Science.gov

Sample records for emulsion chamber experiments

  1. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  2. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  3. Japan - USSR joint emulsion chamber experiment at Pamir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The results are presented for the systematic measurement of cosmic ray showers in the first carbon chamber of Japan-USSR joint experiment at Pamir Plateau. The intensity and the energy distribution of electromagnetic particles, of hadrons and of families are in good agreement with the results of other mountain experiment if the relative error in energy estimation is taken into consideration.

  4. Unusual interactions above 100 TeV: A review of cosmic ray experiments with emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    A method is given for analyzing the space correlated collection of jets (gamma ray families) with energies greater than 100 TeV in Pb or Fe absorber sampled by photosensitive layers in an emulsion chamber. Events analyzed indicate large multiplicities of particles in the primary hadron-air interaction, and a marked absence of neutral pions.

  5. Search for anomalous C-jets in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumano, H.

    1985-01-01

    Anomalous C-jets were measured in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber No.17. Measurement of 150 C-jets nuclear interactions occured in the target layer in the chamber itself with total visible energy greater than 5 TeV was completed. they are recorded in area of 11 sq m, corresponding to 17.1 sq m year exposure. Among them, seven events have no pinaught and two events are peculiar in that three showers out of four show abnormal cascade development. Two show remarkable characteristics indicating that they are coming from exotic interactions in the target layer. Illustrations of these events are presented and the thresholds of this type of event are discussed.

  6. Emulsion chamber observations and interpretation (HE 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results from Emulsion Chamber (EC) experiments at mountain altitudes or at higher levels using flying carriers are examined. The physical interest in this field is concentrated on the strong interaction at the very high energy region exceeding the accelerator energy, also on the primary cosmic ray intensity and its chemical composition. Those experiments which observed cosmic ray secondaries gave information on high energy interaction characteristics through the analyses of secondary spectra, gamma-hadron families and C-jets (direct observation of the particle production occuring at the carbon target). Problems of scaling violation in fragmentation region, interaction cross section, transverse momentum of produced secondaries, and some peculiar features of exotic events are discussed.

  7. Processing of very high energy proton events with using new method of searching for primary cosmic rays in Emulsion Chamber (on RUNJOB experiment data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2013-02-01

    The primary proton tracks are identified in about half of events referred to proton ones in the Russian-Japanese balloon-born emulsion chamber RUNJOB experiment. Reprocessing of experimental data obtained in long-term exposure of RUNJOB-3B, 6A, 11A, 11B emulsion chambers (EC) with new method for searching of the primary cosmic particles leads to confirm that as well as earlier single charged primary tracks are not found in about half of events referred to the proton ones with energy E0 > 20 TeV and zenith angle tg(θ) <= 5. In this paper the new method for searching and tracing of the primary cosmic particles in EC's and characteristics of studied events (energy, angle, pass length of the primary particles until their interaction in EC) are presented.

  8. Hadrons registration in emulsion chamber with carbon block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaszewski, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear-electro-magnetic cascade (NEC) in X-ray emulsion chambers with carbon block, which are usually used in the Pamir experiment, was Monte-Carlo simulated. Going over from optical density to Summary E sub gamma is discussed. The hole of NEC in the interpretation of energy spectra is analyzed.

  9. Multidimensional analysis of data obtained in experiments with X-ray emulsion chambers and extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chilingaryan, A. A.; Galfayan, S. K.; Zazyan, M. Z.; Dunaevsky, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonparametric statistical methods are used to carry out the quantitative comparison of the model and the experimental data. The same methods enable one to select the events initiated by the heavy nuclei and to calculate the portion of the corresponding events. For this purpose it is necessary to have the data on artificial events describing the experiment sufficiently well established. At present, the model with the small scaling violation in the fragmentation region is the closest to the experiments. Therefore, the treatment of gamma families obtained in the Pamir' experiment is being carried out at present with the application of these models.

  10. The SPHINX code for simulation of processes in X-ray emulsion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedshin, R. A.

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo program is elaborated for simulations of processes in X-ray emulsion chambers and measurement procedures used in experiments both aboard stratospheric balloons and at mountain altitudes. The code is applicable from ˜ 1 GeV to extremely high energies (˜ 10 PeV) for arbitrary type of chamber design including lead, carbon, rubber, air, e.g. The code is easy in use and of access for all the persons via Internet.

  11. High energy primary electron spectrum observed by the emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Aizu, H.; Hiraiwa, N.; Taira, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Koss, T. A.; Lord, J. J.; Golden, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector of the emulsion chamber type is used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons. Two large emulsion chambers, each having an area of 40 by 50 sq cm, are exposed for about 25.5 hr at an average pressure altitude of 3.9 mbar. About 500 high-energy cascades (no less than about 600 GeV) are detected by searching for dark spots on the X-ray films. A power-law energy dependence formula is derived for the spectrum of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy region over 100 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the transition curves obtained previously by theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations.

  12. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  13. Drift Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, A. H.; ćonka Nurdan, T.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a laboratory course held at ICFA 2002 Regional Instrumentation School in Morelia, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector and a collimated 90Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course.

  14. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray iron nucleus observed with emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Y.; Shimada, E.; Ohta, I.; Tasaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Sugimoto, H.; Taira, K.; Tateyama, N.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray Fe-nucleus has been measured from 4 GeV per nucleon to beyond 100 GeV per nucleon. The data were obtained using emulsion chambers on a balloon from Sanriku, Japan. The energies were estimated by the opening angle method after calibrated using 1.88 GeV per nucleon Fe collisions. The spectrum of Fe is approximately E-2.5 in the range from 10 to 200 GeV per nucleon. This result is in good agreement with those of other experiments.

  15. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  16. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  17. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-31

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  18. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  19. Combination of emulsion chamber and air shower array at Mt. Chacaltaya

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasumi, N.; Tsushima, I.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K. ); Matano, T. ); Mori, K.; Inoue, N.; Ticona, R. ); Ohsawa, A. ); Tamada, M. ); Martinic, N.; Aliaga, Z.; Reguerin, A.; Aguirre, C. )

    1993-06-15

    Data of 34 familes with the accompanying air showers, observed by the combination of emulsion chamber and air shower array at Mt. Chacaltaya, are presented. Comparison with the simulation calculation concludes that a change is necessary in the characteristics of hadron interactions in [ital E][sub 0][ge]10[sup 15] eV.

  20. MIRACLE Lab: Track recognition and event track reconstruction in nuclear emulsion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, A. M.; Ganssauge, E.

    1999-04-01

    This article is a continuation of a previous paper [ E. Ganssauge, A.M. Tawfik, Nucl. Instr. & Meth. A 416 (1998) 136-147] about automation of measurements in nuclear emulsion chambers. Here the image processing, vertex determination, track recognition, and event reconstruction are discussed.

  1. Development of Large Area Emulsion Chamber Methods with a Super Conducting Magnet for Observation of Cosmic Ray Nuclei from 1 GeV to 1,000 TeV (Emulsion Techniques)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Gregory, John C.; Tominaga, Taka; Dong, Bei Lei

    1997-01-01

    The research developed the fundamental techniques of the emulsion chamber methods that permit measurements of the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays at energies ranging from 1 GeV/n to over 1,000 TeV/n. The research program consisted of exploring new principles and techniques in measuring very high energy cosmic nuclei with large-area emulsion chambers for high statistics experiments. These tasks have been accomplished and their use was essential in successful analysis of the balloon-borne emulsion chamber experiments up to 10(exp 14) eV. It also provided the fundamental technologies for designing large-area detectors that are aimed at measuring the composition at above 1015 eV region. The latter is now partially succeeded by a NASA Mission Concept, Advanced Cosmic Composition Experiments on the Space Station (ACCESS). The cosmic ray group at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has performed technological R & D as well as contributing to the Japanese-American-Emulsion-Chamber-Experiments (JACEE) Collaboration with the regular data analysis. While primary research support for other institutions' efforts in the JACEE experiments came from NSF and DOE, primary support for the University of Alabama in Huntsville was this contract. Supplemental tasks to standardize the data base and hardware upgrades (automatized microscope) had this institutions cooperation. Investigation of new techniques in this program consisted of development of a fast calorimetry, magnetic/scattering selection of high momentum tracks for a pairmeter, and high statistics momentum measurements for low energy nuclei (E < 1 TeV/n). The highest energy calorimetry and a pairmeter have been considered as strawman instruments by the GOAL (Galactic Origin and Acceleration Limit) proposal of the NASA Cosmic Ray Working Group for long- duration balloon flights. We accomplished the objectives of the GOAL program with three circumpolar, Antarctic JACEE balloon flights during 1992 - 1994.

