Science.gov

Sample records for emras urban remediation

  1. Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

    2008-01-01

    The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

  2. Modeling of the EMRAS urban working group hypothetical scenario using the RESRAD-RDD methodology.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J.-J.; Yu, C.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. DOE

    2009-12-01

    The RESRAD-RDD methodology was applied to model the short- and long-term radiation exposures after a hypothetical radiological dispersal device (RDD) event in an urban environment. It was assumed that an RDD event would result in outside surface contamination of the exterior walls and roofs of surrounding buildings, as well as associated paved areas and lawns. The contaminants also might move inside the buildings and deposit on floors and interior walls. Some important input parameters include occupancy factors, building characteristics, and weathering of surface contamination. The modeling results include predicted external dose rates, relative contributions from important surfaces, annual and cumulative doses, and radionuclide concentrations. Potential countermeasures evaluated include grass removal, soil removal, and washing of paved areas.

  3. An urban lake remediation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, S.E.; Gardner, K.H.; Jennings, A.A.

    1998-07-01

    Circumstances provided the opportunity to study a small urban lake as the surrounding municipalities attempted to improve its aesthetic quality by dredging. This manuscript focuses primarily on the sediments in the system: accumulation rates, the expected dynamics of the lake bed drying process, and the influence of the sediments on water quality.

  4. Activities of the EMRAS Tritium/C14 Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.A.; Balonov, M.; Venter, A

    2005-07-15

    A new model evaluation program, Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS), was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in September 2003. EMRAS includes a working group (WG) on modeling tritium and C-14 transfer through the environment to biota and man. The main objective of this WG is to develop and test models of the uptake, formation and translocation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in food crops, animals and aquatic systems. To the extent possible, the WG is carrying out its work by comparing model predictions with experimental data to identify the modeling approaches and assumptions that lead to the best agreement between predictions and observations. Results for scenarios involving a chronically contaminated aquatic ecosystem and short-term exposure of soybeans are presently being analyzed. In addition, calculations for scenarios involving chronically contaminated terrestrial food chains and hypothetical short-term releases are currently underway, and a pinetree scenario is being developed. The preparation of datasets on tritium dynamics in large animals and fish is being encouraged, since these are the areas of greatest uncertainty in OBT modeling. These activities will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the

  6. Progresses in tritium accident modelling in the frame of IAEA EMRAS II

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Melintescu, A.

    2015-03-15

    The assessment of the environmental impact of tritium release from nuclear facilities is a topic of interest in many countries. In the IAEA's Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS I) programme, progresses for routine releases were done and in the EMRAS II programme a dedicated working group (WG 7 - Tritium Accidents) focused on the potential accidental releases (liquid and atmospheric pathways). The progresses achieved in WG 7 were included in a complex report - a technical document of IAEA covering both liquid and atmospheric accidental release consequences. A brief description of the progresses achieved in the frame of EMRAS II WG 7 is presented. Important results have been obtained concerning washout rate, the deposition on the soil of HTO and HT, the HTO uptake by leaves and the subsequent conversion to OBT (organically bound tritium) during daylight. Further needs of the processes understanding and the experimental efforts are emphasised.

  7. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  8. Sediments, porewaters and diagenesis in an urban water body, Salford, UK: impacts of remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kevin G.; Boyd, Nathan A.; Boult, Stephen

    2003-07-01

    Contaminated sediments deposited within urban water bodies commonly exert a significant negative effect on overlying water quality. However, our understanding of the processes operating within such anthropogenic sediments is currently poor. This paper describes the nature of the sediment and early diagenetic reactions in a highly polluted major urban water body (the Salford Quays of the Manchester Ship Canal) that has undergone remediation focused on the water column.The style of sedimentation within Salford Quays has been significantly changed as a result of remediation of the water column. Pre-remediation sediments are composed of a range of natural detrital grains, predominantly quartz and clay, and anthropogenic detrital material dominated by industrial furnace-derived metal-rich slag grains. Post-remediation sediments are composed of predominantly autochthonous material, including siliceous algal remains and clays. At the top of the pre-remediation sediments and immediately beneath the post-remediation sediments is a layer significantly enriched in furnace-derived slag grains, input into the basin as a result of site clearance prior to water-column remediation. These grains contain a high level of metals, resulting in a significantly enhanced metal concentration in the sediments at this depth.Porewater analysis reveals the importance of both bacterial organic matter oxidation reactions and the dissolution of industrial grains upon the mobility of nutrient and chemical species within Salford Quays. Minor release of iron and manganese at shallow depths is likely to be taking place as a result of bacterial Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. Petrographic analysis reveals that the abundant authigenic mineral within the sediment is manganese-rich vivianite, and thus Fe(II) and Mn(II) released by bacterial reactions may be being taken up through the precipitation of this mineral. Significant porewater peaks in iron, manganese and silicon deeper in the sediment column are

  9. Effectiveness and sustainability of remedial actions for land restoration in Abeokuta urban communities, Ogun State, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawal-Adebowale, Okanlade

    2016-04-01

    Land as a major collective human property faces a great deal of threats and eventual degradation from both natural and human causal factors across the globe. But for the central role of land in human's sustenance and quality living, man cannot afford to lose its natural asset and as such takes mitigating or remedial actions to save and restore his land for sustainable use. In view of this, the study assessed the causal factors of land degradation in urban areas of Abeokuta and effectiveness and sustainability of the taken remedial actions to stem the tide of land degradation in the study area. The selected communities were purposively selected based on the observed prevalence of degraded lands in the areas. A qualitative research approach which encompasses observational techniques - participant/field observation, interactive discussion and photographic capturing, was used for collection of data on land degradation in the study area. A combination of phenomenological, inductive thematic analysis and conversation/discourse analysis was employed for data analysis. The results showed land gradients/slopes, rainfall, run-offs/erosion, land-entrenched foot impacts, sand scraping/mining, poor/absence of drainage system and land covers as causal factors of land degradation in the study area. The employed remedial actions for restoration of degraded land included filling of drenches with sand bags, wood logs, bricks and stones, and sand filling. The study though observed that filling of drenches caused by erosion with rubles/stones and construction of drainage were effective remedial actions, good drainage system was presumed to be the most appropriate and sustainable remedial action for land restoration in the study area.

  10. Urban geochemistry: research strategies to assist risk assessment and remediation of brownfield sites in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Thornton, I; Farago, M E; Thums, C R; Parrish, R R; McGill, R A R; Breward, N; Fortey, N J; Simpson, P; Young, S D; Tye, A M; Crout, N M J; Hough, R L; Watt, J

    2008-12-01

    Urban geochemical maps of Wolverhampton and Nottingham, based on multielement analysis of surface soils, have shown distribution patterns of "total" metals concentrations relating to past and present industrial and domestic land use and transport systems. Several methods have been used to estimate the solubility and potential bioavailability of metals, their mineral forms and potential risks to urban population groups. These include sequential chemical extraction, soil pore water extraction and analysis, mineralogical analysis by scanning electron microscopy, source apportionment by lead isotope analysis and the development of models to predict metal uptake by homegrown vegetables to provide an estimate of risk from metal consumption and exposure. The results from these research strategies have been integrated with a geographical information system (GIS) to provide data for future land-use planning. PMID:18584292

  11. Urban gardens: Lead exposure, recontamination mechanisms, and implications for remediation design

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Heather F. Hausladen, Debra M.; Brabander, Daniel J.

    2008-07-15

    Environmental lead contamination is prevalent in urban areas where soil represents a significant sink and pathway of exposure. This study characterizes the speciation of lead that is relevant to local recontamination and to human exposure in the backyard gardens of Roxbury and Dorchester, MA, USA. One hundred forty-one backyard gardens were tested by X-ray fluorescence, and 81% of gardens have lead levels above the US EPA action limit of 400 {mu}g/g. Raised gardening beds are the in situ exposure reduction method used in the communities to promote urban gardening. Raised beds were tested for lead and the results showed that the lead concentration increased from an initial range of 150{+-}40 {mu}g/g to an average of 336 {mu}g/g over 4 years. The percent distribution of lead in the fine grain soil (<100 {mu}m) and the trace metal signature of the raised beds support the conclusion that the mechanism of recontamination is wind-transported particles. Scanning electron microscopy and sequential extraction were used to characterize the speciation of lead, and the trace metal signature of the fine grain soil in both gardens and raised gardening beds is characteristic of lead-based paint. This study demonstrates that raised beds are a limited exposure reduction method and require maintenance to achieve exposure reduction goals. An exposure model was developed based on a suite of parameters that combine relevant values from the literature with site-specific quantification of exposure pathways. This model suggests that consumption of homegrown produce accounts for only 3% of children's daily exposure of lead while ingestion of fine grained soil (<100 {mu}m) accounts for 82% of the daily exposure. This study indicates that urban lead remediation on a yard-by-yard scale requires constant maintenance and that remediation may need to occur on a neighborhood-wide scale.

  12. Urban gardens: lead exposure, recontamination mechanisms, and implications for remediation design.

    PubMed

    Clark, Heather F; Hausladen, Debra M; Brabander, Daniel J

    2008-07-01

    Environmental lead contamination is prevalent in urban areas where soil represents a significant sink and pathway of exposure. This study characterizes the speciation of lead that is relevant to local recontamination and to human exposure in the backyard gardens of Roxbury and Dorchester, MA, USA. One hundred forty-one backyard gardens were tested by X-ray fluorescence, and 81% of gardens have lead levels above the US EPA action limit of 400 microg/g. Raised gardening beds are the in situ exposure reduction method used in the communities to promote urban gardening. Raised beds were tested for lead and the results showed that the lead concentration increased from an initial range of 150+/-40 microg/g to an average of 336 microg/g over 4 years. The percent distribution of lead in the fine grain soil (<100 microm) and the trace metal signature of the raised beds support the conclusion that the mechanism of recontamination is wind-transported particles. Scanning electron microscopy and sequential extraction were used to characterize the speciation of lead, and the trace metal signature of the fine grain soil in both gardens and raised gardening beds is characteristic of lead-based paint. This study demonstrates that raised beds are a limited exposure reduction method and require maintenance to achieve exposure reduction goals. An exposure model was developed based on a suite of parameters that combine relevant values from the literature with site-specific quantification of exposure pathways. This model suggests that consumption of homegrown produce accounts for only 3% of children's daily exposure of lead while ingestion of fine grained soil (<100 microm) accounts for 82% of the daily exposure. This study indicates that urban lead remediation on a yard-by-yard scale requires constant maintenance and that remediation may need to occur on a neighborhood-wide scale.

  13. Fragmentary Cohorts, Full Cohorts, and the Placement/Course Level Match in Remedial Mathematics Courses among Urban Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, William; Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Cypers, Scott; Lester, Jaime; Moon, Hye

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory description of remedial coursetaking over several semesters. In attempting to characterize the introductory course classrooms of urban community colleges, it proposes a distinction between fragmentary and full cohorts. Also proposed is a concept little examined in community colleges, the placement/course level match,…

  14. Spatial and temporal variation of freely dissolved PAHs in an urban river undergoing Superfund remediation

    PubMed Central

    Sower, GJ; Anderson, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Urban rivers with a history of industrial use can exhibit spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations that may significantly affect risk evaluations and even the assessment of remediation efforts. Concentrations of 15 biologically available priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured over five years along 18.5 miles of the lower Willamette River using passive sampling devices and HPLC. The study area includes the Portland Harbor Superfund megasite with several PAH sources including remediation operations for coal tar at RM 6.3 west and an additional Superfund site, McCormick and Baxter, at RM 7 east consisting largely of creosote contamination. Study results show that organoclay capping at the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site reduced PAHs from a pre-cap average of 440 ± 422 ng/L to 8 ± 3 ng/L post-capping. Results also reveal that dredging of submerged coal tar nearly tripled nearby freely dissolved PAH concentrations. For apportioning sources, fluoranthene/ pyrene and phenanthrene/anthracene diagnostic ratios from passive sampling devices were established for creosote and coal tar contamination and compared to published sediment values. PMID:19174872

  15. Bioavailability-Based In Situ Remediation To Meet Future Lead (Pb) Standards in Urban Soils and Gardens.

    PubMed

    Henry, Heather; Naujokas, Marisa F; Attanayake, Chammi; Basta, Nicholas T; Cheng, Zhongqi; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Maddaloni, Mark; Schadt, Christopher; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2015-08-01

    Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the blood Pb reference value to 5 μg/dL. The lower reference value combined with increased repurposing of postindustrial lands are heightening concerns and driving interest in reducing soil Pb exposures. As a result, regulatory decision makers may lower residential soil screening levels (SSLs), used in setting Pb cleanup levels, to levels that may be difficult to achieve, especially in urban areas. This paper discusses challenges in remediation and bioavailability assessments of Pb in urban soils in the context of lower SSLs and identifies research needs to better address those challenges. Although in situ remediation with phosphate amendments is a viable option, the scope of the problem and conditions in urban settings may necessitate that SSLs be based on bioavailable rather than total Pb concentrations. However, variability in soil composition can influence bioavailability testing and soil amendment effectiveness. More data are urgently needed to better understand this variability and increase confidence in using these approaches in risk-based decision making, particularly in urban areas.

  16. Bioavailability-Based In Situ Remediation To Meet Future Lead (Pb) Standards in Urban Soils and Gardens

    DOE PAGES

    Henry, Heather; Naujokas, Marisa F.; Attanayake, Chammi; Basta, Nicholas T.; Cheng, Zhongqi; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Maddaloni, Mark; Schadt, Christopher; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2015-07-03

    Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the blood Pb reference value to 5 μg/dL. The lower reference value combined with increased repurposing of postindustrial lands are heightening concerns and driving interest in reducing soil Pb exposures. As a result, regulatory decision makers may lower residential soil screening levels (SSLs), used in setting Pb cleanup levels, to levels that may be difficult to achieve, especially in urban areas. This study discusses challenges in remediation and bioavailability assessments of Pb in urban soils in the context of lower SSLs and identifies research needs to better address those challenges. Althoughmore » in situ remediation with phosphate amendments is a viable option, the scope of the problem and conditions in urban settings may necessitate that SSLs be based on bioavailable rather than total Pb concentrations. However, variability in soil composition can influence bioavailability testing and soil amendment effectiveness. Finally, more data are urgently needed to better understand this variability and increase confidence in using these approaches in risk-based decision making, particularly in urban areas.« less

  17. Bioavailability-Based In Situ Remediation To Meet Future Lead (Pb) Standards in Urban Soils and Gardens

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Heather; Naujokas, Marisa F.; Attanayake, Chammi; Basta, Nicholas T.; Cheng, Zhongqi; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Maddaloni, Mark; Schadt, Christopher; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2015-07-03

    Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the blood Pb reference value to 5 μg/dL. The lower reference value combined with increased repurposing of postindustrial lands are heightening concerns and driving interest in reducing soil Pb exposures. As a result, regulatory decision makers may lower residential soil screening levels (SSLs), used in setting Pb cleanup levels, to levels that may be difficult to achieve, especially in urban areas. This study discusses challenges in remediation and bioavailability assessments of Pb in urban soils in the context of lower SSLs and identifies research needs to better address those challenges. Although in situ remediation with phosphate amendments is a viable option, the scope of the problem and conditions in urban settings may necessitate that SSLs be based on bioavailable rather than total Pb concentrations. However, variability in soil composition can influence bioavailability testing and soil amendment effectiveness. Finally, more data are urgently needed to better understand this variability and increase confidence in using these approaches in risk-based decision making, particularly in urban areas.

  18. EmrA1 Membrane Fusion Protein of Francisella tularensis LVS is required for Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Intramacrophage Survival and Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo; Banik, Sukalyani; Rane, Harshita; Mora, Vanessa T.; Rabadi, Seham M.; Doyle, Christopher R.; Thanassi, David G.; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar; Malik, Meenakshi

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Category A Biodefense agent that causes a fatal human disease known as tularemia. The pathogenicity of F. tularensis depends on its ability to persist inside host immune cells primarily by resisting an attack from host-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Based on the ability of F. tularensis to resist high ROS/RNS levels, we have hypothesized that additional unknown factors act in conjunction with known antioxidant defenses to render ROS resistance. By screening a transposon insertion library of F. tularensis LVS in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we have identified an oxidant sensitive mutant in putative EmrA1 (FTL_0687) secretion protein. The results demonstrate that the emrA1 mutant is highly sensitive to oxidants and several antimicrobial agents, and exhibits diminished intramacrophage growth that can be restored to wild type F. tularensis LVS levels either by transcomplementation, inhibition of ROS generation, or infection in NADPH oxidase deficient (gp91Phox−/−) macrophages. The emrA1 mutant is attenuated for virulence, which is restored by infection in gp91Phox−/− mice. Further, EmrA1 contributes to oxidative stress resistance by affecting secretion of Francisella antioxidant enzymes SodB and KatG. This study exposes unique links between transporter activity and the antioxidant defense mechanisms of F. tularensis. PMID:24397487

  19. Remediating Mass Movements, induced by Water, in Urban Environments - an example from Chalki Village, Peloponnese, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozos, D.; Loupasakis, C.; Koumantakis, J.; Tsangaratos, P.; Markantonis, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Village of Chalki, located in Korinthos Prefecture, Northern Peloponnese, Greece, is being affected by severe mass movements that have disrupted large portions of the urban settlement, since 1950. In the following years, these phenomena where occasionally reactivated either as a consequence of human interventions and activities or extreme natural events, such as heavy rainfall and seismic activity. In 2003, after a three years long period of heavy rainfall, a number of serious damages were recorded in the region. Specifically, the direct consequences that followed the reactivation of the mass movements were identified as damages recorded on existing buildings, fencing walls, water supply networks as well as on the road network. The observed mass movements caused serious problems in the region that surrounded the village of Chalki, impeding its development, and spreading insecurity among the residents. The severity of the damages forced the authorities to assign the study of these slope movements to our research team. The purpose of this study was to highlight the slope stability problems and systematically study the evolution of the mass movement. More specifically, a detailed geotechnical survey was conducted by (a) collecting and processing the available bibliographical data, (b) mapping and classifying the lithological structure of the research area, (c) executing several field and laboratory tests for the estimation of the physical and mechanical properties of each lithological unit, (d) installing and monitoring specific landslide monitoring systems and (e) conducting all necessary limit equilibrium stability analysis for the design of the proper remedial measures. The monitoring systems included (a) a number of inclinometers for measuring deep displacements, (b) a number of tell-tale crack meters, to measure the surface movements and (c) piezometers, to control the fluctuation of groundwater level. The recordings of the monitoring systems showed a

  20. Case Study of Urban Residential Remediation and Restoration in Port Hope, Canada - 13250

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Brian; DeJong, John; Owen, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The Canadian Municipality of Port Hope, Ontario, is located some 100 km east of Toronto and has been the location of radium and/or uranium refining since the 1930's. Historically, these activities involved materials containing radium-226, uranium, arsenic and other contaminants generated by the refining process. In years past, properties and sites in Port Hope became contaminated from spillage during transportation, unrecorded, un-monitored or unauthorized diversion of contaminated fill and materials, wind and water erosion and spread from residue storage areas. Residential properties in Port Hope impacted by radioactive materials are being addressed by the Canadian federal government under programs administered by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office (LLRWMO) and the Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office (PHAIMO). Issues that currently arise at these properties are addressed by the LLRWMO's Interim Waste Management Program (IWM). In the future, these sites will be included in the PHAIMO's Small Scale Sites (SSS) remedial program. The LLRWMO has recently completed a remediation and restoration program at a residential property in Port Hope that has provided learnings that will be applicable to the PHAIMO's upcoming SSS remedial effort. The work scope at this property involved remediating contaminated refinery materials that had been re-used in the original construction of the residence. Following removal of the contaminated materials, the property was restored for continued residential use. This kind of property represents a relatively small, but potentially challenging subset of the portfolio of sites that will eventually be addressed by the SSS program. (authors)

  1. Development and validation of a model for tritium accumulation by a freshwater bivalve using the IAEA EMRAS scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Inoue, Y.; Takeda, H.; Yanagisawa, K.; Fuma, S.; Ishii, N.; Kuroda, N.; Yankovich, T.; Kim, S. B.; Davis, P.

    2008-07-15

    A six-compartment metabolic model for tritium accumulation by bivalves was developed and validated using two observed data sets supplied in an international IAEA program for validation of environmental models, EMRAS (Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety, 2003-2007). The data observed were presented in scenarios for model prediction of temporal change of HTO and OBT concentrations in Barnes mussels (Elliptio complanata). In the Uptake Scenario, mussels were transplanted from a site with background tritium concentrations into a lake, which has historically received tritium inputs over time from up-gradient waste management areas. Another data set was presented in the Depuration Scenario for model prediction of the temporal decrease in HTO and OBT concentrations in the mussels following transplantation from the lake into another lake with significantly lower tritium levels. The model simulation was able to reproduce the observation that the amount of hydrogen taken from sediment was very small compared with that taken from lake water. (authors)

  2. The use of historical imagery in the remediation of an urban hazardous waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    The information derived from the interpretation of historical aerial photographs is perhaps the most basic multitemporal application of remote-sensing data. Aerial photographs dating back to the early 20th century can be extremely valuable sources of historical landscape activity. In this application, imagery from 1918 to 1927 provided a wealth of information about chemical weapons testing, storage, handling, and disposal of these hazardous materials. When analyzed by a trained photo-analyst, the 1918 aerial photographs resulted in 42 features of potential interest. When compared with current remedial activities and known areas of contamination, 33 of 42 or 78.5% of the features were spatially correlated with areas of known contamination or other remedial hazardous waste cleanup activity. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  3. The use of historical imagery in the remediation of an urban hazardous waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    The information derived from the interpretation of historical aerial photographs is perhaps the most basic multitemporal application of remote-sensing data. Aerial photographs dating back to the early 20th century can be extremely valuable sources of historical landscape activity. In this application, imagery from 1918 to 1927 provided a wealth of information about chemical weapons testing, storage, handling, and disposal of these hazardous materials. When analyzed by a trained photo-analyst, the 1918 aerial photographs resulted in 42 features of potential interest. When compared with current remedial activities and known areas of contamination, 33 of 42 or 78.5% of the features were spatially correlated with areas of known contamination or other remedial hazardous waste cleanup activity.

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban river undergoing Superfund remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Aregory James Sower; Kim A. Anderson

    2008-12-15

    Urban rivers with a history of industrial use can exhibit spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations that may significantly affect risk evaluations and even the assessment of remediation efforts. Concentrations of 15 biologically available priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured over five years along 18.5 miles of the lower Willamette River using passive sampling devices and HPLC. The study area includes the Portland Harbor Superfund megasite with several PAH sources including remediation operations for coal tar at RM 6.3 west and an additional Superfund site, McCormick and Baxter, at RM 7 east consisting largely of creosote contamination. Study results show that organoclay capping at the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site reduced PAHs from a precap average of 440 {+-} 422 ng/L to 8 {+-} 3 ng/L postcapping. Results also reveal that dredging of submerged coal tar nearly tripled nearby freely dissolved PAH concentrations. For apportioning sources, fluoranthene/pyrene and phenanthrene/anthracene diagnostic ratios from passive sampling devices were established for creosote and coal tar contamination and compared to published sediment values. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Wildlife friendly roads: the impacts of roads on wildlife in urban areas and potential remedies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Seth P D; Brown, Justin L.; Sikich, Jeff A.; Schoonmaker, Catherine M.; Boydston, Erin E.

    2014-01-01

    Roads are one of the most important factors affecting the ability of wildlife to live and move within an urban area. Roads physically replace wildlife habitat and often reduce habitat quality nearby, fragment the remaining habitat, and cause increased mortality through vehicle collisions. Much ecological research on roads has focused on whether animals are successfully crossing roads, or if the road is a barrier to wildlife movement, gene flow, or functional connectivity. Roads can alter survival and reproduction for wildlife, even among species such as birds that cross roads easily. Here we examine the suite of potential impacts of roads on wildlife, but we focus particularly on urban settings. We report on studies, both in the literature and from our own experience, that have addressed wildlife and roads in urban landscapes. Although road ecology is a growing field of study, relatively little of this research, and relatively few mitigation projects, have been done in urban landscapes. We also draw from the available science on road impacts in rural areas when urban case studies have not fully addressed key topics.

  6. The Challenges Of Investigating And Remediating Port Hope's Small-Scale Urban Properties - 13115

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Walter van; Case, Glenn; Benson, John; Herod, Judy; Yule, Adam

    2013-07-01

    An important component of the Port Hope Project, the larger of the two projects comprising the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), is the investigation of all 4,800 properties in the Municipality of Port Hope for low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and the remediation of approximately 10% of these. Although the majority of the individual properties are not expected to involve technically sophisticated remediation programs, the large number of property owners and individually unique properties are expected to present significant logistic challenges that will require a high degree of planning, organization and communication. The protocol and lessons learned described will be of interest to those considering similar programs. Information presented herein is part of a series of papers presented by the PHAI Management Office (PHAI MO) at WM Symposium '13 describing the history of the Port Hope Project and current project status. Other papers prepared for WM Symposium '13 address the large-scale site cleanup and the construction of the long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) where all of the LLRW will be consolidated and managed within an engineered, above-ground mound. (authors)

  7. Renewable Energy Production and Urban Remediation: Modeling the biogeochemical cycle at contaminated urban brownfields and the potential for renewable energy production and mitigation of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.

    2014-12-01

    Brownfields or urban sites that have been contaminated as a result of historic practices are present throughout the world. In the United States alone, the National Research Council has estimated that there are approximately 300,000 to 400,000 sites which have been contaminated by improper use and disposal of chemicals (NRC 1993). The land available at these sites is estimated at several million acres; however, the presence of high levels of contamination in the soil and groundwater makes it difficult to utilize these sites for traditional purposes such as agriculture. Further, the time required to remediate these contaminants to regulated levels is in the order of decades, which often results in long-term economic consequences for the areas near these sites. There has been significant interest in developing these sites as potential sources of renewable energy production in order to increase the economic viability of these sites and to provide alternative land resources for renewable energy production (EPA 2012). Solar energy, wind energy, and bioenergy from lignocellulosic biomass production have been identified as the main sources of renewable energy that can be produced at these locations. However, the environmental impacts of such a policy and the implications for greenhouse gas emissions, particularly resulting from changes in land-use impacting the biogeochemical cycle at these sites, have not been studied extensively to date. This study uses the biogeochemical process-based model DNDC to simulate carbon sequestration, nitrous oxide emissions and methane emissions from typical urban brownfield systems in the United States, when renewable energy systems are deployed. Photovoltaic solar energy and lignocellulosic biomass energy systems are evaluated here. Plants modeled include those most widely used for both bioenergy and remediation such as woody trees. Model sensitivity to soil conditions, contaminant levels and local weather data and the resulting impacts on

  8. History of New Bedford Harbor: Ecological consequences of urbanization and implications for remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Voyer, R.A.; Pesch, C.; Garber, J.; Cabral, S.; Copeland, J.; Comeleo, R.

    1995-12-31

    New Bedford, Massachusetts is the product of {approximately}300 years of agricultural, commercial and industrial activities. Located on the Acushnet River and Buzzard`s Bay, New Bedford is renowned as a former whaling center and former producer of fine quality textiles. It has, however, gained notoriety as a Superfund site contaminated with PCBs. The historical research enhances understanding of sources of cumulative ecological impacts in the Acushnet River estuary. Stressors are reviewed and impacts interpreted in terms of geographic and cultural considerations aided by geographic information system techniques, Analysis of information reveals four sequential developmental periods, each with a distinctive effect an estuarine conditions. Changes in coastline morphology and loss of habitat accompanied wharf building during the whaling period. Wetlands were filled and became building sites during the textile phase. A six-fold population increase between 1870 and 1920 accompanied expansion of textile industry and resulted in increased nutrient loading and raw sewage discharge to the estuary. Shellfish beds were closed throughout estuary in 1904, due to outbreaks of typhoid fever. They remain closed. During the post-textile period, discharge of PCBs further limited fishing in New Bedford and presently restricts harbor restoration. Construction of a hurricane barrier to protect the fishing fleet and city further altered estuarine hydrology. This historical analysis represents a significant adjunct to scientific examination of this site and provides a valuable context for design and conduct of remediation activities.

  9. Use of biosurfactants from urban wastes compost in textile dyeing and soil remediation.

    PubMed

    Montoneri, Enzo; Boffa, Vittorio; Savarino, Piero; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio; Micheletti, Luca; Gianotti, Carlo; Chiono, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    A compost isolated humic acid-like (cHAL) material was pointed out in previous work for its potential as auxiliary in chemical technology. Its potential is based on its relatively low 0.4gL(-1) critical micellar concentration (cmc) in water, which enables cHAL to enhance the water solubility of hydrophobic substances, like phenanthrene, when used at higher concentrations than 0.4gL(-1). This material could be obtained from a 1:1 v/v mixture of municipal solid and lignocellulosic wastes composted for 15 days. The compost, containing 69.3% volatile solids, 39.6% total organic C and 21C/N ratio, was extracted for 24h at 65 degrees C under N2 with aqueous 0.1molL(-1) NaOH and 0.1molL(-1) Na4P2O7, and the solution was acidified to separate the precipitated cHAL in 12% yield from soluble carbohydrates and other humic and non-humic substances. In this work two typical applications of surfactants, i.e., textile dyeing (TD) and soil remediation by washing (SW), were chosen as grounds for testing the performance of the cHAL biosurfactant against the one of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), which is a well established commercial synthetic surfactant. The TD trials were carried out with nylon 6 microfiber and a water insoluble dye, while the SW tests were performed with two soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) for several decades. Performances were rated in the TD experiments based on the fabric colour intensity (DeltaE) and uniformity (sigmaDeltaE), and in the SW experiments based on the total hydrocarbons concentration (CWPAH) and on the residual surfactant (Cre) concentrations in the washing solution equilibrated with the contaminated soils. The results show that both cHAL and SDS exhibit enhanced performance when applied above their cmc values. However, while in the TD case a significant performance effect was observed at the surfactants cmc value, in the SW case the required surfactants concentration values were equivalent to 25-125xcmc for cHAL and to

  10. 24 CFR 590.31 - Corrective and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corrective and remedial action. 590.31 Section 590.31 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN HOMESTEADING § 590.31 Corrective and remedial action....

  11. 24 CFR 590.31 - Corrective and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corrective and remedial action. 590.31 Section 590.31 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN HOMESTEADING § 590.31 Corrective and remedial action....

  12. Remediation of Urban River Water by Pontederia Cordata Combined with Artificial Aeration: Organic Matter and Nutrients Removal and Root-Adhered Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dungang; Xu, Huan; He, Yan; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Minsheng

    2015-01-01

    Macrophyte combined with artificial aeration is a promising in situ remediation approach for urban rivers polluted with nutrients and organic matter. However, seasonal variations and aeration effects on phytoremediation performance and root-adhered microbial communities are still unclear. In this study, Pontederia cordata was used to treat polluted urban river water under various aeration intensities. Results showed that the highest removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD(Cr)) and total nitrogen (TN) were attained under aeration of 30 L min(-1) in spring and summer and 15 L min(-1) in autumn, while total phosphorus (TP) removal reached maximum with aeration of 15 L min(-1) in all seasons. Moderate aeration was beneficial for increasing the diversity of root-adhered bacteria communities, and the shift of bacterial community structure was more pronounced in spring and autumn with varying aeration intensity. The dual effect, i.e. turbulence and dissolved oxygen (DO), of aeration on the removal of COD(Cr) and TN prevailed over the individual effect of DO, while DO was the most influential factor for TP removal and the root-adhered bacterial community diversity. P. cordata combined with 15 L min(-1) aeration was deemed to be the best condition tested in this study.

