis secondary to benign disease with no case series published to date. We present our series demonstrating the role of cystic duct stents in managing benign gallbladder disease in those patients unfit for surgery.Materials and MethodsThirty three patients unfit for surgery in our institution underwent cystic duct stent insertion for the management of acute cholecystitis in the period June 2008 to June 2013. Patients underwent a mixture of transperitoneal and transhepatic gallbladder puncture. The cystic duct was cannulated with a hydrophilic guidewire which was subsequently passed through the common bile duct and into the duodenum. An 8Fr 12-cm double-pigtail stent was placed with the distal end lying within the duodenum and the proximal end within the gallbladder.ResultsTen patients presented with gallbladder perforation, 21 patients with acute cholecystitis, 1 with acute cholangitis and 1 with necrotising pancreatitis. The technical success rate was 91 %. We experienced a 13 % complication rate with 3 % mortality rate at 30 days.ConclusionCystic duct stent insertion can be successfully used to manage acute cholecystitis, gallbladder empyema or gallbladder perforations in those unfit for surgery and should be considered alongside external gallbladder drainage as a definitive mid-term treatment option.

  3. A 3-Year-Old Girl with Recurrent Infections and Autoimmunity due to a STAT1 Gain-of-Function Mutation: The Expanding Clinical Presentation of Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Cachay Rojas, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    We report a 3-year-old Peruvian girl, born to non-consanguineous parents. At the age of 8 months, she had a severe pneumonia complicated with empyema that required thoracic drainage and mechanical ventilation. Although no microorganisms were isolated, the patient recovered with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Since that date, she has presented multiple episodes of pneumonia and recurrent episodes of bronchospasm. At 1 year 5 months of age, the patient began with recurrent episodes of oropharyngeal, vaginal, and skin candidiasis, which improved transiently after using oral azole drugs. At 2.5 years of age, she was admitted with lupus-like syndrome, including serositis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and positive antinuclear (1:80) and dsDNA (1:10) autoantibodies. Available immunologic testing was not contributory. Imaging studies revealed bilateral ethmoidal sinusitis and mild hepatomegaly. Bone marrow analysis did not showed evidence of leukemia or myelodysplasia, while renal biopsy concluded mild mesangial proliferation. Genetic studies revealed a pathogenic heterozygous signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 gain-of-function mutation (WT/P293L). The clinical status and lung function of the patient has worsened progressively. She has not achieved an optimal response to therapy, including high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, GM-CSF, prophylactic antibiotics and antifungal drugs, so we plan to perform hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:28367431

  4. Meningitis Caused by Salmonella Newport in a Five-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    De Malet, Ana; Ingerto, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Newport is a Gram-negative bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteria family and the nontyphi Salmonella (NTS), usually related to gastroenteritis. Main difference between NTS and Salmonella typhi is that the last one evolves to an invasive disease easier than NTS. These can progress to bacteremias in around 5% of cases and secondary focuses can appear occasionally, as in meningitis. An infection of the central nervous system is uncommon, considering its incidence in 0.6–8% of the cases; most of them are described in developing countries and mainly in childhood, especially neonates. Bacterial meningitis by NTS mostly affects immunosuppressed people in Europe. Prognosis is adverse, with a 50% mortality rate, mainly due to complications of infection: hydrocephalus, ventriculitis, abscesses, subdural empyema, or stroke. Choice antibiotic treatments are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, or ceftazidime. The aim of this paper is to present a case of meningitis caused by Salmonella Newport diagnosed in a five-year-old girl living in a rural area of the province of Ourense (Spain), with favorable evolution and without neurological disorders. PMID:28058121

  5. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in a 17-year old boy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guzmán, C.; Barrera-Rodríguez, R.; Portilla-Segura, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare, invasive and often fatal neoplasm that develops in the thin layer of tissue surrounding the lungs known as the pleura. Although rare, mesotheliomas do occur in the young; their characteristics are distinct from those of older patients. Case presentation This is a case report of a 17-year-old boy who had moderate dyspnea, cough, right-sided pleuritic chest pain, fever, headache and no weight loss. Physical examination showed a right pleural effusion and chest roentgenograms revealed a homogenous opacity on lower right hemithorax. Biochemical analysis of pleural fluid showed hemorrhagic/turbid effusion compatible with exudate. It was initially treated as an empyema. The pleural fluid culture was negative. Adenosine deaminase level was 34.3 U/L (admission) and 19.02 U/L (two weeks after). Pleural fluid smear and culture for Mtb were negative. During the open pleural biopsy, thickened pleura and multiple pale yellow nodules in the lung were observed. The histopathological report was compatible with malignant pleural mesothelioma. With this diagnosis, a chemotherapy regimen with cisplatin was initiated. After two cycles, the patient had no clinical and radiological improvement. The patient is currently under regular follow up. Conclusion MPM is rare in young adults and its clinical presentation makes it different from mesothelioma in elderly patients, so it will be necessary to identify the new risk factors that can identify these patients. PMID:27222787

  6. Whole body MRI: Improved Lesion Detection and Characterization With Diffusion Weighted Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Attariwala, Rajpaul; Picker, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an established functional imaging technique that interrogates the delicate balance of water movement at the cellular level. Technological advances enable this technique to be applied to whole-body MRI. Theory, b-value selection, common artifacts and target to background for optimized viewing will be reviewed for applications in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Whole-body imaging with DWI allows novel applications of MRI to aid in evaluation of conditions such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and skeletal metastases, while the quantitative nature of this technique permits evaluation of response to therapy. Persisting signal at high b-values from restricted hypercellular tissue and viscous fluid also permits applications of DWI beyond oncologic imaging. DWI, when used in conjunction with routine imaging, can assist in detecting hemorrhagic degradation products, infection/abscess, and inflammation in colitis, while aiding with discrimination of free fluid and empyema, while limiting the need for intravenous contrast. DWI in conjunction with routine anatomic images provides a platform to improve lesion detection and characterization with findings rivaling other combined anatomic and functional imaging techniques, with the added benefit of no ionizing radiation. PMID:23960006

  7. Chemical and immunological features of pleural effusions: comparison between rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, T; Klockars, M; Hellström, P E

    1982-01-01

    The value of determination of pleural fluid glucose, pH, lactic dehydrogenase, IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, anti-IgG antibody, and hydroxyproline in distinguishing between pleural effusions caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and those resulting from other diseases was studied. The series comprised seven patients with RA and 115 patients with other diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, tuberculosis, malignant disease, empyema, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and nonspecific pleural effusion. The low glucose concentration, the low pH and the low C4 level in rheumatoid pleural effusion were the most valuable diagnostic findings. The presence of anti-IgG antibody in pleural fluid was not specific for RA. The concentration of hydroxyproline in pleural fluid and the pleural fluid-to-plasma hydroxyproline ratio were significantly higher in RA than in tuberculosis and malignant disease. The results support the view that local metabolic and immunological phenomena as well as a high turnover of collagen occur in the pleural cavity in RA. PMID:6981226

  8. Comparison of subgaleal and subdural closed drainage system in the surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Sukru; Borklu, Resul Emin; Kucuk, Ahmet; Ulutabanca, Halil; Selcuklu, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One or two burr-hole craniostomies with subgaleal or subdural drainage system and irrigation are the most common methods for surgical treatment of CSDH. The aim of this study is to compare the advantages or disadvantages of these techniques used for CSDH. METHODS: Seventy patients were treated by burr-hole subdural drainage or subgaleal drainage system with irrigation. Our patients were classified into two groups according to the operative procedure as follows: Group I, one or two burr-hole craniostomy with subgaleal closed system drainage and irrigation (n=36), Group II, one or two burr-hole craniostomies with subdural closed drainage system and irrigation (n=38). We compared male and female ratios, complication rates, and age distribution between groups. RESULTS: There was no remarkable difference between recurrence rates of the two groups. Recurrence rate was 6.25% in Group I and 7.8% in Group II. Subdural empyema occurred in one of the patients in Group II. Symptomatic pneumocephalus did not develop in patients. Four patients were reoperated for recurrence at an average of 12–20 days after the operation with the same methods. CONCLUSION: Both of the techniques have a higher cure rate and a lower risk of recurrence. However, subgaleal drainage system is relatively less invasive, safe, and technically easy. So it is applicable for aged and higher risk patients. PMID:28058351

  9. [Osteoarthritis in the neonate. Radiologic diagnosis and follow-up observations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weigel, W; Hayek, W H; Bens, G

    1979-01-01

    A fatally ending index case of septic osteoarthritis that was diagnosed retrospectively initiated this report. This patient had severe, asymmetrically distributed metaphyseal growth disturbances at many long bones. In order to determine the features of early radiologic diagnosis we report the findings of 7 further patients with neonatal septic osteoarthritis with clinical and radiological follow-up. The most important observation for early radiologic diagnosis of osteoarthritis is the displacement of fat layers along the metaphysis. Other findings of the soft tissues have the same diagnostic value as bone destruction and subperiosteal new bone formation found one to three weeks later on roentgenfilms. Detecting early signs of osteoarthritis helps in localizing the focus for bacteriologic diagnosis, which is said to be more successful than blood cultures. Diagnosing a joint empyema initiates surgical intervention for pressure relief in order to avoid necrosis of the epiphysis as seen in the femoral head in septic arthritis of the hip joint. Early diagnosis and treatment prior to destruction of the growing cartilage is necessary to avoid growth disturbances and length discrepancies of long bones. In cases of sepsis a so called "babygram" and a repeat examination 10 to 14 days later is mandatory.

  10. Pleuropulmonary aspergilloma: clinical spectrum and results of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Massard, G; Roeslin, N; Wihlm, J M; Dumont, P; Witz, J P; Morand, G

    1992-12-01

    From 1974 to 1991, 77 patients were admitted for pulmonary (55), pleural (16), or bronchial (6) aspergilloma. About 50% were asymptomatic. Sixty-three underwent operation. Pulmonary aspergillomas were operated on for therapeutic need in 26 and on principle in 18; the procedures were 28 lobar or segmental resections, 10 thoracoplasties, and 5 pleuropneumonectomies (1 patient had exploration only). Pleural aspergillosis was treated by operation on principle in 5 and for therapeutic need in 8 patients; 10 thoracoplasties, 1 attempt at pleuropneumonectomy, and 2 decortications were performed. All six bronchial lesions were operated on as a rule. Overall postoperative mortality was 9.5%. Major complications were bleeding (n = 37), pleural space problems (n = 24), respiratory failure (n = 6), and postpneumonectomy empyema (n = 4). All patients with pleural disease experienced complications. The outcome was better after lobar or segmental resection than after thoracoplasty (mortality, 6% versus 15%). Asymptomatic and nonsequellary pulmonary or bronchial aspergilloma also had an improved outcome. We conclude that operation is at low risk in pulmonary or bronchial locations in asymptomatic patients and in the absence of sequellae; the risk is high in symptomatic patients for whom operation is the only definite treatment. Pleuropneumonectomy should be avoided. Only symptomatic pleural aspergilloma should be operated on.

  11. Advances in pleural disease management including updated procedural coding.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andrew R; Sterman, Daniel H

    2014-08-01

    Over 1.5 million pleural effusions occur in the United States every year as a consequence of a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and malignant conditions. Although rarely fatal in isolation, pleural effusions are often a marker of a serious underlying medical condition and contribute to significant patient morbidity, quality-of-life reduction, and mortality. Pleural effusion management centers on pleural fluid drainage to relieve symptoms and to investigate pleural fluid accumulation etiology. Many recent studies have demonstrated important advances in pleural disease management approaches for a variety of pleural fluid etiologies, including malignant pleural effusion, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and chest tube size. The last decade has seen greater implementation of real-time imaging assistance for pleural effusion management and increasing use of smaller bore percutaneous chest tubes. This article will briefly review recent pleural effusion management literature and update the latest changes in common procedural terminology billing codes as reflected in the changing landscape of imaging use and percutaneous approaches to pleural disease management.