  2. A halo event created at 200 m above the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amato, N. M.; Arata, N.; Maldonado, R. H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of analysis on a cosmic-ray induced nuclear event with the total visible energy approx. = 1300 TeV which is characterized by the central (halo) part of a strong energy concentration and the outer part of a large lateral spread are presented. The event (named as P06) was detected in the 18th two-storied emulsion chamber exposed at Chacaltaya by Brasil-Japan Collaboration. As the nuclear emulsion plates were inserted at every layer of the concerned blocks in the upper and the lower chambers together with RR- and N-type X-ray films, it is possible to study the details of the event. Some results on P06 have already been reported 1 based on the general measurement of opacity on N-type X-ray films: (1) the total energy of halo is approx. = 1000 TeV; (2) the shower transition reaches its maximum at approx. 16 cu; and (3) the radius of halo is 6.5 mm (at the level of 10 to the 6th power electrons/sq.cm.). The results in more details will be described.

  3. Results of investigation of muon fluxes of superhigh energy cosmic rays with X-ray emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Ivanova, M. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Ilyina, N. P.; Mandritskaya, K. V.; Osipova, E. A.; Rakobolskaya, I. V.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall data from the investigation of the cosmic ray muon flux in the range of zenith angles (0-90) deg within the energy range (3.5 to 5.0) TeV is presented. The exposure of large X-ray emulsion chambers underground was 1200 tons. year. The data were processe using the method which was applied in the experiment Pamir and differred from the earlier applied one. The obtained value of a slope power index of the differential energy spectrum of the global muon flux is =3.7 that corresponds to the slope of the pion generation differential spectrum, gamma sub PI = 2.75 + or - .04. The analysis of the muon zenith-angular distribution showed that the contribution of rapid generation muons in the total muon flux agree the best with the value .2% and less with .7% at a 90% reliability level.

  4. Effectiveness of Chamber Music Ensemble Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Jay D.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation was concerned with the effectiveness of chamber music ensemble experience for certain members of a ninth grade band and the evaluation of the effectiveness in terms of performing abilities, cognitive learnings, and attitude changes. (Author)

  5. The analysis of interface emulsion detector for the OPERA experiment in JAPAN Scanning facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, T.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Morishima, K.; Nakano, T.; Omura, T.; Sakatani, Y.; Sato, O.

    2010-04-01

    The OPERA experiment, designed to search for neutrino oscillations, started its physics run in July 2008. It is the most recent emulsion-counter hybrid experiment. In this experiment two different types of emulsion detectors are used. One is called Emulsion Cloud Chamber (ECC), and is used as a target. The other is called Changeable Sheet (CS), which is attached to the downstream side of each ECC to identify the ECC in which a tagged neutrino interaction occurred. The CS interfaces rough tracking information obtained in the electronic detectors to the ECC and therefore is a key element of the emulsion-counter hybrid experiment. As a first step, a CS selected by electronic detectors is scanned and analyzed to decide if the ECC is to be developed and analyzed in detail; a few CS are usually to be analyzed to identify an ECC for each tagged event due to the inaccuracy of the electronic detectors. The CS has a large scanning area and therefore Japan and Europe (Gran Sasso) are sharing in the CS analysis load to handle the scanning job. In this paper, the CS analysis method developed for the Japan scanning facility is described in detail. 100 million tracks are read out on each CS by an automatic emulsion read-out system ( S-UTS ), most of them are so-called fake tracks mainly due to low momentum Compton electrons or random noise and a few real tracks from a tagged neutrino interaction have to be picked up among a huge background. A dedicated method to reject this background without losing real tracks has been developed on the basis of analyzing track data obtained by S-UTS and combining these data with a final selection using additional information on multiple Coulomb scattering of candidate tracks obtained by human eye check to eliminate a remaining background. Performance of this method is shown to be sufficient for the OPERA experiment.

  6. Experience with the jet chamber of the JADE-experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The jet chamber, a pictorial drift chamber used as the central track detector of the JADE experiment at PETRA, is briefly described. The present status of the spatial and dE/dx resolutions and the experience during 4 years of operation is reported. Improvement plans for the readout electronics are described and a short review of the jet chamber designed for the proposed LEP experiment OPAL is given.

  7. Remarkable events from X ray emulsion chambers and multiple production at LHC energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Talai, M. C.; Attallah, R.

    The CORSIKA programme and specific Monte Carlo collision generators are employed in the interpretation of X-ray emulsion chambers data on super gamma ray families at mountain altitude (Chacaltaya, Kanbala, Pamir...) and in the stratosphere (Concorde, balloons). The consequences of measurement conditions(energy thresholds levels...) are detailed to extract common features for the neutral and charged secondaries. The vertex is approached by invariant mass method, geometry, pseudo rapidity distributions , and factors. Sorting the gamma's coupled in the maximum of invariant histograms, we evaluate the multiplicity , , inelasticity behavior up to LHC energy. Attention is given to the penetration power of EAS which levels off one energy decade around the knee and observations related with the fragmentation region (high energy hadron and gamma spectra in EAS, intensity of families with halo's). Hints of new physics are considered around the intriguing alignments registrated in the energy band between colliders and LHC. Several events (stratosphere and mountain) exhibit coplanar emission at similar visible energy, suggesting the valence diquark breaking. Such violent breaking suppressing the leading cluster recombination might come from the rupture of the string under very high tension between the two partners of the diquark.

  8. On mini-cluster observed by Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tati, T.

    1985-01-01

    Bundles of electromagnetic showers with very small tranverse momenta (approx. 10 MeV) accompanied by decay products of Chiron-type fireballs, have been observed. These bundles are called Miniclusters. This phenomenon supports the picture of fireballs made up of hadronic matter and based on the theory of the finite degree of freedom.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY ELECTRONS FROM 30 GeV TO 3 TeV WITH EMULSION CHAMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Nishimura, J.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Tateyama, N.; Yuda, T.; Wilkes, R. J. E-mail: komori-y@kuhs.ac.jp E-mail: nisimura@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: yuda@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-12-01

    We have performed a series of cosmic-ray electron observations using balloon-borne emulsion chambers since 1968. While we previously reported the results from subsets of the exposures, the final results of the total exposures up to 2001 are presented here. Our successive experiments have yielded a total exposure of 8.19 m{sup 2} sr day at altitudes of 4.0-9.4 g cm{sup -2}. The performance of the emulsion chambers was examined by accelerator beam tests and Monte Carlo simulations, and the on-board calibrations were carried out by using the flight data. In this work, we present the cosmic-ray electron spectrum in the energy range from 30 GeV to 3 TeV at the top of the atmosphere, which is well represented by a power-law function with an index of -3.28 {+-} 0.10. The observed data can also be interpreted in terms of diffusive propagation models. The evidence of cosmic-ray electrons up to 3 TeV suggests the existence of cosmic-ray electron sources at distances within {approx}1 kpc and times within {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} yr ago.

  10. Design and Implementation of the Frequency Control in an Ultrasonic Break Water-in-Oil Emulsion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atehortúa, Carlos Mario Giraldo; Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco Aurelio Brizzotti; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Pereira, Luiz Octávio Vieira

    Water-in-oil emulsions present high stability and its separation is commonly accelerated by addition of chemical demulsifiers or using electrostatic techniques. An alternative to reduce the amount of demulsifiers is the use of ultrasonic standing waves. In this work, the design and implementation of an ultrasonic demulsifier system operating in the 1 MHz range is presented. The design includes the ultrasonic resonant chamber, the power electronics to drive the piezoelectric transducers and the control system. The control must track the operating frequency, compensating the changes due to temperature variation. The system was evaluated in a laboratory pipeline showing that the use of ultrasound reduces the final water content in all cases.

  11. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Raut, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-05-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed.

  12. Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

  13. Lateral distribution of high energy hadrons and gamma ray in air shower cores observed with emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Kawasumi, N.; Tsushima, I.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Navia, C. E.; Matinic, N.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    A high energy event of a bundle of electrons, gamma rays and hadronic gamma rays in an air shower core were observed. The bundles were detected with an emulsion chamber with thickness of 15 cm lead. This air shower is estimated to be initiated with a proton with energy around 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power eV at an altitude of around 100 gmc/2. Lateral distributions of the electromagnetic component with energy above 2 TeV and also the hadronic component of energy above 6 TeV of this air shower core were determined. Particles in the bundle are produced with process of the development of the nuclear cascade, the primary energy of each interaction in the cascade which produces these particles is unknown. To know the primary energy dependence of transverse momentum, the average products of energy and distance for various average energies of secondary particles are studied.