  13. 24 CFR 8.52 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 8... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enforcement § 8.52 Remedial and affirmative action. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the responsible civil rights official finds that a recipient has...

  14. 24 CFR 8.52 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 8... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enforcement § 8.52 Remedial and affirmative action. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the responsible civil rights official finds that a recipient has...

  15. 24 CFR 8.52 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 8... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enforcement § 8.52 Remedial and affirmative action. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the responsible civil rights official finds that a recipient has...

  16. 24 CFR 8.52 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 8... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enforcement § 8.52 Remedial and affirmative action. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the responsible civil rights official finds that a recipient has...

  17. 24 CFR 8.52 - Remedial and affirmative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action. 8... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enforcement § 8.52 Remedial and affirmative action. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the responsible civil rights official finds that a recipient has...

  18. Remediation of Highland Drive Landfill: Technical Challenges of Segregating Co-Mingled LLRW and Municipal Solid Waste in an Urbanized Area - 13319

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Jeff; Lawrence, Dave; Case, Glenn; Fergusson Jones, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    Highland Drive Landfill is an inactive Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfill which received waste from the 1940's until its closure in 1991. During a portion of its active life, the Landfill received low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) which currently exists both in a defined layer and co-mingled with MSW. Remediation of this site to remove the LLRW to meet established cleanup criteria, forms part of the Port Hope Project being undertaken by Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) as part of the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI). The total volume of LLRW and co-mingled LLRW/MSW estimated to require removal from the Highland Drive Landfill is approximately 51,900 cubic metres (m{sup 3}). The segregation and removal of LLRW at the Highland Drive Landfill presents a number of unique technical challenges due to the co-mingled waste and location of the Landfill in an urbanized area. Key challenges addressed as part of the design process included: delineation of the extent of LLRW, development of cut lines, and estimation of the quantity of co-mingled LLRW in a heterogeneous matrix; protection of adjacent receptors in a manner which would not impact the use of adjacent facilities which include residences, a recreational facility, and a school; coordination and phasing of the work to allow management of six separate material streams including clean soil, MSW, co-mingled LLRW/MSW, LLRW, un-impacted water, and impacted water/leachate within a confined environment; and development of a multi-tiered and adaptive program of monitoring and control measures for odour, dust, and water including assessment of risk of exceedance of monitoring criteria. In addition to ensuring public safety and protection of the environment during remedy implementation, significant effort in the design process was paid to balancing the advantages of increased certainty, including higher production rates, against the costs of attaining increased

  19. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  20. 24 CFR 511.82 - Corrective and remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM Grantee... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corrective and remedial actions. 511.82 Section 511.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  1. 24 CFR 511.82 - Corrective and remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM Grantee... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Corrective and remedial actions. 511.82 Section 511.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  2. Concerning Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, John P.

    1977-01-01

    The author argues that the key to teaching remedial mathematics is to persuade students to believe that they will advance intellectually by learning mathematics, and that this advance will increase the possibilities open to them. (SD)

  3. 24 CFR 1003.701 - Corrective and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corrective and remedial action. 1003.701 Section 1003.701 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY...

  4. 24 CFR 1003.703 - Other remedies for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other remedies for noncompliance. 1003.703 Section 1003.703 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY...

  5. 24 CFR 1003.701 - Corrective and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corrective and remedial action. 1003.701 Section 1003.701 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY...

  6. 24 CFR 511.82 - Corrective and remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM Grantee... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corrective and remedial actions. 511.82 Section 511.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  7. 24 CFR 511.82 - Corrective and remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM Grantee... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corrective and remedial actions. 511.82 Section 511.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  8. 24 CFR 511.82 - Corrective and remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM Grantee... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corrective and remedial actions. 511.82 Section 511.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  9. 24 CFR 1006.440 - Remedies for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remedies for noncompliance. 1006.440 Section 1006.440 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Monitoring and Accountability §...

  10. 24 CFR 1006.440 - Remedies for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remedies for noncompliance. 1006.440 Section 1006.440 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Monitoring and Accountability §...

  11. The Development and Evaluation of a Set of Multi-Media Self-Instructional Learning Activity Packages for Use in Remedial English at an Urban Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Ellen Jean Baird

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects on achievement and attitude of a method of teaching using multi-media self-instructional learning activity packages, with the conventional method of teaching by lecture and discussion. The subjects were 126 community college students enrolled in remedial English classes. Two instructors…

  12. 24 CFR 4.38 - Administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... by this section whether or not the Ethics Law Division refers a case under 24 CFR part 30, and... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative remedies. 4.38 Section 4.38 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and...

  13. 24 CFR 4.38 - Administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... by this section whether or not the Ethics Law Division refers a case under 24 CFR part 30, and... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative remedies. 4.38 Section 4.38 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and...

  14. Reimagining Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.; Williams, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the College Board's Community College Advisory Panel--a group of college presidents that advises the organization's membership on community college issues--asked these authors to write a paper describing effective remedial education programs. They never wrote the paper. The problem was not the lack of dedicated faculty and staff working…

  15. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  16. 24 CFR 590.31 - Corrective and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corrective and remedial action. 590.31 Section 590.31 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  17. 24 CFR 590.31 - Corrective and remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corrective and remedial action. 590.31 Section 590.31 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  18. In situ biomonitoring of juvenile Chinook salmon (Onchorhynchus tshawytscha) using biomarkers of chemical exposures and effects in a partially remediated urbanized waterway of the Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, Eva; Kelley, Matthew; Zhou, Guo-Dong; He, Ling Yu; McDonald, Thomas; Wang, Shirley; Duncan, Bruce; Meador, James; Donnelly, Kirby; Gallagher, Evan

    2010-10-15

    In situ biomonitoring has been used to assess the effects of pollution on aquatic species in heavily polluted waterways. In the current study, we used in situ biomonitoring in conjunction with molecular biomarker analysis to determine the effects of pollutant exposure in salmon caged in the Duwamish waterway, a Pacific Northwest Superfund site that has been subject to remediation. The Duwamish waterway is an important migratory route for Pacific salmon and has received historic inputs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Juvenile pre-smolt Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) caged for 8 days in the three contaminated sites in close proximity within the Duwamish were analyzed for steady state hepatic mRNA expression of 7 exposure biomarker genes encompassing several gene families and known to be responsive to pollutants, including cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and CYP2K1, glutathione S-transferase {pi} class (GST-{pi}), microsomal GST (mGST), glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), UDP-glucuronyltransferase family 1 (UDPGT), and type 2 deiodinase (type 2 DI, or D2). Quantitation of gene expression was accomplished by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in assays developed specifically for Chinook salmon genes. Gill PAH-DNA adducts were assessed as a chemical effects biomarker using {sup 32}P-postlabeling. The biomarkers in the field-caged fish were analyzed with respect to caged animals maintained at the hatchery receiving flow-through water. Chemical analysis of sediment samples from three field sampling sites revealed relatively high concentrations of total PAHs in one site (site B2, 6711 ng/g dry weight) and somewhat lower concentrations of PAHs in two adjacent sites (sites B3 and B4, 1482 and 1987 ng/g, respectively). In contrast, waterborne PAHs at all of the sampling sites were relatively low (<1 ng/L). Sediment PCBs at the sites ranged from a low of 421 ng/g at site B3

  19. In situ biomonitoring of juvenile Chinook salmon (Onchorhynchus tshawytscha) using biomarkers of chemical exposures and effects in a partially remediated urbanized waterway of the Puget Sound, WA

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Eva; Kelley, Matthew; Zhou, Guo-Dong; He, Ling Yu; McDonald, Thomas; Wang, Shirley; Duncan, Bruce; Meador, James; Donnelly, Kirby; Gallagher, Evan

    2012-01-01

    In situ biomonitoring has been used to assess the effects of pollution on aquatic species in heavily polluted waterways. In the current study, we used in situ biomonitoring in conjunction with molecular biomarker analysis to determine the effects of pollutant exposure in salmon caged in the Duwamish waterway, a Pacific Northwest Superfund site that has been subject to remediation. The Duwamish waterway is an important migratory route for Pacific salmon and has received historic inputs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Juvenile pre-smolt Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) caged for 8 days in the three contaminated sites in close proximity within the Duwamish were analyzed for steady state hepatic mRNA expression of 7 exposure biomarker genes encompassing several gene families and known to be responsive to pollutants, including cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and CYP2K1, glutathione S-transferase π class (GST pi), microsomal GST (mGST), glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), UDP-glucuronyltransferase family 1 (UDPGT), and type 2 deiodinase (type 2 DI, or D2). Quantitation of gene expression was accomplished by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in assays developed specifically for Chinook salmon genes. Gill PAH-DNA adducts were assessed as a chemical effects biomarker using 32P-postlabeling. The biomarkers in the field-caged fish were analyzed with respect to caged animals maintained at the hatchery receiving flow-through water. Chemical analysis of sediment samples from three field sampling sites revealed relatively high concentrations of total PAHs in one site (site B2, 6711 ng/g dry weight) and somewhat lower concentrations of PAHs in two adjacent sites (sites B3 and B4, 1482 and 1987 ng/g, respectively). In contrast, waterborne PAHs at all of the sampling sites were relatively low (<1 ng/L). Sediment PCBs at the sites ranged from a low of 421 ng/g at site B3, to 1160

  20. Reinventing Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    Remedial education, although widely used and disguised with other names, was rarely talked about for it could tarnish a school's reputation if widely discussed. Today, more and more colleges and universities are ditching the old stigma associated with remedial education, reinventing their remedial education and retention programs and, in the…

  1. Duct Remediation Program: Remediation operations and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Plutonium holdup material has accumulated in the process ventilation duct systems at Rocky Flats. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements identified ducts containing this material. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board and the Department of Energy established the criteria for remediation of these ducts. A remediation team was assembled and a program plan created. This program plan included activities such as fissile material accumulation identification, criticality safety assessments, radiation dose determinations, facility safety evaluations, prevention of future accumulation, and removal of holdup material. Several operational considerations had to be evaluated in determining completion of remediation.

  2. 24 CFR 570.496 - Remedies for noncompliance; opportunity for hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Remedies for noncompliance; opportunity for hearing. 570.496 Section 570.496 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND...

  3. Designing Clinical Remediation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleszewski, Susan C.

    1989-01-01

    Elements and considerations in the provision of effective remediation for optometry students not achieving in clinical competence are discussed. Remediation of technical, cognitive, and noncognitive skills are included. A course in professional communication offered by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry is described. (MSE)

  4. Preventing remediation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    Remediation, the design and construction of a remedy, typically represents the most significant portion of the cleanup process. The cost may be 5 to 10 times the cost of earlier investigation and feasibility efforts. Furthermore, the risks associated with remediation activities and their ability to meet ultimate cleanup goals and objectives are far greater than those associated with earlier efforts. Often times there are unrealistic expectations interjected throughout the design and construction process in the remediation field. The simple fact that most problems are buried, and one cannot see all that is below the ground surface provides sufficient uncertainty to result in problems. There are three key points during the remediation process which provide opportunities to prevent and avoid problems. These are: (1) during design; (2) during procurement and contracting; and (3) during construction. This paper examines actions which the author has found or believes will assist in providing a formula for success.

  5. Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are pervasive, severe, and largely independent of the positive and negative symptoms of the illness. These deficits are increasingly considered to be core features of schizophrenia with evidence that the extent of cognitive impairment is the most salient predictor of daily functioning. Unfortunately, current schizophrenia treatment has been limited in addressing the cognitive deficits of the illness. Alterations in neuroplasticity are hypothesized to underpin these cognitive deficits, though preserved neuroplasticity may offer an avenue towards cognitive remediation. Key neuroplastic principles to consider in designing remediation interventions include ensuring sufficient intensity and duration of remediation programs, "bottom-up" training that proceeds from simple to complex cognitive processes, and individual tailoring of remediation regimens. We discuss several cognitive remediation programs, including cognitive enhancement therapy, which embrace these principles to target neurocognitive and social cognitive improvements and which havebeen demonstrated to be effective in schizophrenia. Future directions in cognitive remediation research include potential synergy with pharmacologic treatment, non-invasive stimulation techniques, and psychosocial interventions, identification of patient characteristics that predict outcome with cognitive remediation, and increasing the access to these interventions in front-line settings. PMID:23430145

  6. Unconventional cancer remedies.

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, K J; Stewart, D E; Lippert, G P

    1988-01-01

    Unproven and disproven remedies continue to abound for illnesses for which conventional treatment is only partially effective. This is particularly true with cancer, for which up to 50% of patients may be receiving unorthodox therapy. This article examines unconventional cancer remedies, their adverse effects, their common factors and the basis for their appeal, as well as what motivates and characterizes patients who choose these treatments. Also discussed is an approach that may be used by the conventional physician for patients who are likely to seek unorthodox treatment. This approach will help patients make the best decision about their treatment and protect them from the hazards of unconventional remedies. PMID:3285984

  7. Development, Discouragement, or Diversion? New Evidence on the Effects of College Remediation Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Rodriguez, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Half of all college students will enroll in remedial coursework but evidence of its effectiveness is mixed. Using a regression-discontinuity design with data from a large urban community college system, we make three contributions. First, we articulate three alternative hypotheses regarding the potential impacts of remediation. Second, in addition…

  8. 24 CFR 146.47 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by... Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a) Where the Secretary finds that a recipient has... action. (b) Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative...

  9. 24 CFR 146.47 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by... Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a) Where the Secretary finds that a recipient has... action. (b) Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative...

  10. 24 CFR 146.47 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by... Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a) Where the Secretary finds that a recipient has... action. (b) Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative...

  11. 24 CFR 146.47 - Remedial and affirmative action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action by... Remedial and affirmative action by recipients. (a) Where the Secretary finds that a recipient has... action. (b) Even in the absence of a finding of discrimination, a recipient may take affirmative...

  12. Encapsulation as a passive soil remediation alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Mario, B.R. De

    1996-12-31

    By implementing institutional and engineering controls, a passive, cost-effective, remedial alternative has allowed redevelopment of an abandoned, industrial, site located in Newark, New Jersey. Soil and groundwater contaminants at the site include volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds and metals. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) recognized the impracticality of requiring an aggressive, localized, remedial action to clean up contaminated soil and groundwater in a region that has historically used fill to create land along the state`s waterways. By placing an institutional control, known as a Declaration of Environmental Restriction (DER), on the property, the NJDEP allowed contaminated fill to remain on site and approved encapsulation as the remedial action for the soil. The approved engineering control, encapsulation, consisted of the design and placement of an asphalt pavement cap that covered the affected areas of concern. The asphalt pavement cap prevents direct human contact to contaminated soil and leaching of contaminants in the soil into the groundwater by surface water infiltration. This paper focuses on the subsurface soil investigation and establishment of the DER. The benefits of this remedial alternative are: (1) the urban redevelopment of contaminated land while simultaneously ensuring protection to human health and the environment; (2) costs savings of not having to clean up a regional problem as if it were local; and (3) the facilitation of a property transfer transaction without the risk of future liability for an historical problem.

  13. Sources and Information about Urban Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Dana Scott; Kozeracki, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography directing readers to additional publications about urban education, addressing four issues of particular importance to today's urban community colleges and their nontraditional, underprepared student body: workforce preparation, institutional assessment, English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and remedial education,…

  14. Integrating Study Skills and Problem Solving into Remedial Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornick, Jonathan; Guy, G. Michael; Beckford, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Students at a large urban community college enrolled in seven classes of an experimental remedial algebra programme, which integrated study skills instruction and collaborative problem solving. A control group of seven classes was taught in a traditional lecture format without study skills instruction. Student performance in the course was…

  15. EXPERIMENTS WITH TOKEN REINFORCEMENT IN A REMEDIAL CLASSROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WOLF, MONTROSE M.; AND OTHERS

    IN AN AFTER-SCHOOL REMEDIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 16 FIFTH- AND SIXTH-GRADE URBAN DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS WERE TAUGHT TO MASTER STANDARD INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS WITH THE SUPPORT OF TOKEN REINFORCEMENTS. THE STUDENTS HAD SCORED 2 YEARS BELOW THE READING NORM ON THE STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST, AND THEIR MEDIAN IQ WAS 88. TOKEN POINTS WERE MANIPULATED…

  16. 24 CFR 1000.530 - What corrective and remedial actions will HUD request or recommend to address performance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What corrective and remedial....532 or § 1000.538? 1000.530 Section 1000.530 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN...

  17. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  18. Remediation; An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1988-09-01

    The U.SD. government began committing the nation legally and financially in the last decade to the ultimate remediation of virtually all of the hazardous wastes that were produced in the past and remain to threaten human health and the environment, all that continue to be generated, and all that will be created in the future. Whether engendered by acts of God or human industry, the laws and regulations mandate, hazardous wastes and the threats they pose will be removed or rendered harmless. As mobilization for tackling the monumental task implied by those commitments has progressed, key concepts have changed in meaning. The remedy of remediation once literally meant burying our hazardous waste problems in landfills, for example, a solution now officially defined as the least desirable-although still commonly chosen - course of action. The process of identifying hazardous substances and determining in what quantities they constitute health and environmental hazards continues apace. As measurement technologies become increasingly precise and capable to detecting more 9s to the right of the decimal point, acceptable levels of emissions into the air and concentrations in the ground or water are reduced. This article is intended as a sketch of where the national commitment of remediation currently stands, with examples of implications for both generators of hazardous wastes and those who have entered-or seek to enter-the rapidly growing business of remediation.

  19. Remedial design/remedial action strategy report

    SciTech Connect

    Dieffenbacher, R.G.

    1994-06-30

    This draft Regulatory Compliance Strategy (RCS) report will aid the ER program in developing and implementing Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) projects. The intent of the RCS is to provide guidance for the implementation of project management requirements and to allow the implementation of a flexible, graded approach to design requirements depending on the complexity, magnitude, schedule, risk, and cost for any project. The RCS provides a functional management-level guidance document for the identification, classification, and implementation of the managerial and regulatory aspects of an ER project. The RCS has been written from the perspective of the ER Design Manager and provides guidance for the overall management of design processes and elements. The RCS does not address the project engineering or specification level of detail. Topics such as project initiation, funding, or construction are presented only in the context in which these items are important as sources of information or necessary process elements that relate to the design project phases.

  20. 24 CFR 3.110 - Remedial and affirmative action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264. (c) Self-evaluation. Each recipient education institution shall... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action...

  1. 24 CFR 3.110 - Remedial and affirmative action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264. (c) Self-evaluation. Each recipient education institution shall... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action...

  2. 24 CFR 3.110 - Remedial and affirmative action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264. (c) Self-evaluation. Each recipient education institution shall... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action...

  3. 24 CFR 3.110 - Remedial and affirmative action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264. (c) Self-evaluation. Each recipient education institution shall... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action...

  4. 24 CFR 3.110 - Remedial and affirmative action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264. (c) Self-evaluation. Each recipient education institution shall... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remedial and affirmative action...

  5. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  6. Modularizing Remedial Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    As remedial mathematics education has become an increasingly important topic of conversation in higher education. Mathematics departments have been put under increased pressure to change their programs to increase the student success rate. A number of models have been introduced over the last decade that represent a wide range of new ideas and…

  7. COST OF MTBE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has raised concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to BTEX-only sites. To evaluate these cost, cost information for 311 sites was furnished by U.S. EPA Office of Undergr...

  8. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  9. Determining priorities of a remediation plan at urban scale by assessing the risk of metals and POPs for local population: The Acerra-Pomigliano-Marigliano conurbation case study in Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Stefano; Lima, Annamaria; Rezza, Carmela; Qi, Shihua; Qu, Chengkai; Chen, Wei; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the URGE (Urban Geochemistry) project aiming at depicting the environmental conditions of several cities in Europe, the north-eastern sector of the Naples metropolitan area (Italy), namely the Acerra-Pomigliano-Marigliano area (with ~160.000 inhabitants), has undergone a geochemical characterization based on topsoil sampling (145 samples over an area of 90 sqkm). The conurbation includes 6 municipalities (Acerra, Pomigliano D'Arco, Castello di Cisterna, Brusciano, Mariglianella and Marigliano) and considering the total extension of the urbanized areas (18-20 sqkm) the average population density could be corrected to 6-7000 inhabitants/sqkm. Soils of the area are mostly originated by the pedogenenesis of the original pyroclastics produced by the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano on the south-western side of the study area. The area has been selected because of both the presence of an historical industrial settlement on it (mainly devoted to plastic materials and synthetic fibers production) and of an incinerator which came into operation in March 2009. The main objective of the study was 1) to define the local geochemical baselines both for 53 elements (among which the toxic ones) and for some organic compounds, including PAHs, PCBs and OCPs and 2) to assess the environmental risk generated by polluted soils. Furthermore, the study aimed at supporting epidemiological researches and at establishing a record of the environmental status quo ante to evaluate in the future the impact of the incinerator on life quality and on health of local population. Obtained results showed that most of the urbanized areas of the Acerra-Pomigliano-Marigliano conurbations are characterized by concentrations of Pb, Zn and V exceeding the intervention limits established by the Italian Environmental law (D.Lgs. 152/2006). Agricultural soils, in the surroundings of the urbanized areas, are enriched in Cu, Co, Cd, Be and Ni, and the probable presence of illegal waste disposals

  10. [Cognitive remediation and nursing care].

    PubMed

    Schenin-King, Palmyre; Thomas, Fanny; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Bouaziz, Noomane; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Therapies based on cognitive remediation integrate psychiatric care. Cognitive remediation helps to ease cognitive disorders and enable patients to improve their day-to-day lives. It is essential to complete nurses' training in this field. This article presents the example of a patient with schizophrenia who followed the Cognitive Remediation Therapy programme, enabling him to access mainstream employment. PMID:27615702

  11. Development of a green remediation tool in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Zhang, Hong; Murayama, Koki; Hama, Yoshihito; Tsukada, Yasuhisa; Furukawa, Yasuhide

    2016-09-01

    The green remediation assessment tool for Japan (GRATJ) presented in this study is a spreadsheet-based software package developed to facilitate comparisons of the environmental impacts associated with various countermeasures against contaminated soil in Japan. This tool uses a life-cycle assessment-based model to calculate inventory inputs/outputs throughout the activity life cycle during remediation. Processes of 14 remediation methods for heavy metal contamination and 12 for volatile organic compound contamination are built into the tool. This tool can evaluate 130 inventory inputs/outputs and easily integrate those inputs/outputs into 9 impact categories, 4 integrated endpoints, and 1 index. Comparative studies can be performed by entering basic data associated with a target site. The integrated results can be presented in a simpler and clearer manner than the results of an inventory analysis. As a case study, an arsenic-contaminated soil remediation site was examined using this tool. Results showed that the integrated environmental impacts were greater with onsite remediation methods than with offsite ones. Furthermore, the contributions of CO2 to global warming, SO2 to urban air pollution, and crude oil to resource consumption were greater than other inventory inputs/outputs. The GRATJ has the potential to improve green remediation and can serve as a valuable tool for decision makers and practitioners in selecting countermeasures in Japan. PMID:26803220

  12. Development of a green remediation tool in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Zhang, Hong; Murayama, Koki; Hama, Yoshihito; Tsukada, Yasuhisa; Furukawa, Yasuhide

    2016-09-01

    The green remediation assessment tool for Japan (GRATJ) presented in this study is a spreadsheet-based software package developed to facilitate comparisons of the environmental impacts associated with various countermeasures against contaminated soil in Japan. This tool uses a life-cycle assessment-based model to calculate inventory inputs/outputs throughout the activity life cycle during remediation. Processes of 14 remediation methods for heavy metal contamination and 12 for volatile organic compound contamination are built into the tool. This tool can evaluate 130 inventory inputs/outputs and easily integrate those inputs/outputs into 9 impact categories, 4 integrated endpoints, and 1 index. Comparative studies can be performed by entering basic data associated with a target site. The integrated results can be presented in a simpler and clearer manner than the results of an inventory analysis. As a case study, an arsenic-contaminated soil remediation site was examined using this tool. Results showed that the integrated environmental impacts were greater with onsite remediation methods than with offsite ones. Furthermore, the contributions of CO2 to global warming, SO2 to urban air pollution, and crude oil to resource consumption were greater than other inventory inputs/outputs. The GRATJ has the potential to improve green remediation and can serve as a valuable tool for decision makers and practitioners in selecting countermeasures in Japan.

  13. Remediation technologies for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    Although soil and groundwater remediation has been conducted for many years, sediment remediation is still in its infancy. Regulatory agencies are now beginning to identify areas where contaminated sediments exist and evaluate their environmental impact. As these evaluations are completed, the projects must shift focus to how these sediments can be remediated. Also as the criteria for aquatic disposal of dredged sediments become more stringent, remediation technologies must be developed to address contaminated sediments generated by maintenance dredging.This report describes the various issues and possible technologies for sediment remediation.

  14. Development, Discouragement, or Diversion? New Evidence on the Effects of College Remediation. NBER Working Paper No. 18328

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Rodriguez, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Half of all college students take at least one remedial course as part of their postsecondary experience, despite mixed evidence on the effectiveness of this intervention. Using a regression-discontinuity design with data from a large urban community college system, we extend the research on remediation in three ways. First, we articulate three…

  15. Remediation to improve infiltration into compact soils.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nicholas C; Gulliver, John S; Nieber, John L; Kayhanian, Masoud

    2013-03-15

    Urban development usually involves soil compaction through converting large pervious land into developed land. This change typically increases runoff during runoff events and consequently may add to flooding and additional volume of runoff. The wash off of pollutants may also create numerous water quality and environmental problems for receiving waters. To alleviate this problem many municipalities are considering low impact development. One technique to reduce runoff in an urban area is to improve the soil infiltration. This study is specifically undertaken to investigate tilling and compost addition to improve infiltration rate, and to investigate measurement tools to assess the effectiveness of remediated soil. Soil remediation was performed at three sites in an urban area metropolitan area. Each site was divided into three plots: tilled, tilled with compost addition, and a control plot with no treatment. The infiltration effectiveness within each plot was assessed by measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(sat)) using the modified Philip Dunne (MPD) infiltrometer during pre- and post-treatment. In addition, the use of soil bulk density and soil strength as surrogate parameters for K(sat) was investigated. Results showed that deep tillage was effective at reducing the level of soil strength. Soil strength was approximately half that of the control plot in the first six inches of soil. At two of the sites, tilling was also ineffective at improving the infiltration capacity of the soil. The geometric mean of K(sat) was 0.5-2.3 times that of the control plot, indicating little overall improvement. Compost addition was more effective than tilling by reducing the soil strength and compaction and increasing soil infiltration. The geometric mean of K(sat) on the compost plots was 2.7-5.7 times that of the control plot. No strong correlations were observed before remediation between either soil bulk density or soil strength and K(sat). Simulation results showed

  16. Remediation Technology Collaboration Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, John; Olsen, Wade

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews programs at NASA aimed at development at Remediation Technology development for removal of environmental pollutants from NASA sites. This is challenging because there are many sites with different environments, and various jurisdictions and regulations. There are also multiple contaminants. There must be different approaches based on location and type of contamination. There are other challenges: such as costs, increased need for resources and the amount of resources available, and a regulatory environment that is increasing.

  17. Remediating munitions contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, P.J.; Comfort, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The former Nebraska Ordnance Plant (NOP) at Mead, NE was a military loading, assembling, and packing facility that produced bombs, boosters and shells during World War II and the Korean War (1942-1945, 1950-1956). Ordnances were loaded with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), amatol (TNT and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}), tritonal (TNT and Al) and Composition B (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine [RDX] and TNT). Process waste waters were discharged into wash pits and drainage ditches. Soils within and surrounding these areas are contaminated with TNT, RDX and related compounds. A continuous core to 300 cm depth obtained from an NOP drainage ditch revealed high concentrations of TNT in the soil profile and substantial amounts of monoamino reduction products, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT) and 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT). Surface soil contained TNT in excess of 5000 mg kg{sup -1} and is believed to contain solid phase TNT. This is supported by measuring soil solution concentrations at various soil to solution ratios (1:2 to 1:9) and obtaining similar TNT concentrations (43 and 80 mg L{sup -1}). Remediating munitions-contaminated soil at the NOP and elsewhere is of vital interest since many of the contaminants are carcinogenic, mutagenic or otherwise toxic to humans and the environment. Incineration, the most demonstrated remediation technology for munitions-containing soils, is costly and often unacceptable to the public. Chemical and biological remediation offer potentially cost-effective and more environmentally acceptable alternatives. Our research objectives are to: (a) characterize the processes affecting the transport and fate of munitions in highly contaminated soil; (b) identify effective chemical and biological treatments to degrade and detoxify residues; and (c) integrate these approaches for effective and practical remediation of soil contaminated with TNT, RDX, and other munitions residues.

  18. Remediating MGP brownfields

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, B.R.

    1997-05-01

    Before natural gas pipelines became widespread in this country, gas fuel was produced locally in more than 5,000 manufactured gas plants (MGPs). The toxic wastes from these processes often were disposed onsite and have since seeped into the surrounding soil and groundwater. Although the MGPs--commonly called gas plants, gas-works or town gas plants--have closed and most have been demolished, they have left a legacy of environmental contamination. At many MGP sites, underground storage tanks were constructed of wood or brick, with process piping and equipment which frequently leaked. Waste materials often were disposed onsite. Releases of coal tars, oils and condensates produced within the plants contributed to a wide range of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, benzene and cyanide. Remediation of selected MGP sites has been sporadic. Unless the site has been identified as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) Superfund site, the regulatory initiative to remediate often remains with the state in which the MGP is located. A number of factors are working to change that picture and to create a renewed interest in MGP site remediation. The recent Brownfield Initiative by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is such an example.

  19. Remedial Action Assessment System

    1997-02-01

    RAAS1.1 is a software-based system designed to assist remediation professionals at each stage of the environmental analysis process. RAAS1.1 provides a template for environmental restoration analysis, and provides the user with key results at each step in the analysis. RAAS1.1 assists the user to develop a coherent and consistent site description, estimate baseline and residual risk to public health from the contaminated site, identify applicable environmental restoration technologies, and formulate feasible remedial response alternatives. Inmore » addition, the RAAS1.1 methodology allows the user to then assess and compare those remedial response alternatives across EPA criteria, including: compliance with objectives; short-term and long-term effectiveness; extent of treatment; and implementability of the technologies. The analytic methodology is segmented and presented in a standardized, concise, easy-to-use format that can be viewed on the personal computer screen, saved and further manipulated, or printed for later use. Each screen and analytic step is accessed via a user-friendly personal computer graphical interface. Intuitively-designed buttons, menus, and lists help the user focus in on the particular information and analysis component of interest; the corresponding results are presented in a format that facilitates their use in decision-making.« less

  20. Integrated in-situ remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fustos, V.; Lieberman, P.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an integrated approach to ex-situ and in-situ remediation. A sequence of processes, used successfully in their own right, but used synergistically in this approach, have achieved short-term, economic remediation. In addition the range of contaminants that can be treated is extended. The Process uses ozone, compressed oxygen, water vapor, heat, bioaugmentation and vapor extraction to remediate lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  1. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  2. Electrokinetic remediation prefield test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodko, Dalibor (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for determining the parameters critical in designing an electrokinetic soil remediation process including electrode well spacing, operating current/voltage, electroosmotic flow rate, electrode well wall design, and amount of buffering or neutralizing solution needed in the electrode wells at operating conditions are disclosed These methods are preferably performed prior to initiating a full scale electrokinetic remediation process in order to obtain efficient remediation of the contaminants.