  12. Fatal endocarditis with methicilin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus and major complications: rhabdomyolysis, pericarditis, and intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Anca Meda; Azamfirei, Leonard; Szalman, Krisztina; Szekely, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over the last decades Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has become the dominant etiology of native valve infective endocarditis, with the community-acquired methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA) strains being the prevailing type. Case: We report here a case of extremely severe CA-MSSA aortic valve acute endocarditis associated with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in a previously healthy man and include a literature review. The patient developed severe and rare complications (purpura, purulent pericarditis, intracerebral hematoma, and rhabdomyolysis) through systemic embolism; they required drainage of pericardial empyema and cerebral hematoma, the latter eventually caused a fatal outcome. The strains recovered from sequential blood culture sets and pericardial fluid were MSSA negative for genes encoding for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST)-1 and Panton–Valentine leukocidin. C, G, and I enterotoxin genes were detected. Conclusions: This case with unusually severe evolution underlines the limited ability of vancomycin to control some MSSA infections, possibly due to potential involvement of SA virulence factors, hence the importance of clinical vigilance for community SAB cases. PMID:27741135

  13. Secondary brain abscess following simple renal cyst infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common causative bacteria of neonatal meningitis, but hematogenous intracranial E. coli infection is rare in adults. Moreover, intracranial abscess formation owing to E. coli, including brain abscesses and subdural empyema formation, is extremely rare. We herein present a case involving a patient with a brain abscess owing to E. coli following a simple renal cyst infection. A review of the literature is also presented. Case presentation A 77-year-old Japanese woman with a history of polymyalgia rheumatica was admitted to our hospital because of persistent fever, right flank pain, and pyuria. Intravenous antibiotics were administered; however, her level of consciousness deteriorated 6 days after admission. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a brain abscess in the left occipital lobe and pyogenic ventriculitis. Enhanced abdominal computed tomography revealed a right renal cyst with heterogeneous content. Culture of urine, blood, and aspirated pus from the infected cyst revealed E. coli with identical antibiotic sensitivity in all sites, suggesting that the cyst infection and subsequent bacteremia might have caused the brain abscess. The patient recovered after a 6-week course of meropenem. Conclusion The prognosis of patients with E. coli-associated intracranial abscess is usually poor. Advanced age and immunosuppression may be potent risk factors for intracranial abscess formation owing to the hematogenous spread of E. coli. PMID:24934996

  14. Laser plasmapheresis for treatment of pulmonary and pleural suppurative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopov, A. L.; Bely, K. P.; Berezin, Yu. D.; Orlov, S. V.

    1996-04-01

    Plasmapheresis in pulmonology is one of the leading methods of extracorporeal detoxification of patients with purulent lung and pleura diseases. However this method causes a decrease in patients' leukocyte level and humoral immunity indices. The medico-biological research conducted at the State Scientific Center of Pulmonology demonstrated that a combination of plasmapheresis with additional irradiation of the patients' reinfused erythrocyte mass with low intensive He-Ne laser light with the wavelength of 0.63 mkm considerably reduces the probability of these complications. It may be due to the fact that laser irradiation of autologous erythrocytes induces local and general stimulation, favoring in this way the inflammatory process involution. The suggested method of plasmapheresis was used in the process of treatment of 76 patients with lung abscess, empyema, purulent mediastinitis, sepsis. The essence of the method consists in irradiating with He-Ne laser the last portion of the erythrocyte mass (130 - 170 ml), diluted with saline, during its reinfusion in the course of a routine plasmapheresis. The positive impact of practical application of the above method allows to characterize it as highly effective for treatment of purulent diseases in pulmonology.

  15. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy.

  16. A Severe Case of Rat Lungworm Disease in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old man living on the island of Hawai‘i developed a life threatening case of eosinophilic meningitis caused by infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm disease: RLWD). He was comatose for 3 months, incurring brain and nerve damage sufficiently extensive that he was not expected to recover. The case was complicated by secondary infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and pneumonia, which resulted in an empyema requiring a thoracoscopy and decortication. He was treated with prednisone, mebendozal, and pain medication for RLWD, and antibiotics and antifungal medications for the secondary infections. The administration of herbal supplements was requested by the family and approved, and these were administered through a gastric tube. Less than a month after being declared in a persistent vegetative state the man was able to talk, eat, and had regained some muscle functions. After release from the hospital he continued the use of supplements and received treatments of intravenous vitamin therapy. Four years after onset of the illness he is able to ride a bicycle, is a part time student, plays guitar, and is fluent in two foreign languages. RLWD is an emerging tropical disease of growing importance in Hawai‘i. PMID:23900708

  17. [DR ALEKSANDAR DORŠNER THE FIRST HOSPITAL OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIST IN SPLIT AND DALMATIA].

    PubMed

    Ivanišević, Petar; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Cikojević, Draško; Doršner, Katarina; Ivanišević, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Dr Aleksandar Doršner (Trebinje, 1892 - Lima, 1967) was the first hospital otorhinolaryngologist in Split and Dalmatia. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine in Prague in 1919, and specialized otorhinolaryngology in Graz and Vienna. He led and organized otorhinolaryngological service in Split Hospital from 1923 to 1934, and he also had a private practice. Temporarily he also worked outside Split in Dalmatian hinterland and in Šibenik, Zadar and Dubrovnik. Most frequently he performed the following otorhinolaryngological operations: tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies and operations of purulent middle ear inflammations with mastoiditis, nasal polyps, deviated nasal septum, maxillary sinus empyema and otorhinolaryngological trauma. In 1928 he became a member of Otorhinolaryngological section of Croatian Medical Chamber. He participated in the work of the first otorhinolaryngological congress of the former Yugoslavia in 1931, taken place in Zagreb. From 1928 he was a member of Oto-Neuro-Ophthalmological Society. From 1933 to 1937 he was a vice-president of the main board of Free Organization of Dalmatian Physicians in Split. In 1938 he left Split permanently and continued living with his family in Lima (Peru) where he died in 1967. He was an erudite. He lived for his profession which he liked very much and dedicated his life to. He is one of the most meritorious doctors in Split medical history, whom otorhinolaryngology service in Split Hospital started with.

  18. [Foreign Body in Esophagus].

    PubMed

    Domeki, Yasushi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    An esophageal foreign body is the term for a foreign body in the esophagus. The 2 age groups most prone to this condition are children age 9 and under (and especially toddlers age 4 and under) and elderly individuals age 70 and over. A foreign body often lodges where the esophagus is most constricted. In toddlers, the foreign body is often currency or coins or a toy. In adults, the body is often a piece of fish, dentures, a piece of meat, a pin or needle, or a drug in its blister pack packaging. In children, an esophageal foreign body is treated by fluoroscopically guided removal of the body with a balloon catheter or magnetic catheter or removal of the body via endoscopy or direct esophagoscopy under general anesthesia. In adults, the best choice for treating an esophageal foreign body is removing the body with an endoscope but there are instances where surgery is performed because the body is hard to remove endoscopically, a puncture has occurred, or empyema or mediastinitis has developed. This paper reviews the diagnosis and treatment of an esophageal foreign body.

  19. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  20. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-01-29

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  1. Streptococcus intermedius Causing Necrotizing Pneumonia in an Immune Competent Female: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hannoodi, Faris; Ali, Israa; Sabbagh, Hussam; Kumar, Sarwan

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian female treated for necrotizing Streptococcus intermedius pneumonia and review available literature of similar cases. Our patient presented with respiratory failure and required hospitalization and treatment in the intensive care unit. Moreover, she required surgical drainage of right lung empyema as well as decortication and resection. The review of literature revealed three cases of S. intermedius pneumonia, one of which was a mortality. Comparison of the published cases showed a highly varied prehospital course and radiological presentations, with a symptomatic phase ranging from 10 days to five months. Radiological findings varied from an isolated pleural effusion to systemic disease with the presence of brain abscesses. Immunocompetence appears to correlate well with the overall prognosis. In addition, smoking appears to be an important risk factor for S. intermedius pneumonia. In 2 (50%) of cases, pleural fluid analysis identified S. intermedius. In contrast, no organism was found in our patient, necessitating the acquisition of lung tissue sample for the diagnosis. In conclusion, both medical and surgical management are necessary for effective treatment of S. intermedius pneumonia. The outcome of treatment is good in immunocompetent individuals.

  2. Streptococcus intermedius Causing Necrotizing Pneumonia in an Immune Competent Female: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Israa; Sabbagh, Hussam; Kumar, Sarwan

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian female treated for necrotizing Streptococcus intermedius pneumonia and review available literature of similar cases. Our patient presented with respiratory failure and required hospitalization and treatment in the intensive care unit. Moreover, she required surgical drainage of right lung empyema as well as decortication and resection. The review of literature revealed three cases of S. intermedius pneumonia, one of which was a mortality. Comparison of the published cases showed a highly varied prehospital course and radiological presentations, with a symptomatic phase ranging from 10 days to five months. Radiological findings varied from an isolated pleural effusion to systemic disease with the presence of brain abscesses. Immunocompetence appears to correlate well with the overall prognosis. In addition, smoking appears to be an important risk factor for S. intermedius pneumonia. In 2 (50%) of cases, pleural fluid analysis identified S. intermedius. In contrast, no organism was found in our patient, necessitating the acquisition of lung tissue sample for the diagnosis. In conclusion, both medical and surgical management are necessary for effective treatment of S. intermedius pneumonia. The outcome of treatment is good in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:27891283

  3. A new radiologic appearance of pulmonary thromboembolism: multiloculated pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Levent; Fýndýk, Serhat; Uzun, Oğz; Atýcý, Atilla G; Light, Richard W

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the clinical course and response to treatment of five patients who developed loculated pleural effusions as complications of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The clinical charts of five patients who had loculated pleural effusions in the course of their PTE were reviewed, with special attention paid to the duration of symptoms before diagnosis, the pleural fluid analysis findings, and the response of the loculations to anticoagulant therapy. In a tertiary care academic medical center, the five patients described in the present study had multiple locules of pleural fluid seen on chest radiographs and thoracic CT scans. In all cases, the diagnosis of PTE had been delayed for at least 2 weeks after symptoms developed. The loculated pleural fluid had led to the mistaken diagnosis of empyema in three cases. The pleural fluid in all cases was exudative, with a predominance of lymphocytes. With anticoagulant therapy, the loculations largely disappeared within the first few days of therapy. Although most pleural effusions secondary to PTE are relatively small and free-flowing, this study demonstrates that PTE can lead to loculated pleural effusions. The loculations occurred in patients who had been symptomatic from their PTE for > 2 weeks. In each instance, the pleural fluid was a lymphocytic exudate. The effusions rapidly resolved with the institution of anticoagulant therapy. PTE should be included in the differential diagnosis of a loculated pleural effusion, particularly if the pleural fluid contains predominantly lymphocytes.

  4. Systemic Candidiasis, A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, James M.; Remington, Jack S.

    1972-01-01

    The serious and increasing problem of deep-seated Candida infection and the difficulties encountered in diagnosis of this entity prompted review of all well-documented cases of systemic candidiasis in a 39-month period at Stanford Medical Center. In only 19 of the 40. cases (47.5 percent) was the diagnosis suspected premortem; in 15 (37.5 percent) of these, the diagnosis was established. Thirty-three (82.5 percent) of the 40 patients died, and in 12 (39.4 percent) of them Candida infection was considered to be the primary cause of death or a major contributing factor. The seven survivors were treated either by specific chemotherapy or drainage of abscesses and empyema cavities. When the data were assessed in relation to underlying diseases and other possible predisposing factors, surgery was implicated in 50 percent of the total. In a study to define the prevalence of Candida in the saliva of patients with severe underlying illnesses receiving antibiotics or immunosuppressive therapy at the Stanford Medical Center, a significantly higher prevalence was noted in the multiple therapeutic modality group than in controls. In a review of reported data on methods for serological diagnosis of systemic candidiasis, only the precipitin and agglutinin methods appear promising. PMID:5031746

  5. [Computed tomography in the differential diagnosis of disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis and fibrosing alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Mursalova, G Kh

    2007-01-01

    The differential diagnostic signs of disseminated pulmonary processes were defined by computed tomography. A hundred and sixty-seven patients, including 117 (70%) with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (DPT) and 50 (30%) with alveolitis, were examined. Their mean age was 32.3 +/- 5.1 years; the history of disease averaged 4.6 +/- 1.2 years. Acute, subacute, and chronic DPT was observed in 17 (14.5%), 32 (27.3%), and 68 (58.1%) patients, respectively. Idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis (IFA) was seen in 38 patients; 12 patients had exogenous allergic alveolitis (EAA). IFA and EAA were chronic. Patients with DPT had most commonly signs, such as focal masses (45.3%), intra- and interlobular septal thickening (35%), lung tissue reticulation (35%), centrilobular empyema (29%), only focal masses being detected in its acute form, and other signs being more pronounced in its subacute and particularly chronic form. Glassy dark patches, the opal glass syndrome, were a common sign in patients with alveolitis. Septal thickening, lung tissue meshwork, and centrilobular emphysema were encountered only in patients with IDA and small-nodular focal masses and bronchial wall thickening were present in those with EAA.