  14. Coating experiment with 1.6-m vacuum evaporation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Yukiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Noguchi, Takeshi; Kanzawa, Tomio; Sasaki, Goro; Torii, Yasuo; Yutani, Masami; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi

    1998-08-01

    We have conducted a series of coating experiments using the newly installed 1.6 m evaporation chamber at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The main task of this chamber is to re-aluminize the 1.6 m mirror of the Infrared Simulator at the ATC. The design concept of the 1.6 m chamber is basically the same with the 8.3 m coating facility for Subaru Telescope. Therefore, we could utilize this chamber to evaluate the fundamental performance of the larger chamber. The extensive coating experiments were done in the spring, autumn of 1996, and autumn of 1997. Reduction of the number of the filaments has lead to the increase in their size, which caused difficulty in the annealing process. Attempts are focused on securing the sufficient metal loads on the filaments. Then the filaments are fired to measure the spray pattern of a single filament exposure, or the uniformity pattern resulted from the full setup of filament arrays. Using small slide glasses, the important parameters of the resultant reflecting film that are the thickness, the uniformity of the thickness, and the spectroscopic reflectance are measured. The absolute value of the reflectivity is estimated to be around 91% immediately after opening the chamber. In order to cover a wide range of observing wavelengths for the Infrared Simulator, and eventually for the optical-IR Subaru Telescope, it is necessary to seek after a higher evaporation rate with these chambers.

  15. A new cylindrical drift chamber for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Cavoto, G.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Cei, F.; Corvaglia, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fahrni, D.; Galli, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Hofer, A.; Hildebrandt, M.; Ignatov, F.; Miccoli, A.; Nicolò, D.; Orsini, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Piredda, G.; Signorelli, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Recchia, L.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Tassielli, G.; Tazzioli, A.; Tenchini, F.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is currently under construction for the MEG II experiment. The chamber is meant to track low momentum positrons from μ+ decays to search for μ+ →e+ γ events. The detector is segmented in very small drift cells, placed in stereo configuration and operated in a helium-isobutane gas mixture. The use of thin aluminium wires and light gas mixture set the total radiation length of the chamber to only 1.6 ×10-3X0 per track turn allowing for a momentum resolution of ~120 keV/c.

  16. Overview of the ICF 1000 MJ experiment chamber design

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.

    1988-09-23

    A conceptual design of an experiment chamber for a high gain ICF facility (1000 MJ) is being developed. Performance goals have been established. Several design approaches are being evaluated through computer simulation, engineering analysis, and experimental testing of candidate first wall components. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Dedicated contamination experiments in the Orion laser target chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, J.; Chevalier, J.-M.; Egan, D.; Geille, A.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Quessada, J.-H.; Raffestin, D.; Rubery, M.; Treadwell, P.; Videau, L.

    2015-11-01

    The use of solid targets irradiated in a vacuum target chamber by focussed high energy, high power laser beams to study the properties of matter at high densities, pressures and temperatures are well known. An undesirable side effect of these interactions is the generation of plumes of solid, liquid and gaseous matter which move away from the target and coat or physically damage surfaces within the target chamber. The largest aperture surfaces in these chambers are usually the large, high specification optical components used to produce the extreme conditions being studied [e.g. large aperture off axis parabolas, aspheric lenses, X ray optics and planar debris shields]. In order to study these plumes and the effects that they produce a set of dedicated experiments were performed to evaluate target by product coating distributions and particle velocities by a combined diagnostic instrument that utilised metal witness plates, polymer witness plates, fibre velocimetry and low density foam particle catchers.

  18. Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment /JACEE/. [high energy cosmic ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, R. W.; Hunter, S. D.; Jones, W. V.; Takahashi, Y.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Parnell, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    The instrumentation and results of long duration balloon flights carried out jointly by U.S. and Japan researchers to examine high energy cosmic rays are reported. Basic detector geometries are 2.5 sq m sr with operation at altitudes with 3-4 g/sq cm pressure, with observations thus far of over 100 hr. Energies from 2-100 TeV are recorded for nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus interactions, and searches are made for new particle or interactions. The detector is an emulsion chamber which comprises doubly-coated nuclear emulsions on 800 micron thick methacryl substrates, X-ray films, etchable detectors, low density spacers, and lead sheets. Segmentation of the instrument into a primary charge module, a target section, a spacer section, and a lead-emulsion calorimeter allows accurate charge measurement for primary nuclei, reliable energy resolution, and a large geometrical factor for collecting high energy events. A primary Ca nucleus of 300 TeV has been observed.

  19. Double Hypernuclei Experiment with Hybrid Emulsion Method at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekawa, Hiroyuki

    Double hypernuclei are important probes to study the system with strangeness S = -2. Several emulsion experiments had been performed to search for them. We are planning a new experiment to search for double hypernuclei at the K1.8 beam line in the Hadron Experimental Facility (J-PARC E07 experiment). Ξ- tracks in the emulsion plates and SSD will be automatically connected by a hybrid method. The estimated Ξ- stopped statistics is 10 times as high as that of the KEK E373 experiment. Discoveries of 10 new double hypernuclear species are expected, which enable us to discuss binding energy in terms of mass number dependence. On the other hand, we will also observe X rays from Ξ- atoms with a germanium detector array installed close to theemulsion plates by tagging Ξ- stopped events. This will be the first measurement to give information on the Ξ- potential at the nuclear surface region.

  20. Outdoor smog-chamber experiments: reactivity of methanol exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.; Holleman, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the report was to provide an experimental smog-chamber database especially designed to test photochemical kinetics mechanisms that would be used to assess the effects of methanol fuel use in automobiles. The mechanisms would be used in urban air-quality control models to investigate the advantages of large-scale use of methanol fuel in automobiles. The smog-chamber experiments were performed during three summer months. They have been added to the existing UNC database for photochemical mechanism validation and testing, bringing the total number of dual experiments in the database to over 400. Three different hydrocarbon mixtures were used: a 13-component mixture representing synthetic automobile exhaust; an 18-component mixture representing synthetic urban ambient hydrocarbons; and a 14-component mixture derived from the synthetic automobile exhaust by the addition of n-butane. Three different synthetic methanol-exhaust mixtures were used: 80% methanol/10% formaldehyde; and 100% methanol.

  1. Extra-large crystal emulsion detectors for future large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, T.; Ariga, A.; Kuwabara, K.; Morishima, K.; Moto, M.; Nishio, A.; Scampoli, P.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2016-03-01

    Photographic emulsion is a particle tracking device which features the best spatial resolution among particle detectors. For certain applications, for example muon radiography, large-scale detectors are required. Therefore, a huge surface has to be analyzed by means of automated optical microscopes. An improvement of the readout speed is then a crucial point to make these applications possible and the availability of a new type of photographic emulsions featuring crystals of larger size is a way to pursue this program. This would allow a lower magnification for the microscopes, a consequent larger field of view resulting in a faster data analysis. In this framework, we developed new kinds of emulsion detectors with a crystal size of 600-1000 nm, namely 3-5 times larger than conventional ones, allowing a 25 times faster data readout. The new photographic emulsions have shown a sufficient sensitivity and a good signal to noise ratio. The proposed development opens the way to future large-scale applications of the technology, e.g. 3D imaging of glacier bedrocks or future neutrino experiments.

  2. The INAF/IAPS Plasma Chamber for ionospheric simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The plasma chamber is particularly suitable to perform studies for the following applications: - plasma compatibility and functional tests on payloads envisioned to operate in the ionosphere (e.g. sensors onboard satellites, exposed to the external plasma environment); - calibration/testing of plasma diagnostic sensors; - characterization and compatibility tests on components for space applications (e.g. optical elements, harness, satellite paints, photo-voltaic cells, etc.); - experiments on satellite charging in a space plasma environment; - tests on active experiments which use ion, electron or plasma sources (ion thrusters, hollow cathodes, field effect emitters, plasma contactors, etc.); - possible studies relevant to fundamental space plasma physics. The facility consists of a large volume vacuum tank (a cylinder of length 4.5 m and diameter 1.7 m) equipped with a Kaufman type plasma source, operating with Argon gas, capable to generate a plasma beam with parameters (i.e. density and electron temperature) close to the values encountered in the ionosphere at F layer altitudes. The plasma beam (A+ ions and electrons) is accelerated into the chamber at a velocity that reproduces the relative motion between an orbiting satellite and the ionosphere (≈ 8 km/s). This feature, in particular, allows laboratory simulations of the actual compression and depletion phenomena which take place in the ram and wake regions around satellites moving through the ionosphere. The reproduced plasma environment is monitored using Langmuir Probes (LP) and Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA). These sensors can be automatically moved within the experimental space using a sled mechanism. Such a feature allows the acquisition of the plasma parameters all around the space payload installed into the chamber for testing. The facility is currently in use to test the payloads of CSES satellite (Chinese Seismic Electromagnetic Satellite) devoted to plasma parameters and electric field

  3. [Characterization of photochemical smog chamber and initial experiments].