  3. Saxton soil remediation project

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

  4. Rehabbing for remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Banton, D.; Anderson, R. )

    1994-03-01

    This article examines how rehabilitating contaminated city water wells in Moses Lake, Wash. took care of the problem for less than half the price of conventional remediation techniques. Wells located in similar hydrogeology, often found in the Western and Plains states, may benefit from this approach. Moses Lake is located on the Columbia Plateau in central Washington. The wells are between 700 and 800 ft deep, cased through 100--200 ft of alluvium, and completed open holes stretch across multiple basalt flows of the Wanapum formation of the Columbia River basalt group.

  5. Avoiding costly remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Scheels, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    Some oil and gas pipeline operations require equipment with hydraulic or oil circulation systems. These are subject to oil leaks or spills due to equipment malfunctions as well as normal operation. The potential liability and actual remediation and shutdown costs helped create the need for more environmentally friendly hydraulic fluids. Mobil has developed readily biodegradable, virtually nontoxic hydraulic fluids, Mobil EAL 224H and Mobil EAL Syndrajoc Series oils (EAL stands for Environmental Awareness Lubricants). The first is vegetable oil-based, while the others are formulated from high viscosity-index synthetic ester base stocks. Both use virtually nontoxic additive packages. These hydraulic fluids are described.

  6. Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Florencia; Dluhy, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is a hereditary form of primary hyperaldosteronism and the most common monogenic cause of hypertension. A chimeric gene duplication leads to ectopic aldosterone synthase activity in the cortisol-producing zona fasciculata of the adrenal cortex, under the regulation of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). Hypertension typically develops in childhood, and may be refractory to standard therapies. Hypokalemia is uncommon in the absence of treatment with diuretics. The discovery of the genetic basis of the disorder has permitted the development of accurate diagnostic testing. Glucocorticoid suppression of ACTH is the mainstay of treatment; alternative treatments include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

  7. Remediating Remediation: From Basic Writing to Writing across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This article challenges faculty members and administrators to rethink current definitions of remediation. First year college students are increasingly placed into basic writing courses due to a perceived inability to use English grammar correctly, but it must be acknowledged that all students will encounter the need for remediation as they attempt…

  8. Managing soil remediation problems.

    PubMed

    Okx, J P; Hordijk, L; Stein, A

    1996-12-01

    Soil remediation has only a short history but the problem addressed is a significant one. Cost estimates for the clean-up of contaminated sites in the European Union and the United States are in the order of magnitude of 1,400 billion ECU. Such an enormous operation deserves the best management it can get. Reliable cost estimations per contaminated site are an important prerequisite. This paper addresses the problems related to site-wise estimations.When solving soil remediation problems, we have to deal with a large number of scientific disciplines. Too often solutions are presented from the viewpoint of only one discipline. In order to benefit from the combined disciplinary knowledge and experience, we think that it is necessary to describe the interrelations between these disciplines. This can be realized by developing an adequate model of the desired process which enables to consider and evaluate the essential factors as interdependent components of the total system.The resulting model provides a binding paradigm to the contributing disciplines which will result in improved efficiency and effectivity of the decision and the cost estimation process. In the near future, we will release the "Biosparging and Bioventing Expert Support System", an expert support system for problem owners, consultants and authorities dealing with the design and operation of a biosparging and/or a bioventing system.

  9. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  10. Home Assessment and Remediation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Charles S; Horner, W Elliott; Kennedy, Kevin; Grimes, Carl; Miller, J David

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the relationship of fungi to asthma in indoor air is very old and well documented. There is substantial evidence that mold and dampness exacerbate asthma in sensitized individuals. Many governmental and nongovernmental organizations around the world have issued guidelines to the effect that the elimination of moisture intrusion and the removal of moldy items from living space can improve respiratory health. The process of home assessment for moisture and mold presence is discussed along with factors that can be used to guide fungal exposure reduction efforts. An approach to the assessment process itself is outlined, and common causes of moisture and mold damage are described. Points that should be included in a report resulting from a home assessment and rudimentary elements of report interpretation are discussed. Emphasis is that interpretation of sampling for moisture and fungal presence should be provided by the person performing the assessment. We conclude that multifaceted remediation contributes to fungal allergen avoidance. The use of an indoor environmental professional to generate evaluation reports and remediation activities can be a valuable contribution to an overall allergen avoidance strategy.

  11. Interpersonal Needs of Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Judith

    A study sought to determine the effects of reading deficiency on the interpersonal relationship needs of regular and remedial readers as composite groups and on elementary and secondary school remedial and regular readers as age groups. Elementary and secondary school students were randomly selected and tested on the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests…

  12. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  13. Factors Influencing Teacher Candidates' Participation in a Paid Field Experience with Urban Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Barbara A.; Grande, Marya; Marable, Michele A.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports problems faced by urban schools as well as teacher education's attempts to remedy these problems, and explores one college's effort to understand the complexities of teacher candidates' decision to work in urban schools. A paid field experience in an urban school district allowed teacher candidates to explore their perceptions…

  14. Urban Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazel, Anthony J.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This section on Urban Climates provides a basic understanding of what comprises the urban climate and what factors control the overall development of the urban climate. We also discuss in this section, methods for evaluating urban climate characteristics and forcing functions as well as how the urban heat island effect comes into play as a dynamic influence on urban climatology. Additionally, we examine and discuss the major radiation and energy balance of city (i.e., shortwave and longwave radiation, albedo, net all-wave radiation, total energy balance, and sensible latent, and storage heat) and the interactions of these energy balances with the lower atmosphere. The use of remote sensing to measure urban surface temperatures as a driving force in the development of the urban heat island effect is presented. We also discuss how the overall moisture, precipitation, humidity, and air movement in cities (i,e,, wind speeds and wind direction) and wind environment of the city affects urban climatology.

  15. DDE remediation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  16. Urban bioclimatology.

    PubMed

    Mayer, H

    1993-11-15

    This article deals with the part of urban climatology which is of particular relevance to human beings. Presented first is a summary of all human biometerologically effective complexes, as well as other factors which are relevant to urban planning and which depend on atmospheric conditions in urban structures in a direct or indirect manner. Later, methods for human biometerologically significant assessment of thermal and air pollution components of the urban climate are discussed in detail, because these components can be strongly influenced by urban planning. The application of these methods is illustrated by some results of appropriate investigations in urban areas.

  17. Urban history, urban health.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, K

    2001-12-01

    Over the course of the 20th century, the United States became an urban nation: 80% of Americans now live in metropolitan areas. Supplying basic sanitary services-drinking water, sewers, and garbage removal-to these cities is a gargantuan task, yet most people have little understanding of urban infrastructure systems and their enormous regional ecologic impacts. Municipalization of sanitary services, especially since 1880, distanced people from their wastes and gave city dwellers a simplistic experience of one-way material flow through cities, without knowledge of the environmental costs. Most sanitary infrastructures were built primarily for durability and lack the elasticity to meet changing needs. The challenge now is to adapt sanitary systems for flexibility and simultaneously move from unchecked material consumption toward resource-based thinking.

  18. Urban History, Urban Health

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Over the course of the 20th century, the United States became an urban nation: 80% of Americans now live in metropolitan areas. Supplying basic sanitary services—drinking water, sewers, and garbage removal—to these cities is a gargantuan task, yet most people have little understanding of urban infrastructure systems and their enormous regional ecologic impacts. Municipalization of sanitary services, especially since 1880, distanced people from their wastes and gave city dwellers a simplistic experience of one-way material flow through cities, without knowledge of the environmental costs. Most sanitary infrastructures were built primarily for durability and lack the elasticity to meet changing needs. The challenge now is to adapt sanitary systems for flexibility and simultaneously move from unchecked material consumption toward resource-based thinking. PMID:11726370

  19. Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edmund W.

    2003-01-01

    The research literature on urban education has tended to focus on the problems of low-status minority groups, the complexity of urban school systems, and the financing and governance of such systems. Given this focus, the deeper problems and the significant opportunities associated with the condition of urbanicity have not yet been properly…

  20. Remediation of contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Ariza, C.H.

    1997-07-01

    At least three types of zones of contamination exist whenever there is a chemical release. The impact of Non-Aqueous-Phase Liquids (NAPL) on soils and groundwater, together with the ultimate transport and migration of constituent chemicals in their dissolved or sorbed states, had led environmentalists to develop several techniques for cleaning a contaminated soil. Zone 1 represents the unsaturated zone which could be contaminated to retention capacity by both Dense Non-Aqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPL) and Light Non-Aqueous-Phase Liquids (LNAPL). Zone 2 represents residual DNAPL or LNAPL contamination found below the groundwater table in the saturated zone. Zone 3 is represented by either the presence of NAPL dissolved in the aqueous phase, volatilized in the unsaturated zone or sorbed to either saturated or unsaturated soils. Cleanup of petroleum contaminated soils is presented in this paper. Among several techniques developed for this purpose, in-situ biological remediation is discussed in detail as a technique that does not involve excavation, thus, the costs and disruption of excavating soil are eliminated.

  1. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  2. A Framework for Remediating Number Combination Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.; Cirino, Paul T.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a framework for the remediation of number combination (NC) deficits. Research on the remediation of NC deficits is summarized, and research program studies are used to illustrate the 3 approaches to remediation. The Framework comprises a 2-stage system of remediation. The less intensive stage implementing 1 of 3…

  3. Remediating while preserving wetland habitat at an LLR waste site in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Kleb, H.R.; Zelmer, R.L.

    2007-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office was established in 1982 to carry out the federal government's responsibilities for low-level radioactive (LLR) waste management in Canada. The Office operates programs to characterize, delineate, decontaminate and consolidate historic LLR waste for interim and long-term storage. In this capacity, the Office is currently considering the remediation of 9,000 cubic metres of contaminated sediment in a coastal marsh in the context of a major remediation project involving multiple urban sites. The marsh is situated between the Lake Ontario shoreline and the urban fringe of the Town of Port Hope. The marsh is designated a Cattail Mineral Shallow Marsh under the Ecological Land Classification system for Southern Ontario and was recently named the A.K. Sculthorpe Marsh in memory of a local community member. The marsh remediation will therefore require trade off between the disruption of a sensitive wetland and the removal of contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the issues and trade-off relating to the waste characterization, environmental assessment and regulatory findings and thus the remediation objectives for the marsh. Considerations include the spatial distribution of contaminated sediment, the bioavailability of contaminants, the current condition of the wetland and the predicted effects of remediation. Also considered is the significance of the wetland from provincial and municipal regulatory perspectives and the resulting directives for marsh remediation. (authors)

  4. Phosphorus Amendment Efficacy for In Situ Remediation of Soil Lead Depends on the Bioaccessible Method

    EPA Science Inventory

    A validated method is needed to measure reductions of in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb in urban soil remediated with amendments. This study evaluated the effect of in vitro extraction solution pH and glycine buffer on bioaccesible Pb in P-treated soils. Two Pb-contaminated soils...

  5. How Can Placement Policy Improve Math Remediation Outcomes? Evidence from Experimentation in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Federick; Melguizo, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Changing placement policy may help to improve developmental education student outcomes in community colleges, but there is little understanding of the impacts of these reforms. We take advantage of heterogeneous placement policy in a large urban community college district in California to compare the effects of math remediation under different…

  6. Metal Immobilization Influence On Bioavailability And Remediation For Urban Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immobilization of soil contaminants, such as lead, via phosphate amendments to alter the chemical environment of metals into highly insoluble forms is a well established process. The literature has documented numerous examples of highly contaminated Pb sites at shooting ranges, b...

  7. HANFORD GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, B; THOMPSON, M; WILDE, R.; FORD, B.; GERBER, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    united in its desire to protect the Columbia River and have a voice in Hanford's future. This paper presents the challenges, and then discusses the progress and efforts underway to reduce the risk posed by contaminated groundwater at Hanford. While Hanford groundwater is not a source of drinking water on or off the Site, there are possible near-shore impacts where it flows into the Columbia River. Therefore, this remediation is critical to the overall efforts to clean up the Site, as well as protect a natural resource.

  8. Hanford Groundwater Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Charboneau, B.; Thompson, K. M.; Wilde, R.; Ford, B.; Gerber, M.

    2006-07-01

    united in its desire to protect the Columbia River and have a voice in Hanford's future. This paper presents the challenges, and then discusses the progress and efforts underway to reduce the risk posed by contaminated groundwater at Hanford. While Hanford groundwater is not a source of drinking water on or off the Site, there are possible near-shore impacts where it flows into the Columbia River. Therefore, this remediation is critical to the overall efforts to clean up the Site, as well as protect a natural resource. (authors)

  9. Cognitive remediation and vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    McGurk, Susan R; Wykes, Til

    2008-01-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) who are striving to improve their work prospects are often hindered in work endeavors because of difficulties with cognitive skills, such as paying attention or concentrating, learning and remembering information, responding in a reasonable amount of time to environmental demands, and planning ahead and solving problems. In addition to limiting work functioning, cognitive impairments are obstacles to receiving the full benefits of vocational rehabilitation, including supported employment. Efforts to improve cognition in people with SMI, or cognitive remediation, have produced modest but consistent gains in a variety of cognitive domains. More recent efforts have focused on combining cognitive remediation with vocational rehabilitation in order to improve work functioning. Initial results from four published studies of combined cognitive remediation and vocational programs are encouraging, indicating improvements in both cognitive and work functioning. The approaches to cognitive remediation used in these studies vary considerably, as do the characteristics of participants, the vocational rehabilitation models, and the methods of combining cognitive and vocational therapies. The differences in key components of programs combining cognitive remediation and vocational rehabilitation indicate the need to replicate findings, and raise important questions about what aspects of the programs are associated with improvements in work.

  10. Remedial Action Contacts Directory - 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This document, which was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), is a directory of 2628 individuals interested or involved in environmental restoration and/or remedial actions at radioactively contaminated sites. This directory contains a list of mailing addresses and phone numbers of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor offices; an index of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor office sorted by state; a list of individuals, presented by last name, facsimile number, and e-mail address; an index of affiliations presented alphabetically, with individual contacts appearing below each affiliation name; and an index of foreign contacta sorted by country and affiliation. This document was generated from the Remedial Action Contacts Database, which is maintained by the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC).

  11. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    low-level perchlorate (100 μg.L-1) influent as well as mixed-waste influents more typically found in the environment containing both nitrate and perchlorate. Through extended periods of operation (>70 days), no loss in treatment efficiency was noted and no measurable growth in biomass was observed. Gas phase analysis indicated that low levels of H2 produced at the cathode surface through electrolysis can provide enough reducing equivalents to mediate this metabolism. The results of these studies demonstrate that perchlorate remediation can be facilitated through the use of a cathode as the primary electron donor, and that continuous treatment in such a system approaches current industry standards. This has important implications for the continuous treatment of this critical contaminant in industrial waste streams and drinking water. Such a process has the advantage of long-term, low-maintenance operation with ease of online monitoring and control while limiting the injection of additional chemicals into the water treatment process and outgrowth of the microbial populations. This would negate the need for the continual removal and disposal of biomass produced during treatment and also the downstream issues associated with corrosion and biofouling of distribution systems and the production of toxic disinfection byproducts.

  12. Remediation Technologies Eliminate Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    groundwater tainted by chlorinated solvents once used to clean rocket engine components. The award-winning innovation (Spinoff 2010) is now NASA s most licensed technology to date. PCBs in paint presented a new challenge. Removing the launch stand for recycling proved a difficult operation; the toxic paint had to be fully stripped from the steel structure, a lengthy and costly process that required the stripped paint to be treated before disposal. Noting the lack of efficient, environmentally friendly options for dealing with PCBs, Quinn and her colleagues developed the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS). AMTS is a paste consisting of a solvent solution containing microscale particles of activated zero-valent metal. When applied to a painted surface, the paste extracts and degrades the PCBs into benign byproducts while leaving the paint on the structure. This provides a superior alternative to other methods for PCB remediation, such as stripping the paint or incinerating the structure, which prevents reuse and can release volatized PCBs into the air. Since its development, AMTS has proven to be a valuable solution for removing PCBs from paint, caulking, and various insulation and filler materials in older buildings, naval ships, and former munitions facilities where the presence of PCBs interferes with methods for removing trace explosive materials. Miles of potentially toxic caulking join sections of runways at airports. Any of these materials installed before 1979 potentially contain PCBs, Quinn says. "This is not just a NASA problem," she says. "It s a global problem."

  13. Research issues for thermal remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.L.; Heron, G.

    1998-06-01

    In order to optimize thermal remediation techniques, all of the effects of the heat on the subsurface system must be understood and taken into consideration during the remediation. Research is needed to provide a better understanding of the effects of temperature on capillarity in soils. This should include laboratory data on the effect of temperature on capillarity in soils. This should include laboratory data on the effect of temperature on displacement pressures which is needed to determine the potential for downward movement of DNAPLS.

  14. Urban Blight or Urban Hope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enderle, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Discusses ways urban communities can improve neglected educational facilities, including converting existing commercial buildings into "new paradigm" schools and breaking large schools into small, specialized academies. (EV)

  15. Urban Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy

    Designed as a resource for urban adult basic education (ABE) program planners, this guidebook describes model linkage strategies between ABE and job placement as well as ABE and job training services that are targeted to urban Americans. The following topics are covered in the guide: linkage strategies (the meaning of the term linkages, community…

  16. Urban Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the court-ordered, multibillion-dollar infusion of funds to New Jersey cities for improving their school facilities and whether these additional funds will cause an urban renaissance. Some examples of New Jersey urban school facility needs are highlighted. (GR)

  17. Re/Mediating Adolescent Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, John, Ed.; Luke, Allan, Ed.

    Suggesting that teaching in New Times requires that educators read and re/mediate the social relations, the cultural knowledges, and the relationships of power between adolescents and their social, biological, and semiotic universes, this collection of essays offers new ways of seeing and talking about adolescents and their literacies. Most of the…

  18. Using specialized adsorbents for remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, D.P.; Grant, A.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes two remediation case studies in which specialized adsorbents were used. In one case, the adsorbents were used to treat effluent from a soil vapor extraction system. In the other case, the adsorbents were used to treat air from a groundwater air stripper. The specialized adsorbents effectively removed volatile organic compounds from each air stream.

  19. Cooperative Learning for Remedial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiers, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Offers cooperative learning instructional techniques for teaching the historical novel "The Root Cellar" in a remedial reading classroom. Recommends cooperative learning as a means through which the student can succeed academically while developing interpersonal skills. Suggests that the lesson can be adapted to match the ability level of…

  20. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  1. Remediation Technology for Contaminated Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is the most commonly selected technology for remediation of ground water at Superfund sites in the USA. The next most common technology is Chemical treatment, followed by Air Sparging, and followed by Permeable Reactive Barriers. This presentation reviews the the...

  2. Remedial Mathematics for Quantum Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman, Lodewijk; Brouwer, Natasa; Heck, Andre; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2008-01-01

    Proper mathematical skills are important for every science course and mathematics-intensive chemistry courses rely on a sound mathematical pre-knowledge. In the first-year quantum chemistry course at this university, it was noticed that many students lack basic mathematical knowledge. To tackle the mathematics problem, a remedial mathematics…

  3. Green Chemistry and Environmental Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Nutrient remediation and recovery is a growing concern for two key reasons: (i) the prevention of harmful algal bloom proliferation, and (ii) the recycling of nutrients (e.g., phosphates) as they are non-renewable resources which are quickly being depleted. A wide range...

  4. Adolescent Literacy: More than Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancarosa, Gina

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of adolescent literacy involves more than providing remediation for students who have not mastered basic reading skills. To become successful learners, adolescents must master complex texts, understand the diverse literacy demands of the different content areas, and navigate digital texts. In this article, Biancarosa reviews what the…

  5. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to the author, by the…

  6. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial...

  8. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial Plan. 85.1803 Section 85.1803... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... manufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The plan shall contain...

  9. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial plan. 92.705 Section 92.705... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... manufacturer or remanufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The...

  10. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial Plan. 85.1803 Section 85.1803... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... manufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The plan shall contain...

  11. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial Plan. 85.1803 Section 85.1803... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... manufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The plan shall contain...

  12. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial plan. 92.705 Section 92.705... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... manufacturer or remanufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The...

  13. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Remedial plan. 92.705 Section 92.705... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... manufacturer or remanufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The...

  14. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (ECRTS) DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) process was developed by P2-Soil Remediation, Inc. P-2 Soil Remediation, Inc. formed a partnership with Weiss Associates and ElectroPetroleum, Inc. to apply the technology to contaminated sites. The ECRTs process was evaluated ...

  15. Remediation: Higher Education's Bridge to Nowhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Complete College America, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The intentions were noble. It was hoped that remediation programs would be an academic bridge from poor high school preparation to college readiness. Sadly, remediation has become instead higher education's "Bridge to Nowhere." This broken remedial bridge is travelled by some 1.7 million beginning students each year, most of whom will…

  16. 45 CFR 77.4 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial actions. 77.4 Section 77.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION REMEDIAL ACTIONS APPLICABLE TO LETTER OF CREDIT ADMINISTRATION § 77.4 Remedial actions. If, after the conclusion of the procedures set forth...

  17. Removing Remediation Requirements: Effectiveness of Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Anne; Duggan, Mickle; Braddy, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Remediation of incoming college freshman students is a national concern because remediated students are at higher risk of failing to complete their degrees. Some Oklahoma higher education institutions are working to assist K-12 systems in finding ways to reduce the number of incoming college freshman students requiring remediation. This study…

  18. GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SOLUTIONS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.

    2007-02-26

    In 2006, Congress provided funding to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to study new technologies that could be used to treat contamination from the Hanford Site that might impact the Columbia River. The contaminants of concern are primarily metals and radionuclides, which are byproducts of Hanford’s cold war mission to produce plutonium for atomic weapons. The DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to consider this problem and develop approaches to address the contamination that threatens the river. DOE identified three high priority sites that had groundwater contamination migrating towards the Columbia river for remediation. The contaminants included strontium-90, uranium and chromium. Remediation techniques for metals and radionuclides focus primarily on altering the oxidation state of the contaminant chemically or biologically, isolating the contaminants from the environment through adsorption or encapsulation or concentrating the contaminants for removal. A natural systems approach was taken that uses a mass balance concept to frame the problem and determine the most appropriate remedial approach. This approach provides for a scientifically based remedial decision. The technologies selected to address these contaminants included an apatite adsorption barrier coupled with a phytoremediation to address the strontium-90 contamination, injection of polyphosphate into the subsurface to sequester uranium, and a bioremediation approach to reduce chromium contamination in the groundwater. The ability to provide scientifically based approaches is in large part due to work developed under previous DOE Office of Science and Office of Environmental Management projects. For example, the polyphosphate and the bioremediation techniques, were developed by PNNL under the EMSP and NABIR programs. Contaminated groundwater under the Hanford Site poses a potential risk to humans and the Columbia River. These new technologies holds great promise for

  19. Water resources and the urban environment--98

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.E.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  20. Unique Construction and Social Experiences in Residential Remediation Sites - 13423

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Paul; Scarborough, Rebecca

    2013-07-01

    Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., (Sevenson) has performed several radiological remediation projects located in residential urban areas. Over the course of these projects, there has been a wide variety of experiences encountered from construction related issues to unique social situations. Some of the construction related issues included the remediation of interior basements where contaminated material was located under the footers of the structure or was used in the mortar between cinder block or field stone foundations. Other issues included site security, maintaining furnaces or other utilities, underpinning, backfilling and restoration. In addition to the radiological hazards associated with this work there were occupational safety and industrial hygiene issues that had to be addressed to ensure the safety and health of neighboring properties and residents. The unique social situations at these job sites have included arson, theft/stolen property, assault/battery, prostitution, execution of arrest warrants for residents, discovery of drugs and paraphernalia, blood borne pathogens, and unexploded ordnance. Some of these situations have become a sort of comical urban legend throughout the organization. One situation had historical significance, involving the demolition of a house to save a tree older than the Declaration of Independence. All of these projects typically involve the excavation of early 20. century items such as advertisement signs, various old bottles (milk, Listerine, perfume, whisky) and other miscellaneous common trash items. (authors)

  1. Urban hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Third International Conference on Urban Storm Drainage will be held in Goteborg, Sweden, June 4-8, 1984. Contact A. Sjoborg, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden, for more information. The Fourth Conference will be in late August 1987 in Lausanne, Switzerland, and the Fifth Conference is planned for Tokyo in 1990. The proceedings of the First International Conference, held in Southampton, England, in April 1978, are available from Wiley-Interscience under the title “Urban Storm Drainage.”The proceedings of the Second International Conference, held in Urbana, Illinois, in June 1981, are available from Water Resources Publications, Littleton, Colo., under the title, “Urban Stormwater Hydraulics and Hydrology” and “Urban Stormwater Quality, Management, and Planning.”

  2. Why Aren't We Getting Through? The Urban Communication Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midura, Edmund M., Ed.

    The ten articles in this book examine the causes and remedies for the apparent communication barrier between the urban poor and the rest of the nation. The articles, written by journalists, businessmen, and community leaders--both black and white, range from a broad based description of the communications behaviors of the urban poor, to attempts…

  3. Recovery of energetically overexploited urban aquifers using surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo Lázaro, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Shallow aquifers have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases through helping manage the temperature of urban environments. Nevertheless, the uncontrolled rapid use of shallow groundwater resources to heat or cool urban environments can cause thermal pollution that will limit the long term sustainability of the resource. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate mitigation/remediation strategies capable of recovering energetically overexploited aquifers. In this work, a novel remediation strategy based on surface water recharge into aquifers is presented. To evaluate the capabilities of such measures for effective remediation, this strategy is optimized for a management problem raised in the overheated "Urban Alluvial Aquifer of Zaragoza" (Spain). The application of a transient groundwater flow and heat transport model under 512 different mitigation scenarios has enabled to quantify and discuss the magnitude of the remediation effect as a respond to injection rates of surface water, seasonal schedule of the injection and location of injection. The quantification of the relationship between these variables together with the evaluation of the amount of surface water injected per year in each scenario proposed have provided a better understanding of the system processes and an optimal management alternative. This work also makes awareness of the magnitude of the remediation procedure which is in an order of magnitude of tenths of years.

  4. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wierowski, J. V.; Henry, L. G.; Dooley, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning planning of any scale and for recording

  5. "A Foundation for Something Bigger": Community College Students' Experience of Remediation in the Context of a Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnee, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal, qualitative study explores developmental English students' experience of remediation in the context of a first-semester learning community (LC). Conducted at an urban community college in the Northeast, data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted over a 3-year period with a cohort of 15 students who…

  6. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  7. Urban hopper.

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Feddema, John Todd; Little, Charles Quentin; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John; Weagle, Christian A.; Salton, Jonathan Robert; Marron, Lisa Carol; Malchano, Matthew D.; Giarrantana, John; Murphy, Michael P.; Rizzi, Alfred A.; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2010-03-01

    Hopping robots provide the possibility of breaking the link between the size of a ground vehicle and the largest obstacle that it can overcome. For more than a decade, DARPA and Sandia National Laboratories have been developing small-scale hopping robot technology, first as part of purely hopping platforms and, more recently, as part of platforms that are capable of both wheeled and hopping locomotion. In this paper we introduce the Urban Hopper robot and summarize its capabilities. The advantages of hopping for overcoming certain obstacles are discussed. Several configurations of the Urban Hopper are described, as are intelligent capabilities of the system. Key challenges are discussed.

  8. Remediation tradeoffs addressed with simulated annealing optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L. L., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    Escalation of groundwater remediation costs has encouraged both advances in optimization techniques to balance remediation objectives and economics and development of innovative technologies to expedite source region clean-ups. We present an optimization application building on a pump-and-treat model, yet assuming a prior removal of different portions of the source area to address the evolving management issue of more aggressive source remediation. Separate economic estimates of in-situ thermal remediation are combined with the economic estimates of the subsequent optimal pump-and-treat remediation to observe tradeoff relationships of cost vs. highest remaining contamination levels (hot spot). The simulated annealing algorithm calls the flow and transport model to evaluate the success of a proposed remediation scenario at a U.S.A. Superfund site contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  9. [Natural remedies during pregnancy and lactation].

    PubMed

    Gut, E; Melzer, J; von Mandach, U; Saller, R

    2004-10-01

    Up to date there is a lack of systematically gathered data on the use of natural remedies (phytotherapeutic, homeopathic, anthroposophic, spagyric, Bach and Schussler remedies) during pregnancy and lactation. The aim of this non-representative pilot study on 139 women, who came for delivery to three institutions between mid-1997 and the beginning of 1998, was to receive data about how often and within which spectrum natural remedies are used during pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy 96% and within the lactation period 84% of the women consumed at least 1 natural remedy. Phytotherapeutic drugs were used most frequently. In contrast to the widespread use of natural remedies by pregnant women and nursing mothers in this study, little information on the effectiveness and possible risks is available. Therefore it seems necessary to examine and evaluate natural remedies used during pregnancy and lactation.

  10. Effects of urbanization on groundwater evolution in an urbanizing watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, D.; Banner, J. L.; Bendik, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Jollyville Plateau Salamander (Eurycea tonkawae), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, is endemic to springs and caves within the Bull Creek Watershed of Austin, Texas. Rapid urbanization endangers known populations of this salamander. Conservation strategies lack information on the extent of groundwater contamination from anthropogenic sources in this karst watershed. Spring water was analyzed for strontium (Sr) isotopes and major ions from sites classified as "urban" or "rural" based on impervious cover estimates. Previous studies have shown that the 87Sr/86Sr value of municipal water is significantly higher than values for natural streamwater, which are similar to those for the Cretaceous limestone bedrock of the region's watersheds. We investigate the application of this relationship to understanding the effects of urbanization on groundwater quality. The use of Sr isotopes as hydrochemical tracers is complemented by major ion concentrations, specifically the dominant ions in natural groundwater (Ca and HCO3) and the ions associated with the addition of wastewater (Na and Cl). To identify high priority salamander-inhabited springs for water quality remediation, we explore the processes controlling the chemical evolution of groundwater such as municipal water inputs, groundwater-soil interactions, and solution/dissolution reactions. 87Sr/86Sr values for water samples from within the watershed range from 0.70760 to 0.70875, the highest values corresponding to sites located in the urbanized areas of the watershed. Analyses of the covariation of Sr isotopes with major ion concentrations help elucidate controls on spring water evolution. Springs located in rural portions of the watershed have low 87Sr/86Sr, high concentrations of Ca and HCO3, and low concentrations of Na and Cl. This is consistent with small inputs of municipal water. Three springs located in urban portions of the watershed have high 87Sr/86Sr, low Ca and HCO3, and

  11. 40 CFR 300.435 - Remedial design/remedial action, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Hazardous Substance Response § 300.435 Remedial design/remedial...