  6. [Acute acalculous cholecystitis. Results of surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    de la Garza Villaseñor, L

    1993-01-01

    During an 11 year period, 47 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were operated on. Two to one male/female ratio was observed with a mean age of 55 age of 55 years. No one had a past history of biliary tract pathology but 70 per cent of the patients had risk factors, mainly diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular and collagenous diseases, some different of those reported in the world literature (sepsis, trauma, non biliary tract surgery, etc.). The ultrasound was the best diagnostic tool. Open cholecystectomy was performed in all patients and some sort of local complication was found in 85 per cent of patients (empyema, gangrene or perforation) in spite of the surgical procedure was done on emergency or early elective basis, a 31 per cent operative mortality rate was found and a 10.6% Operative mortality rates was observed. The bacterial cultures showed gram negative and anaerobic flora. This report shows that an early diagnosis and surgical treatment keeps a low morbidity and mortality rates but the gallbladder late complications have a high rates.

  7. Lung abscess due to non-tuberculous, non-Mycobacterium fortuitum in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Glatstein, Miguel; Scolnik, Dennis; Bensira, Liat; Domany, Keren Armoni; Shah, Mansi; Vala, Snehal

    2012-10-01

    Although Mycobacterium fortuitum (MF) is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium that rarely causes disease, there are reported cases of pneumonia, lung abscess, and empyema in subjects with predisposing lung disease. We report a neonate, without predisposing disease or risk factors, who manifested pneumonia and lung abscess. The patient was initially treated with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and gentamycin, and subsequently with piperazilin, tazobactam, and vancomycin when there was no improvement. Pleural nodules were detected on computed tomography, and microbiology revealed MF in the absence of other pathogens and a week later the organism was identified in culture as MF, confirmed on four separate samples. The MF was sensitive to amikacin and clarithromycin and the patient was continued on oral clarithromycin for two more weeks until full recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MF abscess in a neonate. MF should be sought in similar patients, especially when microbiology fails to detect the usual pathogens, and when the clinical picture is unclear.

  8. An unusual case of delayed-type hypersensitivity to ceftriaxone and meropenem.

    PubMed

    Dias de Castro, E; Leblanc, A; Sarmento, A; Cernadas, J R

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a low cross-reactivity between β-lactam antibiotics and carbapenems in IgE-mediated reactions. There are no studies on cross-reactivity of meropenem in patients with non-immediate hypersensitivity to cephalosporins. We describe a case of a 13-year-old male, admitted in Neurosurgery with a severe extradural empyema complicating frontal sinusitis, submitted to an emergent bifrontal craniotomy. A generalized maculopapular exanthema, fever and malaise, appeared by the 7th day of meningeal doses of ceftriaxone, clindamycin and vancomycin. Those were replaced by meropenem, with posterior worsening of the reaction and mucosal involvement. A new scheme with amikacin, metronidazole and linezolid was done with improvement. Skin prick, intradermal and patch tests to penicillins, ceftriaxone and meropenem were negative. Lymphocyte transformation test was positive to ceftriaxone and negative to meropenem.Non-immediate T cell mechanism seems to be involved. Diagnosis work-up couldn't exclude cross-reactivity between ceftriaxone and meropenem.

  9. Minimal access surgery in children – 5 years institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Oak, S N; Parelkar, S V; Akhtar, T; Joshi, M; Pathak, R; Viswanath, N; V, K Satish Kumar; Ravikiran, K; Manjunath, L; Ahmed, A

    2005-01-01

    Context: Minimal access surgery (MAS) in children are common place and performed worldwide with gratifying results as the learning curve of the surgeon attains plateau. We share our experience of this technically evolving modality of surgery, performed at our setup over a period of 5 years. We also review and individually compare the data for commonly performed procedures with other available series. Author also briefly discuss potential advantages of MAS in certain debatable conditions performed quickly and with cosmesis as open procedure. Materials and methods: We performed 677 MAS in children aged between 7 days and 12 years. Five hundred and sixty-eight of these were Laparoscopic procedures and 109 were Video assisted thoracoscopic surgeries (VATS). In all laparoscopic procedures, the primary port placement was by the Hasson's open technique. We have used 5, 3 and 2 mm instruments. Our study include 259 inguinal hernia, 161 Appendectomies, 95 VATS for empyema, 51 orchiopexies, 49 diagnostic laparoscopy, 29 cholecystectomies, 22 adhesionlysis and other uncommonly performed procedures. Results: The ultimate outcome of all the performed procedures showed gratifying trend, the data of which are discussed in detail in the article. Conclusion: As we gained experience the operating time showed a decreasing trend, the complication rates and conversion rate also reduced. The advantages we came across were better postoperative appearances, less pain and early return to unrestricted activities. PMID:21188009

  10. Bronchial fistula closure with negative pressure wound therapy: a feasible and cost-effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rodrigo Barboza; Müller, Bruno Francisco; Cipriano, Federico Enrique Garcia; Coltro, Pedro Soler; Farina, Jayme Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of bronchial fistula (BF) after pulmonary lobectomy is a challenge. Often, patients require long hospital stay, have recurrent empyema and pneumonia, are susceptible to sepsis, often need broad-spectrum antibiotics, as well as various surgical approaches. With the advent and growing evidence of the benefits of negative pressure therapy (NPT), its use in some patients with BF has been reported with encouraging results concerning its feasibility and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the application of NPT as a resource for BF treatment and comparatively analyze the overall cost of treatment. RESUMO O tratamento de fístula brônquica (FB) após lobectomia pulmonar é um desafio. Muitas vezes, o paciente demanda longo tempo de internação, apresenta recidivas de empiema e pneumonia, pode evoluir para sepse, frequentemente necessita de antibioticoterapia de amplo espectro, bem como de várias abordagens cirúrgicas. Com o advento e acúmulo de evidências dos benefícios da terapia por pressão negativa (TPN), seu uso em alguns pacientes com FB tem sido relatado com resultados animadores relativos à sua viabilidade e ao seu custo-efetividade. O objetivo deste estudo foi demonstrar a aplicação de TPN como recurso para tratamento da FB e analisar comparativamente o custo global do seu tratamento.

  11. A novel technique for chest drain removal using a two layer method with triclosan-coated sutures

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yujiro; Nakagomi, Takahiro; Shikata, Daichi

    2017-01-01

    In thoracic surgery, a thoracic drain is always inserted after the surgical procedure. Repair of the wound after removal of the thoracic tube is performed postoperatively, but no universally standard methods currently exists for this tube removal. Here we report a technique using triclosan-coated sutures that is used in thoracic surgery in our hospital. There are several advantages of this technique. First, there is no need for stitches removal on follow-up. Second, it prevents the leakage of pleural exudate because of the tight two-layer sutures. In addition, it was observed to be superior in terms of both wound healing and cosmetic aspects, due to the layer-to-layer sutures. The use of triclosan-coated sutures helps prevent infection and empyema is quite unlikely to occur as the result of the tight ligating of the muscular layer using these sutures. We applied this method in 168 patients over a period of 24 months. There were no complications on removal of the chest tube such as infection, fluid leakage or opening of the surgical wound. PMID:28203426

  12. Surgical and nonsurgical management of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sherly; Rivero, Haidy G; Erlikh, Irina V; Griffith, Larry F; Kondamudi, Vasantha K

    2014-05-15

    Cholelithiasis, or gallstones, is one of the most common and costly of all the gastrointestinal diseases. The incidence of gallstones increases with age. At-risk populations include persons with diabetes mellitus, persons who are obese, women, rapid weight cyclers, and patients on hormone therapy or taking oral contraceptives. Most patients are asymptomatic; gallstones are discovered incidentally during ultrasonography or other imaging of the abdomen. Asymptomatic patients have a low annual rate of developing symptoms (about 2% per year). Once symptoms appear, the usual presentation of uncomplicated gallstones is biliary colic, caused by the intermittent obstruction of the cystic duct by a stone. The pain is characteristically steady, is usually moderate to severe in intensity, is located in the epigastrium or right upper quadrant of the abdomen, lasts one to five hours, and gradually subsides. If pain persists with the onset of fever or high white blood cell count, it should raise suspicion for complications such as acute cholecystitis, gallstone pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. Ultrasonography is the best initial imaging study for most patients, although additional imaging studies may be indicated. The management of acute biliary colic mainly involves pain control with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or narcotic pain relievers. Oral dissolution therapy is usually minimally successful and used only if the patient cannot undergo surgery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains the surgical choice for symptomatic and complicated gallstones, with a shorter hospital stay and shorter convalescence period than open cholecystectomy. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is an alternative for patients who are critically ill with gallbladder empyema and sepsis.

  13. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  14. Management of Parapneumonic Pleural Effusion in Adults.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, María Esther; Valdés, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Pleural infections have high morbidity and mortality, and their incidence in all age groups is growing worldwide. Not all infectious effusions are parapneumonic and, in such cases, the organisms found in the pleural space are not the same as those observed in lung parenchyma infections. The diagnostic difficulty lies in knowing whether an infectious effusion will evolve into a complicated effusion/empyema, as the diagnostic methods used for this purpose provide poor results. The mainstays of treatment are to establish an early diagnosis and to commence an antibiotic regimen and chest drain as soon as possible. This should preferably be carried out with fine tubes, due to certain morphological, bacteriological and biochemical characteristics of the pleural fluid. Fluid analysis, particularly pH, is the most reliable method for assessing evolution. In a subgroup of patients, fibrinolytics may help to improve recovery, and their combination with DNase has been found to obtain better results. If medical treatment fails and surgery is required, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is, at least, comparable to decortication by thoracotomy, so should only undertaken if previous techniques have failed. Further clinical trials are needed to analyze factors that could affect the results obtained, in order to define new evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that provide more effective, standardized management of this disease.

  15. The expanded role of extracellular matrix patch in malignant and non-malignant chest wall reconstruction in thoracic surgery†

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The extracellular matrix (XCM Biologic Tissue Matrix) is a non-cross-linked 3D patch derived from porcine dermis. Once implanted, it is infiltrated by recipient's cells and becomes incorporated in the repair. Here, we report the first series of using this device for chest wall reconstruction. METHODS The XCM Biologic Tissue Matrix was utilized to provide the restoration of chest wall defects. It was used either alone or in conjunction with the Synthes titanium system to provide additional support. The decision was made intraoperatively. RESULTS Since April 2010, 21 (12 females) patients received the device. Average age at operation was 47 ± 17 years. Eleven (52%) patients had the patch inserted alone, while the remaining 10 received it in combination with another implantable medical device. The biological tissue matrix was used to reconstruct chest wall defects in cancer involving chest wall (n = 9), chest wall deformity (n = 6), chest wall hernia (n = 5) and chest wall repair following empyema drainage (n = 1). Complications were witnessed in 3 patients receiving the combined XCM and Synthes bar mechanisms; infection (n = 2) and bar displacement and infection (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS The XCM patch can be safely used to provide the strength required for chest wall reconstruction and to replace previously infected reconstructions. PMID:24263580

  16. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future.