    PubMed

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu; Shi, Yu-Zhen

    2011-02-01

    A self-made new indoor environmental chamber facility for the study of atmospheric processes leading to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols has been introduced and characterized. The characterization experiments include the measurements of wall effects for reactive species and the determination of chamber dependent * OH radical sources by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments. Preliminary ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments were conducted as well. The results of characterization experiments show that the wall effects for O3 and NO2 in a new reactor are not obvious. Relative humidity has a great effect on the wall losses in the old reactor, especially for O3. In the old reactor, the rate constant for O3 wall losses is obtained to be 1.0 x 10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 4.0 x10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 91%), whereas for NO2, it is 1.0 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 0.6 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 75%). The value for k(NO2 --> HONO) determined by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments is (4.2-5.2) x 10(-5) s(-1) and (2.3-2.5) x 10(-5) s(-1) at RH = 5% and RH 75% -77%, respectively. The average *OH concentration is estimated to be (2.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(6) molecules/cm3 by using a reaction rate coefficient of CO and * OH. The sensitivity of chamber dependent auxiliary reactions to the O3 formation is discussed. Results show that NO2 --> HONO has the greatest impact on the O3 formation during the initial stage, N2O5 + H2O --> 2HNO3 has a minus effect to maximum O3 concentration, and that the wall losses of both O3 and NO2 have little impact on the O3 formation. The results from the ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments are in good agreement with those from the MCM simulation, which reflects that the facility for the study of the formation of secondary pollution of ozone and secondary organic aerosols is reliable. This demonstrates that our facility can be further used in the deep-going study of chemical processes in the atmosphere.

  4. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  5. New analysis of nuclear interaction observed by Mt. Kanbara emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanjo, H.

    1985-01-01

    To date the analysis of the air cascade family has been performed using a full Monte Carlo simulation. It is difficult to draw a definite conclusion about the interaction mechanism by using only this kind of simulation. On the other hand, attempts to reproduce the original gamma ray at the interaction point, for example decascading, have also been made. This method makes it possible to observe the interaction directly and to analyze the data from various angles. All of these methods, however, assume a constant ER in the cascade shower, where E is energy and R is the distance from the center of the cascade shower. It is impossible to reproduce the exact interaction height and energy by these methods. A relative method in separating one cascade shower from others is adopted. This method makes it possible to estimate the interaction height and energy by using information about the lateral spread of the cascade shower.

  6. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  7. Convective melting in a magma chamber: theory and numerical experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of the numerical modeling of convective melting in a magma chamber in 2D. Model was pointed on the silicic system approximated with Qz-Fsp binary undersaturated with water. Viscosity was calculated as a function of the melt composition, temperature and crystal content and comprises for the pure melt 104.5-105.5 Pas. Lower boundary was taken thermally insulated in majority of the runs. Size of FEM (bilinear elements) grid for velocity is 25x25 cm and for the integration of the density term 8x8 cm. Melting of the chamber roof proceeds with the heat supply due to the chaotic thermo-compositional convection and conductive heat loose into melted substrate. We compare our numerical data with existing semi-analytical models. Theoretical studies of the assimilation rates in the magma chambers usually use theoretical semi-analytical model by Huppert and Sparks (1988) (e.g., Snyder, 2000). We find that this model has strong points: 1) Independence of the melting rate on the sill thickness (Ra>>Rac) 2) Independence of the convective heat transfer on the roof temperature 3) Determination of the exponential thermal boundary layer ahead of the melting front and weak points: 1) Ignoring the possibility of the crystallization without melting regime for narrow sills and dykes. 2)Neglecting of two-phase character of convection. 3)Ignoring of the strong viscosity variation near the melting front. Independence of convective flux from the sill size (at Ra>>Rac) allows reducing of computational domain to the geologically small size (10-15 m). Concept of exponential thermal boundary layer is also rather important. Length scale (L0) of this layer is related to the melting rate and thermal diffusivity coefficient kT as L0=kT/um and at the melting rate 10 m/yr becomes about 2 m. Such small scale implies that convective melting is very effective (small conductive heat loss) and part of the numerical domain filled with roof rocks can be taken small. In the H&S model

  8. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the ..lambda../sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a ..gamma..-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven.

  9. Optics laboratory experiments with laser-heated samples of crude oils and oil-in-water emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Costa, Germán.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe incorporation of basic industrial research results into current University study programs in Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering. The Laboratory of Optics and Fluids (LOF) of University Simon Bolivar (USB) leads a research program on applications of Photonics technology in the Petroleum Industry. More precisely, the main research subject at the (LOF) is development of optical procedures allowing determination of conditions of stability of oil-in-water emulsions. In several countries (for example, Canada and Venezuela) there exist important reservoirs of heavy crude oils, whose high viscosity impede their transportation through pipelines. Therefore, emulsions of heavy oils in water were developed in order to allow their commercialization. Though those emulsions are stable in current environmental conditions, high temperature or velocity gradients frequently provoke their coalescence. In typical experiments conducted at the (LOF) temperature gradients are induced in oil-water emulsions and in crude oil samples by irradiation with a CW laser beam. In crude oil samples the strong dependence of the liquid surface tension and refractive index on the local liquid temperature gives rise to long-range deformation of the liquid free surface. The latter cited thus behaves as an interferometrically smooth liquid mirror, which gives rise in turn to phase and intensity variations in the reflected light beam. In emulsion samples the inhomogeneous heating gives rise to thermoconvective flow, which is clearly observed as a moving speckle pattern in the reflected light beam. These are typical phenomena of self-interaction of a laser beam incident upon a material medium. In the present paper we discuss these optical phenomena, first studied in a basic research context, from an educational viewpoint.

  10. Experience with the BaBar Resistive Plate Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, H.

    2005-04-06

    The BaBar detector has operated over 2000 m{sup 2} of Resistive Plates Chambers (RPCs) as muon and neutral hadron detectors since 1999. Most of the original RPC production have lost significant efficiency and many are now completely inefficient. Both the linseed oil used to coat the inner surfaces and the graphite coating on the outer surfaces are implicated as contributors to the efficiency loss which was accelerated by the operation of the RPCs at 29 to 34 C during the first summer. RPCs from 2 more recent production runs have been installed and tested. The most recent RPCs have exhibited stable efficiencies and high voltage plateaus during the first 8 months of service. Some have shown increased dark currents and noise rates.

  11. Development of glass resistive plate chambers for INO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, V. M.; Jena, Satyajit; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Reddy, L. V.; Saraf, M.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Verma, P.

    2009-05-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a massive 50 kton magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector, to study atmospheric neutrinos and to make precision measurements of the parameters related to neutrino oscillations. Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) of about 2 m×2 m in size are going to be used as active elements for the ICAL detector. We have fabricated a large number of glass RPC prototypes of 1 m×1 m in size and have studied their performance and long term stability. In the process, we have developed and produced a number of materials and components required for fabrication of RPCs. We have also designed and optimised a number of fabrication and quality control procedures for assembling the gas gaps. In this paper we will review our various activities towards development of glass RPCs for the INO ICAL detector. We will present results of the characterisation studies of the RPCs and discuss our plans to prototype 2 m×2 m sized RPCs.

  12. Spectra, composition, and interactions of nuclei with magnet interaction chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parneil, T. A.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Roberts, F. E.; Tabuki, T.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. C.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.

    1990-01-01

    Emulsion chambers will be flown in the Astromag Facility to measure the cosmic ray composition and spectra to 10 exp 15 eV total energy and to definitively study the characteristics of nucleus-nucleus interactions above 10 exp 12 eV/n. Two configurations of emulsion chambers will be flown in the SCIN/MAGIC experiment. One chamber has an emulsion target and a calorimeter similar to those recently flown on balloons for composition and spectra measurements. The other has an identical calorimeter and a low-density target section optimized for performing rigidity measurements on charged particles produced in interactions. The transverse momenta of charged and neutral mesons, direct hadronic pairs from resonance decays and interference effects, and possible charge clustering in high-density states of matter will be studied.