  12. 40 CFR 300.435 - Remedial design/remedial action, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Hazardous Substance Response § 300.435 Remedial design/remedial...

  13. 40 CFR 300.435 - Remedial design/remedial action, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Hazardous Substance Response § 300.435 Remedial design/remedial...

  14. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (ECRTS) - IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Innovative Technology Evaulation Report summarizes the results of the evaluation of the Electrochemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) process, developed by P2-Soil Remediation, Inc. (in partnership with Weiss Associates and Electro-Petroleum, Inc.). This evaluation was co...

  15. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 7 Sustainable Remediation And Air-Based Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites, " the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Enviro...

  16. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 8 Air-Based Remediation Technology Selection Logic

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  17. 40 CFR 300.435 - Remedial design/remedial action, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS... remedial action objectives and remediation goals in the ROD, and is determined to be operational...

  18. NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REMEDIATION OF HYPERACTIVE CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Neena; Rao, Shobini L.

    1997-01-01

    Hyperkinesis is associated with deficits of attention (poor allocation of attention resources, susceptibility to interference and perseveration); vigilance and perceptual sensitivity. Three boys aged 7-8 years with simple hyperkinesis were given cognitive tasks to improve the above functions in daily one hour sessions for a month. The children improved significantly in the above functions and behaviour. Three other children aged 5-8 years with simple hyperkinesis who were on medication improved only slightly in their behaviour during this period. Behavioural intervention and parental counselling were additional inputs to the children in both groups. Neuropsychological remediation combined with parental counselling and behavioural intervention shows promise in treating hyperactive children. PMID:21584098

  19. Night Blindness and Ancient Remedy

    PubMed Central

    Al Binali, H.A. Hajar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to briefly review the history of night blindness and its treatment from ancient times until the present. The old Egyptians, the Babylonians, the Greeks and the Arabs used animal liver for treatment and successfully cured the disease. The author had the opportunity to observe the application of the old remedy to a patient. Now we know what the ancients did not know, that night blindness is caused by Vitamin A deficiency and the animal liver is the store house for Vitamin A. PMID:25774260

  20. Electrokinetic remediation of oil-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Vladimir A; Romanyukha, Olga V; Abyzova, Anna M

    2008-07-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the factors influencing electrokinetic remediation of soils from petroleum pollutants. The remediation method was applied in two versions: (i) static and (ii) flowing, when a sample was washed with leaching solution. It was found that all the soils studied can be purified using this technique. It was also observed that the mineral and grain-size composition of soils, their properties, and other parameters affect the remediation efficiency. The static and flowing versions of the remediation method removed 25-75% and 90-95% of the petroleum pollutants, respectively from the soils under study.

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  2. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  3. Groundwater remediation at a wood preservatives site

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, H.K.; Damera, R.

    1994-12-31

    A wood treatment facility in Pennsylvania allegedly discharged about a million gallons of spent wood preservatives containing pentachlorophenol into a well from 1947 to 1963. Contaminated water was noticed in a creek adjacent to the site and was reported by the residents in 1972. Subsequently this site was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the EPA in 1982. Tetra Tech, Inc. has performed Remedial Investigations (RI), Feasibility Studies (FS), Remedial Designs (RD) and Remedial Action (RA) at this Superfund site, for five years. This paper presents an overview of RI, FS, RD and treatability studies related to groundwater remediation.

  4. Urban Agrarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kerry A.

    1996-01-01

    Chicago's High School for Agricultural Sciences is a popular and successful urban school devoted to agriculture. This agriculturally focused high school features a tough academic curriculum and hands-on learning designed to prepare the predominantly Black and Hispanic student body for college and careers in agriculture. (SM)

  5. Virtual Urbanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirc, Geoffrey

    2001-01-01

    Considers how visual literacy implies a poetics of technology, one rooted in basic human passion. Notes that most academic forms sanctioned for students to inhabit are as monumentally dull as the urban forms in which they pass an extra-academic portion of their lives. Concludes that technology is most useful when it allows the poetic spirit to…

  6. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS AND SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Permeable Reactive Barriers for treatment of organic and inorganic contaminants and remediation of DNAPL source zones.

  7. Some Similarities and Differences Between Compositions Written by Remedial and Non-Remedial College Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Elizabeth B.; House, William J.

    The essays composed by 84 remedial and 77 nonremedial college freshmen were analyzed for some features proposed by Mina Shaughnessy as being characteristic of basic writers. The students were enrolled in either a beginning remedial class (098), a class at the next level of remediation (099), or a regular English class (101). The essays were…

  8. Lasagna{trademark} soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna{trademark} is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed which remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna{trademark} is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured and decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration. Major features of the technology are electrodes energized by direct current, which causes water and soluble contaminants to move into or through the treatment layers and also heats the soil; treatment zones containing reagents that decompose the soluble organic contaminants or adsorb contaminants for immobilization or subsequent removal and disposal; and a water management system that recycles the water that accumulates at the cathode (high pH) back to the anode (low pH) for acid-base neutralization. Alternatively, electrode polarity can be reversed periodically to reverse electroosmotic flow and neutralize pH.

  9. Characterization technologies for environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Improved site characterization technologies are being developed at Martin Marietta Energy Systems for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in support of environmental restoration activities throughout the DOE complex. Since site characterization is an expensive and time consuming process that must be performed prior to, during, and following remediation efforts, an obvious way to reduce the overall cost of remediation is to develop improved characterization methods. For example, the Derivative Ultraviolet Absorption Spectrometer (DUVAS), which is being field tested as part of the OTD program, is a fiberoptic device for in situ, real time measurement of aromatic organic compounds in groundwater. A transportable, direct sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (ITMS) is being developed for continuous monitoring of hazardous organic compounds in air. In areas where the environment is hazardous to human health, it is desirous to perform site characterization remotely; if robotics are to be employed, the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) can be used to provide telemetry information on robot location as well as sensor measurements. Once fully developed, these technologies can be transferred to the private sector. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Lasagna{trademark} soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna{trademark} is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed by an industrial consortium consisting of Monsanto, E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Inc. (DuPont), and General Electric, with participation from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology (EM-50), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (Figure 1). Lasagna{trademark} remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna{trademark} is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured or decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration.

  11. Individualized remediation during fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Sparks, J William; Landrigan-Ossar, Mary; Vinson, Amy; Dearden, Jennifer; Navedo, Andres T; Waisel, David B; Holzman, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires medical training programs to monitor, track, and formally document a fellow's performance. If deficiencies are found, programs are expected to prepare and implement an effective plan of action for improvement and to ensure that graduates acquire the personal and professional attributes of an independent physician. We revised our evaluation policy and instituted a remediation protocol in 2008. Since that time, 130 pediatric anesthesia fellows have graduated. Seven fellows (5%) underwent departmental formal consultation for deficient behavior or poor performance. Of these 7 fellows, 4 underwent an individualized remediation program (IRP). A formal performance review and written contract, with specifically identified problems and general themes, recommendations for time-based successful behaviors, and clearly identified consequences for unsuccessful behaviors, was initiated for each fellow undergoing an IRP. All fellows who participated in this program completed their subspecialty training in pediatric anesthesia, and all eligible fellows have successfully achieved their subspecialty board certification. Our approach has the advantage of multimodality, time-based daily evaluations, and group discussions in the context of a Clinical Competency Committee. Utilization of an IRP as a metric for progress has features similar to effective cognitive behavioral therapy contracts and has ensured that our graduates are held to clearly delineated and specified skills and behaviors that allow them to work independently in the field of pediatric anesthesiology. PMID:27687433

  12. Effectiveness of remediation of metal-contaminated mangrove sediments (Sydney estuary, Australia).

    PubMed

    Birch, Gavin; Nath, Bibhash; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2015-04-01

    Industrial activities and urbanization have had a major consequence for estuarine ecosystem health and water quality globally. Likewise, Sydney estuary has been significantly impacted by widespread, poor industrial practices in the past, and remediation of legacy contaminants have been undertaken in limited parts of this waterway. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effectiveness of remediation of a former Pb-contaminated industrial site in Homebush Bay on Sydney estuary (Australia) through sampling of inter-tidal sediments and mangrove (Avicennia marina) tissue (fine nutritive roots, pneumatophores, and leaves). Results indicate that since remediation 6 years previously, Pb and other metals (Cu, Ni and Zn) in surficial sediment have increased to concentrations that approach pre-remediation levels and that they were considerably higher than pre-settlement levels (3-30 times), as well as at the reference site. Most metals were compartmentalized in fine nutritive roots with bio-concentration factors greater than unity, while tissues of pneumatophores and leaves contained low metal concentrations. Lead concentrations in fine nutritive root, pneumatophore, and leaf tissue of mangroves from the remediated site were similar to trees in un-remediated sites of the estuary and were substantially higher than plants at the reference site. The situation for Zn in fine nutritive root tissue was similar. The source of the metals was either surface/subsurface water from the catchment or more likely remobilized contaminated sediment from un-remediated parts of Homebush Bay. Results of this study demonstrate the problems facing management in attempting to reduce contamination in small parts of a large impacted area to concentrations below local base level. PMID:25404497

  13. Effectiveness of remediation of metal-contaminated mangrove sediments (Sydney estuary, Australia).

    PubMed

    Birch, Gavin; Nath, Bibhash; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2015-04-01

    Industrial activities and urbanization have had a major consequence for estuarine ecosystem health and water quality globally. Likewise, Sydney estuary has been significantly impacted by widespread, poor industrial practices in the past, and remediation of legacy contaminants have been undertaken in limited parts of this waterway. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effectiveness of remediation of a former Pb-contaminated industrial site in Homebush Bay on Sydney estuary (Australia) through sampling of inter-tidal sediments and mangrove (Avicennia marina) tissue (fine nutritive roots, pneumatophores, and leaves). Results indicate that since remediation 6 years previously, Pb and other metals (Cu, Ni and Zn) in surficial sediment have increased to concentrations that approach pre-remediation levels and that they were considerably higher than pre-settlement levels (3-30 times), as well as at the reference site. Most metals were compartmentalized in fine nutritive roots with bio-concentration factors greater than unity, while tissues of pneumatophores and leaves contained low metal concentrations. Lead concentrations in fine nutritive root, pneumatophore, and leaf tissue of mangroves from the remediated site were similar to trees in un-remediated sites of the estuary and were substantially higher than plants at the reference site. The situation for Zn in fine nutritive root tissue was similar. The source of the metals was either surface/subsurface water from the catchment or more likely remobilized contaminated sediment from un-remediated parts of Homebush Bay. Results of this study demonstrate the problems facing management in attempting to reduce contamination in small parts of a large impacted area to concentrations below local base level.

  14. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, F.W.

    1997-02-01

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes.

  15. Urban Challenges for the Urban Educator Corps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howey, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The Urban Educator Corps, comprised of urban education school deans and faculty members from thirty-nine public urban research universities, is committed to advancing the quality of urban education, specifically addressing the key issues of teacher quality, student retention and success, and the creation of systemic partnerships. This article…

  16. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  17. Autonomy and Motivation in Remedial Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that a significant majority of students in remedial mathematics do not remediate successfully. Such widespread failure raises the question of motivation. Some would argue that the instructor should directly compel students to commit themselves to the course and its work. This can be done by mandating attendance and/or by…

  18. Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This document describes how to investigate and evaluate moisture and mold problems in educational facilities, and presents the key steps for implementing a remediation plan. A checklist is provided for conducting mold remediation efforts along with a resource list of helpful organizations and governmental agencies. Appendices contain a glossary,…

  19. Remedial Reading Students at Moraine Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In an effort to assess the effectiveness of their remedial reading courses, Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in Palos Hills, Illinois, undertook a study of the retention, course completion, and graduation rates of students who completed one of three remedial reading courses: RDG-040, basic skills for students reading below the 7th grade…

  20. 30 CFR 270.7 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedies. 270.7 Section 270.7 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 270.7 Remedies. In addition to the penalties available under 30 CFR...

  1. 30 CFR 270.7 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedies. 270.7 Section 270.7 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 270.7 Remedies. In addition to the penalties available under 30 CFR...

  2. Remedial Testing and Placement in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Catherine; McCoy, Zoe; Campbell, Lea; Brock, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Almost half of students who enter college require some sort of remedial coursework. Further, states are increasingly moving the responsibility of postsecondary remediation away from four-year campuses to two-year institutions. Scholars and policymakers have grappled with best practice for successfully filling in academic gaps and moving students…

  3. Tank waste remediation system compensatory measure removal

    SciTech Connect

    MILLIKEN, N.J.

    1999-05-18

    In support of Fiscal Year 1998 Performance Agreement TWR1.4.3, ''Replace Compensatory Measures,'' the Tank Waste Remediation System is documenting the completion of field modifications supporting the removal of the temporary exemptions from the approved Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006. These temporary exemptions or compensatory measures expire September 30, 1998.

  4. READING AND WRITING, THE REMEDIAL PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euclid English Demonstration Center, OH.

    THE PAPERS IN THIS COLLECTION EXPLAIN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL REMEDIAL PROGRAM IN READING AND WRITING DEVELOPED BY THE EUCLID ENGLISH DEMONSTRATION CENTER, THEY ARE (1) "REMEDIAL CLASSES AND THE TOTAL ENGLISH PROGRAM," BY GEORGE HILLOCKS, (2) "DEFINITION, ORIGIN, AND TREATMENT OF UNDERACHIEVEMENT," BY JANE W. KESSLER, (3) "READING SKILLS IN JUNIOR…

  5. Laboratory Experiment on Electrokinetic Remediation of Soil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed-Ali, Alya H.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is a method of decontaminating soil containing heavy metals and polar organic contaminants by passing a direct current through the soil. An undergraduate chemistry laboratory is described to demonstrate electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with copper. A 30 cm electrokinetic cell with an applied voltage of 30…

  6. 30 CFR 570.7 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedies. 570.7 Section 570.7 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 570.7 Remedies. In addition to the penalties available under 30 CFR part 550, subpart...

  7. 30 CFR 570.7 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedies. 570.7 Section 570.7 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 570.7 Remedies. In addition to the penalties available under 30 CFR part 550, subpart...

  8. 30 CFR 570.7 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedies. 570.7 Section 570.7 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 570.7 Remedies. In addition to the penalties available under 30 CFR part 550, subpart...

  9. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT General Provisions § 706.103 Remedial action. (a) A violation of this part by...

  10. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT General Provisions § 706.103 Remedial action. (a) A violation of this part by...

  11. 48 CFR 203.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedies. 203.906 Section 203.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF... for Contractor Employees 203.906 Remedies. (1) Not later than 30 days after receiving a DoD...

  12. 48 CFR 203.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedies. 203.906 Section 203.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF... for Contractor Employees 203.906 Remedies. (1) Not later than 30 days after receiving a DoD...

  13. 32 CFR 536.36 - Related remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Related remedies. 536.36 Section 536.36 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.36 Related remedies. An ACO or a CPO...

  14. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE... penalty prescribed by law; or (4) Disqualification for a particular assignment. (b) Remedial...

  15. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE... penalty prescribed by law; or (4) Disqualification for a particular assignment. (b) Remedial...

  16. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE... penalty prescribed by law; or (4) Disqualification for a particular assignment. (b) Remedial...

  17. 45 CFR 1177.3 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.3 Other remedies. The remedies and sanctions available to the National Endowment for the Humanities under this part are not intended to be exclusive. The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or his designee may impose...

  18. 45 CFR 1177.3 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.3 Other remedies. The remedies and sanctions available to the National Endowment for the Humanities under this part are not intended to be exclusive. The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or his designee may impose...

  19. Remedial Placements Found to Be Overused

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2013-01-01

    At a time when more high schools are looking to their graduates' college-remediation rates as a clue to how well they prepare students for college and careers, new research findings suggest a significant portion of students who test into remedial classes don't actually need them. Separate studies from Teachers College, Columbia University, and the…

  20. 10 CFR 1008.15 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil remedies. 1008.15 Section 1008.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) RECORDS MAINTAINED ON INDIVIDUALS (PRIVACY ACT) Requests for Access or Amendment § 1008.15 Civil remedies. Subsection (g) of the Act provides that an individual may bring...

  1. 14 CFR 1212.800 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil remedies. 1212.800 Section 1212.800... Comply With Requirements of This Part § 1212.800 Civil remedies. Failure to comply with the requirements of the Privacy Act and this part could subject NASA to civil suit under the provisions of 5...

  2. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  3. Greener and sustainable remediation using iron nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main goal of remediation is to protect humans and the environment. Unfortunately, many remedial actions in the past concentrated more on site-specific environmental risks and conditions completely ignoring external social and economic impacts. Thus, new approach called green ...

  4. 45 CFR 1177.3 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.3 Other remedies. The remedies and sanctions available to the National Endowment for the Humanities under this part are not intended to be exclusive. The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or his designee may impose...

  5. 49 CFR 604.47 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of this part occurred, he or she may take one or more of the following actions: (1) Bar the recipient..., its employees, or its contractors. (b) In determining the type and amount of remedy, the Chief Counsel... office may mitigate the remedy when the recipient can document corrective action of alleged...

  6. Remedial Math: Its Effect on the Final Grade in Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, L. Quinn; Lindsey, Jimmy D.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of one remedial mathematics technique is examined. Results indicated that students who passed remedial math and then took college algebra had significantly higher final algebra grades than did undergraduates who failed remedial math. (MLW)

  7. Statewide Mandatory Remediation Policies: National, State, and Institutional Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peak, Charity S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite uncertainty related to student outcomes resulting from remediation (Bettinger & Long, 2009), eleven states mandate remedial education through common placement testing and standardized cutoff scores rather than permitting individual postsecondary institutions to establish remediation guidelines. Colorado, in particular, offers an…

  8. Evaluation of effectiveness of various remediation options for Onondaga Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, G.N.; Henry, E.; Dodge-Murphy, L.

    1995-12-31

    Onondaga Lake, New York, is a slightly alkaline, hypereutrophic urban lake that was subjected to industrial discharges of mercury between 1947 and 1988. Since 1991, it has been the object of an extensive study to address mercury bioaccumulation issues among other things. An extensive field data collection program was conducted in 1992 to document the temporal and spatial variability of mercury species, as well as the dynamics of mercury cycling and bioaccumulation in the lake. Mercury concentrations were measured in tributaries, surficial sediments, sediment pore water, lake water, phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fishes. A numerical model was developed based on the field data for two purposes: (1) to provide a framework for understanding the behavior of mercury in Onondaga Lake, including a mass balance analysis of sources and sinks, and (2) to permit an evaluation of remedial alternatives. The model has identified tributaries as the major source of total mercury to the lake. Sediments generally act as a sink for mercury. The most effective remedial alternative is to reduce continuing sources of mercury to the lake. Since imposition of discharge limits in 1970, fish mercury levels have decreased dramatically. Remedial options that include treatment of sediment will have little effect on the concentration of mercury in fishes. The primary site for methylmercury production is the anoxic hypolimnion. Elimination of anoxia through aeration would result in reduced methylmercury production in the water column, reduced flux of dissolved mercury from sediment, and an increased importance on the methylmercury input from a sewage treatment plant that discharges to the lake.

  9. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  10. Heavy metals in traditional Indian remedies.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2002-02-01

    The growing popularity of traditional Indian remedies necessitates a critical evaluation of risks associated with their use. This systematic review aims at summarising all available data relating to the heavy metal content in such remedies. Computerised literature searches were carried out to identify all articles with original data on this subject. Fifteen case reports and six case series were found. Their collective results suggest that heavy metals, particularly lead, have been a regular constituent of traditional Indian remedies. This has repeatedly caused serious harm to patients taking such remedies. The incidence of heavy metal contamination is not known, but one study shows that 64% of samples collected in India contained significant amounts of lead (64% mercury, 41% arsenic and 9% cadmium). These findings should alert us to the possibility of heavy metal content in traditional Indian remedies and motivate us to consider means of protecting consumers from such risks.

  11. Groundwater remediation: the next 30 years.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Paul W; Newell, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater remediation technologies are designed, installed, and operated based on the conceptual models of contaminant hydrogeology that are accepted at that time. However, conceptual models of remediation can change as new research, new technologies, and new performance data become available. Over the past few years, results from multiple-site remediation performance studies have shown that achieving drinking water standards (i.e., Maximum Contaminant Levels, MCLs) at contaminated groundwater sites is very difficult. Recent groundwater research has shown that the process of matrix diffusion is one key constraint. New developments, such as mass discharge, orders of magnitude (OoMs), and SMART objectives are now being discussed more frequently by the groundwater remediation community. In this paper, the authors provide their perspectives on the existing "reach MCLs" approach that has historically guided groundwater remediation projects, and advocate a new approach built around the concepts of OoMs and mass discharge.

  12. Urban pollution.

    PubMed

    Sancini, Angela; Tomei, Francesco; Tomei, Gianfranco; Caciari, Tiziana; Di Giorgio, Valeria; André, Jean-Claude; Palermo, Paola; Andreozzi, Giorgia; Nardone, Nadia; Schifano, Maria Pia; Fiaschetti, Maria; Cetica, Carlotta; Ciarrocca, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution represents a health risk for people living in urban environment. Urban air consists in a complex mixture of chemicals and carcinogens and its effects on health can be summarized in acute respiratory effects, neoplastic nonneoplastic (e.g. chronic bronchitis) chronic respiratory effects, and effects on other organs and systems. Air pollution may be defined according to origin of the phenomena that determine it: natural causes (natural fumes, decomposition, volcanic ash) or anthropogenic causes which are the result of human activities (industrial and civil emissions). Transport is the sector that more than others contributes to the deterioration of air quality in cities. In this context, in recent years, governments of the territory were asked to advance policies aimed at solving problems related to pollution. In consideration of the many effects on health caused by pollution it becomes necessary to know the risks from exposure to various environmental pollutants and to limit and control their effects. Many are the categories of "outdoor" workers, who daily serve the in urban environment: police, drivers, newsagents, etc.

  13. Urban pollution.

    PubMed

    Sancini, Angela; Tomei, Francesco; Tomei, Gianfranco; Caciari, Tiziana; Di Giorgio, Valeria; André, Jean-Claude; Palermo, Paola; Andreozzi, Giorgia; Nardone, Nadia; Schifano, Maria Pia; Fiaschetti, Maria; Cetica, Carlotta; Ciarrocca, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution represents a health risk for people living in urban environment. Urban air consists in a complex mixture of chemicals and carcinogens and its effects on health can be summarized in acute respiratory effects, neoplastic nonneoplastic (e.g. chronic bronchitis) chronic respiratory effects, and effects on other organs and systems. Air pollution may be defined according to origin of the phenomena that determine it: natural causes (natural fumes, decomposition, volcanic ash) or anthropogenic causes which are the result of human activities (industrial and civil emissions). Transport is the sector that more than others contributes to the deterioration of air quality in cities. In this context, in recent years, governments of the territory were asked to advance policies aimed at solving problems related to pollution. In consideration of the many effects on health caused by pollution it becomes necessary to know the risks from exposure to various environmental pollutants and to limit and control their effects. Many are the categories of "outdoor" workers, who daily serve the in urban environment: police, drivers, newsagents, etc. PMID:22888729

  14. Determination of urban groundwater pollution in alluvial aquifer using linked process models considering urban water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizintin, Goran; Souvent, Petra; Veselič, Miran; Cencur Curk, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThis paper presents the results of the 5th FP project AISUWRS (Assessing and Improving the Sustainability of Urban Water Resources and Systems) which aimed to assess the impact of the urban water infrastructure to underlying or nearby aquifers with the urban water balance modelling approach - a chain of different models that handle with contaminant fluxes and the movement of contaminants from the urban infrastructure into the underlying aquifer. An existing urban water management model UVQ was linked to a model for sewer infiltration and exfiltration (NEIMO), as well as unsaturated zone models (SLeakI/POSI, UL_FLOW) with existing numerical groundwater models. The linked process models offer the prospect of better quantification of urban water balance and contaminant loads, including improved estimates of total recharge and its components in urban areas. Once the model framework has been set up for a selected city, it can easily be updated in the future and it can be used for other purposes like planning of local remediation measures in the vicinity of individual contaminant spillages. This paper describes the application and results of the urban water model chain for the city of Ljubljana, which is the capital of Slovenia. The results from this study suggest that residential land-uses in urban areas with thick unsaturated zone may have significantly smaller impact on the groundwater than agriculture or industry. This can be seen as a speculative understanding of the groundwater pollutions problems. In this respect, use of sustainable urban development systems like on-site infiltration of roof runoff and improved sewer control and standards could result in better groundwater quality.

  15. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

  16. Novel sorbents for environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Werner, David

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, one of the major environmental problems is the pollution of aquatic systems and soil by persistent pollutants. Persistent pollutants have been found widespread in sediments, surface waters, and drinking water supplies. The removal of pollutants can be accomplished prior to their discharge to receiving bodies or by immobilizing them onto soil. Sorption is the most commonly applied process, and activated carbons have been widely used. Rapid progress in nanotechnology and a new focus on biomass-based instead of non-renewable starting materials have produced a wide range of novel engineered sorbents including biosorbents, biochars, carbon-based nanoparticles, bio-nano hybrid materials, and iron-impregnated activated carbons. Sorbent materials have been used in environmental remediation processes and especially in agricultural soil, sediments and contaminated soil, water treatment, and industrial wastewater treatment. Furthermore, sorbents may enhance the synergistic action of other processes, such as volatilization and biodegradation. Novel sorbents have been employed for the removal or immobilization of persistent pollutants such as and include heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Cd, and Hg), halogenated organic compounds, endocrine disrupting chemicals, metalloids and non-metallic elements, and other organic pollutants. The development and evaluation of novel sorbents requires a multidisciplinary approach encompassing environmental, nanotechnology, physical, analytical, and surface chemistry. The necessary evaluations encompass not only the efficiency of these materials to remove pollutants from surface waters and groundwater, industrial wastewater, polluted soils and sediments, etc., but also the potential side-effects of their environmental applications. The aim of this work is to present the results of the use of biochar and impregnated carbon sorbents for the removal of organic pollutants and metals. Furthermore, the new findings from the forthcoming session

  17. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  18. Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2007-07-25

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

  19. Phytoremediative urban design: transforming a derelict and polluted harbour area into a green and productive neighbourhood.

    PubMed

    Wilschut, M; Theuws, P A W; Duchhart, I

    2013-12-01

    Many urban areas are polluted by industrial activities and waste disposal in landfills. Since conventional soil remediation techniques are costly and unsustainable, phytoremediation might offer an alternative. In this article, we explore how phytoremediation can be integrated into the transformation of urban post-industrial areas, while improving public space. Buiksloterham, a polluted and deprived industrial area in Amsterdam, serves as case study. Buiksloterham is polluted with heavy metals, with Zinc (Zn) concentrations being the highest. A regression-model for Alpine Pennycress (Thlaspi caerulescens) is used to estimate the time needed to remediate the site. This reveals a conflict in time between remediation and urban development. A research by design experiment shows how to overcome this conflict by dealing with polluted soil innovatively while emphasizing spatial and aesthetic qualities of the phytoremediation plant species. The resulting landscape framework integrates phytoremediation with biomass production and gives new ecological, economic and social value to Buiksloterham.

  20. Integrated groundwater quality management in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartjes, F. A.; Otte, P. F.

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, groundwater assessments and remediations are approached at the scale of individual groundwater plumes. In urban areas, however, this management of individual groundwater plumes is often problematic for technical, practical or financial reasons, since the groundwater quality is often affected by a combination of sources, including (former) industrial activities, spills and leachate from uncontrolled landfills and building materials. As a result, often a whole series of intermingling contamination plumes is found in large volumes of groundwater. In several countries in the world, this led to stagnation of groundwater remediation in urban areas. Therefore, in the Netherlands there is a tendency managing groundwater in urban areas from an integrated perspective and on a larger scale. This so-called integrated groundwater quality management is often more efficient and hence, cheaper, since the organisation of the management of a cluster of groundwater plumes is much easier than it would be if all individual groundwater plumes were managed at different points in time. Integrated groundwater quality management should follow a tailor-made approach. However, to facilitate practical guidance was developed. This guidance relates to the delineation of the domain, the management of sources for groundwater contamination, procedures for monitoring, and (risk-based) assessment of the groundwater quality. Function-specific risk-based groundwater quality criteria were derived to support the assessment of the groundwater quality.

  1. A Regional Categorization for "New-Type Urbanization" in China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chuanglin; Ma, Haitao; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in the character of urbanization in China are substantial. The promotion of what has been termed "new-type urbanization" cannot, as a result of these regional differences, be expected to follow a universal approach--rather, such a development must objectively adhere to locational and category-specific principles and adopt differentiated urbanization development models. Regional categorization is often used in geography, but is rarely deployed in research addressing human and social problems relating to urbanization. In March 2014, China published the National New-type Urbanization Plan (2014-2020), which calls for the scientific and reasonable planning of "new-type urbanization," and appropriate regional categorizations are urgently needed in order to guide this reform. Responding to this challenge, this research engaged in the design of a "dominantly quantitative analysis, qualitatively supplemented" method in order to divide China into 5 main regions and 47 sub-regions in terms of new-type urbanization. The paper discusses the features and key problems of each region. This study introduces a new method for regional categorization, thereby remedying the lack of regional categorization in relation to "new-type urbanization" in China, and ultimately promoting the development of regional categorization in the humanities as a valuable reference for healthy and sustainable Chinese urbanization. PMID:26237405

  2. A Regional Categorization for "New-Type Urbanization" in China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chuanglin; Ma, Haitao; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in the character of urbanization in China are substantial. The promotion of what has been termed "new-type urbanization" cannot, as a result of these regional differences, be expected to follow a universal approach--rather, such a development must objectively adhere to locational and category-specific principles and adopt differentiated urbanization development models. Regional categorization is often used in geography, but is rarely deployed in research addressing human and social problems relating to urbanization. In March 2014, China published the National New-type Urbanization Plan (2014-2020), which calls for the scientific and reasonable planning of "new-type urbanization," and appropriate regional categorizations are urgently needed in order to guide this reform. Responding to this challenge, this research engaged in the design of a "dominantly quantitative analysis, qualitatively supplemented" method in order to divide China into 5 main regions and 47 sub-regions in terms of new-type urbanization. The paper discusses the features and key problems of each region. This study introduces a new method for regional categorization, thereby remedying the lack of regional categorization in relation to "new-type urbanization" in China, and ultimately promoting the development of regional categorization in the humanities as a valuable reference for healthy and sustainable Chinese urbanization.

  3. [What perspectives for cognitive remediation in schizophrenia?].