  17. An alternative method to achieve one-lung ventilation by surgical pneumothorax in difficult lung isolation patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Pin-Hung; Hsu, Po-Kai

    2016-04-01

    It is challenging to establish one-lung ventilation in difficult airway patients. Surgical pneumothorax under spontaneous breathing to obtain well-collapsed lung is a feasible method for thoracic surgery. A 76-year-old man with right empyema was scheduled for decortication. The patient had limited mouth opening due to facial cellulitis extending from the left cheek to neck. Generally, lung isolation is achieved by double-lumen endotracheal tube or bronchial blocker. Double-lumen tube insertion is difficult for patients with limited mouth opening and right-side placement of bronchial blocker usually causes insufficient deflation. We introduce an alternative lung isolation technique by surgical pneumothorax under spontaneous breathing simply with an endotracheal tube placement. This technique has never been applied into the management of difficult one-lung ventilation. By this method, we provide an ideal surgical condition with safer, less time-consuming, and less skill-demanding anesthesia. It would be an alternative choice for management of one-lung ventilation in the difficult lung isolation patient.

  18. [Videothoracospy in thoracic trauma and penetrating injuries].

    PubMed

    Lang-Lazdunski, L; Chapuis, O; Pons, F; Jancovici, R

    2003-03-01

    Videothoracoscopy represents a valid and useful approach in some patients with blunt chest trauma or penetrating thoracic injury. This technique has been validated for the treatment of clotted hemothorax or posttraumatic empyema, traumatic chylothorax, traumatic pneumothorax, in patients with hemodynamic stability. Moreover, it is probably the most reliable technique for the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury. It is also useful for the extraction of intrathoracic projectiles and foreign bodies. This technique might be useful in hemodynamically stable patients with continued bleeding or for the exploration of patients with penetrating injury in the cardiac area, although straightforward data are lacking to confirm those indications. Thoracotomy or median sternotomy remain indicated in patients with hemodynamic instability or those that cannot tolerate lateral decubitus position or one-lung ventilation. Performing video-surgery in the trauma setting require expertise in both video-assisted thoracic surgery and chest trauma management. The contra-indications to videothoracoscopy and indications for converting the procedure to an open thoracotomy should be perfectly known by surgeons performing video-assisted thoracic surgery in the trauma setting. Conversion to thoracotomy or median sternotomy should be performed without delay whenever needed to avoid blood loss and achieve an adequate procedure.

  19. Effectiveness of medical thoracoscopy and thoracoscopic talc poudrage in patients with exudative pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Taha, Aza; Venkateswaran, Sridhar; Tee, Augustine

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of medical thoracoscopy (MT) and thoracoscopic talc poudrage (TTP) in patients with exudative pleural effusion. METHODS We evaluated the diagnostic yields, complications and outcomes of MT and TTP in 41 consecutive patients with symptomatic pleural effusions who were planned to undergo both procedures from 1 December 2011 to 30 November 2012. Data was reviewed retrospectively and prospectively up to March 2013. RESULTS Among the 41 patients, 36 underwent MT with the intent of biopsy and talc pleurodesis, 2 underwent MT for pleurodesis only and 3 had failed MT. Aetiologies of pleural effusion included lung cancer (n = 14), tuberculosis (n = 9), breast cancer (n = 7), ovarian cancer (n = 2), malignant mesothelioma (n = 1), congestive cardiac failure (n = 1), peritoneal dialysis (n = 1) and hepatic hydrothorax (n = 1); pleural effusion was undiagnosed in five patients. The overall diagnostic yield of MT, and the yield in tubercular and malignant pleural effusions were 77.8%, 100.0% and 82.6%, respectively; it was inconclusive in 22.2%. Complications that occurred were self-limiting, with no procedure-related mortality. The 30-day mortality rate was 17.1%. A total of 15 patients underwent TTP. The 30-, 60- and 90-day success rates were 77.8%, 80.0% and 80.0%, respectively, with one patient having complications (i.e. empyema). The 30-day mortality was 40.0%. CONCLUSION MT is a safe procedure with high diagnostic yields in undiagnosed pleural effusions. TTP is an effective method to stop recurrence of pleural effusions. PMID:26034319

  20. Pasteurella multocida infections. Report of 34 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Wolfson, J S; Swartz, M N; Hooper, D C

    1984-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus , is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including the dog and cat. P. multocida is the etiologic agent in a variety of infectious disease syndromes. We have reported 34 cases of infection caused by P. multocida and have reviewed the English literature. P. multocida infections may be divided into three broad groups: 1. Infections resulting from animal bites and scratches : The most common infections caused by P. multocida are local wound infections following animal bites or scratches . Cats are the source of infection in 60 to 80% of cases and dogs in the great majority of the remainder. Local infections are characterized by the rapid appearance of erythema, warmth, tenderness, and frequently purulent drainage. The most common local complications are abscess formation and tenosynovitis. Serious local complications include septic arthritis proximal to bites or scratches , osteomyelitis resulting from direct inoculation or extension of cellulitis, and the combination of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, most commonly involving a finger or hand after a cat bite. 2. Isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract: The isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract must be interpreted differently than its isolation from other systemic sites. Most commonly P. multocida found in the respiratory tract is a commensal organism in patients with underlying pulmonary disease, but serious respiratory tract infections including pneumonia, empyema, and lung abscesses may develop. Most patients with respiratory tract colonization or infection have a history of animal exposure. 3. Other systemic infections: P. multocida is recognized as a pathogen in a variety of systemic infections including bacteremia, meningitis, brain abscess, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess. P. multocida often acts as an opportunistic pathogen with a predilection for causing bacteremia in patients

  1. Primary pyogenic ventriculitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ibrahim; Newton, Pippa

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pyogenic ventriculitis is a well-known complication of meningitis, brain abscesses and intraventricular drains. Primary pyogenic ventriculitis is a rare entity and few cases have been described so far. We report the first case of primary pyogenic ventriculitis in an adult caused by Neisseria meningitidis and present an overview of all reported adult primary pyogenic ventriculitis cases in the English literature. Methods. A PubMed search was performed using the terms ependymitis, ventricular empyema, pyocephalus and ventriculitis. Filter was set for adults and English. Articles in which pyogenic ventriculitis was a complication of well-known risk factors were excluded. A total of five cases of primary pyogenic ventriculitis were identified. Results. There were seven adult patients. Only one patient showed signs of meningeal irritation. Four patients had positive blood cultures with Escherichia coli (one patient), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (one patient), one patient was bacteraemic with Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Peptostreptococcus spp., and N. meningitidis (our patient). In four patients cerebrospinal fluid was sent for culture, which yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (one patient), Peptostreptococcus spp. (one patient), Streptococcus intermedius (one patient, identified via 16S PCR) and Listeria monocytogenes (one patient). Cerebrospinal fluid cell count was determined in four patients and showed pleocytosis in all four cases. Ventricular drainage was performed in four patients. Five patients survived. Discussion. We report the first case of pyogenic ventriculitis caused by N. meningitidis. Primary pyogenic ventriculitis is a rare entity with various clinical presentations caused by various bacterial species. Treatment consists of adequate antimicrobial therapy, and ventricular drainage may be necessary. PMID:28348798

  2. Infections caused by Moraxella, Moraxella urethralis, Moraxella-like groups M-5 and M-6, and Kingella kingae in the United States, 1953-1980.

    PubMed

    Graham, D R; Band, J D; Thornsberry, C; Hollis, D G; Weaver, R E

    1990-01-01

    From 1953 to 1980 the Centers for Disease Control received 933 isolates of bacteria belonging to species of the genus Moraxella, Moraxella-like Moraxella urethralis, now renamed Oligella urethralis, unnamed groups M-5 and M-6, and Kingella kingae. Ordinarily sterile sites were the source of 233 isolates. Moraxella nonliquefaciens, the most common isolate (356 strains), was recovered from upper respiratory or ocular sites in 208 (58%) of the cases. Moraxella osloensis was next most common (199 strains) but was the most frequent blood isolate (44 cases). K. kingae appeared especially invasive, with 58 of 78 isolates from blood, bone, or joint. Of the K. kingae strains, 75% were recovered from children under 6 years, compared with 23% of the other strains from that age group (P less than .01). Of the 74 isolates of group M-5, 53 were from wounds caused by dog bites; no other organism in this series was recovered from such wounds. Sixteen of the 28 M. urethralis isolates were from urine. Cases occurred as single infections, with no evidence of clusters. Of patients with infection of ordinarily sterile sites, 9.3% died; only bacteremia, meningitis, and empyema caused fatalities. Most referring laboratories (98%) had not identified the organisms to species, and only 30% had identified them to correct genus. Susceptibility testing by broth dilution revealed low MICs of penicillin (mean, 0.3; 64% less than 1 micrograms/mL). Moraxella, M. urethralis, M-5, M-6, and Kingella are important but frequently misidentified pathogens for humans; penicillin appears to be the treatment of choice.

  3. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1500 ml; group B, 1500 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1700 ml; group C, 1700 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 2000 ml. Then, coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P < 0.001). Fibrinogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets strikingly decreased, whereas prothrombin time and APTT values significantly increased with bleeding amounts in both quick and slow-bleeding groups. Interestingly, compared with slow-bleeding patients, coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  4. Video-assisted thoracic surgery--state of the art.

    PubMed

    Weissberg, D; Schachner, A

    2000-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is one of the main medical revolutions of the past decade. For its satisfactory performance, the following prerequisites are essential: (1) knowledge and experience in thoracic surgery; (2) team of experienced anesthesiologists; (3) preoperative assessment of respiratory function; (4) adequate postoperative care; and (5) instruments specially designed for thoracoscopic surgery. VATS is routinely performed under general anesthesia with double lumen endotracheal intubation for separate control of each lung. Insufflation of carbon dioxide must not exceed 1-3 mm Hg. Too high pressure may cause harmful reduction of venous return and mediastinal shift with impairment of ventilation. Presence of adhesions should be determined by finger exploration of the pleural cavity. Operative ports should be placed carefully, avoiding damage to the intercostal nerves and vessels. The video technique can be used with efficiency for the following indications: pneumothorax, resection of pulmonary nodules, biopsies of lung, pleura and mediastinal structures, resection of mediastinal tumors, management of empyema, and hemostasis and closure of lacerations after trauma. Indications for esophageal procedures include esophagomyotomy for achalasia and resections of benign lesions. Repair of perforated esophagus is a matter of controversy, but in early stages it can be done thoracoscopically. Although video-pericardioscopy has been performed by some surgeons, this procedure can be done easier and faster using the direct approach without the video equipment. There are differences of opinion with regard to major pulmonary and esophageal resections for cancer. The apparent advantage of diminished pain is offset by inadequate resection, spread of malignant cells and potential damage to the resected specimen with loss of important information concerning pathology. Complications of VATS are few, and include prolonged air leak, dysrhythmia, respiratory failure

  5. Evolution of rhinology.

    PubMed

    Kaluskar, S K

    2008-06-01

    The study of the nose is as old as civilisation. Various conditions affecting its structure and function has been documented in Edwin Smith Papyrus in hieroglyphic script, an Egyptian writing system of the mid -4th Millennium BC.The major contribution for the complete reconstruction of the nose originated in India by Sushruta in around 600 BC. Writing in Sanskrit in the form of verses he described in detail the technique of total reconstruction, which is still being practiced today as Indian Rhinoplasty. This surgical reconstruction paved the way to modern plastic surgery in Europe and United States in 18th century. Sushruta contributed not only to the plastic surgery of the nose, but described entire philosophy of Head and Neck and other surgery as well. Other notable contributors were Greek physicians, Hippocrate and Galen, and at the birth of the Christianity, Celsus wrote eight books of medical encyclopaedia, which described various conditions affecting nose.Septal and Sinus surgery, in comparison to rhinoplasty did not develop until 17th century. Septal surgery began with total septectomy, sub mucous resection by Killian & Freer in early 20th century and later septoplasty by Cottle in middle of 20th century.Sinus surgery probably originated in Egypt, where instruments were used to remove brain through the ethmoid sinuses as part of the mummification process. In 18th century, empyema of the maxillary sinus was drained through the tooth socket or anterior wall of the sinus, which lead to the evolution of radical procedures of removal of mucous membrane and inferior meatal antrostomy. In the late 20th century, improved understanding of the mucociliary mechanism described by Prof. Messerklinger and Nasal Endoscopy described by Prof. Draf with the development of fibre optics and CT imaging, heralded a new era, which evolved in functional endoscopic sinus surgery. New technology further enhanced the scope of endoscope being used "around and beyond" the nose.