  13. Muon radiography in Russia with emulsion technique. First experiments future perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A. B.; Bagulya, A. V.; Chernyavsky, M. M.; Konovalova, N. S.; Polukhina, N. G.; Shchedrina, T. V.; Starkov, N. I.; Tioukov, V. E.; Vladymyrov, M. S.; Managadze, A. K.; Roganova, T. M.; Orurk, O. I.; Zemskova, S. G.

    2015-12-31

    Cosmic ray muon radiography is a novel technique for imaging the internal structures of massive objects. It exploits the capability of high energy muons from cosmic-rays in order to obtain a density map of investigated object and trying to guess information on the variation in the density distribution. Nuclear emulsions are tracking detectors well suited to be employed in this context since they have an excellent angular resolution (few mrad), they are cheap, compact and robust, easily transportable, able to work in harsh environments, and do not require power supply. This work presents the first successful results in the field of muon radiography in Russia with nuclear emulsions.

  14. Smog chamber experiments to test oxidant related control strategy issues. Final report 1978-81

    SciTech Connect

    Kamens, R.M.; Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.; Gerhardt, A.A.

    1982-03-01

    Outdoor smog chamber experiments were performed to address various issues relating to ozone (O3) production and oxidant control strategies. Temperature effects on single hydrocarbon-NOx systems were studied. Propylene-NOx systems were modeled with particular attention to peroxynitric acid chemistry. Mechanisms were developed to model the O3 reactions with the two major isoprene daughter products, methylvinylketone and methacrolein. Chamber systems with isoprene and O3 were also modeled.

  15. Experience With the Resistive Plate Chamber in the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2006-11-15

    The BABAR detector has operated nearly 200 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), constructed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detector, for the past two years. The RPCs experience widely different background and luminosity-driven singles rates (0.01-10 Hz/cm{sup 2}) depending on position within the endcap. Some regions have integrated over 0.3 C/cm{sup 2}. RPC efficiency measured with cosmic rays and beam is high and stable. However, a few of the highest rate RPCs have suffered efficiency losses of 5-15%. Although constructed with improved techniques many of the RPCs, which are operated in streamer mode, have shown increased dark currents and noise rates that are correlated with the direction of the gas flow and the integrated current.

  16. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  17. Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy for Acute Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication: Clinical Experience in Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Gökhan; Güneysel, Özlem; Taşyürek, Tanju; Kozan, Ergül; Çevik, Şebnem Eren

    2015-01-01

    There is no specific antidote for intoxication with synthetic cannabinoids. In this case series, we considered the efficiency of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in four cases, who presented to emergency department with synthetic cannabinoid (bonzai) intoxication. The first patient had a GCS of 3 and a left bundle branch block on electrocardiography. The electrocardiography revealed sinus rhythm with normal QRS width after the treatment. The second patient had bradycardia, hypotension, and a GCS of 14. After intravenous lipid emulsion therapy, the bradycardia resolved, and the patient's GCS improved to 15. The third patient presented with a GCS of 8, and had hypotension and bradycardia. After the treatment, not only did the bradycardia resolve, but also the GCS improved to 15. The fourth patient, whose electrocardiography revealed accelerated junctional rhythm, had a GCS of 13. The patient's rhythm was sinus after the treatment. Cardiovascular recovery was seen in all four cases, and neurological recovery was also seen in three of them. Based on the fact that intravenous lipid emulsion is beneficial in patients intoxicated with lipophilic drugs, unstable patients presenting to the emergency department with acute synthetic cannabinoid intoxication may be candidates for intravenous lipid emulsion treatment. PMID:26078891

  18. Phase inversion of particle-stabilised perfume oil-water emulsions: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-10-14

    Phase inversion of fumed silica particle-stabilised emulsions of water and perfume oil can be effected in three ways. The transitional inversion from water-in-oil (w/o) to oil-in-water (o/w) occurs upon increasing the particle hydrophilicity for 9 oils of different polarity and structure. Results are compared for systems in which particles are pre-dispersed in one of the bulk phases and for those in which a novel powdered particle method is used. Using a simple theory involving the surface energies of the various interfaces, the contact angle θ of a particle with the oil-water interface is calculated as a function of the particle hydrophilicity. Assuming phase inversion occurs at θ = 90°, very good agreement is obtained for all oils between the calculated and experimental particle hydrophilicity required for inversion in the case of the powdered particle method. Inversion from o/w to w/o induced by simply increasing the particle concentration is shown to be as a result of changes in the aggregation state of the particles influencing their wettability. Finally, catastrophic phase inversion from w/o to o/w is achieved by increasing the volume fraction of water, and multiple emulsions form around inversion in a system containing only one particle type. Results of the latter two inversion routes are combined to develop an emulsion compositional map allowing a variety of emulsions with different characteristics to be described by varying the relative amounts of the three components.

  19. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  20. Experiment 8: Environmental Conditions in the ASTROCULTURE(trademark) Plant Chamber During the USML-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Zhou, Weijia; Yetka, R. A.; Draeger, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Conducting plant research to assess the impact of microgravity on plant growth and development requires a plant chamber that has the capability to control other environmental parameters involved in plant growth and development. The environmental control in a space-based plant chamber must be equivalent to that available in such facilities used for terrestrial plant research. Additionally, plants are very sensitive to a number of atmospheric gaseous materials. Thus, the atmosphere of a plant chamber must be isolated from the space vehicle atmosphere, and the plant growth unit should have the capability to remove any such deleterious materials that may impact plant growth and development. The Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison, has developed a totally enclosed controlled environment plant growth unit. The flight unit was used to support the ASTROCULTURE(TM) experiment conducted during the USML-2 mission. The experiment had two major objectives: 1) Provide further validation of the flight unit to control the experiment-defined environmental parameters in the plant chamber, and 2) support a plant experiment to assess the capability of potato plant material to produce tubers in microgravity. This paper describes the temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide conditions of the plant chamber during the mission, from launch to landing. Another paper will present the plant response data.

  1. Droplet freezing experiments in stearic acid-water emulsions, role of the droplet-medium interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiez, J.P.; Grange, G.; Mutaftschiev, B.

    1982-02-01

    Droplets of stearic acid emulsions in water, stabilized with cationic or anionic emulsifiers, undergoing freezing-melting cycles with constant temperature scanning rate, freeze as monocrystals and independently from one another, even when visible clustering takes place. The study of the nucleation kinetics by differential scanning calorimetry shows that nucleation threshold (critical undercooling) depends on the nature of the emulsifier, adsorbed at the droplet-medium interface. 30 references.

  2. A facility for long-term Mars simulation experiments: the Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lars Liengaard; Merrison, Jonathan; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Mikkelsen, Karina Aarup; Kristoffersen, Tommy; Nørnberg, Per; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Finster, Kai

    2008-06-01

    We describe the design, construction, and pilot operation of a Mars simulation facility comprised of a cryogenic environmental chamber, an atmospheric gas analyzer, and a xenon/mercury discharge source for UV generation. The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH) consists of a double-walled cylindrical chamber. The double wall provides a cooling mantle through which liquid N(2) can be circulated. A load-lock system that consists of a small pressure-exchange chamber, which can be evacuated, allows for the exchange of samples without changing the chamber environment. Fitted within the MESCH is a carousel, which holds up to 10 steel sample tubes. Rotation of the carousel is controlled by an external motor. Each sample in the carousel can be placed at any desired position. Environmental data, such as temperature, pressure, and UV exposure time, are computer logged and used in automated feedback mechanisms, enabling a wide variety of experiments that include time series. Tests of the simulation facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to produce temperature cycles and maintain low temperature (down to -140 degrees C), low atmospheric pressure (5-10 mbar), and a gas composition like that of Mars during long-term experiments. PMID:18593229

  3. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-08-26

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

  4. Outdoor smog chamber experiments to test photochemical models. Final report May 78-May 81

    SciTech Connect

    Feffries, H.E.; Kamens, R.M.; Sexron, K.G.; Gerhardt, A.A.

    1982-04-01

    The smog chamber facility of the University of North Carolina was used in a study to provide experimental data for developing and testing kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation. The smog chamber, located outdoors in rural North Carolina, is an A-frame structure covered with Teflon film. Because the chamber is partitioned into two sections, each with a volume of 156 cu m, two experiments can be conducted simultaneously. The dual chamber is operated under natural conditions of solar radiation, temperature, and relative humidity. In this study, 115 dual all-day experiments were conducted using NOx and a variety of organic species. The organic compounds investigated included various paraffins, olefins, aromatics and oxygenates, both singly and in mixtures of two or more components. In this report the data collected over the three-year period of the study are described. The experimental procedures and analytical methods used in this study and the limitations and uncertainties of the data are discussed. Guidance for modeling of the data is also given, including a detailed discussion of how to estimate photolytic rate constants from the available UV and total solar radiation data and how to treat such chamber artifacts as dilution, wall sources and losses of pollutants, and reactivity of the background air.