    PubMed

    Correard, N; Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Elissalde, S-N; Viglianese-Salmon, N; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2011-12-01

    Cognitive deficits are routinely evident in schizophrenia, and are of sufficient magnitude to influence functional outcomes in work, social functioning and illness management. Cognitive remediation is an evidenced-based non-pharmacological treatment for the neurocognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia. Narrowly defined, cognitive remediation is a set of cognitive drills or compensatory interventions designed to enhance cognitive functioning, but from the vantage of the psychiatric rehabilitation field, cognitive remediation is a therapy which engages the patient in learning activities that enhance the neurocognitive skills relevant to their chosen recovery goals. Cognitive remediation programs vary in the extent to which they reflect these narrow or broader perspectives but a metaanalytic study reports moderate range effect sizes on cognitive test performance, and daily functioning. Reciprocal interactions between baseline ability level, the type of instructional techniques used, and motivation provide some explanatory power for the heterogeneity in patient response to cognitive remediation. Recent studies indicate that intrinsic motivation mediates the relationship between neurocognition and functional outcomes. Results of these studies suggest that intrinsic motivation should be a viable treatment target in cognitive remediation intervention. In this perspective, NEAR (Neuropsychological Educational Approach to Remediation) program was created to enhance intrinsic motivation by employing more engaging and interesting software packages for cognitive practice, involving consumers in choosing the focus of training and having the NEAR leader serve as a coach to engage the consumers in active guidance of their own treatment program.

  4. Put risk-based remediation to work

    SciTech Connect

    Johl, C.J.; Feldman, L.; Rafferty, M.T.

    1995-09-01

    Risk-based site cleanups are gaining prominence in environmental remediation. In particular, the ``brownfields`` program in the US--designed to promote the redevelopment of contaminated industrial sites rather than the development of pristine sites--is bringing this new remediation approach to the forefront on a national basis. The traditional approach to remediating a contaminated site is dubbed the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI-FS) approach. Using an RI-FS approach, site operators and environmental consultants conduct a complete site characterization, using extensive air, water and soil sampling, and then evaluate all potential remediation alternatives. In many cases, the traditional remediation goal has been to return contaminant levels to background or ``non-detect`` levels--with little or no regard to the potential future use of the site. However, with cleanup costs on the rise, and a heightened awareness of the ``how clean is clean`` debate, nay are beginning to view the RI-FS approach as excessive. By comparison, the goal for a focused, risk-based site remediation is to protect human health and the environment in a manner that is consistent with the planned use of the site. Compared to a standard RI-FS cleanup, the newer method can save time and money, by prioritizing site-restoration activities based on risk analysis. A comparison of the to approaches for metals-laden soil is presented.

  5. Evaluation of French Guiana traditional antimalarial remedies.

    PubMed

    Bertani, S; Bourdy, G; Landau, I; Robinson, J C; Esterre, Ph; Deharo, E

    2005-04-01

    In order to evaluate the antimalarial potential of traditional remedies used in French Guiana, 35 remedies were prepared in their traditional form and screened for blood schizonticidal activity in vitro on Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine re4sistant strain (W2). Some of these extracts were screened in vivo against Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria. Ferriprotoporphyrin inhibition test was also performed. Four remedies, widely used among the population as preventives, were able to inhibit more than 50% of the parasite growth in vivo at around 100 mg/kg: Irlbachia alata (Gentiananceae), Picrolemma pseudocoffea (Simaroubaceae), Quassia amara (Simaroubaceae), Tinospora crispa (Menispermaceae) and Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae). Five remedies displayed an IC50 in vitro < 10 microg/ml: Picrolemma pseudocoffea, Pseudoxandra cuspidata (Annonaceae) and Quassia amara leaves and stem, together with a multi-ingredient recipe. Two remedies were more active than a Cinchona preparation on the ferriprotoporphyrin inhibition test: Picrolemma pseudocoffea and Quassia amara. We also showed that a traditional preventive remedy, made from Geissospermum argenteum bark macerated in rum, was able to impair the intrahepatic cycle of the parasite. For the first time, traditional remedies from French Guiana have been directly tested on malarial pharmacological assays and some have been shown to be active.

  6. Remediation of heterogeneous aquifers subject to uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, K L

    2009-01-01

    Optimal cost pump-and-treat ground water remediation designs for containment of a contaminated aquifer are often developed using deterministic ground water models to predict ground water flow. Uncertainty in hydraulic conductivity fields used in these models results in remediation designs that are unreliable. The degree to which uncertainty contributes to the reliability of remediation designs as measured by the characterization of the uncertainty is shown to differ depending upon the geologic environments of the models. This conclusion is drawn from the optimal design costs for multiple deterministic models generated to represent the uncertainty of four distinct models with different geologic environments. A multi scenario approach that includes uncertainty into the remediation design called the deterministic method for optimization subject to uncertainty (DMOU) is applied to these distinct models. It is found that the DMOU is a method for determining a remediation design subject to uncertainty that requires minimal postprocessing efforts. Preprocessing, however, is required for the application of the DMOU to unique problems. In the ground water remediation design problems, the orientation of geologic facies with respect to the orientation of flow patterns, pumping well locations, and constraint locations are shown to affect the preprocessing, the solutions to the DMOU problems, and the computational efficiency of the DMOU approach. The results of the DMOU are compared to the results of a statistical analysis of the effects of the uncertainty on remediation designs. This comparison validates the efficacy of the DMOU and illustrates the computational advantages to using the DMOU over statistical measures.

  7. Urban Stream Ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban watersheds characteristically have high impervious surface cover, resulting in high surface runoff and low infiltration following storms. In response, urban streams experience “flashy” stormflows, reduced baseflows, bank erosion, channel widening, and sedimentation. Urban ...

  8. Natural hydrocarbons, urbanization, and urban ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, C. A.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The combined effects of emission control and urbanization, with its concomitant intensification of the urban heat island, on urban ozone concentrations are studied. The effect of temperature on ozone is considered, and attention is given to the temperature effect on ozone photochemistry. Model calculations suggest that ozone concentration enhancements are caused by the effect of temperature on the atmospheric chemistry of peroxyacetyl nitrate, as well as the temperature dependence of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. It is pointed out that, because of the sensitivity of urban ozone to local climatic conditions and the ability of trees to moderate summertime temperatures, the inadvertent removal of trees from urbanization can have an adverse effect on urban ozone concentration, while a temperature increase in the urban heat island caused by urbanization can essentially cancel out the ozone-reducing benefits obtained from a 50-percent reduction in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions.

  9. Remediation using nested, horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Desantis, P.J.; Andrilenas, J.S.; Cheng, S.; Esler, C.; Miller, R.S.; Lew, K.V.

    1995-11-01

    A pair of nested, horizontal wells (one for vapor extraction, one for groundwater extraction) were utilized to remediate a mixed aromatic volatile organic compound (AVOC) and halogenated volatile organic compound (HVOC) soil and groundwater plume. The project site is an operating gasoline service station located in Portland, Oregon. The site has low permeability soils, a thin unconfined aquifer, with a relatively steep groundwater gradient. Each of the nested horizontal wells was drilled using the continuous borehole directional drilling method. The wells are each 110 meters long employing 73 meters of pre-packed well screen. The groundwater extraction well was pumped via vacuum-enhanced methods utilizing a two-pump configuration to eliminate the need for installation of a pump within the horizontal well and to increase both flow and radius of influence in fine-grained soils. Two groundwater models, a 2D analytical model and a finite element model, were utilized to analyze the potential and actual performance of the well. Of the two models used, the finite element model has produced results closely matching the actual performance of the well. After one year of operation, both AVOCs and HVOCs concentrations have been reduced by between 70 to 100%. All but two downgradient site wells have met cleanup standards for AVOCs; all have met substantial compliance for HVOCs.

  10. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  11. Luminescence study of homeopathic remedies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobyshev, Valentin I.; Tomkevitch, Marie

    2001-06-01

    It was shown in our recent papers that distilled water possesses intrinsic luminescence at wavelength of about 400 nm with excitation wavelength 300 nm, which is very sensitive to small amount of dissolved substances. This phenomena was chosen to study homeopathic remedies. Pronounced difference in the intensity of luminescence between several commercial preparations with the same potency and one preparation with various potencies was obtained. Long scale evolution of the spectra was registered and final result was dependent on preparation and its potency. Systematic study of homeopathic preparations of halit (natural sodium chloride) from 1 to 30 decimal dilution was done. A stepwise dilution with mechanical agitation between the dilution steps, the so-called potentisation, was produced specially by homeopathic company Weleda. Luminescence intensity against concentration (potency) of halit is non monotonous function with several maxima, the main maximum is located at 13-14-th dilution. Evolution of the spectra was registered during several months. The analogous potentisation treatment of water without additional substances results also in changes of the luminescence spectra, depending on the number of potentisation. The obtained differences of luminescence spectra at ultra high dilutions and potentisation show that the collective properties of water are really changed in homeopathic preparations.

  12. List of Contractors to Support Anthrax Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2010-05-14

    This document responds to a need identified by private sector businesses for information on contractors that may be qualified to support building remediation efforts following a wide-area anthrax release.

  13. Remedial Mathematics in the College: A Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akst, Geoffrey

    1978-01-01

    References dealing specifically with college remedial mathematics programs fall into several categories: descriptions of programs at individual colleges, regional surveys, and comparative studies on the relative effectiveness of various modes of instruction. (MN)

  14. A Model for Teaching College Remedial Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Mordechai

    1986-01-01

    A model for teaching college remedial mathematics is presented, with information on the background, the development of the model, and the model itself, as well as a discussion of how the model is used. (MNS)

  15. FIELD ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE DNAPL REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated in constructed test cells at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor...

  16. ELECTROKINETIC REMEDIATION: BASICS AND TECHNOLOGY STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrokinetic remediation, variably named as electrochemical soil processing, electromigration, electrokinetic decontamination or electroreclamation uses electric currents to extract radionuclides, heavy metals, certain organic compounds, or mixed inorganic species and some orga...

  17. Porous graphene materials for water remediation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xiaodong

    2014-09-10

    Water remediation has been a critical issue over the past decades due to the expansion of wastewater discharge to the environment. Currently, a variety of functional materials have been successfully prepared for water remediation applications. Among them, graphene is an attractive candidate due to its high specific surface area, tunable surface behavior, and high strength. This Concept paper summarizes the design strategy of porous graphene materials and their applications in water remediation, such as the cleanup of oil, removal of heavy metal ions, and elimination of water soluble organic contaminants. The progress made so far will guide further development in structure design strategy of porous materials based on graphene and exploration of such materials in environmental remediation.

  18. Burnout--Is Alcohol a Remedy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce, James E.

    1982-01-01

    The remedy for school personnel who drink too much is not dismissal but an understanding examination of the problem and encouragement to get help under the rules that apply for sick leave and medical insurance coverage. (Author/MLF)

  19. REAL TIME DATA FOR REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES [11505

    SciTech Connect

    BROCK CT

    2011-01-13

    Health physicists from the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company collaborated with Berkeley Nucleonics Corporation to modify the SAM 940 isotope identifier instrument to be used for nuclear waste remediation. These modifications coupled with existing capabilities of the SAM 940 have proven to be invaluable during remediation activities, reducing disposal costs by allowing swift remediation of targeted areas that have been identified as having isotopes of concern (IOC), and eliminating multiple visits to sites by declaring an excavation site clear of IOCs before demobilizing from the site. These advantages are enabled by accumulating spectral data for specific isotopes that is nearly 100 percent free of false positives, which are filtered out in 'real time.'

  20. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... intact. (3) The label shall contain: (i) The recall campaign number; and (ii) A code designating...

  1. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is...: (i) The recall campaign number; and (ii) A code designating the campaign facility at which the...

  2. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is...: (i) The recall campaign number; and (ii) A code designating the campaign facility at which the...

  3. School Finance Reform: Acceptable Remedies for Serrano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, James W.

    1974-01-01

    Article examined the remedies available to states in the wake of Serrano and its progeny. As well, it analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of "district power equalizing" and "full state assumption" as alternative methods of financing schools. (Editor/RK)

  4. Remediation Evaluation Model for Chlorinated Solvents (REMChlor)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new analytical solution has been developed for simulating the transient effects of groundwater source and plume remediation. This development was performed as part of a Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) research project, which was a joint effort ...

  5. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10 Remedial... with 45 CFR Part 74 and 42 CFR Part 50, as appropriate. Effective Date Note: At 62 FR 53564, Oct....

  6. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10 Remedial... with 45 CFR Part 74 and 42 CFR Part 50, as appropriate. Effective Date Note: At 62 FR 53564, Oct....

  7. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10 Remedial... with 45 CFR Part 74 and 42 CFR Part 50, as appropriate. Effective Date Note: At 62 FR 53564, Oct....

  8. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10 Remedial... with 45 CFR Part 74 and 42 CFR Part 50, as appropriate. Effective Date Note: At 62 FR 53564, Oct....

  9. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10 Remedial... with 45 CFR Part 74 and 42 CFR Part 50, as appropriate. Effective Date Note: At 62 FR 53564, Oct....

  10. Herbal remedies and supplements for weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... counter remedies. Over-the-counter refers to medicines, herbs, or supplements you can buy without a prescription. ... memory loss, and mood problems. Supplements with the herb Acacia rigidula labeled on the packaging often contain ...

  11. Academic Remediation, Parole Violations, and Recidivism Rates among Delinquent Youths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archwamety, Teara; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of the records of incarcerated juvenile males (N=505) receiving remediation in either reading or mathematics with those receiving no remediation found members of the remedial groups were twice as likely to be recidivists or parole violators as members of the nonremedial group. Predictors of remedial group membership included verbal IQ,…

  12. Praying for Change: The Ignatian Examen in the "Remedial" Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehner, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Contradictions abound in remedial higher education. While 40% of American undergraduate students take remedial coursework (Attewell et al., 2006), remediation represents just one percent of the national higher education budget (Handel & Williams, 2011). Furthermore, the status quo in remedial teaching and learning in American higher education does…

  13. 40 CFR 209.9 - Contents of a remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contents of a remedial plan. 209.9... remedial plan. (a) The Administrator will specify the requirements of the remedial plan. This may include... detailed plan for implementing the remedies, both those proposed by the Administrator and those proposed...

  14. 40 CFR 209.8 - Submission of a remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of a remedial plan. 209.8... remedial plan. (a) The Administrator may require the respondent to submit a remedial plan. Notice of this... remedial plan required by the complaint need not be submitted. The final order may include a...

  15. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  16. Natural Remediation at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C. M.; Van Pelt, R.

    2002-02-25

    Natural remediation is a general term that includes any technology or strategy that takes advantage of natural processes to remediate a contaminated media to a condition that is protective of human health and the environment. Natural remediation techniques are often passive and minimally disruptive to the environment. They are generally implemented in conjunction with traditional remedial solutions for source control (i.e., capping, stabilization, removal, soil vapor extraction, etc.). Natural remediation techniques being employed at Savannah River Site (SRS) include enhanced bio-remediation, monitored natural attenuation, and phytoremediation. Enhanced bio-remediation involves making nutrients available and conditions favorable for microbial growth. With proper precautions and feeding, the naturally existing microbes flourish and consume the contaminants. Case studies of enhanced bio-remediation include surface soils contaminated with PCBs and pesticides, and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) contamination in both the vadose zone and groundwater. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been selected as the preferred alternative for groundwater clean up at several SRS waste units. Successful implementation of MNA has been based on demonstration that sources have been controlled, groundwater modeling that indicates that plumes will not expand or reach surface water discharge points at levels that exceed regulatory limits, and continued monitoring. Phytoremediation is being successfully utilized at several SRS waste units. Phytoremediation involves using plants and vegetation to uptake, break down, or manage contaminants in groundwater or soils. Case studies at SRS include managing groundwater plumes of tritium and VOCs with pine trees that are native to the area. Significant decreases in tritium discharge to a site stream have been realized in one phytoremediation project. Studies of other vegetation types, methods of application, and other target contaminants are

  17. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  19. An Electronic Encyclopedia of Remedial Options

    1992-10-01

    REOPT has been developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information about remedial action technologies, including application and regulatory information for over 700 contaminants. REOPT is a user-friendly personal computer program and database that functions like an electronic encyclopedia, sorting and presenting information to quickly familiarize engineers and planners with available remediation technologies. The system will help users focus quickly on the remediation technologies most likely to be effective for a particular site and problem,more » and presents concise, easy-to-use information about those technologies, helping users identify the key factors and constraints to consider in evaluating the use of each technology. REOPT contains information on approximately 90 established (i.e., proven) remediation technologies that could potentially be used for DOE waste-site cleanup. REOPT also contains auxiliary information about hazardous and radioactive contaminants and the federal regulations that govern their disposal. REOPT contains data for approximately 90 remedial action technologies, divided into categories according to the portion of a remedial action (i.e., containment, treatment, disposal, etc.) that they relate to or perform. Technologies are also classified according to the contaminants to which they may be applied. Contaminants may be selected from a list of approximately 700 in ten organic and four inorganic categories. The information for each technology is organized into the broad categories of descriptive information, application information, and additional information sources; these are then subdivided to allow the user to access more specific information about the technology.« less

  20. California seeks new technologies for site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    Innovative new technologies for site remediation will be sought by the California Department of Health Services (Department), Toxic Substances Control Division, Alternative Technology Section, for assessment in the field as full-scale demonstration projects. The Remedial Technology Assessment Program (RTAP) fosters emerging technologies, which have been successfully tested in the laboratory, at bench scale, or at pilot scale and are ready for field or full-scale demonstration project testing. The Department will solicit interest from companies to conduct full-scale demonstrations of remedial treatment technologies for site remediation. The solicitation responses will be used to compile a list of treatment technologies which can be considered during the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) process for implementation at State-lead Bond Expenditure Plan sites and possibly responsible party sites. RTAP will attempt to match submitted remedial technologies to specific hazardous waste sites via the RAP process. A technical report, including an evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility, will be prepared after each demonstration project.

  1. Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

  2. Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkin, Thomas J.; Favara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this

  3. Triad method for assessing the remediation effect of humic preparations on urbanozems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukalchik, M. A.; Terekhova, V. A.; Yakimenko, O. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Akulova, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    The data on the pollutant content, ecological toxicity, and structural and functional specifics of soil microbial communities in urbanozem sampled in the city of Kirov were used to describe the remediation effect of humic substances (lignohumate and nanomagnetitohumate). The integral index of environmental risk on contaminated and background soil sites was calculated using the triad method. Based on varying Chemical Risk Index, Ecotoxicological Risk Index, and Ecological Risk Index, this method proved that humic substances are able to reduce ecological toxicity and transform the ecophysiological indices of biota in urban soils. The most vivid effect of humic products has been revealed on introduction of 0.0025 and 0.01% mass. The biological activity of nanomagnetitohumate and lignohumate, rather than their ability to bind toxicants, is apparently the principal factor controlling their remediating effect.

  4. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  5. The Aftermath of Remedial Math: Investigating the Low Rate of Certificate Completion among Remedial Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Peter Riley

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, a majority of community college students require remedial assistance with mathematics, but comparatively few students who begin the remedial math sequence ultimately complete it and achieve college-level math competency. The academic outcomes of students who begin the sequence but do not complete it are disproportionately unfavorable:…

  6. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements, standard operating procedures, and a contingency plan that conforms with 29 CFR 1910... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to... characteristics of the site, including important surface features, soils, geology, hydrogeology, meteorology,...

  7. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements, standard operating procedures, and a contingency plan that conforms with 29 CFR 1910... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to... characteristics of the site, including important surface features, soils, geology, hydrogeology, meteorology,...

  8. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements, standard operating procedures, and a contingency plan that conforms with 29 CFR 1910... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to... characteristics of the site, including important surface features, soils, geology, hydrogeology, meteorology,...

  9. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substances, pollutants, or contaminants. Institutional controls may be used during the conduct of the...: (i) The field sampling plan, which describes the number, type, and location of samples and the type... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation......

  10. EDTA retention and emissions from remediated soil.

    PubMed

    Jez, Erika; Lestan, Domen

    2016-05-01

    EDTA-based remediation is reaching maturity but little information is available on the state of chelant in remediated soil. EDTA soil retention was examined after extracting 20 soil samples from Pb contaminated areas in Slovenia, Austria, Czech Republic and USA with 120 mM kg(-1) Na2H2EDTA, CaNa2EDTA and H4EDTA for 2 and 24 h. On average, 73% of Pb was removed from acidic and 71% from calcareous soils (24 h extractions). On average, 15% and up to 64% of applied EDTA was after remediation retained in acidic soils. Much less; in average 1% and up to the 22% of EDTA was retained in calcareous soils. The secondary emissions of EDTA retained in selected remediated soil increased with the acidity of the media: the TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) solution (average pH end point 3.6) released up to 36% of EDTA applied in the soil (28.1 mmol kg(-1)). Extraction with deionised water (pH > 6.0) did not produce measurable EDTA emissions. Exposing soil to model abiotic (thawing/freezing cycles) and biotic (ingestion by earthworms Lumbricus rubellus) ageing factors did not induce additional secondary emissions of EDTA retained in remediated soil. PMID:26943741

  11. Electrokinetic soil remediation--critical overview.

    PubMed

    Virkutyt, Jurate; Sillanpää, Mika; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2002-04-22

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in finding new and innovative solutions for the efficient removal of contaminants from soils to solve groundwater, as well as soil, pollution. The objective of this review is to examine several alternative soil-remediating technologies, with respect to heavy metal remediation, pointing out their strengths and drawbacks and placing an emphasis on electrokinetic soil remediation technology. In addition, the review presents detailed theoretical aspects, design and operational considerations of electrokinetic soil-remediation variables, which are most important in efficient process application, as well as the advantages over other technologies and obstacles to overcome. The review discusses possibilities of removing selected heavy metal contaminants from clay and sandy soils, both saturated and unsaturated. It also gives selected efficiency rates for heavy metal removal, the dependence of these rates on soil variables, and operational conditions, as well as a cost-benefit analysis. Finally, several emerging in situ electrokinetic soil remediation technologies, such as Lasagna, Elektro-Klean, electrobioremediation, etc., are reviewed, and their advantages, disadvantages and possibilities in full-scale commercial applications are examined. PMID:12049409

  12. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  13. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  14. Electrokinetic soil remediation--critical overview.

    PubMed

    Virkutyt, Jurate; Sillanpää, Mika; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2002-04-22

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in finding new and innovative solutions for the efficient removal of contaminants from soils to solve groundwater, as well as soil, pollution. The objective of this review is to examine several alternative soil-remediating technologies, with respect to heavy metal remediation, pointing out their strengths and drawbacks and placing an emphasis on electrokinetic soil remediation technology. In addition, the review presents detailed theoretical aspects, design and operational considerations of electrokinetic soil-remediation variables, which are most important in efficient process application, as well as the advantages over other technologies and obstacles to overcome. The review discusses possibilities of removing selected heavy metal contaminants from clay and sandy soils, both saturated and unsaturated. It also gives selected efficiency rates for heavy metal removal, the dependence of these rates on soil variables, and operational conditions, as well as a cost-benefit analysis. Finally, several emerging in situ electrokinetic soil remediation technologies, such as Lasagna, Elektro-Klean, electrobioremediation, etc., are reviewed, and their advantages, disadvantages and possibilities in full-scale commercial applications are examined.

  15. Managing urban nutrient biogeochemistry for sustainable urbanization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Gibson, Valerie; Cui, Shenghui; Yu, Chang-Ping; Chen, Shaohua; Ye, Zhilong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-09-01

    Urban ecosystems are unique in the sense that human activities are the major drivers of biogeochemical processes. Along with the demographic movement into cities, nutrients flow towards the urban zone (nutrient urbanization), causing the degradation of environmental quality and ecosystem health. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of nutrient cycling within the urban ecosystem compared to natural ecosystems. The dynamic process of nutrient urbanization is then explored taking Xiamen city, China, as an example to examine the influence of rapid urbanization on food sourced nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism. Subsequently, the concept of a nutrient footprint and calculation method is introduced from a lifecycle perspective. Finally, we propose three system approaches to mend the broken biogeochemical cycling. Our study will contribute to a holistic solution which achieves synergies between environmental quality and food security, by integrating technologies for nutrient recovery and waste reduction.

  16. In situ soil remediation speeds site closure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    An automotive parts manufacturing site in Madison, Wisconsin contaminated primarily with 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) achieved closure in 15 months using an in situ soil remediation technology that improved soil conditions nearly a thousand fold. TCA concentrations were as high as 19,600 ppb. However, TCA levels dropped to 20 ppb after one year of system operation, prompting the state agency to grant closure for the remediation project in late 1992, following 15 months of operation. The groundwater remediation system is a packed-to-wet air stripper. It includes two groundwater extraction wells, each pumping 30 gallons per minute, and three soil vadose zone wells with a total design capacity of 100 cubic feet per minute. The soil-vapor extraction system included two 15-foot-deep wells and a 40-foot-deep well connected to a blower with condensate-recovery equipment.

  17. Cognitive Remediation in Severe Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement has received substantial recent attention because of multiple recent successes. We review the current research literature on cognitive enhancement, focusing on new developments that separate previous less successful efforts from recent successes. These innovations include increased understanding of the dosing and spacing of sessions, the need for titration of difficulty of individual sessions, and the importance of concurrent interventions. We also review the domains of functioning shown to be improved by cognitive remediation and the possibility that some biomarkers improve as well. We close by noting that current societal factors may impose limitations on the benefits accrued from cognitive remediation and also note that some pharmacological treatments, such as anticholinergic medications, may reduce or eliminate the potential benefits from cognitive remediation. PMID:22666639

  18. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  19. Implementation of Electrokinetic-ISCO Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. Z.; Reynolds, D.; Fourie, A.; Prommer, H.; Thomas, D.

    2011-12-01

    Significant challenges remain in the remediation of low-permeability porous media (e.g. clays, silts) contaminated with dissolved and sorbed organic contaminants. Current remediation technologies, such as in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), are often ineffective and the treatment region is limited by very slow rates of groundwater flow (advection) or molecular diffusion. At the laboratory-scale several studies (e.g. Reynolds et al. 2008) have highlighted the potential for utilising electrokinetic transport, as induced by the application of an electric field, to deliver a remediation compound (e.g. permanganate, persulfate) within heterogeneous and low-permeability sediments for ISCO (termed EK-ISCO) or other treatments. Process-based numerical modelling of the coupled flow, transport and reaction processes can provide important insights into the prevailing controls and feedback mechanisms and therefore guide the optimisation of EK-ISCO remediation efficacy. In this study, a numerical model was developed that simulates groundwater flow and multi-species reactive transport under both hydraulic and electric gradients (Wu et al. 2010). Coupled into the existing, previously verified reactive transport model PHT3D (Prommer et al. 2003), the model was verified against analytical solutions and data from experimental studies. Using the newly developed model, the sensitivity of electrokinetic, hydraulic and engineering parameters as well as alternative configurations of the EK-ISCO treatment process were investigated. The duration and energy required for remediation was most dependent upon the applied voltage gradient and the natural oxidant demand and all investigated parameters affected the remediation process to some extent. Investigated variants of treatment configurations included several alternative locations for oxidant injection and a series of one-dimensional and two-dimensional electrode configurations.

  20. Mapping Contaminant Remediation with Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, J.; Power, C.; Tsourlos, P.; Karaoulis, M.; Giannopoulos, A.; Soupios, P. M.; Simyrdanis, K.

    2014-12-01

    The remediation of sites contaminated with industrial chemicals - specifically dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) like coal tar and chlorinated solvents - represents a major geoenvironmental challenge. Remediation activities would benefit from a non-destructive technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long-standing potential in this context but has not yet become a common tool at DNAPL sites. This work evaluated the potential of time-lapse ERT for mapping DNAPL mass reduction in real time during remediation. Initially, a coupled DNAPL-ERT numerical model was developed for exploring this potential at the field scale, generating realistic DNAPL scenarios and predicting the response of an ERT survey. Also, new four-dimensional (4D) inversion algorithms were integrated for tracking DNAPL removal over time. 4D ERT applied at the surface for mapping an evolving DNAPL distribution was first demonstrated in a laboratory experiment. Independent simulation of the experiment demonstrated the reliability of the DNAPL-ERT model for simulating real systems. The model was then used to explore the 4D ERT approach at the field scale for a range of realistic DNAPL remediation scenarios. The approach showed excellent potential for mapping shallow DNAPL changes. However, remediation at depth was not as well resolved. To overcome this limitation, a new surface-to-horizontal borehole (S2HB) ERT configuration is proposed. A second laboratory experiment was conducted that demonstrated that S2HB ERT does better resolve changes in DNAPL distribution relative to surface ERT, particularly at depth. The DNAPL-ERT model was also used to demonstrate the improved mapping of S2HB ERT for field scale DNAPL scenarios. Overall, this work demonstrates that, with these innovations, ERT exhibits significant potential as a real time, non-destructive geoenvironmental remediation site monitoring tool.

  1. Education in Disadvantaged Urban Areas; an In-Service Course, January-March 1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Public Schools, MA.

    This pamphlet contains the lectures delivered during an inservice course for staff in the Boston public schools to acquaint them with the characteristics of their Negro students. The contents include: Rev. Edward L. Murphy, S.J., "The Urbanization of America"; Catherine M. Maney, "Preventive and Remedial Programs for the Disadvantaged Child";…

  2. Remedial action planning for Trench 1

    SciTech Connect

    Primrose, A.; Sproles, W.; Burmeister, M.; Wagner, R.; Law, J.; Greengard, T.

    1998-07-01

    The accelerated action to remove the depleted uranium chips and associated soils and wastes from Trench 1 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) will begin in June 1998. To ensure that the remedial action is conducted safely, a rigorous and disciplined planning process was followed that incorporates the principles of Integrated Safety Management and Enhanced Work Planning. Critical to the success of the planning was early involvement of project staff (salaried and hourly) and associated technical support groups and disciplines. Feedback was and will continue to be solicited, and lessons learned incorporated to ensure the safe remediation of this site.

  3. Novel biotechnological approaches in environmental remediation research.

    PubMed

    Pletsch, M; de Araujo, B S; Charlwood, B V

    1999-12-30

    Two novel approaches, the use of Agrobacterium-transformed plant roots and mycelia cultures of fungi, are considered as research tools in the study of the remediation of soil, groundwater, and biowastes. Transformed roots are excellent model systems for screening higher plants that are tolerant of various inorganic and organic pollutants, and for determining the role of the root matrix in the uptake and further metabolism of contaminants. Edible and/or medicinal fungi may also be natural environmental remediators. Liquid cultures of fungal mycelia are appropriate model systems with which to commence screening and biochemical studies in this under-researched area of biotransformation.