  6. Does intrapleural length and position of the intercostal drain affect the frequency of residual hemothorax? A prospective study from north India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Agarwal, Nitin; Rattan, Amulya; Rathi, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Thoracic trauma causes significant morbidity; however, many deaths are preventable and few patients require surgery. Intercostal chest drainage (ICD) for hemo/pneumothorax is simple and effective; the main problem is residual hemothorax, which can cause lung collapse and empyema. Aims: Our study aimed to analyze the relationship between radiological chest tube parameters (position and intrathoracic length) and the frequency of residual hemothorax. Settings and Design: This prospective analytical study was conducted in a large tertiary care hospital in north India over 2 years till March 2013. Materials and Methods: Patients of chest trauma aged 18-60 years, with hemothorax or hemopneumothorax requiring ICD insertion were included in the study. Bedside ICD insertion was performed as per current standards. Immediate post-ICD chest radiographs were used to record lung status and ICD position (chest tube zone and intrapleural length). Residual hemothorax was defined as any collection identified on radiological investigations after 48 hours of ICD placement. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis was performed with the chi-square test or Student's t-test as appropriate, while multivariate analysis using stepwise logistic regression; a P-value < 0.05 was significant. Results: Out of 170 patients of chest trauma, 154 underwent ICD insertion. Most patients were young (mean age: 31.7 ± 12 years) males (M:F = 14:1). Ninety-seven patients (57.1%) had isolated chest injuries. Blunt trauma (n = 119; 77.3%) and motor vehicle accidents (n = 72; 46.7%) were the commonest causes. Mean hospital stay was 9 ± 3.94 days, and mortality 2/154 (1.1%). Residual hemothorax was seen in 48 (31%). No ICD zone or length was significantly associated with residual hemothorax on univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Intrapleural ICD zone or length does not affect the frequency of residual hemothorax. PMID:25400388

  7. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  8. [Reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of the oesophagus, stomach and colon, with preservation of the larynx].

    PubMed

    Filippini, Arnaldo; Pagliaricci, Laura; Pomidori, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a case of reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract in a young woman of 36 years of age who, after ingesting muriatic acid, and after a series of consecutive operations found herself without an oesophagus (from the hypopharynx) stomach and colon. She was fed with a jejunostomy and had a large pharyngostomy to prevent sialorrhoea. After one year, the patient manifested the need to resume eating by mouth. The problem was serious due both to the anastomosis above the level of the larynx and the very long period of rehabilitation. The technical problem included the need to avoid the thoracic cavity due to the previous empyema, and thus to bring a viable jejunal loop up to the neck in a subject already operated on four times. The solution was a Roux loop at the level of the 4th-5th jejunal arcade brought to the neck via a subcutaneous presternal route and anastomised in a supraglottic location at the level of the right pyriform sinus. The viability of the loop was guaranteed by an arterial shunt with a branch of the mesenteric artery by means of a segment of saphenous vein and a venous shunt over the right internal jugular vein to guarantee venous flow. The pharyngo-jejunal anastomosis was done with a 21 mm circular stapler with a rotary head after a partial parietal resection of the laryngeal cartilage and under the protection of a provisional tracheostomy. After 4 months' treatment, partly in intensive care and partly in a rehabilitation centre with logopaedic assistance, the tracheal cannula could be removed and the patient is now able to eat by mouth with normal phonation.

  9. [Andreas Vesalius and surgery].

    PubMed

    Van Hee, R

    1993-01-01

    By publishing De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem in 1543, Andries van Wesel (1514-1564) gave surgical science an immense impulse. The revolutionary renovation in the knowledge of man's anatomical structure changed slowly and progressively into topographical and physiological understanding of surgical diseases. At the same time, this made better aimed and more secure operations possible. Apart from the importance of this anatomical publication, Andreas Vesalius also won his spurs as a surgeon. He taught surgery in Padua for many years. He was appointed court physician and surgeon at the Habsburg Court of Charles V and Philip II. He personally performed lots of operations known at the time as major ones. He not only quickly adopted the surgical innovations of his fellow-surgeon Ambroise Paré, but he even performed operations that had been forgotten during several centuries, among which thoracocentesis for pleural empyema. His clinical perspicacity in discovering the indication for some operations was staggering and was appreciated by all great monarchs of Europe in the 16th century. In his several consilia, numerous pieces of advice were given for the treatment of surgical patients. The surgical practice which Vesalius had in Brussels for many years, consequently became most successful. Many publications by Vesalius about surgery and blood-letting are well-known. His Chirurgia magna in septem Libros digesta still remains controversial; these books were published by Prospero Borgarruccio (1560) in 1568 by the Venetian editor Valgrisi. This book gives an excellent survey of surgical pathology as it was taught and treated in the 16th century. The scientific method that Vesalius used, not only in his anatomical studies but also in his surgical practice, deserves not only our full appraisal but should still be studied in our own time.

  10. The role of surgery in treating pleuropulmonary suppurative disease--review of 77 cases managed at Queens Hospital Center between 1986 and 1989.

    PubMed Central

    Cordice, J. W.; Chitkara, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the generally salutary experience in recent years of managing suppurative pleuropulmonary disease, empyemas and lung abscesses have persisted and increased in incidence in hospitals such as Queens Hospital Center that serve large numbers of the socioeconomically disadvantaged. This study documents the etiology, clinical presentation, treatment, and treatment results of suppurative pleuropulmonary disease at Queens Hospital Center, which serves a large segment of the urban poor, many of whom are black. Results indicate that contributory or antecedent etiologic factors include a history of prior disease (specifically pneumonia, lung abscess, obstructive lung disease, pulmonary neoplasia, and tuberculosis); a predisposition to constitutional or immunologic deficiencies (specifically, alcoholism, anemia/malnutrition, drug abuse, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]); conditions contributing to tracheobronchial aspiration (specifically, alcoholism and seizure disorders); and a miscellaneous group such as prior surgery, cardiovascular disease, and sepsis syndrome. The patients in this study were young with maximal incidence occurring in the third to fifth decades of life. Patients were predominantly male (75%) and black (66%). There were 18 deaths (23%), with sepsis being the cause in 10 (56%). Most surgical interventions were conservative, ie, bronchoscopies (48), thoracenteses (43), and tube thoracotomies (39). Thirty-one open thoracotomies were performed for drainage, decortication, or pulmonary resection. The surgical mortality was three cases or 5% of the patients who underwent surgery. The designated incidence of proven AIDS in this series (29%) was low, undoubtedly because many patients refused testing, and the multiple gram-positive and gram-negative infections that were seen did not conform to the Centers for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis and case reporting for AIDS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1602513

  11. Effect of Serotype on Focus and Mortality of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Coverage of Different Vaccines and Insight into Non-Vaccine Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Andrews, Nick; Waight, Pauline A.; George, Robert; Miller, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Differences in pathogenicity between pneumococcal serotypes are important when assessing the potential benefit of different valency vaccines. We investigated the effect of serotype on clinical presentation, outcome, and quality of life lost from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the context of the 7, 10, and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7, PCV10, PCV13). Method Serotyped IPD cases in England were linked to the national dataset of hospital admissions for April 2002 to March 2011. Based on patients’ diagnostic codes and vital status at the end of the admission, disease focus (meningitis, empyema, sepsis, or respiratory disease) and case fatality rates by serotype and age group (5, 5–64, and 65 years and over) were obtained. Using these data the quality adjusted life years (QALY) lost from the IPD remaining when use of PCV7 stopped in 2010 was estimated for the serotypes covered by higher valency vaccines. Results The linked dataset contained 23,688 cases with information on diagnosis, mortality, and serotype. There were significant differences between serotypes in the propensity to cause meningitis, death, and QALY loss in each of the investigated age groups. As a result, vaccines’ coverage of disease burden differed by endpoint. For example, in children under 5 years in 2009/10, PCV10 covered 39% of meningitis, 19% of deaths and 28% of the QALY loss of attributable to IPD, whereas the respective percentages for PCV13 were 65%, 67%, and 66%. The highest QALY loss per serotype in this age group was for 6A. Non-PCV serotypes causing the highest QALY loss were 22F and 33F in <5 year olds and 31 in older individuals. Conclusion Marked differences exist between serotypes in clinical presentation and outcome, and these should be considered when evaluating the potential impact of higher valency vaccines on overall disease burden and associated QALY loss. PMID:22815698

  12. Circulation of international clones of levofloxacin non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y-C; Chang, L-Y; Huang, Y-C; Lin, H-C; Huang, L-M; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-07-01

    Levofloxacin susceptibility testing was carried out for a total of 2539 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained from January 2001 to February 2008 at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) and a further 228 pneumococcal isolates obtained from January 2004 to December 2006 at three other hospitals in different geographical areas in Taiwan. Levofloxacin non-susceptible S. pneumoniae isolates were subsequently analysed for serotype and molecular epidemiology. Rates of levofloxacin non-susceptibility of S. pneumoniae increased significantly from 1.2% in 2001 to 4.2% in 2007 at NTUH. A total of 30 isolates of levofloxacin non-susceptible S. pneumoniae isolates (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) were available for evaluation of serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility, nucleotide sequence of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of parC, gyrA, parE and gyrB, reserpine effect on quinolone susceptibility and multilocus sequence type. Among these isolates, seven (23.3%) were from children, and two (6.7%; one from a 3- and one from a 93-year-old patient) were from blood. One levofloxacin-resistant isolate (MIC = 8 mg/L) was recovered from a previously healthy child with bacteraemic necrotizing pneumonia complicated by empyema and a haemolytic-uraemic syndrome. All isolates except two had Ser79 and/or Asp83 changes in ParC, and/or Ser81 or Glu85 changes in GyrA. An efflux phenotype concerning levofloxacin was detected in only one (3.3%) isolate. A novel clone (ST3642), genetically related to Spain(9V)-3 and belonging to serotype 11A, was identified. Dissemination of clonal complexes related to Spain(23F)-1, Taiwan(19F)-14, Spain(9V)-3 and Taiwan(23F)-15 has contributed to levofloxacin non-susceptibility among these S. pneumoniae isolates from Taiwan.