  5. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-06-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  6. Specifications for and preliminary design of a plant growth chamber for orbital experimental experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, H. C.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    It was proposed that plant experiments be performed on board the space shuttle. To permit the proper execution of most tests, the craft must contain a plant growth chamber which is adequately designed to control those environmental factors which can induce changes in a plant's physiology and morphology. The various needs of, and environmental factors affecting, plants are identified. The permissilbe design, construction and performance limits for a plant-growth chamber are set, and tentative designs were prepared for units which are compatible with both the botanical requirements and the constraints imposed by the space shuttle.

  7. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  8. Study of charm production in the forward cone at energy ELab ˜ 75 TeV with a two-storey X-ray emulsion chamber exposed at, mountain altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. S.; Chubenko, A. P.; Denisova, V. G.; Galkin, V. I.; Guseva, Z. M.; Kanevskaya, E. A.; Kogan, M. G.; Kulikov, V. N.; Morozov, A. E.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Puchkov, V. S.; Nazarov, S. I.; Pyatovsky, S. E.; Shoziyoev, G. P.; Smirnova, M. D.; Vargasov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the cosmic ray hadron excess observed in a deep uniform lead X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC) at depths larger than 70 radiation lengths is analyzed. We present preliminary experimental data on the absorption of cosmic ray hadrons in the two-storey XREC with a large air gap exposed at the Tien Shan mountains. The design of the chamber was especially invented to prove the hypothesis on a substantial increase of the charm particle production cross section with energy at ELab ˜ 75 TeV as the main source of the darkness spot excess observed on X-ray films. Experimental data obtained with both a 2-storey XREC and a deep uniform XREC are compared with simulation results calculated with the FANSY 1.0 model. The comparison reveals a qualitative agreement between experimental and simulated data under the assumption of high values of charm particle production cross section at ELab ˜ 75 TeV in the forward kinematic region at xLab > 0.1.

  9. Spectra, composition, and interactions of nuclei above 10 TeV using magnet-interferometric chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Takahashi, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Although the SCIN-MAGIC experiment has, like all ASTROMAG and most other Attached Payload experiments, been 'deselected' from Space Station, it is expected that ultimately such emulsion chambers will be flown on the Station. Some brief studies are described which were made in support of the design efforts for such a program being conducted at NASA Marshall.

  10. Performance of the Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiz Silva, Cesar

    2004-10-01

    The Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector (TEC/TRD) in the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC measures ionization losses (dE/dX) and transition radiation from charged particles produced by beam collisions. It is designed to perform tracking and identification for charged particles on very high particle multiplicity environment. The TEC/TRD consists of 24 wire chambers readout on both sides filled with recycled Xe-based gas mixture. This wire chamber configuration, besides providing measurements of ionization losses for charged particles, can absorb X-Ray photons generated by transition radiation from incident particles with γ>1000 crossing fiber radiators placed at the entrance of the chambers. This allows TEC/TRD to distinguish electrons from the huge pion signal produced over a broad momentum range (1GeV/c

  11. MicroBooNE: A New Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber detectors are well suited to study neutrino interactions, and are an intriguing option for future massive detectors capable of measuring the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. These detectors combine fine-grained tracking with calorimetry, allowing for excellent imaging and particle identification ability. In this talk the details of the MicroBooNE experiment, a 175 ton LArTPC which will be exposed to Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beamline starting in 2011, will be presented. The ability of MicroBooNE to differentiate electrons from photons gives the experiment unique capabilities in low energy neutrino interaction measurements.

  12. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features is 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.

  13. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features ismore » 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.« less

  14. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-15

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10{sup 13} emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  15. A Freon-Filled Bubble Chamber for Neutron Detection in Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.

    2011-03-24

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron–Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium–tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  16. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghilea, M C; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10(13) emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  17. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghilea, M C; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10(13) emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility. PMID:21456730

  18. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  19. [A dust generator for inhalation experiments in a high-pressure chamber].

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, K H; Bergmann, K H

    1984-03-01

    The health effect of inhalable dust particles at working places is predominantly related to "normal" conditions (i.e. temperature = 20 degrees C, atmospheric pressure = 1013 mbar). A probable risk for humans, working in pressurized places (tunnels) raises from modified respiration conditions. An inhalation experiment with rats was performed in a pressurized exposure chamber (1,5 bar). The dust generator was placed in the chamber and consisted of an endless ball-chain, which was lead through a glass-funnel as a dust-store. The average dust concentration ranged between 10 and 14 mg/m3 air. Short-time variations in case of the quartz dust DQ 12 were unavoidable.

  20. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  1. Intravascular behavior of a perfluorochemical emulsion.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Y; Yamanouchi, K; Okamoto, H; Yokoyama, K; Heldebrant, C

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the reason why two similar perfluorochemical (PFC) emulsions, namely a mixed PFC (perfluorodecalin: FDC and perfluorotripropylamine: FTPA) and an FDC emulsion, resulted in a very different survival time for the exchange-transfused rats. Supposing that some difference in the intravascular behavior of both emulsions would account for such a difference in efficacy, experiments on behavior of PFC emulsions were carried out focusing on the particle size. It was reconfirmed that larger PFC particles were eliminated from the blood stream much more rapidly than smaller particles with three FMIQ (perfluoro-N-methyldecahydroisoquinoline) emulsions. After the FDC + FTPA emulsion or the FDC emulsion were injected into rabbits, PFC particles in the blood tended to decrease in size. When each of the collected blood samples was incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the FDC emulsion enlarged in size markedly, but the FDC + FTPA emulsion showed no change. The retention of PFC particles appeared to depend on the emulsion stability rather than simply on the emulsifying agent alone. These data showed that some differences were observed in intravascular persistence of the FDC + FTPA emulsion and the FDC emulsion, and suggested that the efficacy of PFC emulsions would reflect their behavior in the circulation. PMID:2374085

  2. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Zaveryaev, V.S.; Trusillo, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and National Ignition Facility experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Zaveryaev, V.S.; Trusillo, S.V.

    1996-07-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will be discussed.

  4. Report of the Next Generation TRIUMF-MTV Experiment Run-IV Using Cylindrical Drift Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, R.; Seitaibashi, E.; Baba, H.; Kawamura, H.; Behr, J. A.; Onishi, J.; Ninomiya, K.; Pearson, M.; Ikeda, M.; Levy, P.; Narikawa, R.; Openshaw, R.; Tanaka, S.; Saiba, S.; Iguri, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Nakaya, Y.; Murata, J.

    The MTV (Mott polarimetry for T-Violation) experiment is running from 2009 at TRIUMF, which aims to search a large non-standard T-Violation in polarized nuclear beta decay. Existence of a large transverse polarization of electrons emitted from polarized Li-8 nuclei, which are produced at TRIUMF-ISAC and stopped inside an aluminum stopper, is investigated. We utilize a Mott polarimeter consists of a CDC (Cylindrical Drift Chamber), measuring backward scattering left-right asymmetry from a thin lead analyzer foil. In this paper, results from the final performance test run using CDC performed in 2012 are described.

  5. Multiwire proportional chambers in M1 and M3 spectrometers of charmed baryon experiment (E781) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Mithat; /Iowa U.

    1997-08-01

    The status of the multiwire proportional chambers in the FERMILAB E781 experiment and a general description of the readout system are given. This essay will describe the system of multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) that are part of the Fermilab experiment E781 setup. Multiwire proportional chambers are often used in particle physics experiments because they can determine the position of charged particles very accurately (less than a millimeter). The E781 experiment which is also called SELEX (SEgmented LargE-X) is a spectrometer designed to study the production and decay of charmed baryons. MWPCs are part of the 3-stage charged particle spectrometer (Figure 1). Each spectrometer stage includes a bending magnet and chambers. More information about E781 experiment is given in the Appendix. In the following, some basic concepts of MWPCs will be given briefly. After that the multiwire proportional chambers (M1PWC and M3PWC) that are used in the E781 fixed target experiment will be described. Then a general description of the readout system for both M1PWC and M3PWC setups will follow. Finally the tests done on both sets of chambers will be explained in detail.