  4. DESCRIPTION OF MODELING ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF THE 200-ZP-1 REMEDIAL DESIGN/REMEDIAL ACTION

    SciTech Connect

    VONGARGEN BH

    2009-11-03

    The Feasibility Study/or the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-28) and the Proposed Plan/or Remediation of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-33) describe the use of groundwater pump-and-treat technology for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) as part of an expanded groundwater remedy. During fiscal year 2008 (FY08), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport (flow and transport) model was developed to support remedy design decisions at the 200-ZP-1 OU. This model was developed because the size and influence of the proposed 200-ZP-1 groundwater pump-and-treat remedy will have a larger areal extent than the current interim remedy, and modeling is required to provide estimates of influent concentrations and contaminant mass removal rates to support the design of the aboveground treatment train. The 200 West Area Pre-Conceptual Design/or Final Extraction/Injection Well Network: Modeling Analyses (DOE/RL-2008-56) documents the development of the first version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS model of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau, as well as the initial application of that model to simulate a potential well field for the 200-ZP-1 remedy (considering only the contaminants carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99). This document focuses on the use of the flow and transport model to identify suitable extraction and injection well locations as part of the 200 West Area 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOEIRL-2008-78). Currently, the model has been developed to the extent necessary to provide approximate results and to lay a foundation for the design basis concentrations that are required in support of the remedial design/remediation action (RD/RA) work plan. The discussion in this document includes the following: (1) Assignment of flow and transport parameters for the model; (2) Definition of initial conditions for the transport model for each simulated contaminant of concern (COC) (i.e., carbon

  5. Urban behavioural adaptation.

    PubMed

    Garroway, Colin J; Sheldon, Ben C

    2013-07-01

    A large and growing proportion of the world is impacted directly by human activities; among the most extreme of these is the spread of urban environments. Environmental change associated with urbanization represents a potentially potent source of selection. While urban environments generally have lowered biodiversity, some clades seem to thrive in urban settings. For example, many members of the bird family Turdidae, known as the ‘truethrushes’ and the blackbird Turdus merula (Fig. 1) in particular, are familiar urban species. Indeed, the colonization of urban environments by blackbirds has become a textbook case study for our understanding of the many ways a wild species can deal with urbanization. In this issue, Mueller et al. (Molecular Ecology, 00, 2013, 00) add to that story by beginning to address the genetic nature of behavioural adaptation of blackbirds colonizing urban areas. They do this by testing for divergence between paired urban and rural samples at a suite of candidate genes with hypothesized effects on behaviours thought to be important for the colonization of urban environments.They find evidence for consistent patterns of divergence at an exonic microsatellite associated with the SERT gene. SERT has a number of hypothesized behavioural effects, including harm avoidance, which may be associated with tolerating the hustle and bustle of urban environments. This is among the first evidence that behavioural differences between urban and rural environments have a genetic basis and this work suggests that urban environments can in some cases exert homogeneous selection pressures. PMID:23967452

  6. Air-Base Remediation Workshop - Section 3 Bioventig

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  7. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  8. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 6 Thermal Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  9. SADA: Ecological Risk Based Decision Support System for Selective Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is freeware that implements terrestrial ecological risk assessment and yields a selective remediation design using its integral geographical information system, based on ecological and risk assessment inputs. Selective remediation ...

  10. PERFORMANCE MONITORING FOR NATURAL ATTENUATION REMEDIES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental monitoring is the major component of any remedy that relies on natural attenuation processes. The objective of this document is to identify data needs and evaluation methods useful for designing monitoring networks and determining remedy effectiveness. Effective mon...

  11. Improving Hazardous Waste Remediation and Restoration Decisions Using Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous site management in the US includes remediation of contaminated environmental media and restoration of injured natural resources. Site remediation decisions are informed by ecological risk assessment (ERA), while restoration and compensation decisions are informed by the...

  12. Single-Concept Videotapes for College Remedial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utz, Peter

    1973-01-01

    More than 100 videotapes form part of a new remedial algebra program developed by Kingsborough Community College at Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn. Project aim was to improve remedial education in a difficult subject during a budget crisis. (Author)

  13. Shared Poetry: A Whole Language Experience Adapted for Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicklund, LaDonna K.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how a shared poetry exercise, combining whole language experiences with process writing techniques, motivates remedial readers. Notes that this technique helps remedial readers achieve success in writing, build sight and meaning vocabularies, and improve reading fluency. (MM)

  14. 45 CFR 94.6 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Remedies. (a) If the failure of an Investigator to comply with an Institution's financial conflicts of..., conduct, or reporting of the PHS-funded research, the Institution shall promptly notify the PHS Awarding... situation and, as necessary, take appropriate action, or refer the matter to the Institution for...

  15. 45 CFR 1177.3 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other remedies. 1177.3 Section 1177.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE... appropriate sanctions upon a debtor for prolonged or repeated failure to pay a debt. For example,...

  16. 45 CFR 1177.3 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other remedies. 1177.3 Section 1177.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE... appropriate sanctions upon a debtor for prolonged or repeated failure to pay a debt. For example,...

  17. Remedial Math and College Algebra Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, L. Quinn

    This investigation tried to determine if a statistically significant relationship exists between different sequences of enrollment in remedial mathematics and grades obtained in college algebra classes at Jacksonville State University. Groups consisting of five different enrollment sequences in mathematics were studied. The data collected supports…

  18. Ethics and Motivation in Remedial Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article examines motivational potentialities in remedial mathematics education within an ethical context, applying a model for ethical decision making in education developed by Shapiro and Stefkovich, in which three broad ethical categories are discussed: the ethic of justice, the ethic of care, and the ethic of critique. These ethical…

  19. 48 CFR 3.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedies. 3.906 Section 3.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS... (including attorneys' fees and expert witnesses' fees) that were reasonably incurred by the complainant...

  20. 48 CFR 3.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedies. 3.906 Section 3.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS... (including attorneys' fees and expert witnesses' fees) that were reasonably incurred by the complainant...

  1. 48 CFR 1803.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedies. 1803.906 Section 1803.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GENERAL... expert witnesses' fees) that were reasonably incurred by the complainant for, or in connection...

  2. Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G.; Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W.; Illangasakere, T.

    1996-12-31

    Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

  3. Remediating Hyperkinetic Behavior with Inpulse Control Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Mike

    1981-01-01

    This case study reviews a remediation program developed for a hyperkinetic school child. An important element of the program is the verbal portion of the therapist-student interaction. This consists of training in physical skills, encouragement, challenges, and conditioning the hand and verbal signals. (Author/AL)

  4. Evaluation of Remedial Programs at UC Davis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    Efforts at the University of California, Davis, (UC Davis) to develop standard evaluation models for remedial programs are described, and three UC Davis evaluation studies are considered. A standard evaluation model entails a formal orientation, a singular values perspective, and a primary audience of program funders and oversight agencies. The…

  5. Some aspects of remediation of contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Korobova, Elena; Abreu, Manuela; Bini, Claudio; Chon, Hyo-Taek; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Roca, Núria

    2014-05-01

    Soils are essential components of the environment, a limited precious and fragile resource, the quality of which should be preserved. The concentration, chemical form and distribution of potential harmful elements in soils depends on parent rocks, weathering, soil type and soil use. However, their concentration can be altered by mismanagement of industrial and mining activities, energy generation, traffic increase, overuse of agrochemicals, sewage sludge and waste disposal, causing contamination, environmental problems and health concerns. Heavy metals, some metalloids and radionuclides are persistent in the environment. This persistence hampers the cost/efficiency of remediation technologies. The choice of the most appropriate soil remediation techniques depends of many factors and essentially of the specific site. This contribution aims to offer an overview of the main remediation methods in contaminated soils. There are two main groups of technologies: the first group dealing with containment and confinement, minimizing their toxicity, mobility and bioavailability. Containment measures include covering, sealing, encapsulation and immobilization and stabilization. The second group, remediation with decontamination, is based on the remotion, clean up and/or destruction of contaminants. This group includes mechanical procedures, physical separations, chemical technologies such as soil washing with leaching or precipitation of harmful elements, soil flushing, thermal treatments and electrokinetic technologies. There are also two approaches of biological nature: bioremediation and phytoremediation. Case studies from Chile, Ecuador, Italy, Korea, Peru, Portugal, Russia and Spain, will be discussed in accordance with the time available.

  6. Regulatory Aspects Of Implementing Electrokinetic Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better understanding of the environmental impact of hazardous waste management practices has led to new environmental laws and a comprehensive regulatory program. This program is designed to address remediation of past waste management practices and to ensure that the hazardou...

  7. Microbial Remediation of Metals in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, K. A.; Roane, T. M.

    Of metal-contaminated systems, metal-contaminated soils present the greatest challenge to remediation efforts because of the structural, physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneities encountered in soils. One of the confounding issues surrounding metal remediation is that metals can be readily re-mobilized, requiring constant monitoring of metal toxicity in sites where metals are not removed. Excessive metal content in soils can impact air, surface water, and groundwater quality. However, our understanding of how metals affect organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals, and our ability to negate the toxicity of metals are in their infancies. The ubiquity of metal contamination in developing and industrialized areas of the world make remediation of soils via removal, containment, and/or detoxification of metals a primary concern. Recent examples of the health and environmental consequences of metal contamination include arsenic in drinking water (Wang and Wai 2004), mercury levels in fish (Jewett and Duffy 2007), and metal uptake by agricultural crops (Howe et al. 2005). The goal of this chapter is to summarize the traditional approaches and recent developments using microorganisms and microbial products to address metal toxicity and remediation.

  8. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary will notify...

  9. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

    2004-11-12

    This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

  10. Community College Presidents' Attitudes toward Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzarelli, Carla L.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges are the primary providers of remedial/developmental education. The cost, an ongoing values debate and varied institutional ideologies have led to a standard array of programs and services whose administration and efficacy vary from institution to institution. While leadership can be exercised at all levels of an institution, the…

  11. Tank waste remediation system mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Acree, C.D.

    1998-01-06

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report identifies the initial states of the system and the desired final states of the system. The Mission Analysis Report identifies target measures of success appropriate to program-level accomplishments. It also identifies program-level requirements and major system boundaries and interfaces.

  12. 22 CFR 213.4 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION General § 213.4 Other remedies. (a) This... contract, statute, regulation or other Agency procedures, e.g., resolution of audit findings under grants or contracts, informal grant appeals, formal appeals, or review under a procurement contract. (b)...

  13. COSTS TO REMEDIATE MTBE-CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extensive contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluate these costs, cost information for 311 sites wa...

  14. ENHANCED REMEDIATION DEMONSTRATIONS AT HILL AFB: INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine enhanced aquifer remediation technologies were demonstrated side-by-side at a Hill Air Force Base Chemical Disposal Pit/Fire Training Area site. The demonstrations were performed inside 3 x 5 m cells isolated from the surrounding shallow aquifer by steel piling. The site w...

  15. 49 CFR 228.333 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.333 Remedial action. A railroad shall, within 24 hours after receiving a good faith notice from a camp car occupant or an employee labor organization representing camp car occupants or notice from a...

  16. 49 CFR 228.333 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.333 Remedial action. A railroad shall, within 24 hours after receiving a good faith notice from a camp car occupant or an employee labor organization representing camp car occupants or notice from a...

  17. Acid mine drainage prediction and remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, G.; Robinson, J.

    1996-12-31

    The use of constructed wetlands for treatment of acid mine drainage is discussed in the article. Drainage characteristics and mine water flow rate are identified as important predictors of remediation success. Aerobic and anaerobic chemical reaction processes are described. Problems and potential uses of wetlands are briefly described.

  18. Integrating Remedial Writing into Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Gerard

    1983-01-01

    Seven remedial exercises designed to integrate reading and writing skills for learning disabled students are presented. The exercises, part of a model communicative writing program, focus on copying, automatic writing, restoring deleted words, outlining, paraphrasing, projection, and correspondence. Examples of student writing are included. (CL)

  19. 48 CFR 3.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedies. 3.906 Section 3.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS... (including attorneys' fees and expert witnesses' fees) that were reasonably incurred by the complainant...

  20. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  1. Dairy livestock methane remediation and global warming.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Neil J

    2010-10-01

    One of the major greenhouse gases is the methane released from ruminants. Greenhouse gas emissions in the agricultural portion of the economy may benefit from biologically based remediation strategies, including potential use of probiotics in animal husbandry. A broad range of disciplines (including climatologists, microbiologists, biochemists, physical chemists, agricultural economists) can assist in biological strategies to reduce agricultural methane emissions.

  2. English Teachers for Junior College Remedial Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefevre, Helen E.

    After a brief discussion of the problems and defects of junior college remedial or compensatory English programs, the need for adequately trained teachers for these programs is considered. The major areas essential to the training of such teachers are identified as (1) training in English, including oral language and linguistic studies and a broad…

  3. Contextualized Learning May Redefine Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Paul Fain (2011), cited community college leaders who overwhelmingly voted at the Reimagining Community Colleges invitation-only conference held September 23, 2011 in New York City, for team teaching and other innovations as the most important fix for remedial education in community colleges. Team teaching is not common in postsecondary education…

  4. GENERAL METHODS FOR REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document was developed by an EPA-funded project to explain technical considerations and principles necessary to evaluated the performance of ground-water contamination remediations at hazardous waste sites. This is neither a "cookbook", nor an encyclopedia of recommended fi...

  5. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary will notify...

  6. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... covered equipment does not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary...

  7. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... covered equipment does not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary...

  8. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... covered equipment does not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary...

  9. Comparing Alternative Algebraic Modalities for Remedial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClendon, Marie; McArdle, Michele

    This paper reports that the student population enrolled in remedial mathematics is rapidly increasing, while funding for these classes in Florida is declining. The Math Department at the Winter Park Campus (WPC) of Florida's Valencia Community College (VCC) has developed a curriculum that offers a variety of instructional formats to its remedial…

  10. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  12. 48 CFR 2803.906 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Remedies. 2803.906 Section 2803.906 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE General IMPROPER BUSINESS... contractor fails to comply with an order, the HCA shall request an action be filed for enforcement of...

  13. Proceedings: Conference on Compensatory/Remedial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fea, Henry R., Ed.; And Others

    This document presents the papers and discussions from the Conference on Compensatory/Remedial Education. The contents include: "Institutional Programs for the Low Achievers" by Joan G. Roloff; "Communication in Compensatory Education" by Henry R. Fea; "Seminar: Special Programs for Minorities" by Constance Acholonu; "Seminar: Special Programs for…

  14. 45 CFR 94.6 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedies. 94.6 Section 94.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RESPONSIBLE PROSPECTIVE CONTRACTORS § 94.6... interest policy or a financial conflict of interest management plan appears to have biased the...

  15. 45 CFR 94.6 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedies. 94.6 Section 94.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RESPONSIBLE PROSPECTIVE CONTRACTORS § 94.6... interest policy or a financial conflict of interest management plan appears to have biased the...

  16. Raleigh County Remedial Laboratory: Mathematics. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capehart, Ernestine

    A project was conducted to develop a program of effective remediation in mathematics for the adolescent learner using the laboratory approach. The project addressed: (1) material development and equipment/supply selection for use within the laboratory which would address individual/small group needs; (2) identification of specific needs of…

  17. Remediation technologies for heavy metal contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Hashim, M A; Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Sengupta, Bhaskar

    2011-10-01

    The contamination of groundwater by heavy metal, originating either from natural soil sources or from anthropogenic sources is a matter of utmost concern to the public health. Remediation of contaminated groundwater is of highest priority since billions of people all over the world use it for drinking purpose. In this paper, thirty five approaches for groundwater treatment have been reviewed and classified under three large categories viz chemical, biochemical/biological/biosorption and physico-chemical treatment processes. Comparison tables have been provided at the end of each process for a better understanding of each category. Selection of a suitable technology for contamination remediation at a particular site is one of the most challenging job due to extremely complex soil chemistry and aquifer characteristics and no thumb-rule can be suggested regarding this issue. In the past decade, iron based technologies, microbial remediation, biological sulphate reduction and various adsorbents played versatile and efficient remediation roles. Keeping the sustainability issues and environmental ethics in mind, the technologies encompassing natural chemistry, bioremediation and biosorption are recommended to be adopted in appropriate cases. In many places, two or more techniques can work synergistically for better results. Processes such as chelate extraction and chemical soil washings are advisable only for recovery of valuable metals in highly contaminated industrial sites depending on economical feasibility.

  18. Chlorinated ethene source remediation: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Stroo, Hans F; Leeson, Andrea; Marqusee, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Paul C; Ward, C Herb; Kavanaugh, Michael C; Sale, Tom C; Newell, Charles J; Pennell, Kurt D; Lebrón, Carmen A; Unger, Marvin

    2012-06-19

    Chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) are widespread groundwater contaminants often released as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). These contaminants are difficult to remediate, particularly their source zones. This review summarizes the progress made in improving DNAPL source zone remediation over the past decade, and is structured to highlight the important practical lessons learned for improving DNAPL source zone remediation. Experience has shown that complete restoration is rare, and alternative metrics such as mass discharge are often useful for assessing the performance of partial restoration efforts. Experience also has shown that different technologies are needed for different times and locations, and that deliberately combining technologies may improve overall remedy performance. Several injection-based technologies are capable of removing a large fraction of the total contaminant mass, and reducing groundwater concentrations and mass discharge by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Thermal treatment can remove even more mass, but even these technologies generally leave some contamination in place. Research on better delivery techniques and characterization technologies will likely improve treatment, but managers should anticipate that source treatment will leave some contamination in place that will require future management.

  19. Urban Schools in Urban Systems, Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappert, Gary, Ed.

    This volume contains papers which were presented at a conference focusing on the themes of partnership and progress in urban education. The following papers are included: (1) an introduction to the volume, by Gary Gappert; (2) "Urban Education: Past, Present and Future," by Bernard G. Watson; (3) "Variables Affecting the Learning of Inner City…

  20. TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: CONSTRUCTION QUALITY MANAGEMENT FOR REMEDIAL ACTION AND REMEDIAL DESIGN WASTE CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technical Guidance Document is intended to augment the numerous construction quality control and construction quality assurance (CQC and CQA) documents that are available far materials associated with waste containment systems developed for Superfund site remediation. In ge...

  1. Urban runoff quality management

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This new manual of practice, jointly produced by the Water Environment Federation and American Society of Civil Engineers, focuses on the protection and enhancement of urban water resources by controlling the transport of constituents into urban waterways by urban stormwater runoff. The manual emphasizes control of constituent discharges, reflecting the fact that chemical and particulate constituents in urban stormwater runoff play a key role in determining the negative effects of that runoff.

  2. Urban water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  3. Green remediation: Using plants to clean the soil

    SciTech Connect

    Comis, D.

    1996-05-01

    Rufus Chaney has his eye on plants with a lusty appetite for toxic heavy materials. Chaney foresees a day when these remarkable plants will be used to clean contaminated soils at smelter and mining sites, landfills, nuclear waste dumps, farmland, or at any urban or rural site contaminated with lead, cadmium, zinc, nickel, or radioactive isotopes such as uranium or cobalt. The plants would take up the toxic metals or isotopes through their roots and transport them to stems or leaves where they could be easily removed by harvesting. A U.S. Department of AGriculture agronomist, Chaney says the cost of using plants to clean polluted soil {open_quotes}could be less than one-tenth the price tag for either digging up and trucking the soil to a hazardous waste landfill or making it into concrete.{close_quotes} Chaney, a heavy-metals expert at USDA`s Agricultural Research Service Environmental Chemistry Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, says the cost could be further offset by recovering heavy metals from the plants and selling them. The metal-scavenging plants, called hyperaccumultors, would be grown and harvested like hay, Chaney says. {open_quotes}Burning the hay allows recovery and recycling of the metals. The ash is similar to commercial ore and could be sold as {open_quote}Bio-Ore{close_quote}.{close_quotes} Chaney calls the process {open_quotes}green remediation.{close_quotes} He says that without intervention, heavy metals stay in soil for centuries.

  4. 45 CFR 83.3 - Remedial and affirmative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; Coverage § 83.3 Remedial and affirmative actions. (a) Remedial action. If the Director finds that an entity has discriminated against persons on the basis of sex in any of its training programs, such entity shall take such remedial action as the Director deems necessary to overcome the effects of...

  5. 40 CFR 761.61 - PCB remediation waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PCB remediation waste. 761.61 Section... PROHIBITIONS Storage and Disposal § 761.61 PCB remediation waste. This section provides cleanup and disposal options for PCB remediation waste. Any person cleaning up and disposing of PCBs managed under this...

  6. 22 CFR 505.12 - Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil remedies and criminal penalties. 505.12 Section 505.12 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties. (a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the...

  7. 22 CFR 505.12 - Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Civil remedies and criminal penalties. 505.12 Section 505.12 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties. (a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the...

  8. 22 CFR 505.12 - Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil remedies and criminal penalties. 505.12 Section 505.12 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties. (a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the...

  9. 46 CFR 298.41 - Remedies after default.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedies after default. 298.41 Section 298.41 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION VESSEL FINANCING ASSISTANCE OBLIGATION GUARANTEES Defaults and Remedies, Reporting Requirements, Applicability of Regulations § 298.41 Remedies after default. (a) In general. The Security...

  10. Remedial Policy in the California State University System: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Taryn Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Remedial courses have become a fixture on college and university campuses across the nation with nearly all public institutions offering at least one remedial course and nearly one quarter of first-year students requiring remediation (USDE, NCES, 2003). In the California State University System, the context for this study, the proportion of…

  11. 12 CFR 268.501 - Remedies and relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies and relief. 268.501 Section 268.501 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) RULES REGARDING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY Remedies and Enforcement § 268.501 Remedies and relief. (a) When the Board, or the Commission, in...

  12. 40 CFR 270.68 - Remedial Action Plans (RAPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). 270.68 Section 270.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... § 270.68 Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) are special forms of permits...

  13. 40 CFR 270.68 - Remedial Action Plans (RAPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). 270.68 Section 270.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... § 270.68 Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) are special forms of permits...

  14. 40 CFR 270.68 - Remedial Action Plans (RAPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). 270.68 Section 270.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... § 270.68 Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) are special forms of permits...

  15. 40 CFR 270.68 - Remedial Action Plans (RAPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). 270.68 Section 270.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... § 270.68 Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) are special forms of permits...

  16. 40 CFR 270.68 - Remedial Action Plans (RAPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). 270.68 Section 270.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... § 270.68 Remedial Action Plans (RAPs). Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) are special forms of permits...

  17. Calculating the Costs of Remedial Placement Testing. CCRC Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Olga; Bowden, Brooks; Belfield, Clive; Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Of the more than one million new students who enter community colleges each fall, nearly 70 percent are assigned to remedial coursework. The cost of providing this coursework is high, yet evidence about the effectiveness of remediation is not compelling. In addition, many students are misclassified in the remedial assessment process. In order for…

  18. 45 CFR 30.5 - Other administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other administrative remedies. 30.5 Section 30.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION General Provisions § 30.5 Other administrative remedies. The remedies and sanctions available under this part...

  19. Rolled lawn as tool for industrial barren remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, T. T.; Ivanova, L. A.; Kikuchi, R.; Gerardo, R.

    2009-04-01

    Fast development of the industrial and urban territories during last century has led to great disturbance of natural ecosystems in a lot of regions of the world. In the Far North the risk resulted from technogenic influence involves essentially more expressed negative consequences for the nature comparing to a regions of averages and southern latitudes due to higher sensitivity of northern ecosystems. Since thirtieth years of last century industrial complexes on extraction and processing of nonferrous metals ores are functioned on Kola peninsula territory. They are powerful sources of emissions of acidifying substances and heavy metals. Long term influence of these emissions resulted in deep degradation of terrestrial ecosystems up to industrial barren arising in immediate proximity to industrial centre Monchegorsk. The most radical way of disturbed territories rehabilitation is biological remediation. In 2006-2008 innovative methods of high-quality grass cover performance was developed in local enterprise «VIPON» in Apatity. Vermiculite trademark «VIPON» is characterized by not broken structure of minerals combined with week reactance, high mechanical durability, favorable рН equal 6.5-7.0, valuable absorptive and ion exchange properties. Final product of proposed technology was rolled lawn which successfully applied for remediation of disturbed sites in urban territories as such as industrial plots with low contamination. One of abstract authors namely L.Ivanova is one of technology implementators. During 2008 the field test was performed near the smelter complex (67°51'N, 32°48'E) to estimate suitability of proposed method for site remediation in more severe conditions such as in industrial barren. The method is based on cultivation of perennial grasses using hydroponics with thermally inflated vermiculite from local deposit (Kovdor) followed by rolled lawn placement on very contaminated sites near Monchegorsk. Great advantage of rolled lawn is short

  20. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational

  1. [Cognitive remediation and work outcome in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Franck, N

    2014-06-01

    Recovery is partly defined by the patients' capacity to work, since doing well in a job favors hope and responsibilities' taking. Diminished job placement or tenure is linked with cognitive disorders, which impact directly and indirectly (through negative symptoms) functional outcomes. Attention, executive functions and working memory disorders can result in an alteration of the ability to manage the tasks required in the workplace. Executive function, working memory and social cognition disorders may also have an impact on behavior in relationships. Cognitive disorders do not automatically directly contribute to vocational outcome, yet their effects may be mediated by other variables such as symptoms, metacognition, social skills and intrinsic motivation. Then, since all these dimensions have to be taken into account, reducing the impact of cognitive troubles becomes a major challenge for the care of schizophrenia. Cognitive remediation is the more effective therapeutic tool to reduce cognitive dysfunctions. It rests in particular on the development of new strategies that allow taking concrete situations into account more efficiently. Cognitive remediation reduces the detrimental consequences of cognitive disorders and permits their compensation. It has emerged as an effective treatment, that improves not only cognitive abilities but also functioning, as it has been shown by numerous randomized controlled studies and several meta-analyses. The present article considers the effects on cognitive remediation on work function in schizophrenia. Several randomized controlled trials that compared supported employment alone versus supported employment associated with cognitive remediation showed significant improvement of employment rates in the latter condition. These results favor the use of cognitive remediation before job placement. The specific needs of the occupation that will be provided and the cognitive profile of the user should be taken into account.

  2. [Cognitive remediation and work outcome in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Franck, N

    2014-06-01

    Recovery is partly defined by the patients' capacity to work, since doing well in a job favors hope and responsibilities' taking. Diminished job placement or tenure is linked with cognitive disorders, which impact directly and indirectly (through negative symptoms) functional outcomes. Attention, executive functions and working memory disorders can result in an alteration of the ability to manage the tasks required in the workplace. Executive function, working memory and social cognition disorders may also have an impact on behavior in relationships. Cognitive disorders do not automatically directly contribute to vocational outcome, yet their effects may be mediated by other variables such as symptoms, metacognition, social skills and intrinsic motivation. Then, since all these dimensions have to be taken into account, reducing the impact of cognitive troubles becomes a major challenge for the care of schizophrenia. Cognitive remediation is the more effective therapeutic tool to reduce cognitive dysfunctions. It rests in particular on the development of new strategies that allow taking concrete situations into account more efficiently. Cognitive remediation reduces the detrimental consequences of cognitive disorders and permits their compensation. It has emerged as an effective treatment, that improves not only cognitive abilities but also functioning, as it has been shown by numerous randomized controlled studies and several meta-analyses. The present article considers the effects on cognitive remediation on work function in schizophrenia. Several randomized controlled trials that compared supported employment alone versus supported employment associated with cognitive remediation showed significant improvement of employment rates in the latter condition. These results favor the use of cognitive remediation before job placement. The specific needs of the occupation that will be provided and the cognitive profile of the user should be taken into account. PMID

  3. Radio frequency heating for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.L.; Kasevich, R.S.; Marley, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) for soil remediation brings controlled heating to the subsurface, increasing the rate of removal of contaminants from the soil. RFH alone does not remove contaminants; it eases contaminant removal by enhancing the performance of other technologies such as Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Groundwater Venting (Air Sparging), Groundwater Pump and Treat, and Bioremediation. In general, heating soils and groundwater makes the physical, chemical and biological properties of the soil, groundwater and contaminants more amenable to remediation efforts, reducing time on-site. RFH technology for environmental remediation by KAI Technologies Inc. (KAI) began in the early 1990s when an RFH system was deployed to an East Coast Naval Shipyard and tested on a {number_sign}2 fuel oil spill. RFH was then employed by KAI at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1993 and at Kelly Air Force Base in 1994. This paper discusses the spring 1996 RFH demonstration conducted with DAHL and Associates of St. Paul, Minnesota which employed SVE and Groundwater Venting at the site of a former gasoline station near St. Paul, Minnesota. Currently, RFH is assisting SVE at a jet fuel spill within Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This paper provides a general overview of RFH technology for soil remediation by reviewing the theory and computer modeling of RFH and presenting results on the efficacy of RFH with SVE for soil remediation from a bench-scale study and the field demonstration mentioned previously. The bench-scale study evaluated effectiveness of RFH for enhancing SVE removal of tetrachloroethylene from a Burlington, Massachusetts site. Data from Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) computer modeling of the field demonstration provides insight into the shape of the subsurface heating pattern.

  4. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 1 Sampling And Analysis Revelant To Air-Based Remediation Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Force Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environme...

  5. China's Urban Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Clifton

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that Chinese urbanization is proceeding rapidly in step with population growth and a structural shift in employment patterns. Discusses governmental policies and economic reforms that enhance the urbanization process. Describes four extended metropolitan areas and maintains they will be the models for future urbanization. (CFR)

  6. Characterization and Low-Cost Remediation of Soils Contaminated by Timbers in Community Gardens.

    PubMed

    Heiger-Bernays, W; Fraser, A; Burns, V; Diskin, K; Pierotti, D; Merchant-Borna, K; McClean, M; Brabander, D; Hynes, H P

    2009-01-01

    Urban community gardens worldwide provide significant health benefits to those gardening and consuming fresh produce from them. Urban gardens are most often placed in locations and on land in which soil contaminants reflect past practices and often contain elevated levels of metals and organic contaminants. Garden plot dividers made from either railroad ties or chromated copper arsenate (CCA) pressure treated lumber contribute to the soil contamination and provide a continuous source of contaminants. Elevated levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derived from railroad ties and arsenic from CCA pressure treated lumber are present in the gardens studied. Using a representative garden, we 1) determined the nature and extent of urban community garden soil contaminated with PAHs and arsenic by garden timbers; 2) designed a remediation plan, based on our sampling results, with our community partner guided by public health criteria, local regulation, affordability, and replicability; 3) determined the safety and advisability of adding city compost to Boston community gardens as a soil amendment; and 4) made recommendations for community gardeners regarding healthful gardening practices. This is the first study of its kind that looks at contaminants other than lead in urban garden soil and that evaluates the effect on select soil contaminants of adding city compost to community garden soil. PMID:21804925

  7. Characterization and Low-Cost Remediation of Soils Contaminated by Timbers in Community Gardens

    PubMed Central

    Heiger-Bernays, W.; Fraser, A.; Burns, V.; Diskin, K.; Pierotti, D.; Merchant-Borna, K.; McClean, M.; Brabander, D.; Hynes, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Urban community gardens worldwide provide significant health benefits to those gardening and consuming fresh produce from them. Urban gardens are most often placed in locations and on land in which soil contaminants reflect past practices and often contain elevated levels of metals and organic contaminants. Garden plot dividers made from either railroad ties or chromated copper arsenate (CCA) pressure treated lumber contribute to the soil contamination and provide a continuous source of contaminants. Elevated levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derived from railroad ties and arsenic from CCA pressure treated lumber are present in the gardens studied. Using a representative garden, we 1) determined the nature and extent of urban community garden soil contaminated with PAHs and arsenic by garden timbers; 2) designed a remediation plan, based on our sampling results, with our community partner guided by public health criteria, local regulation, affordability, and replicability; 3) determined the safety and advisability of adding city compost to Boston community gardens as a soil amendment; and 4) made recommendations for community gardeners regarding healthful gardening practices. This is the first study of its kind that looks at contaminants other than lead in urban garden soil and that evaluates the effect on select soil contaminants of adding city compost to community garden soil. PMID:21804925

  8. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  9. Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2007-02-15

    On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain

  10. WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Sudan

    2000-06-22

    The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste

  11. Environmental challenges threatening the growth of urban agriculture in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Sam E; Lovell, Sarah Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Urban agriculture, though often difficult to define, is an emerging sector of local food economies in the United States. Although urban and agricultural landscapes are often integrated in countries around the world, the establishment of mid- to large-scale food production in the U.S. urban ecosystem is a relatively new development. Many of the urban agricultural projects in the United States have emerged from social movements and nonprofit organizations focused on urban renewal, education, job training, community development, and sustainability initiatives. Although these social initiatives have traction, critical knowledge gaps exist regarding the science of food production in urban ecosystems. Developing a science-based approach to urban agriculture is essential to the economic and environmental sustainability of the movement. This paper reviews abiotic environmental factors influencing urban cropping systems, including soil contamination and remediation; atmospheric pollutants and altered climatic conditions; and water management, sources, and safety. This review paper seeks to characterize the limited state of the science on urban agricultural systems and identify future research questions most relevant to urban farmers, land-use planners, and environmental consultants. PMID:24216408

  12. Environmental challenges threatening the growth of urban agriculture in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Sam E; Lovell, Sarah Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Urban agriculture, though often difficult to define, is an emerging sector of local food economies in the United States. Although urban and agricultural landscapes are often integrated in countries around the world, the establishment of mid- to large-scale food production in the U.S. urban ecosystem is a relatively new development. Many of the urban agricultural projects in the United States have emerged from social movements and nonprofit organizations focused on urban renewal, education, job training, community development, and sustainability initiatives. Although these social initiatives have traction, critical knowledge gaps exist regarding the science of food production in urban ecosystems. Developing a science-based approach to urban agriculture is essential to the economic and environmental sustainability of the movement. This paper reviews abiotic environmental factors influencing urban cropping systems, including soil contamination and remediation; atmospheric pollutants and altered climatic conditions; and water management, sources, and safety. This review paper seeks to characterize the limited state of the science on urban agricultural systems and identify future research questions most relevant to urban farmers, land-use planners, and environmental consultants.