  13. Update on pleural diseases - 2007

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Ayman; Raoof, Suhail; Esan, Adebayo; Sung, Arthur; Wali, Siraj; Lee, Leonard Y.; George, Liziamma; Saleh, Anthony; Baumann, Michael

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New information is available on pleural diseases. The authors selected articles to make recommendations on diagnostic and treatment aspects of pleural diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven articles published in the English language between 2004 and 2007 were chosen. The basis of selection of the articles was the impact on daily practice, change in prior thinking of a disease process or specific treatment modality, as well as proper design and execution of the study. 5-amino-laevulinic acid with fluorescent light combined with white light may allow further diagnostic yield in undiagnosed pleural disease. FDG-PET may allow prognostication of patients with pleural tumors. Utilizing ultrasound by trained Emergency Department physicians is a rapid and effective technique to evaluate non-traumatic pleural effusions in symptomatic patients. Serum osteopontin levels may distinguish patients exposed to asbestos with benign disease from those with pleural mesothelioma. Administration of streptokinase in patients with empyema does not need for surgical drainage, length of hospital stay, or mortality as compared to conventional treatment with chest tube drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Silver nitrate may be an alternative agent to talc for producing pleurodesis. Routine use of graded talc (50% particles greater than 25 microns) is recommended to reduce the morbidity associated with talc pleurodesis. Study design does not permit us to conclude that aspiration of spontaneous pneumothorax is as effective as chest tube drainage. Pleural catheter may prove to be an important palliative modality in treating debilitated patients or patients with trapped lung who show symptomatic improvement with drainage; however, at the present time, these catheters cannot be considered a first line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural effusion. One of the studies reviewed showed no significant difference in tract metastasis in patients with malignant mesothelioma

  14. Pleural effusion: diagnosis, treatment, and management

    PubMed Central

    Karkhanis, Vinaya S; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2012-01-01

    A pleural effusion is an excessive accumulation of fluid in the pleural space. It can pose a diagnostic dilemma to the treating physician because it may be related to disorders of the lung or pleura, or to a systemic disorder. Patients most commonly present with dyspnea, initially on exertion, predominantly dry cough, and pleuritic chest pain. To treat pleural effusion appropriately, it is important to determine its etiology. However, the etiology of pleural effusion remains unclear in nearly 20% of cases. Thoracocentesis should be performed for new and unexplained pleural effusions. Laboratory testing helps to distinguish pleural fluid transudate from an exudate. The diagnostic evaluation of pleural effusion includes chemical and microbiological studies, as well as cytological analysis, which can provide further information about the etiology of the disease process. Immunohistochemistry provides increased diagnostic accuracy. Transudative effusions are usually managed by treating the underlying medical disorder. However, a large, refractory pleural effusion, whether a transudate or exudate, must be drained to provide symptomatic relief. Management of exudative effusion depends on the underlying etiology of the effusion. Malignant effusions are usually drained to palliate symptoms and may require pleurodesis to prevent recurrence. Pleural biopsy is recommended for evaluation and exclusion of various etiologies, such as tuberculosis or malignant disease. Percutaneous closed pleural biopsy is easiest to perform, the least expensive, with minimal complications, and should be used routinely. Empyemas need to be treated with appropriate antibiotics and intercostal drainage. Surgery may be needed in selected cases where drainage procedure fails to produce improvement or to restore lung function and for closure of bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27147861

  15. Results of surgery for chronic pulmonary Aspergillosis, optimal antifungal therapy and proposed high risk factors for recurrence - a National Centre’s experience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgery for pulmonary aspergillosis is infrequent and often challenging. Risk assessment is imprecise and new antifungals may ameliorate some surgical risks. We evaluated the medical and surgical management of these patients, including perioperative and postoperative antifungal therapy. Methods Retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for pulmonary aspergillosis between September 1996 and September 2011. Results 30 patients underwent surgery with 23 having a preoperative tissue diagnosis while 7 were confirmed post-resection. The median age was 57 years (17–78). The commonest presenting symptoms were cough (40%, n = 12) and haemoptysis (43%, n = 13). Twelve (40%) patients had simple aspergilloma (including 2 with Aspergillus nodules) while the remaining 18 (60%) had chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA) (complex aspergilloma). Most of the patients had underlying lung disease: tuberculosis (20%, n = 6), asthma (26%, n = 8) and COPD (20%, n = 6). The procedures included lobectomy 50% (n = 15), pneumonectomy 10% (n = 3), sublobar resection 27% (n = 8), decortication 7% (n = 2), segmentectomy 3% (n = 1), thoracoplasty 3% (n = 1), bullectomy and pleurectomy 3% (n = 1), 6% (n = 2) lung transplantation for associated disease. Median hospital stay was 9.5 days (3–37). There was no operative and 30 day mortality. Main complications were prolonged air leak (n = 7, 23%), empyema (n = 6, 20%), respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy /reintubation (n = 4, 13%). Recurrence of CCPA was noted in 8 patients (26%), most having prior CCPA (75%). Taurolidine 2% was active against all 9 A. fumigatus isolates and used for pleural decontamination during surgery. Conclusions Surgery in patients with chronic pulmonary aspergillosis offered good outcomes with an acceptable morbidity in a difficult clinical situation; recurrence is problematic. PMID:23915502

  16. Ventilator-associated pneumonia by Staphylococcus aureus. Comparison of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive episodes.

    PubMed

    Rello, J; Torres, A; Ricart, M; Valles, J; Gonzalez, J; Artigas, A; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    1994-12-01

    All episodes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Staphylococcus aureus were prospectively analyzed for a 30-mo period. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated in 38 episodes and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in 11 others. The two groups were similar regarding sex, severity of underlying diseases, prior surgery, and presence of renal failure, diabetes, cardiopathy, and coma. MRSA-infected persons were more likely to have received steroids before developing infection (relative risk [RR] = 3.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-8.59), to have been ventilated > 6 d (RR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.36-3.03), to have been older than 25 yr (RR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.09-2.06), and to have had preceding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR = 2.76, 95% CI = 0.89-8.56) than MSSA-infected patients. MSSA-infected persons were more likely than MRSA-infected patients to have cranioencephalic trauma (RR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.22-3.09). All patients with MRSA VAP had previously received antibiotics, compared with only 21.1% of those with MSSA infection (p < 0.000001). The incidence of empyema was similar in both groups; nevertheless, the presence of bacteremia and septic shock was more frequent in the MRSA group. Finally, mortality directly related to pneumonia was significantly higher among patients with MRSA episodes (RR = 20.72, 95% CI = 2.78-154.35). This analysis was repeated for monomicrobial episodes, and the difference remained statistically significant. We conclude that MRSA and MSSA strains infect patients with different demographic profiles; previous antibiotic therapy is the most important risk factor for developing MRSA infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Laparoscopic modified subtotal cholecystectomy for difficult gall bladders: A single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Harilingam, Mohan Raj; Shrestha, Ashish Kiran; Basu, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is considered the ‘gold standard’ intervention for gall bladder (GB) diseases. However, to avoid serious biliovascular injury, conversion is advocated for distorted anatomy at the Calot's triangle. The aim is to find out whether our technique of laparoscopic modified subtotal cholecystectomy (LMSC) is suitable, with an acceptable morbidity and outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 993 consecutive patients who underwent cholecystectomy was done at a large District General Hospital (DGH) between August 2007 and January 2015. The data are as follows: Patient's demographics, operative details including intra- and postoperative complications, postoperative stay including follow-up that was recorded and analysed. RESULTS: A total of 993 patients (263 males and 730 female) were included. The median age was 52*(18-89) years. Out of the 993 patients, 979 (98.5%) and 14 (1.5%) were listed for laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy, respectively. Of the 979 patients, 902 (92%) and 64 (6.5%) patients underwent LC ± on-table cholangiography (OTC) and LMSC ± OTC, respectively, with a median stay of 1* (0-15) days. Of the 64 patients, 55 (86%) had dense adhesions, 22 (34%) had acute inflammation, 19 (30%) had severe contraction, 12 (19%) had empyema, 7 (11%) had Mirizzi's syndrome and 2 (3%) had gangrenous GB. The mean operative time was 120 × (50-180) min [Table 1]. Six (12%) patients required endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) postoperatively, and there were four (6%) readmissions in a follow-up of 30 × (8-76) months. The remaining 13 (1.3%) patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy converted to an open cholecystectomy. The median stay for open/laparoscopic cholecystectomy converted to open cholecystectomy was 5 × (1-12) days. CONCLUSION: Our technique of LMSC avoided conversion in 6.5% patients and believe that it is feasible and safe for difficult GBs

  18. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  19. Effectiveness and safety of outpatient pleurodesis in patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion and low performance status

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Teixeira, Lisete Ribeiro; Bibas, Benoit Jacques; Pego‐Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Vargas, Francisco Suso; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pleurodesis carried out entirely on an outpatient basis in patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusions and Karnofsky Performance Status scores ≤70. METHODS: This study was a prospective trial comprising patients with symptomatic recurrent malignant pleural effusion and Karnofsky Performance Status scores ≤70 but >30. All selected patients underwent pleural catheter placement (14 Fr) in an outpatient facility. When chest radiography revealed post‐drainage lung expansion of >90%, pleurodesis (3 g of talc) was performed. Catheters were maintained until the daily output was <100 mL/day. The patients were evaluated in the first month and every three months thereafter for fluid recurrence, the need for additional procedures, and complications. RESULTS: During the study period (January 2005 to July 2007), 64 patients (24 men, 40 women), with an average age of 61.4 years, underwent elective chest tube drainage. Primary sites of the underlying malignancy were breast (27), lung (22), and others (15). Sixty‐six pleural catheters were placed (bilaterally in 2 patients), and 52 talc pleurodesis procedures were performed. Fourteen patients had a trapped lung and were excluded from the trial. No complications were observed during catheter placement or pleurodesis. Post‐pleurodesis complications included catheter obstruction (4 patients) and empyema (1). The average drainage time was 9.9 days. The recurrence rate observed in patients that were alive 30 days after pleurodesis was 13.9% (5/36 patients). Six patients required additional procedures after the pleurodesis. The average survival time was 101 days. CONCLUSION: In this study, talc pleurodesis was safely performed in an outpatient setting with good efficacy and a reasonable complication rate, thereby avoiding hospital admission. PMID:21484035

  20. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia without evidence of antecedent viral upper respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cristina Moran; Janvier, Jack; Zhang, Kunyan; Fonseca, Kevin; Gregson, Dan; Church, Deirdre; Laupland, Kevin; Rabin, Harvey; Elsayed, Sameer; Conly, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: USA300 community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains causing necrotizing pneumonia have been reported in association with antecedent viral upper respiratory tract infections (URI). METHODS: A case series of necrotizing pneumonia presenting as a primary or coprimary infection, secondary to CA-MRSA without evidence of antecedent viral URI, is presented. Cases were identified through the infectious diseases consultation service records. Clinical and radiographic data were collected by chart review and electronic records. MRSA strains were isolated from sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, pleural fluid or blood cultures and confirmed using standard laboratory procedures. MRSA strains were characterized by susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, agr typing and multilocus sequence typing. Testing for respiratory viruses was performed by appropriate serological testing of banked sera, or nucleic acid testing of nasopharyngeal or bronchoalveloar lavage specimens. RESULTS: Ten patients who presented or copresented with CA necrotizing pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA from April 2004 to October 2011 were identified. The median length of stay was 22.5 days. Mortality was 20.0%. Classical risk factors for CA-MRSA were identified in seven of 10 (70.0%) cases. Chest tube placement occurred in seven of 10 patients with empyema. None of the patients had historical evidence of antecedent URI. In eight of 10 patients, serological or nucleic acid testing testing revealed no evidence of acute viral coinfection. Eight strains were CMRSA-10 (USA300). The remaining two strains were a USA300 genetically related strain and a USA1100 strain. CONCLUSION: Pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA can occur in the absence of an antecedent URI. Infections due to CA-MRSA are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians need to have an awareness of this clinical entity, particularly in patients who are in risk

  1. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery in patients aged 80 years and older

    PubMed Central

    Facktor, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is routinely performed with general anesthesia and double-lumen endotracheal intubation, but this technique may stress an elderly patient’s functional reserve. We chose to study the safety and efficacy of non-intubated VATS, utilizing local anesthesia, sedation, and spontaneous ventilation in the elderly. Methods The medical records of all patients aged 80 years and older who underwent VATS under local anesthesia and sedation during the time period 6/1/2002 to 6/1/2010 at Geisinger Health System (Pennsylvania, USA) and 10/1/2011 to 12/31/2014 at Sinai Hospital (Maryland, USA) were retrospectively reviewed. Unsuccessful attempts at this technique were eligible for inclusion but there were none. No patient was excluded based on comorbidity. Results A total of 96 patients ranging in age from 80 to 104 years underwent 102 non-intubated VATS procedures: pleural biopsy/effusion drainage with or without talc 73, drainage of empyema 17, evacuate hemothorax 4, pericardial window 3, lung biopsy 2, treat chylothorax 2, treat pneumothorax 1. No patient required intubation or conversion to thoracotomy. No patient required a subsequent procedure or biopsy. Complications occurred in three patients (3.1% morbidity): cerebrovascular accident, pulmonary embolism, prolonged air leak. One 94-year-old patient died from overanticoagulation and two 84-year-old patients died of their advanced lung cancers (3.1% morbidity). Conclusions Non-intubated VATS utilizing local anesthesia and sedation in the elderly is well tolerated and safe for a number of indications. PMID:26046042