  6. Continuous measurements of H2 and CO deposition onto soil: a laboratory soil chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Eiler, J.; Smith, N. V.; Thrift-Viveros, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen uptake in soil is the largest single component of the global budget of atmospheric H2, and is the most important parameter for predicting changes in atmospheric concentration with future changing sources (anthropogenic and otherwise). The rate of hydrogen uptake rate by soil is highly uncertain [1]. As a component of the global budget, it is simply estimated as the difference among estimates for other recognized sources and sinks, assuming the atmosphere is presently in steady state. Previous field chamber experiments [2] show that H2 deposition velocity varies complexly with soil moisture level, and possibly with soil organic content and temperature. We present here results of controlled soil chamber experiments on 3 different soil blocks (each ~20 x ~20 x ~21 cm) with a controlled range of moisture contents. All three soils are arid to semi arid, fine grained, and have organic contents of 10-15%. A positive air pressure (slightly higher than atmospheric pressure) and constant temperature and relative humidity was maintained inside the 10.7 liter, leak-tight plexiglass chamber, and a stream of synthetic air with known H2 concentration was continuously bled into the chamber through a needle valve and mass flow meter. H2, CO and CO2 concentrations were continuously analyzed in the stream of gas exiting the chamber, using a TA 3000 automated Hg-HgO reduced gas analyzer and a LI-820 CO2 gas analyzer. Our experimental protocol involved waiting until concentrations of analyte gases in the exiting gas stream reached a steady state, and documenting how that steady state varied with various soil properties and the rate at which gases were delivered to the chamber. The rate constants for H2 and CO consumption in the chamber were measured at several soil moisture contents. The calculated deposition velocities of H2 and CO into the soil are positively correlated with steady-state concentrations, with slopes and curvatures that vary with soil type and moisture level

  7. [Metabolism, intensity of lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant defense system in humans during chamber experiments with long-term isolation].

    PubMed

    Markin, A A; Stroganova, L B; Vostrikova, L V; Balashov, O I; Nichiporuk, I A

    1997-01-01

    Blood biochemical parameters of lipid, protein, carbohydrate and energy metabolism were measured in a 135-day chamber experiment. Also, dynamics of the intensity of lipid peroxidation and status of the antioxidant defence system were evaluated. Results of the investigation showed that extended chamber isolation led to modifications of several biochemical parameters including hemoglobin, bilirubin, cholesterol and its fractions, elevated transaminase activity which are typical for long-term space mission. However, these were not accompanied by substantive changes in protein, energy and carbohydrate metabolisms, or intensity of free radical processes. Effects of prolonged stay in chamber was successfully counterbalanced by organism.

  8. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened “Alpha Cabin”, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  9. Small-strip Thin Gap Chambers for the muon spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Codina, E.

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS muon system upgrade to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19, the so-called New Small Wheel (NSW), is designed to cope with the increased instantaneous luminosity in LHC Run 3. The small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) will provide the NSW with a fast trigger and high precision tracking. The construction protocol has been validated by test beam experiments on a full-size prototype sTGC detector, showing the performance requirements are met. The intrinsic spatial resolution for a single layer has been found to be about 45 μm for a perpendicular incident angle, and the transition region between pads has been measured to be about 4 mm.

  10. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D.; Goh, J.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J. W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. K.; Park, S. K.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Costantini, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W. V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O. M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H. S.; Morales, M. I. P.; Bernardino, S. C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  11. Chamber experiments to investigate the release of fungal IN into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Krüger, Mira; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Several types of microorganisms like bacteria, fungi and lichen have been identified as sources of biological ice nuclei (IN). They are a potentially strong source of atmospheric IN, as some of them are able to catalyze ice formation at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures. Common plant-associated bacteria are the best-known biological IN but recently ice nucleation activity in a variety of fungal species such as Mortierella alpina, Isaria farinosa, Acremonium implicatum was found. These fungal species are widely spread throughout the world and are present in soil and air. Their IN seem to be proteins, which are not anchored in the fungal cell wall. To which extent these small, cell-free IN are emitted directly into the atmosphere remains unexplored just as other processes, which probably indirectly release fungal IN e.g. absorbed onto soil dust particles. To analyze the release of fungal IN into the air, we designed a chamber, whose main principle is based on the emission of particles into a closed gas compartment and the subsequent collection of these particles in water. The concentration of the collected IN in the water is determined by droplet freezing assays. For a proof of principles, fungal washing water containing cell-free IN was atomized by an aerosol generator and the produced gas stream was lead through a water trap filled with pure water. Preliminary results show a successful proof of principles. The chamber design is capable of collecting aerosolic IN produced by an aerosol generator with fungal washing water. In ongoing experiments, alive or dead fungal cultures are placed into the chamber and a gentle, particle free air stream is directed over the fungi surface. This gas stream is also lead through water to collect particles, which might be emitted either actively or passively by the fungi. Further experiments will be e.g. conducted under different relative humidities. Results

  12. Evaluation of different SOA schemes using experiments in two outdoor chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco, Marta G.; Couvidat, Florian; Santiago, Manuel; Seignuer, Christian; Jang, Myoseon; Barron, Henderson; Bertrand, Bessagnet

    2014-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) constitute a significant fraction of the atmospheric particulate matter. These particles are formed as a consequence of the oxidation reaction of certain organic gases that leads to the formation of low-volatility compounds. Much research has been done during the last years regarding SOA modelling. Since the initial one-step oxidation reaction included in most regional models more complex schemes taking into account the NOx regime have been proposed. In these schemes the intermediate specie formed from the oxidation of SOA precursors can continue reacting through different pathways depending on the atmospheric chemical conditions. Basically based on chamber experiments, the second-step reaction pathways involve radicals such as HO2, CH3COO or CH3O2 in low NOx conditions. In this study we present an intercomparison of different SOA mechanism (Couvidat et al. 2012, Kim et al. 2011, 1-step scheme currently included in the CHIMERE model) for anthropogenic SOA precursors, and their sensibility to different chemical mechanisms. A comparison of model results against two sets of experiments, performed in two outdoor chambers, EUPHORE (Ceam, Valencia, Spain; Vivanco et al., 2013), and UF (University of Florida, USA) is also included. Experiments in UF were performed for individual VOCs (toluene and 1,3,5 trimethylbenzene), whereas experiments in EUPHORE were focused on a mixture of four anthropogenic VOCs (toluene, 1,3,5 trimethylbenzene, o-xylene and octane). Regarding the gas phase, a comparison of radical concentration for different chemical mechanisms has been done. Modeled radical concentration was evaluated for one experiment measuring OH and HO2 concentration. References: Couvidat, F., Debry, ' E., Sartelet, K., and Seigneur, C (2012) .: A hydrophilic/hydrophobic organic (H2O) model: Model development,evaluation and sensitivity analysis, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D10304, doi:10.1029/2011JD017214, 2012. Y. Kim, K. Sartelet, and C

  13. A review of chamber experiments for determining specific emission rates and investigating migration pathways of flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Lazarov, Borislav; Harrad, Stuart; Covaci, Adrian; Stranger, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of flame retardants (FRs) in indoor products has led to their ubiquitous distribution within indoor microenvironments with many studies reporting concentrations in indoor air and dust. Little information is available however on emission of these compounds to air, particularly the measurement of specific emission rates (SERs), or the migration pathways leading to dust contamination. Such knowledge gaps hamper efforts to develop understanding of human exposure. This review summarizes published data on SERs of the following FRs released from treated products: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), including a brief discussion of the methods used to derive these SERs. Also reviewed are published studies that utilize emission chambers for investigations/measurements of mass transfer of FRs to dust, discussing the chamber configurations and methods used for these experiments. A brief review of studies investigating correlations between concentrations detected in indoor air/dust and possible sources in the microenvironment is included along with efforts to model contamination of indoor environments. Critical analysis of the literature reveals that the major limitations with utilizing chambers to derive SERs for FRs arise due to the physicochemical properties of FRs. In particular, increased partitioning to chamber surfaces, airborne particles and dust, causes loss through “sink” effects and results in long times to reach steady state conditions inside the chamber. The limitations of chamber experiments are discussed as well as their potential for filling gaps in knowledge in this area.