  13. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  14. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  15. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  16. Deposit control in ground water remediation equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, B.; Soeder, K.

    1995-12-31

    Remedial actions at all types of hazardous waste sites require the implementation of various water treatment technologies. Though the many groundwater treatment technologies are constantly developing, some age-old problems associated with handling any water remains. These operating problems include deposition of naturally occurring inorganic solutes such as iron, manganese, calcium and fouling by indigenous micro-organisms. Fouling of air stripping towers is a common example of this phenomenon. Virtually all groundwater treatment systems experience some degree of operating impediment from this cause. Some systems may take years for deposits to become problems, but many systems become inoperable within weeks or months. Recently released studies by the American Petroleum Institute show that deposit control is the most common operation problem causing remediation system failure. Such failures result in greatly increased operation & maintenance costs and non compliance with regulatory mandates.

  17. In situ soil remediation: Bacteria or fungi?

    SciTech Connect

    Cutright, T.J.; Lee, S.

    1995-07-01

    Contamination of the environment is not a new problem. For most of recorded history, the unwanted byproducts of industrial and residential processes have been dumped into unlined pits or nearby streams. Although disposal techniques have greatly improved, significant quantities of hazardous materials are still being released to the environment via accidental spills and leaking underground storage tanks. One particular group of contaminants of critical environmental concern is polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH-contaminated sites typically cover large areas; therefore, the development of in situ remediation techniques such as bioremediation is strongly emphasized. In situations when inherent microorganisms are not capable of degrading the contaminants, foreign strains must be used. Bioremediation experiments were conducted to compare the remediation efficiencies of a bacteria and a fungus for an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the use of three supplemental nutrient solutions were investigated in conjunction with the bacteria Achromobacter sp. and fungus Cunninghamella echinulata var. elegans.

  18. The role of innovative remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Doesburg, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund`s National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don`t really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

  19. The role of innovative remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Doesburg, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund's National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don't really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

  20. Briefing paper -- Remedial Action Assessment System

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.

    1990-04-01

    Congress has mandated a more comprehensive management of hazardous wastes with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund'') and the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA). This mandate includes restoration of disposal sites contaminated through past disposal practices. This mandate applies to facilities operated for and by the Department of Energy (DOE), just as it does to industrial and other institutions. To help implement the CERCLA/SARA remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) process in a consistent, timely, and cost-effective manner, a methodology needs to be developed that will allow definition, sorting, and screening of remediation technologies for each operable unit (waste site). This need is stated specifically in Section 2.2.2.1 of the October 1989 Applied Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT E) Plan of the DOE. This Briefing Paper is prepared to respond to this need. 1 fig.

  1. Rethinking remediation technologies for desertified landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, J.E.; Havstad, K.M.; Coffin, D.P.

    1997-07-01

    Shrub-dominated communities have replaced native grasslands throughout much of the arid Southwest during the past 120 years. Most currently available remediation technologies are uneconomical due to large inputs of energy, fertilizers, herbicides and labor, or are ecologically ineffective due to harsh environments and the highly competitive nature of these native shrubs. Our analysis of these historical remediation technologies together with new information on ecosystem processes has led us to pursue an ecologically-based approach in which more limited inputs are targeted to promote natural processes of regeneration. Advantages to this approach include lower costs, reduced reliance on agronomic practices, and maintenance of natural landscape features. Disadvantages include longer time required for desired changes to occur, and a need for increased understanding of arid land processes.

  2. Uranium concentrations in South African herbal remedies.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Vanessa; Stewart, Michael J; Chimuka, Luke; Cukrowska, Ewa

    2005-12-01

    South Africa contains some of the world's largest mineral deposits, which include uranium. Uranium is mined as a by-product of gold production. The uranium content of the surface soil and groundwater in South Africa has been measured and shows marked variation, depending on location. Herbal remedies are collected by traditional healers from many sites, some of which may be contaminated. Thirty herbal remedies were analyzed using a sensitive adsorptive stripping voltammetry method. Eight samples had levels below the limit of detection, but in five the levels were greatly elevated, showing concentrations above 40,000 ppb. The mean uranium concentration of the remainder of the specimens was of the order of 15,000 ppb. We have attempted to put these data into context by comparison with other studies of absorption of uranium by the oral route.

  3. Intrinsic remediation of an industrial waste impoundment

    SciTech Connect

    Swindoll, C.M.; Lee, M.D.; Wood, K.N.; Hartten, A.S.; Bishop, A.L.; Connor, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Intrinsic remediation, also known as natural restoration, was evaluated as a potential corrective action alternative for an industrial surface impoundment previously used for the disposal of waste treatment biosolids, organic wastes, and fly ash. Organic waste constituents included chlorobenzene, aniline, xylenes, benzene, toluene, acetone, p-cresol, 2-butanone, fluorene, and ethylbenzene. The evaluation demonstrated that the impoundment contains an active microbial community including aerobic, denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microbes, and that environmental conditions were favorable for their growth. Laboratory studies confirmed that these microbes could biodegrade the organic waste constituents under varying redox conditions. The sorptive properties of the residual biosolids and fly ash contribute to the immobilization of chemical constituents and may enhance biodegradation by sequestering chemicals onto surfaces where microbes grow. Based on this field and laboratory evaluation, it was concluded that intrinsic remediation offers significant environmental benefits over other corrective action alternatives that would not allow these natural restoration processes to continue in the surface impoundment.

  4. Electrochemical remediation of phenanthrene from contaminated kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, T; Pazos, M; Cameselle, C; Sanromán, M A

    2008-04-01

    In this work a two-stage process combining soil electrokinetic remediation and liquid electrochemical oxidation for the remediation of polluted soil with organic compounds has been developed and evaluated using phenanthrene-spiked kaolinite. Application of an unenhanced electrokinetic process resulted in negligible removal of phenanthrene from the kaolinite sample. Addition of co-solvents and electrolyte to the processing fluid used in the electrode chambers enhanced phenanthrene desorption from the kaolinite matrix and favoured electro-osmotic flow. Near-complete removal of phenanthrene was achieved using Na2SO4 and ethanol in the processing fluid. Phenanthrene was transported towards the cathode chamber where it was collected. The cathodic solution containing the pollutant was treated by electrochemical oxidation; complete degradation of phenanthrene occurred after 9 h using Na2SO4 as electrolyte.

  5. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-12-31

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

  6. Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.

    2005-09-01

    The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation.

  7. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  8. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Riha, Brian D.; Looney, Brian B.

    2015-10-27

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  9. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Rhia, Brian D.

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  10. Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

    2002-02-27

    During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

  11. Tank waste remediation system mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Acree, C.D.

    1998-01-09

    This document describes and analyzes the technical requirements that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) must satisfy for the mission. This document further defines the technical requirements that TWRS must satisfy to supply feed to the private contractors` facilities and to store or dispose the immobilized waste following processing in these facilities. This document uses a two phased approach to the analysis to reflect the two-phased nature of the mission.

  12. Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Gwo, Jin-Ping; Siegel, Malcolm D; Li, Ming-Hsu; Fang, Yilin; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-05-01

    There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g., Ni, Cr, Co). The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport

  13. Drug interactions in African herbal remedies.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Werner; Steenkamp, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Herbal usage remains popular as an alternative or complementary form of treatment, especially in Africa. However, the misconception that herbal remedies are safe due to their "natural" origins jeopardizes human safety, as many different interactions can occur with concomitant use with other pharmaceuticals on top of potential inherent toxicity. Cytochrome P450 enzymes are highly polymorphic, and pose a problem for pharmaceutical drug tailoring to meet an individual's specific metabolic activity. The influence of herbal remedies further complicates this. The plants included in this review have been mainly researched for determining their effect on cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein drug transporters. Usage of herbal remedies, such as Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Sutherlandia frutescens and Harpagophytum procumbensis popular in Africa. The literature suggests that there is a potential for drug-herb interactions, which could occur through alterations in metabolism and transportation of drugs. Research has primarily been conducted in vitro, whereas in vivo data are lacking. Research concerning the effect of African herbals on drug metabolism should also be approached, as specific plants are especially popular in conjunction with certain treatments. Although these interactions can be beneficial, the harm they pose is just as great. PMID:21756221

  14. Flexible remediation design lowers total cost

    SciTech Connect

    Struttman, T.; Towarnicky, J.

    1995-08-01

    Most groundwater remediation systems are built to operate for many years. Predicting time to cleanup is difficult due to unforeseeable problems and changes in underground conditions. As a result, many treatment systems tend to be over-designed, with multiple built-in safety factors and excessive capital costs. Total time in operation also is unnecessarily long because upfront assumptions often fail to match future realities. A Superfund site remediation in Arizona illustrates how a flexible, ongoing design approach can significantly reduce life cycle costs. The site is a municipal airport where degreasing activities from the 1940s through the 1970s left trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and in two aquifers beneath the site. The soil is being remediated in five areas, representing approximately 10 acres. The upper aquifer plume covers approximately 400 acres, and the two lower aquifer plumes cover 10 and 30 acres. The cleanup involves extraction of groundwater in a pump-and-treat system of 16 extraction wells, followed by treatment with an air stripper for the upper aquifer and liquid-phase high-pressure carbon on the lower aquifer. The treated/clean water is reinjected to augment hydraulic control.

  15. An unmanned ground vehicle for landmine remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Steven R.; Guilberto, Jose; Ogg, Wade; Wedeward, Kevin; Bruder, Stephen; El-Osery, Aly

    2004-09-01

    Anti-tank (AT) landmines slow down and endanger military advances and present sizeable humanitarian problems. The remediation of these mines by direct human intervention is both dangerous and costly. The Intelligent Systems & Robotics Group (ISRG) at New Mexico Tech has provided a partial solution to this problem by developing an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) to remediate these mines without endangering human lives. This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of this UGV. Current results and future work are also described herein. To initiate the remediation process the UGV is given the GPS coordinates of previously detected landmines. Once the UGV autonomously navigates to an acceptable proximity of the landmine, a remote operator acquires control over a wireless network link using a joystick on a base station. Utilizing two cameras mounted on the UGV, the operator is able to accurately position the UGV directly over the landmine. The UGV houses a self-contained drill system equipped with its own processing resources, sensors, and actuators. The drill system deploys a neutralizing device over the landmine to neutralize it. One such device, developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), employs incendiary materials to melt through the container of the landmine and slowly burn the explosive material, thereby safely and remotely disabling the landmine.

  16. Methodology to remediate a mixed waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to the complex issue of mixed waste management, a generalized methodology for remediation of a mixed waste site has been developed. The methodology is based on requirements set forth in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and incorporates ``lessons learned`` from process design, remediation methodologies, and remediation projects. The methodology is applied to the treatment of 32,000 drums of mixed waste sludge at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Process technology options are developed and evaluated, first with regard to meeting system requirements and then with regard to CERCLA performance criteria. The following process technology options are investigated: (1) no action, (2) separation of hazardous and radioactive species, (3) dewatering, (4) drying, and (5) solidification/stabilization. The first two options were eliminated from detailed consideration because they did not meet the system requirements. A quantitative evaluation clearly showed that, based on system constraints and project objectives, either dewatering or drying the mixed waste sludge was superior to the solidification/stabilization process option. The ultimate choice between the drying and the dewatering options will be made on the basis of a technical evaluation of the relative merits of proposals submitted by potential subcontractors.

  17. Laboratory/industry partnerships for environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Beskid, N.J.; Zussman, S.K.

    1994-09-01

    There are two measures of ``successful`` technology transfer in DOE`s environmental restoration and waste management program. The first is remediation of DOE sites, and the second is commercialization of an environmental remediation process or product. The ideal case merges these two in laboratory/industry partnerships for environmental remediation. The elements to be discussed in terms of their effectiveness in aiding technology transfer include: a decision-making champion; timely and sufficient funding; well organized technology transfer function; well defined DOE and commercial markets; and industry/commercial partnering. Several case studies are presented, including the successful commercialization of a process for vitrification of low-level radioactive waste, the commercial marketing of software for hazardous waste characterization, and the application of a monitoring technique that has won a prestigious technical award. Case studies will include: vitrification of low-level radioactive waste (GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD); borehole liner for emplacing instrumentation and sampling groundwater (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Santa Fe, NM); electronic cone penetrometer (Applied Research Associates, Inc., South Royalton, VT); and software for hazardous waste monitoring ConSolve, Inc. (Lexington, MA). The roles of the Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory in these successes will be characterized.

  18. Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-08

    The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

  19. Total quality management -- Remedial actions planning program

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, J.L.; Horne, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the management approach being taken within the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) Support Contractor Office (SCO) to ensure quality of services in a highly competitive waste management environment. An overview is presented of the contractor support role assigned to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) national program for managing hazardous waste. The HAZWRAP SCO mission, organizational structure, and major programs are outlined, with emphasis on waste management planning for the DOE Work for Others (WFO) Program. The HAZWRAP SCO provides waste management technical support, via interagency agreements between DOE and various Department of Defense (DOD) agencies for DOD sponsors planning remedial response actions. The remainder of the paper focuses on how the concept of Total Quality Management is applied to the HAZWRAP Remedial Actions Planning (RAP) Program. The management challenge is to achieve quality on a ''system'' basis where all functional elements of program management synergistically contribute to the total quality of the effort. The quality assurance (QA) program requirements applied to the RAP Program and its subcontractors are discussed. The application of management principles in the areas of program management, procurement, and QA to achieve total quality is presented. 3 refs.

  20. Preliminary remediation goals for ecological endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, R.A.; Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.

    1996-07-01

    Preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) are useful for risk assessment and decision making at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites. PRGs are upper concentration limits for specific chemicals in specific environmental media that are anticipated to protect human health or the environment. They can be used for multiple remedial investigations at multiple facilities. In addition to media and chemicals of potential concern, the development of PRGs generally requires some knowledge or anticipation of future land use. In Preliminary Remediation Goals for Use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (Energy Systems 1995), PRGs intended to protect human health were developed with guidance from Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual, Part B (RAGS) (EPA 1991). However, no guidance was given for PRGs based on ecological risk. The numbers that appear in this volume have, for the most part, been extracted from toxicological benchmarks documents for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and have previously been developed by ORNL. The sources of the quantities, and many of the uncertainties associated with their derivation, are described in this technical memorandum.

  1. Reading program-Remedial, integrated, and innovative.

    PubMed

    Butler, S R

    1991-01-01

    An innovative integrated remedial reading program has been developed based on recent research findings. My longitudinal studies have revealed that poor reading compounds itself over the years. The majority of children with reading disabilities currently remain in regular classrooms with varying techniques being used depending upon individual school directives and current educational theory.Despite current remedial techniques, the poorer reader tends to remain so throughout the school years. Innovative techniques must be developed in the hope of altering this pattern.This paper presents one alternative strategy which can be used to upgrade reading skills and break the cycle of reading failure. The Reading Assistance Tutorial Pack (R.A.T. Pack) is a carefully sequenced series of activities that enables the learner to experience the motivating and reinforcing properties of success through all stages of phonetic and reading skills development.It is a systematic, multidisciplinary remedial reading program based on sound behavior, psycholinguistic and cognitive theories of learning-incorporating listening, speaking, seeing, writing, thinking, and comprehension skills. The R.A.T. Pack demands a high percentage of on-task behavior and trains phonological processing strategies. Functional language use is promoted through enjoyable activities involving sentence construction, cloze passages, puzzles, games, and other creative manipulations of the surface features of languages. The program has proven successful in schools, homes, and clinics. PMID:24233760

  2. Natural hydrocarbons, urbanization, and urban ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Cardelino, C.A.; Chameides, W.L. )

    1990-08-20

    Using the Atlanta metropolitan area as a case study, the authors examine the effects of urbanization and its associated heat island on urban ozone concentrations. Air quality data from Atlanta suggest that urban ozone concentrations are enhanced by increases in ambient temperature. Model calculations suggest that this enhancement is caused by the effect of temperature on the atmospheric chemistry of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), as well as the temperature dependence of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. A comparison of summertime temperatures in Atlanta and a nearby rural station, suggests that Atlanta's temperature over the past 15 years has increased by about 2{degree}C due to urbanization and its concomitant intensification of the urban heat island. Numerical simulations using conditions of a typical summertime day in Atlanta suggest that this rise in temperature could have, (1) resulted in a significant increase in the net emissions of natural hydrocarbons in the area in spite of the loss of about 20% of the areas forests over the same period, and (2) negated the beneficial effects on summertime ozone concentrations that would have been obtained from a 50% reduction in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. Because a NO{sub x}-based ozone abatement strategy appears to be less sensitive to temperature increases than does a hydrocarbon-based strategy, a NO{sub x} strategy may prove to be more effective in the future if temperatures continue to rise as a result of urbanization and the greenhouse effect.

  3. Natural hydrocarbons, urbanization, and urban ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelino, C. A.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-08-01

    Using the Atlanta metropolitan area as a case study, we examine the effects of urbanization and its associated heat island on urban ozone concentrations. Air quality data from Atlanta suggest that urban ozone concentrations are enhanced by increases in ambient temperature. Model calculations suggest that this enhancement is caused by the effect of temperature on the atmospheric chemistry of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), as well as the temperature dependence of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. A comparison of summertime temperatures in Atlanta and a nearby rural station, suggests that Atlanta's temperature over the past 15 years has increased by about 2°C due to urbanization and its concomitant intensification of the urban heat island. Numerical simulations using conditions of a typical summertime day in Atlanta suggest that this rise in temperature could have, (1.) resulted in a significant increase in the net emissions of natural hydrocarbons in the area in spite of the loss of about 20% of the area's forests over the same period, and (2.) negated the beneficial effects on summertime ozone concentrations that would have been obtained from a 50% reduction in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. Because a NOx-based ozone abatement strategy appears to be less sensitive to temperature increases than does a hydrocarbon-based strategy, a NOx strategy may prove to be more effective in the future if temperatures continue to rise as a result of urbanization and the "greenhouse effect".

  4. Environmental impacts of remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated site: life cycle assessment of remediation alternatives.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Z; Chambon, Julie; Binning, Philip J; Bulle, Cécile; Margni, Manuele; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-12-01

    The environmental impacts of remediation of a chloroethene-contaminated site were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). The compared remediation options are (i) in situ bioremediation by enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD), (ii) in situ thermal desorption (ISTD), and (iii) excavation of the contaminated soil followed by off-site treatment and disposal. The results showed that choosing the ERD option will reduce the life-cycle impacts of remediation remarkably compared to choosing either ISTD or excavation, which are more energy-demanding. In addition to the secondary impacts of remediation, this study includes assessment of local toxic impacts (the primary impact) related to the on-site contaminant leaching to groundwater and subsequent human exposure via drinking water. The primary human toxic impacts were high for ERD due to the formation and leaching of chlorinated degradation products, especially vinyl chloride during remediation. However, the secondary human toxic impacts of ISTD and excavation are likely to be even higher, particularly due to upstream impacts from steel production. The newly launched model, USEtox, was applied for characterization of primary and secondary toxic impacts and combined with a site-dependent fate model of the leaching of chlorinated ethenes from the fractured clay till site.

  5. Ecological benefits of contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Zarull, Michael A; Hartig, John H; Krantzberg, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Contaminated sediment has been identified as a source of ecological impacts in marine and freshwater systems throughout the world, and the importance of the contaminated sediment management issue continues to increase in all industrialized countries. In many areas, dredging or removal of sediments contaminated with nutrients, metals, oxygen-demanding substances, and persistent toxic organic chemicals has been employed as a form of environmental remediation. In most situations, however, the documentation of the sediment problem has not been quantitatively coupled to ecological impairments. In addition, the lack of long-term, postactivity research and monitoring for most projects has impeded a better understanding of the ecological significance of sediment contamination. Establishing quantitatively the ecological significance of sediment-associated contamination in any area is a difficult time- and resource-consuming exercise. It is, however, absolutely essential that it be done. Such documentation will likely be used as the justification for remedial and rehabilitative action(s) and also as the rationale for proposing when intervention is necessary in one place but not another. Bounding the degree of ecological impact (at least semiquantitatively) provides for realistic expectations for improvement if sediment remediation is to be pursued. It should also provide essential information on linkages that could be used in rehabilitating other ecosystem components such as fish or wildlife habitat. The lack of information coupling contaminated sediment to specific ecological impairments has, in many instances, precluded a clear estimate of how much sediment requires action to be taken, why, and what improvements can be expected to existing impairment(s) over time. Also, it has likely resulted in either a delay in remedial action or abandonment of the option altogether. A clear understanding of ecological links not only provides adequate justification for a cleanup program

  6. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  7. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  8. Salmon Site Remediation Investigation Report, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE /Nevada Operations Office

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  9. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 1

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  10. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix D

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  11. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 3

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  12. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 4

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  13. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  14. ERT monitoring of environmental remediation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Brecque, D. J.; Ramirez, A. L.; Daily, W. D.; Binley, A. M.; Schima, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The use of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to monitor new environmental remediation processes is addressed. An overview of the ERT method, including design of surveys and interpretation, is given. Proper design and lay-out of boreholes and electrodes are important for successful results. Data are collected using an automated collection system and interpreted using a nonlinear least squares inversion algorithm. Case histories are given for three remediation technologies: Joule (ohmic) heating, in which clay layers are heated electrically; air sparging, the injection of air below the water table; and electrokinetic treatment, which moves ions by applying an electric current. For Joule heating, a case history is given for an experiment near Savannah River, Georgia, USA. The target for Joule heating was a clay layer of variable thickness. During the early stages of heating, ERT images show increases in conductivity due to the increased temperatures. Later, the conductivities decreased as the system became dehydrated. For air sparging, a case history from Florence, Oregon, USA is described. Air was injected into a sandy aquifer at the site of a former service station. Successive images clearly show the changes in shape of the region of air saturation with time. The monitoring of an electrokinetic laboratory test on core samples is shown. The electrokinetic treatment creates a large change in the core resistivity, decreasing near the anode and increasing near the cathode. Although remediation efforts were successful both at Savannah River and at Florence, in neither case did experiments progress entirely as predicted. At Savannah River, the effects of heating and venting were not uniform and at Florence the radius of air flow was smaller than expected. Most sites are not as well characterized as these two sites. Improving remediation methods requires an understanding of the movements of heat, air, fluids and ions in the sub-surface which ERT can provide. The

  15. Field Implementation of Electrokinetic-ISCO Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. Z.; Reynolds, D. A.; Fourie, A.; Thomas, D.; Prommer, H.

    2010-12-01

    Challenges remain in the remediation of low-permeability porous media (e.g. clays, silts) contaminated with dissolved and sorbed organic contaminants. Current remediation technologies, such as in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), are often ineffective and the treatment region is limited by very slow rates of groundwater flow (advection) or molecular diffusion. Several studies (e.g. Reynolds et al. 2008) have highlighted the potential at a laboratory scale for utilising electrokinetic transport, through the application of an electric field, to deliver a remediation compound (e.g. permanganate, persulfate) within heterogeneous and low-permeability sediments for ISCO (termed EK-ISCO) or other treatments. A numerical modelling approach is highly beneficial to optimise the efficacy of EK-ISCO remediation. A numerical model was developed that simulates groundwater flow and multi-species reactive transport under hydraulic and electric gradients (Wu et al. 2010). Coupled into the existing, previously verified reactive transport model PHT3D (Prommer, Barry and Zheng 2003), the model was verified against analytical and experimental studies. This study, through numerical modelling, investigated the feasibility of various factors, such as electrode configurations, applied voltage and oxidant loading, for EK-ISCO treatment at several field sites. Successful in situ oxidation is dependent upon the electrokinetic transport and dispersal of oxidant through the contaminated region, however this is limited by modelled conditions such as natural oxidant demand and contaminant phase. Electrode configurations investigated included one-dimensional or two-dimensional configurations, unidirectional, bidirectional or rotational operations, and position of oxidant injection. References Prommer, H, Barry, DA and Zheng, C 2003, 'MODFLOW/MT3DMS-Based Reactive Multicomponent Transport Modeling', Ground Water, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 247-257. Reynolds, DA, Jones, EH, Gillen, M, Yusoff, I and Thomas

  16. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Main Body

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  17. Science plus management equals successful remediation -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Buehlman, M.D.; Rogers, D.T.; Payne, F.C.

    1997-12-31

    In the past, owners of contaminated sites attempted to remediate as quickly as possible, usually by excavating contaminated soil or pumping and treating contaminated groundwater. Often, they started remediation before identifying all potential types and sources of contaminants, and before conducting a thorough hydrogeologic study. Such premature action usually resulted in the selected remedy not working, the contamination spreading, or unnecessary remedial activities. Today, successful site remediation is recognized as a complex and time-consuming undertaking--requiring a combination of careful scientific study, effective negotiation with the regulatory agencies and skillful management of multidisciplinary efforts. A case study involving a Brownfields site in southeastern Michigan clearly illustrates the elements of successful remediation. The site`s soil was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and its groundwater with a variety of chlorinated solvents. The original estimate for remediation had exceeded $30 million. Several phases of investigation were conducted to evaluate the nature and sources of contaminants, the site`s hydrogeology, potential risks to human health and the environment, and feasible remedial technologies. Multiple cleanup criteria were established for different affected areas based on the results of the investigations, changes that were taking place with the state cleanup regulations and standards and subsequent negotiations with state and federal regulators. Innovative remedial technologies were selected. The result was a remediation that met or exceeded all soil and groundwater cleanup objectives, was performed on schedule, and was highly cost-effective. The final cost was limited to $3 million--one-tenth of the original estimate.

  18. [Urbanization control policies in Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Syafrizal

    1987-06-01

    Urbanization policy in Indonesia is outlined. Elements of this policy include the issuing of residency permits for major urban areas, the migration program to assist jobless urban residents in moving to underpopulated areas, and rural development and the encouragement of growth in smaller urban centers. The effectiveness of existing policies in controlling urbanization is assessed. (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  19. Deconstructing Remediation in Community Colleges: Exploring Associations between Course-Taking Patterns, Course Outcomes, and Attrition from the Remedial Math and Remedial Writing Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Peter Riley

    2012-01-01

    Each year, a sizeable percentage of community college students enroll in remedial coursework to address skill deficiencies in math, writing, and/or reading. Unfortunately, the majority of these students do not attain college-level competency in the subjects in which they require remedial assistance. Moreover, students whose point of entry into the…

  20. Urban Food Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Buluswar, Shashi

    2015-05-06

    Shashi Buluswar, Berkeley Lab's Executive Director of the Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT) discusses the issue of urban food deserts and malnutrition in American inner cities.

  1. Contaminants in urban waters—Science capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jastram, John D.; Hyer, Kenneth E.

    2016-04-29

    Streams and estuaries with urban watersheds commonly exhibit increased streamflow and decreased base flow; diminished stream-channel stability; excessive amounts of contaminants such as pesticides, metals, industrial and municipal waste, and combustion products; and alterations to biotic community structure. Collectively, these detrimental effects have been termed the “urban-stream syndrome.” Water-resource managers seek to lessen the effects on receiving water bodies of new urban development and remediate the effects in areas of existing urbanization. Similarly, the scientific community has produced extensive research on these topics, with researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) leading many studies of urban streams and the processes responsible for the urban-stream syndrome. Increasingly, USGS studies are evaluating the effects of management and restoration activities to better understand how urban waters respond to the implementation of management practices. The USGS has expertise in collecting and interpreting data for many physical, chemical, and ecological processes in urban waters and, thus, provides holistic assessments to inform managers of urban water resources.

  2. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  3. Hazardous waste site remediation and community acceptance: Beyond regulatory compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M.A.; Moreau, J.P.

    1998-12-31

    Community acceptance is an important criteria in securing regulatory approval of remediation alternatives, and yet the legal requirements for public consultation during the preparation of site investigation and feasibility study reports are minimal. Usually the only provision for formal public input on remedial plans is at the final stages of preparation through the formalistic constraints of a public meeting and limited comment period. This is often too late for meaningful public input and precludes constructive dialogue between responsible parties, local citizens, and regulatory representatives. Often the public opposes proposed remediation alternatives because of insufficient information leading to mistrust and irreconcilable differences. This paper suggests that responsible parties run the risk of community rejection of remediation plans, and costly project delays, if they follow the minimum regulatory requirements for public involvement. Through the use of active and meaningful citizen participation throughout project planning, success in securing community acceptance for preferred remedial alternatives in potentially controversial remediation projects is greatly enhanced.