  2. Impact of ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumonia in Finnish children in a nation-wide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Palmu, Arto A.; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Nohynek, Hanna; Nuorti, J. Pekka; Kilpi, Terhi M.; Jokinen, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    Background The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Program (NVP) in September 2010 using a 2+1 schedule (3, 5, 12 months). We estimated the direct and indirect effects of PCV10 on pneumonia among children to evaluate the public health impact of the vaccine. Methods We conducted a nation-wide population-based, observational study comparing rates of pneumonia in children before and after the NVP introduction. For the total (direct and indirect) effect, the cohort of vaccine-eligible children (born June 1, 2010 or later) was followed until the end of 2013 (age range 3–42 months). For the indirect effect, a cohort of older children (age range 7–71 months) not eligible for the PCV vaccination was followed from 2011 to 2013. Both cohorts were compared with two season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. Hospitals’ in- and outpatient discharge notifications with ICD-10 diagnoses compatible with pneumonia (J10.0, J11.0, J12-J18, J85.1 or J86) as set by the hospital pediatricians were collected from the national Care Register. The main outcome was hospital-treated primary pneumonia (HTPP), defined as primary diagnosis of pneumonia after in-patient hospitalization. We compared rates of pneumonia in the NVP target and reference cohorts by using Poisson regression models. Results The rate of HTPP episodes was 5.3/1000 person-years in the combined reference cohorts and 4.1/1000 person-years in the target cohort vaccine-eligible children. Compared with the reference cohort, the relative rate reduction in target cohort was 23% (95%CI 18–28) and the absolute reduction 1.3/1000 person-years. In the indirect effect evaluation, we observed continued increase in HTPP incidence until 2011 with a subsequent reduction of 18% (95%CI 10–25) during years 2012 to 2013. Number of empyema diagnoses remained low. Conclusions A substantial decrease in pneumonia rates was observed both among

  3. Expansion of Serotype Coverage in the Universal Pediatric Vaccination Calendar: Short-Term Effects on Age- and Serotype-Dependent Incidence of Invasive Pneumococcal Clinical Presentations in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Contreras, Jesus; Casado-Flores, Juan; Negreira, Sagrario; García-de-Miguel, Maria-Jesus; Hernández-Sampelayo, Teresa; Otheo, Enrique; Méndez, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In Madrid, Spain, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced PCV7 in the pediatric universal vaccination calendar in June 2010. A prospective clinical surveillance that included all children hospitalized with culture- and/or PCR-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was performed in all Madrid hospitals. The incidence rates (IRs) (defined as the number of cases/100,000 inhabitants aged <15 years) in the PCV7 (May 2007 to April 2010) versus PCV13 (May 2011 to April 2012) periods were compared. There were 499 cases in the PCV7 period and 79 cases in the PCV13 period. Globally, the IR significantly decreased from 17.09 (PCV7 period) to 7.70 (PCV13 period), with significant decreases (PCV7 versus PCV13 periods) in all age groups for bacteremic pneumonia (5.51 versus 1.56), parapneumonic pneumococcal empyema (PPE) (5.72 versus 3.12), and meningitis (2.16 versus 0.97). In the PCV13 period, significant reductions (the IR in the PCV7 period versus the IR in the PCV13 period) were found in IPDs caused by PCV13 serotypes (13.49 versus 4.38), and specifically by serotypes 1 (globally [4.79 versus 2.53], for bacteremic pneumonia [2.23 versus 0.97], and for PPE [2.26 versus 1.17]), serotype 5 (globally [1.88 versus 0.00], for bacteremic pneumonia [0.89 versus 0.00], and for PPE [0.55 versus 0.00]), and serotype 19A (globally [3.77 versus 0.49], for bacteremic pneumonia [0.72 versus 0.00], for PPE [0.89 versus 0.00], and for meningitis [0.62 versus 0.00]). IPDs caused by non-PCV13 serotypes did not increase (IR, 3.60 in the PCV7 period versus 3.31 in the PCV13 period), regardless of age or presentation. No IPDs caused by the PCV13 serotypes were found in children who received 3 doses of PCV13. The number of hospitalization days and sanitary costs were significantly lower in the PCV13 period. The switch from PCV7 to PCV13 in the universal pediatric vaccination calendar provided sanitary and economical benefits without a replacement by non-PCV13

  4. Proteomic Analyses of Chlorhexidine Tolerance Mechanisms in Delftia acidovorans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Rema, Tara; Medihala, Prabhakara; Lawrence, John R.; Vidovic, Sinisa; Leppard, Gary G.; Reid, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein expression and fatty acid profiles of biofilm cells of chlorhexidine-tolerant Delftia acidovorans (MIC = 15 µg/ml) and its chlorhexidine-susceptible mutant (MIC = 1 µg/ml) were investigated. The chlorhexidine-susceptible mutant (MT51) was derived from the parental strain (WT15) using Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. The disrupted gene was identified as tolQ, a component of the tolQRAB gene cluster known to be involved in outer membrane stability. Proteomic responses of biofilm cells were compared by differential in-gel electrophoresis following exposure to chlorhexidine at sub-MIC (10 µg/ml) and above-MIC (30 µg/ml) concentrations. Numerous changes in protein abundance were observed in biofilm cells following chlorhexidine exposure, suggesting that molecular changes occurred during adaptation to chlorhexidine. Forty proteins showing significant differences (≥1.5-fold; P < 0.05) were identified by mass spectrometry and were associated with various functions, including amino acid and lipid biosynthesis, protein translation, energy metabolism, and stress-related functions (e.g., GroEL, aspartyl/glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase, elongation factor Tu, Clp protease, and hydroxymyristoyl-ACP dehydratase). Several proteins involved in fatty acid synthesis were affected by chlorhexidine, in agreement with fatty acid analysis, wherein chlorhexidine-induced shifts in the fatty acid profile were observed in the chlorhexidine-tolerant cells, primarily the cyclic fatty acids. Transmission electron microscopy revealed more prominent changes in the cell envelope of chlorhexidine-susceptible MT51 cells. This study suggests that multiple mechanisms involving both the cell envelope (and likely TolQ) and panmetabolic regulation play roles in chlorhexidine tolerance in D. acidovorans. IMPORTANCE Delftia acidovorans has been associated with a number of serious infections, including bacteremia, empyema, bacterial endocarditis, and ocular and urinary tract infections

  5. Early reoperation performed for the management of complications in patients undergoing general thoracic surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Kleontas, Athanasios; Karatzopoulos, Avgerinos; Nana, Chryssoula; Tagarakis, George; Tossios, Paschalis; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the rate and predisposing factors for the development of postoperative complications requiring re-operation for their control in the immediate postoperative period. Methods During the time period 2009-2012, 719 patients (male: 71.62%, mean age: 54±19 years) who underwent a wide range of general thoracic surgery procedures, were retrospectively collected. Data of patients who underwent early re-operation for the management of postoperative complications were assessed for identification of the responsible causative factors. Results Overall, 33/719 patients (4.6%) underwent early re-operation to control postoperative complications. Early re-operation was obviated by the need to control bleeding or to drain clotted hemothoraces in nine cases (27.3%), to manage a prolonged air leak in six cases (18.2%), to drain a post-thoracotomy empyema in five cases (15.2%), to revise the thoracotomy incision or an ischemic musculocutaneous flap in five cases (15.2%), to manage a bronchopleural fistula in four cases (12.1%), to manage persistent atelectasis of the remaining lung in two cases (6.1%), to cease a chyle leak in one case (3%) and to plicate the right hemidiaphragm in another one case (3%). The factors responsible for the development of complications requiring reopening of the chest for their management were technical in 17 cases (51.5%), initial surgery for lung or pleural infections in 9 (27.3%), the recent antiplatelet drug administration in 4 (12.1%) and advanced lung emphysema in 3 (9.1%). Mortality of re-operations was 6.1% (2/33) and it was associated with the need to proceed with completion pneumonectomy in the two cases with persistent atelectasis of the remaining lung and permanent parenchymal damage. The majority of complications requiring reoperation were observed after lung parenchyma resection (17 out of the 228 procedures/7.4%) or pleurectomy (7 out of the 106 procedures/6.5%). Reoperations after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS

  6. 613 cases of splenic rupture without risk factors or previously diagnosed disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rupture of the spleen in the absence of trauma or previously diagnosed disease is largely ignored in the emergency literature and is often not documented as such in journals from other fields. We have conducted a systematic review of the literature to highlight the surprisingly frequent occurrence of this phenomenon and to document the diversity of diseases that can present in this fashion. Methods Systematic review of English and French language publications catalogued in Pubmed, Embase and CINAHL between 1950 and 2011. Results We found 613 cases of splenic rupture meeting the criteria above, 327 of which occurred as the presenting complaint of an underlying disease and 112 of which occurred following a medical procedure. Rupture appeared to occur spontaneously in histologically normal (but not necessarily normal size) spleens in 35 cases and after minor trauma in 23 cases. Medications were implicated in 47 cases, a splenic or adjacent anatomical abnormality in 31 cases and pregnancy or its complications in 38 cases. The most common associated diseases were infectious (n = 143), haematologic (n = 84) and non-haematologic neoplasms (n = 48). Amyloidosis (n = 24), internal trauma such as cough or vomiting (n = 17) and rheumatologic diseases (n = 10) are less frequently reported. Colonoscopy (n = 87) was the procedure reported most frequently as a cause of rupture. The anatomic abnormalities associated with rupture include splenic cysts (n = 6), infarction (n = 6) and hamartomata (n = 5). Medications associated with rupture include anticoagulants (n = 21), thrombolytics (n = 13) and recombinant G-CSF (n = 10). Other causes or associations reported very infrequently include other endoscopy, pulmonary, cardiac or abdominal surgery, hysterectomy, peliosis, empyema, remote pancreato-renal transplant, thrombosed splenic vein, hemangiomata, pancreatic pseudocysts, splenic artery aneurysm, cholesterol embolism

  7. Curative potential of foremost mitogen applications.

    PubMed

    Wimer, Bruce M

    2003-12-01

    This paper is presented as a sequel to the Mitogen Information Summaries article, representing a condensation of salient features involved with facilitating the curative potential of the more important mitogen applications. Following is a resumé of the critical attributes of mitogen therapy relative to the management of malignant tumors: (1) An inherent capability to recognize and destroy mutated or damaged tissues without altering those that are normal; (2) The capacity to induce global immunostimulation by the nonspecific activation of CD4+/- and CD8+/- cells with balanced production of a variety of cytokines able to stimulate B cell, NK cell, and macrophage pathways, at the same time augmenting myeloproliferation; (3) The ability to afford protection and accelerated recovery from the immunosuppressive and myelosuppressive effects of tumors, infections, GvH reactions, and autoimmune states along with the surgery, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, and suppressive factors used in their management; (4) Berke's in vitro data from the lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (LDCC) system showing that systemic administration of mitogens such as PHA-L4 should indeed prove destructive to virtually any type of malignancy, leaving normal tissues undamaged; and (5) The potential of these activities to reconstitute the immune competence so vital to lasting cures. The potential role of L4 immunotherapy for infections may be defined by the following criteria: those, including drug-resistant infections, not satisfactorily treatable otherwise; those in which a rapid response is essential; those that are subclinical, latent, recurrent, chronic, persistent, highly lethal, or opportunistic; those in patients with impaired immune responses; and most importantly, those that are not likely to be adversely affected by immunostimulation. Certain paths of administration such as the intralesional (for granulomas), intrapleural (for pleurisy, empyema), and intraperitoneal

  8. Incidence of pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease in the Island of Majorca (2008-2010), an area with non-universal vaccination, and estimations of serotype & children population coverage by available conjugate vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization reported in 2007 that inclusion of PCV7 in national immunization programs should be seen as a priority, also encouraging countries to conduct appropriate surveillances for monitoring the impact of vaccination. These analyses should be conducted in specific geographical areas and should be aimed to evolution of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), by age groups, clinical presentation, and vaccine serotypes (and non-vaccine serotypes to detect possible replacement). This study aimed to monitor the evolution of IPD incidence in children <15 years requiring hospitalization in the Island of Majorca. Methods A prospective clinical surveillance of all culture and/or PCR-confirmed IPD in children <15 years was performed in all hospitals in the Island of Majorca (approximately 900,000 inhabitants) from January 2008 to December 2010. Incidence rate (IR) was calculated as cases/100000 inhabitants using children population data. Results 66 IPDs were identified: 39 (59.1%) parapneumonic pneumococcal empyema (PPE), 16 (24.2%) bacteremic pneumonia (BP), 7 (10.6%) primary bacteremia, 3 (4.5%) meningitis, and 1 (1.5%) osteomyelitis. IRs in the three-year study period were: 64.22 for children 12- < 24 months, 37.21 for those 24-59 months, 22.62 for those <12 months, and 3.98 for children >59 months. By study year, IRs were 21.25 in 2008, 19.89 in 2009 and 9.80 in 2010. The reduction found in 2010 was significant and due to significant reductions in IRs of IPDs caused by serotypes included in PCV10 and PCV13. Overall, estimated serotype coverage by conjugate vaccines was 12.1% for PCV7, 37.9% for PCV10 and 65.2% for PCV13. Of the 66 hospitalized children with IPD, 20 had received at least one dose of PCV7 (13 cases with identified serotype). None of these 13 cases was caused by PCV7 serotypes, all were caused by PCV13 serotypes and only 53.8% by PCV10 serotypes. Conclusions The results of the present study evidence the importance of

  9. [Thoracic drainage in trauma emergencies].

    PubMed

    Bergaminelli, C; De Angelis, P; Gauthier, P; Salzano, A; Vecchio, G

    1999-10-01

    A group of 191 cases of emergency tube thoracostomy for acute trauma reviewed retrospectively from March 1993 to March 1998 is reported. Of this group 169 were men and 22 were women. Their ages ranged from 16 to 73 years. The causes were as follows: 89 cases (46%) road accident; 33 cases (17%) accidental trauma; 33 cases (17%) someone else violence (assault, gunshot or stab wound); 15 cases (8%) work accident; 11 cases (6%) domestic accident and 5 cases (3%) iatrogenic trauma. In 32 patients a diagnosis of pneumothorax was made (2 tension, 11 for penetrating chest injuries, 19 after blunt trauma). In 2 cases of tension pneumothorax and in 3 cases of open pneumothorax a chest tube (24-28 Fr) in the third space in the mid-clavicular line was introduced. In the other patients it was decided to place a chest tube in the mid-axillary line in the fifth intercostal space to drain pneumothorax. Only in 7 cases suction was necessary. Fifty-four hemothorax (3 bilateral) were treated in 11 cases using thoracentesis, while the remaining cases were treated using the insertion of multiple drainage holes in the intercostal space (fifth in the mid-axillary line directed inferiorly and posteriorly). One hundred and three were the cases of hemopneumothorax: 24 of them received 2 chest tubes, the first (20-26 Fr) apically in the second intercostal space in the mid-clavicular line, the second (32-38 Fr) in the fifth intercostal space in the mid-axillary line. All the other cases were treated using a single thoracostomy. In 14 cases suction was applied. Two cases of chylothorax resolved by a large tube positioned in the chest (fifth intercostal space in the mid-axillary line) with a constant negative pressure were also observed. Duration of tube drainage ranged from 4 and 18 days, with an average of 11 days. Five infections of thoracostomy site and 1 empyema resolved by rethoracotomy were observed. Moreover, there were 3 complications: 2 subcutaneous placements and 1 little laceration

  10. The challenges of cardiothoracic surgery practice in Nigeria: a 12 years institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Sanusi, Michael; Animasahun, Adeola; Mgbajah, Ogadinma; Majekodunmi, Adetinuwe; Nzewi, Onyekwelu; Nwiloh, Jonathan; Oke, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the specialty of cardiothoracic surgery has been practiced in Nigeria for many years, open heart surgery (OHS) has only in the last decade become relatively more frequent, mainly through visiting foreign cardiac surgical teams. At this early phase of development it is faced with multiple challenges, especially financing and local skilled manpower for which solutions have to be identified in order to ensure sustainability and future growth. This study is aimed at highlighting these obstacles to growth of cardiothoracic surgery based on our own institutional experience at Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) and the current status of OHS activity in other cardiothoracic centers in Nigeria. Methods Prospectively acquired data from our center from March 2004 to December 2015 was reviewed. A telephone survey was also conducted with all other institutions in Nigeria performing cardiac surgery. Results During the study period 1,520 patients underwent various procedures with a mean age of 37±22.4 years and 813 (53.5%) were males. There were 450 major procedures (29.6%), 889 minor procedures (58.5%) and 181 endoscopic procedures (11.9%). The top ten clinical diagnoses were empyema thoracis (17.5%), malignant pleural effusion (14.7%), chest trauma (12%), hemodialysis access (6.1%), bradyarrhythmia (5.3%), aerodigestive foreign bodies (4.1%), vascular injury (3.9%), pericardial disease (3.8%), lung cancer (3.6%) and congenital heart disease (3.4%). The range of procedures was chest tube insertion (41.6%), endoscopy (11.9%), lung procedures (7%), arterio-venous fistula (6.1%), pacemaker implantation (5.3%), vascular repair (4.4%), OHS (3.4%), esophageal procedures (2.6%), chest wall surgery (2%), video assisted thoracic surgery (2%), closed heart surgery (1.6%), diaphragmatic procedures (1.6%) and thymectomy (1%). Survey of 15 centers in Nigeria with cardiac surgery activity showed a total of 496 OHS cases between 1974 and 2016, with 330 cases

  11. Expansion of serotype coverage in the universal pediatric vaccination calendar: short-term effects on age- and serotype-dependent incidence of invasive pneumococcal clinical presentations in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan; Ruiz-Contreras, Jesus; Casado-Flores, Juan; Negreira, Sagrario; García-de-Miguel, Maria-Jesus; Hernández-Sampelayo, Teresa; Otheo, Enrique; Méndez, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    In Madrid, Spain, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced PCV7 in the pediatric universal vaccination calendar in June 2010. A prospective clinical surveillance that included all children hospitalized with culture- and/or PCR-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was performed in all Madrid hospitals. The incidence rates (IRs) (defined as the number of cases/100,000 inhabitants aged <15 years) in the PCV7 (May 2007 to April 2010) versus PCV13 (May 2011 to April 2012) periods were compared. There were 499 cases in the PCV7 period and 79 cases in the PCV13 period. Globally, the IR significantly decreased from 17.09 (PCV7 period) to 7.70 (PCV13 period), with significant decreases (PCV7 versus PCV13 periods) in all age groups for bacteremic pneumonia (5.51 versus 1.56), parapneumonic pneumococcal empyema (PPE) (5.72 versus 3.12), and meningitis (2.16 versus 0.97). In the PCV13 period, significant reductions (the IR in the PCV7 period versus the IR in the PCV13 period) were found in IPDs caused by PCV13 serotypes (13.49 versus 4.38), and specifically by serotypes 1 (globally [4.79 versus 2.53], for bacteremic pneumonia [2.23 versus 0.97], and for PPE [2.26 versus 1.17]), serotype 5 (globally [1.88 versus 0.00], for bacteremic pneumonia [0.89 versus 0.00], and for PPE [0.55 versus 0.00]), and serotype 19A (globally [3.77 versus 0.49], for bacteremic pneumonia [0.72 versus 0.00], for PPE [0.89 versus 0.00], and for meningitis [0.62 versus 0.00]). IPDs caused by non-PCV13 serotypes did not increase (IR, 3.60 in the PCV7 period versus 3.31 in the PCV13 period), regardless of age or presentation. No IPDs caused by the PCV13 serotypes were found in children who received 3 doses of PCV13. The number of hospitalization days and sanitary costs were significantly lower in the PCV13 period. The switch from PCV7 to PCV13 in the universal pediatric vaccination calendar provided sanitary and economical benefits without a replacement by non-PCV13

  12. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  13. Complications of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Our Experience from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Radunovic, Miodrag; Lazovic, Ranko; Popovic, Natasa; Magdelinic, Milorad; Bulajic, Milutin; Radunovic, Lenka; Vukovic, Marko; Radunovic, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intraoperative and postoperative complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, as well as the frequency of conversions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 740 patients who had laparoscopic cholecystectomy were analysed retrospectively. We evaluated patients for the presence of potential risk factors that could predict the development of complications such as age, gender, body mass index, white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP), gallbladder ultrasonographic findings, and pathohistological analysis of removed gallbladders. The correlation between these risk factors was also analysed. RESULTS: There were 97 (13.1%) intraoperative complications (IOC). Iatrogenic perforations of a gallbladder were the most common complication - 39 patients (5.27%). Among the postoperative complications (POC), the most common ones were bleeding from abdominal cavity 27 (3.64%), biliary duct leaks 14 (1.89%), and infection of the surgical wound 7 patients (0.94%). There were 29 conversions (3.91%). The presence of more than one complication was more common in males (OR = 2.95, CI 95%, 1.42-4.23, p < 0.001). An especially high incidence of complications was noted in patients with elevated white blood cell count (OR = 3.98, CI 95% 1.68-16.92, p < 0.01), and CRP (OR = 2.42, CI 95% 1.23-12.54, p < 0.01). The increased incidence of complications was noted in patients with ultrasonographic finding of gallbladder empyema and increased thickness of the gallbladder wall > 3 mm (OR = 4.63, CI 95% 1.56-17.33, p < 0.001), as well as in patients with acute cholecystitis that was confirmed by pathohistological analysis (OR = 1.75, CI 95% 2.39-16.46, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Adopting laparoscopic cholecystectomy as a new technique for treatment of cholelithiasis, introduced a new spectrum of complications. Major biliary and vascular complications are life threatening, while minor complications cause patient discomfort and prolongation of

  14. Anæsthesia in Chest Surgery, with Special Reference to Controlled Respiration and Cyclopropane

    PubMed Central

    Nosworthy, M. D.

    1941-01-01

    's modification of Frenkner's spiropulsator or by hand. Active respiration will cease (i) if the patient's CO2 is lowered sufficiently by hyperventilation, (ii) if the patient's respiratory centre is depressed sufficiently by sedative and anæsthetic drugs, and (iii) by a combination of (i) and (ii) of less degree. The author uses the second method, depressing the respiratory centre with omnoponscopolamine, pentothal sodium, and then cycloprȯpane. The CO2 absorption method is essential for this technique, and this and controlled respiration should be mastered by the anæsthetist with a familiar agent and used at first only in uncomplicated cases. The significance of cardiac arrhythmias occuring with cyclopropane is discussed. The place of the other available anæsthetic agents is discussed particularly on the advisability of using local anæsthesia for the drainage of empyema or lung abscess. Pharyngeal airway or endotracheal tube? Anæsthesia may be maintained with a pharyngeal airway in many cases but intubation must be used when tracheobronchial suction may be necessary and when there may be difficulty in maintaining an unobstructed airway. A one-lung anæsthesia is ideal for pneumonectomy. This may be obtained by endotracheal anæsthesia after bronchial tamponage of the affected side (Crafoord, v. fig. 6b) or by an endobronchial intubation of the sound side (v. figs. 9b and 9c). Endobronchial placing of the breathing tube may be performed “blind”. Before deciding on blind bronchial intubation, the anæsthetist must examine X-ray films for any abnormality deviating the trachea or bronchi. Though the right bronchus may be easily intubated blindly as a rule, there is the risk of occluding the orifice of the upper lobe bronchus (fig. 9d) when the patient will become cyanosed. If the tube bevel is facing its orifice the risk of occlusion will be decreased (fig. 9c). Greater accuracy in placing the tube can be effected by inserting it under direct vision. Instruments for