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  5. Distribution of Herbal Remedy Knowledge in Tabi, Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Allison; Stepp, John Richard

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of herbal remedy knowledge among a group of people is studied for two main reasons: (1) to identify plants that are promising for pharmacological analysis, and (2) to examine the factors that lead to herbal remedy knowledge erosion as opposed to dynamism in the acquisition of knowledge. The goal of this particular study, which is aligned with the second reason, is to establish the variation in herbal remedy knowledge among the Yucatec Maya in Tabi, Yucatan, Mexico. Free listing and cultural consensus analysis revealed that knowledge about a few medicinal plants and herbal remedies was distributed widely among the Yucatec Maya in Tabi, whereas the majority of knowledge was idiosyncratic. This finding was consistent with other studies of herbal remedy knowledge distribution among indigenous groups in Latin America and Africa. Assessing patterns in the distribution of herbal remedy knowledge is an important next step in determining the degree of dynamism or erosion in knowledge acquisition and transmission in Tabi. PMID:23539665

  6. Population, migration and urbanization.

    PubMed

    1982-06-01

    Despite recent estimates that natural increase is becoming a more important component of urban growth than rural urban transfer (excess of inmigrants over outmigrants), the share of migration in the total population growth has been consistently increasing in both developed and developing countries. From a demographic perspective, the migration process involves 3 elements: an area of origin which the mover leaves and where he or she is considered an outmigrant; the destination or place of inmigration; and the period over which migration is measured. The 2 basic types of migration are internal and international. Internal migration consists of rural to urban migration, urban to urban migration, rural to rural migration, and urban to rural migration. Among these 4 types of migration various patterns or processes are followed. Migration may be direct when the migrant moves directly from the village to the city and stays there permanently. It can be circular migration, meaning that the migrant moves to the city when it is not planting season and returns to the village when he is needed on the farm. In stage migration the migrant makes a series of moves, each to a city closer to the largest or fastest growing city. Temporary migration may be 1 time or cyclical. The most dominant pattern of internal migration is rural urban. The contribution of migration to urbanization is evident. For example, the rapid urbanization and increase in urban growth from 1960-70 in the Republic of Korea can be attributed to net migration. In Asia the largest component of the population movement consists of individuals and groups moving from 1 rural location to another. Recently, because urban centers could no longer absorb the growing number of migrants from other places, there has been increased interest in the urban to rural population redistribution. This reverse migration also has come about due to slower rates of employment growth in the urban centers and improved economic opportunities

  7. Do We Need Remedial College Math Courses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anne O.; Khatri, D.

    2006-12-01

    Entering college freshmen, in increasing numbers, in practically every public institution of higher learning are in need of one or two remedial math courses. This is particularly a big problem at the Historically Black Colleges and Universities where a large number of remedial math course sections are offered to meet the growing demand for such courses. For most of these students, graduation is delayed by at least a year. In addition, these students continue to be taught by teaching methodologies that did not work for them even in high schools resulting in disgust and hatred for math. This situation makes entry for these students into STEM areas difficult and is the perfect recipe for failure in STEM disciplines if they enroll in college level courses. The University of the District of Columbia (UDC) is no exception. A first attempt was made in summer 2006 to remedy this situation. The problem for this exploratory research study was to ascertain if a short, intensive six-week project in basic math and introductory algebra would produce a recognizable improvement in the math performance of entering UDC freshmen students as measured by the UDC math placement test. The results are eye opening. On the pre-test for basic math (005), the mean score for the group (N=10) was 35.6, with the passing score being 70. On the post-test, the mean increased to 63.4 showing an improvement of 78 percent. The authors will present the results of this research study at the conference

  8. Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaulis, L.; Wilson, G.; Jacobson, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer{trademark}, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made.

  9. Rail transportation of Fernald remediation waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fellman, R.T.; Lojek, D.A.; Motl, G.P.; Weddendorf, W.K.

    1995-01-24

    Remediation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald site located north of Cincinnati will generate large quantities of low-level radwaste. This volume includes approximately 1,050,000 tons of material to be removed from eight waste pits comprising Operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The remedial alternative selected includes waste material excavation, drying and transportation by rail to a burial site in the arid west for disposal. Rail transportation was selected not only because rail transportation is safer than truck transportation, but also because of the sheer magnitude of the project and the availability of bulk rail car unloading facilities at a representative disposal site. Based upon current waste quantity estimates as presented in the Feasibility Study for OUI, a fully-loaded 47-car unit train would depart the Fernald site weekly for five years. This paper illustrates the steps taken to obtain agency and public acceptance of the Record of Decision for the remedy which hinged on rail transportation. A preliminary, but detailed, rail transportation plan was prepared for the project to support a series of CERCLA public meetings conducted in late 1994. Some of the major issues addressed in the plan included the following: (1) Scope of project leading to selection of rail transportation; (2) Waste classification; (3) Rail Company overview; (4) Train configuration and rail car selection; (5) Routing; (6) Safety; (7) Prior Notification Requirements (8) Emergency Response. A series of three public meetings identified a number of issues of prime concern to Fernald stakeholders. Following resolution of these issues during the public comment period, a Record of Decision (ROD) approving implementation of the rail transportation strategy was approved pending incorporation of EPA and State of Ohio comments on December 22, 1994.

  10. Intelligent Unmanned Monitoring of Remediated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Emile Fiesler, Ph.D.

    2001-06-01

    During this Phase I project, IOS demonstrated the feasibility of combining digital signal processing and neural network analysis to analyze spectral signals from pure samples of several typical contaminants. We fabricated and tested a prototype system by automatically analyzing Raman spectral data taken in the Vadose zone at the 321 M site in the M area of DOE's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This test demonstration proved the ability of IOS's technology to detect the target contaminants, tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), in isolation, and to detect the spectra of these contaminants in real-world noisy samples taken from a mixture of materials obtained from this typical remediation target site.

  11. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable. PMID:26414316

  12. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable.

  13. Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Gour T.; Gwo, Jin Ping; Siegel, Malcolm D.; Li, Ming-Hsu; Fang, Yilin; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-05-01

    There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models

  14. Monitoring engineered remediation with borehole radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Joesten, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    The success of engineered remediation is predicated on correct emplacement of either amendments (e.g., vegetable-oil emulsion, lactate, molasses, etc.) or permeable reactive barriers (e.g., vegetable oil, zero-valent iron, etc.) to enhance microbial or geochemical breakdown of contaminants and treat contaminants. Currently, site managers have limited tools to provide information about the distribution of injected materials; the existence of gaps or holes in barriers; and breakdown or transformation of injected materials over time. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. Remediation of waters contaminated with pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Rudolph A; Capracotta, Michael

    2003-02-01

    We describe a simple method of remediating waters contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP), which involves filtering the water through clean soil. The filtrate is contaminant free and no PCP can be extracted from the soil. If the soil it treated with dilute acid, the filtrate is still contaminant free but 28.7% of the PCP can be extracted from the contaminated soil. Irradiating the soil with microwave energy either destroys or binds the PCP to the soil irreversibly such that none can be extracted after long periods of time.

  16. Applications of microwave radiation environmental remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    A growing number of environmental remediation technologies (e.g., drying, melting, or sintering) utilize microwave radiation as an integral part of the process. An increasing number of novel applications, such as sustaining low-temperature plasmas or enhancing chemical reactivity, are also being developed. An overview of such technologies being developed by the Department of Energy is presented. A specific example being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, microwave-induced plasma reactors for the destruction of volatile organic compounds, is discussed in more detail.

  17. Applications of microwave radiation environmental remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    A growing number of environmental remediation technologies (e.g., drying, melting, or sintering) utilize microwave radiation as an integral part of the process. An increasing number of novel applications, such as sustaining low-temperature plasmas or enhancing chemical reactivity, are also being developed. An overview of such technologies being developed by the Department of Energy is presented. A specific example being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, microwave-induced plasma reactors for the destruction of volatile organic compounds, is discussed in more detail.

  18. Baking soda: a potentially fatal home remedy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, M H; Wason, S; Gonzalez del Rey, J; Benfield, M

    1995-04-01

    We present a case of a six-week-old infant who developed life-threatening complications after unintentional sodium bicarbonate intoxication. Baking soda was being used by the mother as a home remedy to "help the baby burp." A review of the literature regarding the use (or misuse) of baking soda follows. Our patient, along with the other noted case reports, emphasizes the need for warnings on baking soda products whose labels recommend its use as an antacid. Poisonings must be high in the differential diagnosis of any patient, regardless of age, who presents with altered mental status or status epilepticus.

  19. Natural remediation in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino-Reader, Dora R.; Kamrin, Michael A.; Hickey, James P.; Swindoll, C. Michael; Stahl, Ralph G.; Ells, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Overall, the existence of stricter environmental laws during the last 30 years and a reduction in the manufacturing base in the Great Lakes has resulted in improvement in conditions in harbors, rivers, and nearshore waters. Problems remain, such as the inability to dredge certain harbors and remove sediments because of lack of disposal facilities for contaminated sediments. Because of the wide extent of of contaminated sediments in the Great Lakes, much work remains to be done to document the condition of contaminated areas and the degree to which remediation of these areas is occurring from biotic and abiotic natural processes.

  20. 7 CFR 3022.12 - Remedies for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS CONDUCTING USDA-FUNDED EXTRAMURAL RESEARCH; RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 3022.12 Remedies for noncompliance. USDA agencies' implementation procedures identify...

  1. 7 CFR 3022.12 - Remedies for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS CONDUCTING USDA-FUNDED EXTRAMURAL RESEARCH; RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 3022.12 Remedies for noncompliance. USDA agencies' implementation procedures identify...

  2. 7 CFR 3022.12 - Remedies for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS CONDUCTING USDA-FUNDED EXTRAMURAL RESEARCH; RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 3022.12 Remedies for noncompliance. USDA agencies' implementation procedures identify...

  3. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible,...

  4. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible,...

  5. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible,...

  6. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible,...

  7. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible,...

  8. Urban School Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Troy V., Ed.; Swanson, Austin D., Ed.

    This document contains 12 papers presented at an institute for urban school administrators designed to deal with the contemporary urban educational problems incident to school desegregation, social integration, and the equality of educational opportunity. The authors of the papers relate recent research findings to practical field experience, and…

  9. Rural-Urban Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Daniel F.; LaGreca, Anthony J.; Mullis, Ronald L.

    This publication combines three papers on rural and urban youth issues. "Key Issues Facing Rural Youth" (Daniel F. Perkins) notes that rural adolescents share the same concerns and exhibit the same problem behaviors as their urban counterparts. But in addition, geographic isolation presents problems unique to rural areas. A framework is proposed…

  10. THE URBAN NEGRO FAMILY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOUGLASS, JOSEPH H.

    IN TRACING THE MOVEMENT OF THE NEGRO FAMILY TOWARD A MIDDLE-CLASS ORIENTATION AND TOWARD URBANIZATION, THIS ARTICLE NOTES THAT THE PATTERN IS BECOMING SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE GENERAL AMERICAN FAMILY. NEGROES HAVE LEFT THEIR SOUTHERN RURAL FARMS FOR BOTH SOUTHERN AND NORTHERN URBAN AREAS AND HAVE TENDED TO SETTLE IN THE INNER CORE OF THE LARGEST…

  11. URBAN STUDIES CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEBOUT, JOHN E.

    THE CENTER WORKS WITH RUTGERS UNIVERSITY TO MAKE USE OF URBAN STUDIES IN APPROPRIATE RESEARCH AND TEACHING PROGRAMS AND IN OTHER INTELLECTUAL SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY. THE FIVE MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CENTER - EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND EDUCATION, LIBRARY SERVICES, OPPORTUNITIES EXPANSION PROJECT, AND THE URBAN FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM - ARE…

  12. Urban Expansion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Under an Egyptian government contract, PADCO studies urban growth in the Nile Area. They were assisted by LANDSAT survey maps and measurements provided by TAC. TAC had classified the raw LANDSAT data and processed it into various categories to detail urban expansion. PADCO crews spot checked the results, and correlations were established.

  13. Theme: Urban Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellibee, Margaret; And Others

    1990-01-01

    On the theme of secondary agricultural education in urban areas, this issue includes articles on opportunities, future directions, and implications for the profession; creative supervised experiences for horticulture students; floral marketing, multicultural education; and cultural diversity in urban agricultural education. (JOW)

  14. Urban Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling Green State Univ., OH. Coll. of Education.

    A brief description of the Urban Education Project of the Bowling Green State University is presented. Designed to prepare students for teaching urban area youths, the program results in triple certification for the teaching of mildly retarded children (K-12, with or without behavior disorders), learning disabled and/or behaviorally disordered…

  15. Grooming Great Urban Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Michele; Lewis, Jeffrey; Onafowora, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Master teachers working in real urban classrooms have shared their exemplary teaching practices in an After-School Pedagogical Laboratory (L-TAPL), a program for elementary students that aims to improve the achievement of urban students and the competence of their teachers. The L-TAPL enrichment program curriculum includes language arts, math,…

  16. Urban Areas. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The overview discusses the city as an ecosystem, changing urban habitats, urban wildlife habitats, values of wildlife, habitat management, and…

  17. Theme: Urban Mechanization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Glen; And Others, Eds.

    1991-01-01

    Six theme articles discuss agricultural mechanics and its image problem, its importance, and its relevance to urban mechanization. They stress the need for agricultural mechanics and science in the urban environment for preparation for a variety of careers including landscape technology, environmental technology, energy systems management, and…

  18. Introducing Experimental Design by Evaluating Efficacy of Herbal Remedies (Do Herbal Remedies Really Work?)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert A.; Pontiggia, Laura; Waterman, Carrie; Lichtenwalner, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based upon experiments developed as part of a Directed Research course designed to provide undergraduate biology students experience in the principles and processes of the scientific method used in biological research. The project involved the evaluation of herbal remedies used in many parts of the world in the treatment of diseases…

  19. A blueprint for strategic urban research: the urban piazza.

    PubMed

    Kourtit, Karima; Nijkamp, Peter; Franklin, Rachel S; Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Urban research in many countries has failed to keep up with the pace of rapidly and constantly evolving urban change. The growth of cities, the increasing complexity of their functions and the complex intra- and inter-urban linkages in this 'urban century' demand new approaches to urban analysis, which, from a systemic perspective, supersede the existing fragmentation in urban studies. In this paper we propose the concept of the urban piazza as a framework in order to address some of the inefficiencies associated with current urban analysis. By combining wealth-creating potential with smart urban mobility, ecological resilience and social buzz in this integrated and systemic framework, the aim is to set the basis for a 'New Urban World' research blueprint, which lays the foundation for a broader and more integrated research programme for strategic urban issues. PMID:25339782

  20. A blueprint for strategic urban research: the urban piazza

    PubMed Central

    Kourtit, Karima; Nijkamp, Peter; Franklin, Rachel S.; Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Urban research in many countries has failed to keep up with the pace of rapidly and constantly evolving urban change. The growth of cities, the increasing complexity of their functions and the complex intra- and inter-urban linkages in this ‘urban century’ demand new approaches to urban analysis, which, from a systemic perspective, supersede the existing fragmentation in urban studies. In this paper we propose the concept of the urban piazza as a framework in order to address some of the inefficiencies associated with current urban analysis. By combining wealth-creating potential with smart urban mobility, ecological resilience and social buzz in this integrated and systemic framework, the aim is to set the basis for a ‘New Urban World’ research blueprint, which lays the foundation for a broader and more integrated research programme for strategic urban issues. PMID:25339782

  1. Reduction of metal exposure of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) following remediation of pond sediment as evidenced by metal concentrations in hair.

    PubMed

    Flache, Lucie; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Kierdorf, Uwe; Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Encarnação, Jorge A

    2016-03-15

    Transfer of contaminants from freshwater sediments via aquatic insects to terrestrial predators is well documented in spiders and birds. Here, we analyzed the metal exposure of Myotis daubentonii using an urban pond as their preferred foraging area before and after a remediation measure (sediment dredging) at this pond. Six metal elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni) were measured in the sediment of the pond, in EDTA extracts of the sediment and in hair samples of M. daubentonii foraging at the pond. Samples were taken before remediation in 2011 and after remediation in 2013. Metal concentrations were quantified by ICP-OES after miniaturized microwave assisted extraction. In 2011, the pond sediment exhibited a high contamination with nickel, a moderate contamination with copper and chromium and low contents of zinc, cadmium and lead. While sediment metal contents declined only weakly after remediation, a much more pronounced reduction in the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium and lead concentrations was observed in bat hair. Our results suggest a marked decline in metal exposure of the bats foraging at the pond as a consequence of the remediation measure. It is concluded that Daubenton's bats are suitable bioindicators of metal contamination in aquatic environments, integrating metal exposure via prey insects over their entire foraging area. We further suggest that bat hair is a useful monitoring unit, allowing a non-destructive and non-invasive assessment of metal exposure in bats. PMID:26780144

  2. Reduction of metal exposure of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) following remediation of pond sediment as evidenced by metal concentrations in hair.

    PubMed

    Flache, Lucie; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Kierdorf, Uwe; Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Encarnação, Jorge A

    2016-03-15

    Transfer of contaminants from freshwater sediments via aquatic insects to terrestrial predators is well documented in spiders and birds. Here, we analyzed the metal exposure of Myotis daubentonii using an urban pond as their preferred foraging area before and after a remediation measure (sediment dredging) at this pond. Six metal elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni) were measured in the sediment of the pond, in EDTA extracts of the sediment and in hair samples of M. daubentonii foraging at the pond. Samples were taken before remediation in 2011 and after remediation in 2013. Metal concentrations were quantified by ICP-OES after miniaturized microwave assisted extraction. In 2011, the pond sediment exhibited a high contamination with nickel, a moderate contamination with copper and chromium and low contents of zinc, cadmium and lead. While sediment metal contents declined only weakly after remediation, a much more pronounced reduction in the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium and lead concentrations was observed in bat hair. Our results suggest a marked decline in metal exposure of the bats foraging at the pond as a consequence of the remediation measure. It is concluded that Daubenton's bats are suitable bioindicators of metal contamination in aquatic environments, integrating metal exposure via prey insects over their entire foraging area. We further suggest that bat hair is a useful monitoring unit, allowing a non-destructive and non-invasive assessment of metal exposure in bats.

  3. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Jordi Diaz-Ferraro

    2000-02-28

    SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices generally fail (or are cost prohibitive) to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites or they require the use of organic solvents to achieve removal, at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. Initial work is being conducted at SRI to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene) in water, using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. Preliminary results with pyrene and fluoranthene in water clearly indicate a significant enhancement of solubility with increase in temperature. During this quarter, we conducted experiments with pyrene in the temperature range 200 to 300 C and observed a great enhancement in solubility with an increase in temperature. We also started experiments with real-world soil samples purchased from the subcontractor.

  4. On-site remediation shakes out

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1996-01-03

    Consolidation in several segments of the environmental services industry is being driven by continued sluggishness. Process engineering and construction company Fluor Daniel (Irvine, CA) has reached a definitive agreement to acquire a controlling interest in environmental remediation firm Groundwater Technology Inc.. Fluor Daniel will combine its environmental services unit with GTI. Fluor Daniel/GTI will be headquartered in Norwood and remain a publicly traded entity. The transaction is subject to approval by GTI`s shareholders and other customer conditions and is expected to be completed in the next few months. Fluor Daniel/GTI will operate as a subsidiary of Fluor Daniel and will become one of the world`s largest on-site remediation companies. David Myers, president of Fluor Daniel`s environmental services unit, will become chairman, while Walter C. Barber, chairman and CEO of GTI, will continue as the company`s president and CEO. Certain Fluor Daniel environmental business components, specifically the Department of Energy management and operations business, will not be included in the transaction and will operate separately.

  5. Groundwater remediation optimization using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L. L., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    One continuing point of research in optimizing groundwater quality management is reduction of computational burden which is particularly limiting in field-scale applications. Often evaluation of a single pumping strategy, i.e. one call to the groundwater flow and transport model (GFTM) may take several hours on a reasonably fast workstation. For computational flexibility and efficiency, optimal groundwater remediation design at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has relied on artificial neural networks (ANNS) trained to approximate the outcome of 2-D field-scale, finite difference/finite element GFTMs. The search itself has been directed primarily by the genetic algorithm (GA) or the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. This approach has advantages of (1) up to a million fold increase in speed of remediation pattern assessment during the searches and sensitivity analyses for the 2-D LLNL work, (2) freedom from sequential runs of the GFTM (enables workstation farming), and (3) recycling of the knowledge base (i.e. runs of the GFTM necessary to train the ANNS). Reviewed here are the background and motivation for such work, recent applications, and continuing issues of research.

  6. Remedial training: Will CRM work for everyone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. N.

    1987-01-01

    The subject of those pilots who seem unresponsive to Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) training is addressed. Attention is directed to the need and opportunity for remedial action. Emphasis is given to the requirement for new perspectives and additional training resources. It is also argued that, contrary to conventional training wisdom, such individuals do not represent a hard core which is beyond assistance. Some evidence is offered that such a new perspective will lend itself to a wider appreciation of certain specific training needs. The role of appropriately trained specialists is briefly outlined, and a selected bibliography is attached. The combined experiences of several Pilot Advisory Groups (PAG's) within IFALPA member association form the basis for this discussion. It does not purport to desribe the activities of any one PAG. While much of the activities of PAG's have no relevance to CRM, there are clearly some very important points of intersection. The relevance of these points to diagnostic skills, and remedial training in the general domain of CRM is made obvious.

  7. Assessment of a biological in situ remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Wuerdemann, H.; Lund, N.C.; Gudehus, G.

    1995-12-31

    A field experiment using a bioventing technique has been conducted at the center of contamination at a former gasworks site for 3 years. The emphasis of this investigation is to determine the efficiency of in situ remediation. Due to an extremely heterogeneous distribution of contamination it was impossible to satisfactorily quantify the reduction of hydrocarbons. However, a comparison of highly contaminated soil samples shows a qualitative alteration. The analyses of pollutant composition reveal a significant decrease of low condensed PAHs up to anthracene. The relative increase of high condensed PAHs in the contaminant composition indicates a PAH degradation of 54%. Soil respiration is used to assess the course of remediation. Continuous monitoring of O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the used air leads to an amount of about 2,400 kg of decomposed organics. Large-scale elution tests show a reduction of the sum parameters for the organic pollution of the flushing water of 80%. The PAHs have dropped about 97%. The Microtox test indicates a detoxification of 98%.

  8. Installation of an innovative remedial technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, B.

    1995-12-31

    The major goal of the Lasagna{trademark} project was to design, construct, install, and operate an in situ remediation system in low-permeability soil. A new technology--the Lasagna process--uses electro-osmosis to move contaminated groundwater through treatment zones. The treatment zones are installed in contaminated soils, thereby forming an integrated in situ remedial process. Electro-osmosis, well known for its effectiveness and extremely low power consumption, uses a direct current to cause Groundwater to travel through low-permeability soil. When a bench-scale version of the technology was 98 percent effective in removing contamination, an actual field test was the next step. The site chosen for this first field effort was the DOE-owned Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant located in Paducah, Kentucky. The target contaminant for this project was trichloroethylene (TCE) because it is found at many sites across the country and is present at approximately 60 percent of DOE`s sites.

  9. PCB remediation in schools: a review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathleen W; Minegishi, Taeko; Cummiskey, Cynthia Campisano; Fragala, Matt A; Hartman, Ross; MacIntosh, David L

    2016-02-01

    Growing awareness of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in legacy caulk and other construction materials of schools has created a need for information on best practices to control human exposures and comply with applicable regulations. A concise review of approaches and techniques for management of building-related PCBs is the focus of this paper. Engineering and administrative controls that block pathways of PCB transport, dilute concentrations of PCBs in indoor air or other exposure media, or establish uses of building space that mitigate exposure can be effective initial responses to identification of PCBs in a building. Mitigation measures also provide time for school officials to plan a longer-term remediation strategy and to secure the necessary resources. These longer-term strategies typically involve removal of caulk or other primary sources of PCBs as well as nearby masonry or other materials contaminated with PCBs by the primary sources. The costs of managing PCB-containing building materials from assessment through ultimate disposal can be substantial. Optimizing the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of remediation programs requires aligning a thorough understanding of sources and exposure pathways with the most appropriate mitigation and abatement methods. PMID:25994266

  10. Protein patterns as endpoints in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.; Brown, D.

    1995-12-31

    Biological endpoints can complement chemical analyses in monitoring environmental remediation. In some cases the levels of chemical detection are so low that the costs of clean-up to no detection would be prohibitive. And chemical tests do not indicate the availability of the contaminants to the biota. On the other hand many if not most biological tests lack specificity. The authors have investigated a protein expression assay to establish an endpoint for clean-up of sulfur mustard and breakdown products. Earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to sulfur mustard (SM), a breakdown product thiodiethanol (TDE), and ethylene glycol, the solvent for the two chemicals. Tissue from the lining of the coelomic cavity was taken from each of 6 worms in each treatment class. Soluble proteins were extracted and separated on one and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) gels. The 1 D gels showed no difference by eye but the patterns from control and solvent control worms on 2D gels differed from those of worms exposed to TDE and SM. The 1D gel data were digitized and analyzed by pattern recognition using artificial neural networks. The protein patterns under the two treatments and the two controls were learned in one set of data and successfully recognized in a second. This indicated that what was learned was useful in recognizing patterns induced by SM and TDE. Thus a possible endpoint for remediation would be the protein pattern at no effect levels of chemicals of interest.

  11. Overview of innovative remediation of emerging contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, A. A.; Adeleye, A. S.; Huang, Y.; Garner, K.

    2015-12-01

    The application of nanotechnology in drinking water treatment and pollution cleanup is promising, as demonstrated by a number of field-based (pilot and full scale) and bench scale studies. A number of reviews exist for these nanotechnology-based applications; but to better illustrate its importance and guide its development, a direct comparison between traditional treatment technologies and emerging approaches using nanotechnology is needed. In this review, the performances of traditional technologies and nanotechnology for water treatment and environmental remediation were compared with the goal of providing an up-to-date reference on the state of treatment techniques for researchers, industry, and policy makers. Pollutants were categorized into broad classes, and the most cost-effective techniques (traditional and nanotechnology-based) in each category reported in the literature were compared. Where information was available, cost and environmental implications of both technologies were also compared. Traditional treatment technologies were found to currently offer the most cost-effective choices for removal of several common pollutants from drinking water and polluted sites. Nano-based techniques may however become important in complicated remediation conditions and meeting increasingly stringent water quality standards, especially in removal of emerging pollutants and low levels of contaminants. We also discuss challenges facing environmental application of nanotechnology were also discussed and potential solutions.

  12. Parasitic diseases and urban development.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Desjeux, P.; Moncayo, A.; Ranque, P.; de Raadt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and epidemiology of parasitic diseases in both urban and periurban areas of endemic countries have been changing as development progresses. The following different scenarios involving Chagas disease, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis are discussed: (1) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas without vectors; (2) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas with vectors; (3) infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (4) non-infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (5) urbanization or domestication of natural zoonotic foci; and (6) vectors entering nonendemic urban areas. Cultural and social habits from the rural areas, such as type of house construction and domestic water usage, are adopted by migrants to urban areas and increase the risk of disease transmission which adversely affects employment in urban populations. As the urban health services must deal with the rise in parasitic diseases, appropriate control strategies for the urban setting must be developed and implemented. PMID:2127380

  13. Private Urban Renewal: A Neglected Urban Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitz, Eileen

    This is a report on the process of private urban renewal of three areas in Washington, D.C. The areas are Georgetown, Capitol Hill and Adams-Morgan. The paper presents an analysis of general population trends and of the change in composition of the population in these three areas. Two general questions are raised: To what extent does the process…

  14. Crossing Urban Boundaries: The Mission of Urban Affairs Quarterly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Albert

    1985-01-01

    Presents brief overview of the development of urban studies, from its origins in the "urban crisis" of the 1960's to the present trend toward study of the terrapolis, the world system of interdependent metropolitan areas. Focuses on the role of "Urban Affairs Quarterly," changing definitions of the "city," and the contributions of urban studies to…

  15. Element content of Xanthoparmelia scabrosa growing on asphalt in urban and rural New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wright, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Xanthoparmelia scabrosa is a foliose lichen that grows abundantly on pedestrian and automobile asphalt in New Zealand, which are considered inhospitable habitats for lichens. Samples were collected at eight localities ranging from urban streets to very rural roads and analyzed for 28 chemical elements in order to determine elemental chemistry and to test hypotheses about tolerance mechanisms. Anthropogenic elements (Cu, Pb, and Zn) decreased significantly from urban to rural areas, while nutritional elements (K, P, and S) increased. Samples from urban areas contained 10% calcium. Sulfur was elevated at both urban and rural sites, possibly due to pollution in the former site and higher levels of sulfur-containing scabrosin esters at the rural sites. The ability of this lichen to accumulate high levels of Cu, Pb and Zn may make it useful as a remediation tool.

  16. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    D. Vandel

    2003-09-01

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

  17. Urban Environment Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Urban Environment Initiative (UEI), has been established as part of a Cooperative Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The UEI is part of NASA's overall High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) and the Information Infrastructure Technology Applications (IITA) programs. The goal of the UEI is to provide public access to Earth Science information and promote its use with a focus on the environment of urban areas. This goal will be accomplished through collaborative efforts of the UEI team with both community-based and local/regional governmental organizations. The UEI team is comprised of four organizations representing private industry, NASA, and universities: Prime Technologies Service Corporation, NASA's Minority University Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) California State University, at Los Angeles, and Central State University (Wilberforce, OH). "Urban Environment" refers to the web of environmental, economic, and social factors that combine to create the urban world in which we live. Examples of these factors are population distribution, neighborhood demographic profiles, economic resources, business activities, location and concentration of environmental hazards and various pollutants, proximity and level of urban services, which form the basis of the urban environment and ultimately affect our lives and experiences. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing allows data to be visualized in the forms of maps and spatial images. The use of these tools allow analysis of information about urban environments. Also included are descriptions of the four query types which will assist in understanding the maps.

  18. Effective utilization of waste water through recycling, reuse, and remediation for sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajamani; Krishnamoorthy, Renga

    2014-01-01

    Water is vital for human, animal, and plant life. Water is one of the most essential inputs for the production of crops. Plants need it in enormous quantities continuously during their life. The role of water is felt everywhere; its scarcity causes droughts and famines, its excess causes floods and deluge. During the next two decades, water will increasingly be considered a critical resource for the future survival of the arid and semiarid countries. The requirement of water is increasing day by day due to intensive agriculture practices, urbanization, population growth, industrialization, domestic use, and other uses. On the other hand, the availability of water resources is declining and the existing water is not enough to meet the needs. To overcome this problem, one available solution is utilization of waste water by using recycling, reuse, and remediation process.

  19. The use of zero-valent iron for groundwater remediation and wastewater treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fenglian; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Liu, Hong

    2014-02-28

    Recent industrial and urban activities have led to elevated concentrations of a wide range of contaminants in groundwater and wastewater, which affect the health of millions of people worldwide. In recent years, the use of zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the treatment of toxic contaminants in groundwater and wastewater has received wide attention and encouraging treatment efficiencies have been documented. This paper gives an overview of the recent advances of ZVI and progress obtained during the groundwater remediation and wastewater treatment utilizing ZVI (including nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI)) for the removal of: (a) chlorinated organic compounds, (b) nitroaromatic compounds, (c) arsenic, (d) heavy metals, (e) nitrate, (f) dyes, and (g) phenol. Reaction mechanisms and removal efficiencies were studied and evaluated. It was found that ZVI materials with wide availability have appreciable removal efficiency for several types of contaminants. Concerning ZVI for future research, some suggestions are proposed and conclusions have been drawn.

  20. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.