  14. Study of isospin correlation in high energy S + Pb and Pb + Pb interactions with a magnetic-interferometric-emulsion-chamber. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1997-12-12

    This report describes the research results of the study of high energy heavy-ion interactions and multi-cluster correlations at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). This study has been performed as the CERN experiments, EMU05, EMU09 and EMU16, and a part of the RHIC PHENIX and its MVD Collaboration work. Physics objectives and methods are described in chapters 1, 2, 3 and Appendices A1 and A2. The experimental set-up, measurements, an the data analyses at UAH are described in chapters 4 through 10 and Appendices. The UAH research was a quest for high density state of nuclear matter, in terms of finding analysis methods of multi-isospin correlations. The present work emphasized a study of the fluctuation of the particle density, discriminating the isospin for exploring the Disoriented Chiral Condensate (DCC). The analysis methods developed are: (1) Chi-square density test; (2) Run-test; (3) G-test; (4) Fourier analysis; and (5) Lomb`s Periodogram. The application of these methods for central collision events in 2,000 GeV/n S + Pb and 167 GeV/n Pb + Pb produced interesting DCC correlations for a few events. However, further investigation of fluctuations with Monte Carlo method guided them to understand various hidden degree of freedoms in such analyses. The results of the analysis of the experimental data in comparison with the Monte Carlo data did not support the DCC process as compelling. The developed methods evolved for a plan to investigate the DCC in the PHENIX. The study has obtained several mathematical analysis methods from the CERN EMU05/16 experiments for a possible use in RHIC experiments.

  15. Assessment of SAPRC07 with updated isoprene chemistry against outdoor chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuzhi; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Jerry, Roger E.; Surratt, Jason D.; Vizuete, William

    2015-03-01

    Isoprene, the most emitted non-methane hydrocarbon, is known to influence ozone (O3) formation in urban areas rich with biogenic emissions. To keep up with the recent advance on isoprene oxidation chemistry including the identification of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) as a precursor to secondary organic aerosol (SOA), Xie et al. (2013) updated the SAPRC (Statewide Air Pollution Research Center)-07 chemical mechanism. It is currently unknown how the Xie modification of SAPRC07 impacts the ability of the model to predict O3. In this study we will evaluate the Xie mechanism with simulations of 24 isoprene experiments from the UNC Dual Gas-phase Chamber. Our results suggest that the new mechanism increases NOx (nitrogen oxides) inter-conversion and produces more O3 than SAPRC07 for all experiments. In lower-NOx experiments, the new mechanism worsens O3 performance in the wrong direction, increasing bias from 4.92% to 9.44%. We found increased NOx recycling from PANs accounts for that. This could be explained by more PANs made due to increased first generation volatile organic compound (VOC) products and hydroxyl radical (OH) production.

  16. Performance of the Cylindrical Drift Chamber and the Inner Plastic Scintillator in the BGOegg experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibukawa, Takuya; Masumoto, Shinichi; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Muramatsu, Norihito; Ishikawa, Takatsugu; Miyabe, Manabu; Tsuchikawa, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Ryuji; Matsumura, Yuji; Mizutani, Keigo; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; Hamano, Hirotomo; LEPS2/BGOegg Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Properties of vector mesons, such as ω mesons, in nucleus are intensively measured to study interactions between mesons and nuclear medium. To study ω meson properties in nuclei, we search for the nuclear ω bound states in the LEPS2/BGOegg experiment at SPring-8. If a strongly bounded ω state exists and binding energy is measured, it gives a phenomenological information about interactions between ω meson and nuclei. ω meson is produced using the GeV γ rays at SPring-8/LEPS2 beamline. The ω bound state is searched from the missing mass measurements of forward going protons. ω meson production is identified by detecting γ and proton from ωN --> N* --> γp or ωN --> γΔ --> γπ p reaction. In the BGOegg experiment, charged particles are detected by Cylindrical Drift Chamber(CDC) and Inner Plastic Scintillators (IPS) around the target. CDC has 4 layers of stereo wires and each layer has 72 sense wires. IPS consists of 30 plastic scintillators. In this talk, the performance of CDC and IPS are described in detail. Properties of vector mesons, such as ω mesons, in nucleus are intensively measured to study interactions between mesons and nuclear medium. To study ω meson properties in nuclei, we search for the nuclear ω bound states in the LEPS2/BGOegg experiment at SPring-8. If a strongly bounded ω state exists and binding energy is measured, it gives a phenomenological information about interactions between ω meson and nuclei. ω meson is produced using the GeV γ rays at SPring-8/LEPS2 beamline. The ω bound state is searched from the missing mass measurements of forward going protons. ω meson production is identified by detecting γ and proton from ωN --> N* --> γp or ωN --> γΔ --> γπ p reaction. In the BGOegg experiment, charged particles are detected by Cylindrical Drift Chamber(CDC) and Inner Plastic Scintillators (IPS) around the target. CDC has 4 layers of stereo wires and each layer has 72 sense wires. IPS consists of 30 plastic

  17. Atmospheric photochemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons: OH budgets during SAPHIR chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehr, S.; Bohn, B.; Dorn, H.-P.; Fuchs, H.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Li, X.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2014-03-01

    Current photochemical models developed to simulate the atmospheric degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons tend to underestimate OH radical concentrations. In order to analyse OH budgets, we performed experiments with benzene, toluene, p-xylene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. Experiments were conducted under low-NO conditions (typically 0.1-0.2 ppb) and high-NO conditions (typically 7-8 ppb), and starting concentrations of 6-250 ppb of aromatics, dependent on OH rate constants. For the OH budget analysis a steady-state approach was applied where OH production and destruction rates (POH and DOH) have to be equal. The POH were determined from measurements of HO2, NO, HONO, and O3 concentrations, considering OH formation by photolysis and recycling from HO2. The DOH were calculated from measurements of the OH concentrations and total OH reactivities. The OH budgets were determined from DOH / POH ratios. The accuracy and reproducibility of the approach were assessed in several experiments using CO as a reference compound where an average ratio DOH / POH = 1.13 ± 0.19 was obtained. In experiments with aromatics, these ratios ranged within 1.1-1.6 under low-NO conditions and 0.9-1.2 under high-NO conditions. The results indicate that OH budgets during photo-oxidation experiments with aromatics are balanced within experimental accuracies. Inclusion of a further, recently proposed OH production via HO2 + RO2 reactions led to improvements under low-NO conditions but the differences were small and insignificant within the experimental errors.

  18. Atmospheric photochemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons: OH budgets during SAPHIR chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehr, S.; Bohn, B.; Dorn, H.-P.; Fuchs, H.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Li, X.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2014-07-01

    Current photochemical models developed to simulate the atmospheric degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons tend to underestimate OH radical concentrations. In order to analyse OH budgets, we performed experiments with benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. Experiments were conducted under low-NO conditions (typically 0.1-0.2 ppb) and high-NO conditions (typically 7-8 ppb), and starting concentrations of 6-250 ppb of aromatics, dependent on OH rate constants. For the OH budget analysis a steady-state approach was applied in which OH production and destruction rates (POH and DOH) have to be equal. The POH were determined from measurements of HO2, NO, HONO, and O3 concentrations, considering OH formation by photolysis and recycling from HO2. The DOH were calculated from measurements of the OH concentrations and total OH reactivities. The OH budgets were determined from DOH/POH ratios. The accuracy and reproducibility of the approach were assessed in several experiments using CO as a reference compound where an average ratio DOH/POH = 1.13 ± 0.19 was obtained. In experiments with aromatics, these ratios ranged within 1.1-1.6 under low-NO conditions and 0.9-1.2 under high-NO conditions. The results indicate that OH budgets during photo-oxidation experiments with aromatics are balanced within experimental accuracies. Inclusion of a further, recently proposed OH production via HO2 + RO2 reactions led to improvements under low-NO conditions but the differences were small and insignificant within the experimental errors.

  19. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point.

  20. Radon detection in conical diffusion chambers: Monte Carlo calculations and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rickards, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G.; Vázquez-López, C.

    2015-07-23

    The operation of radon detection diffusion chambers of truncated conical shape was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The efficiency was studied for alpha particles generated randomly in the volume of the chamber, and progeny generated randomly on the interior surface, which reach track detectors placed in different positions within the chamber. Incidence angular distributions, incidence energy spectra and path length distributions are calculated. Cases studied include different positions of the detector within the chamber, varying atmospheric pressure, and introducing a cutoff incidence angle and energy.

  1. The Resistive Plate Chambers of the ATLAS experiment:. performance studies on Calibration Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaferro, Luca

    2012-08-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the four experiments installed on the hadron-hadron collider LHC at CERN. It is a general purpose experiment, with a physics program which spans from the search for the Higgs Boson to the search of physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). An integrated luminosity of about 5 fb-1 is expected to be reached by the end of 2011. The Resistive Plate Chambers, installed in the barrel region, are used to provide the first muon level trigger, and cover an area of 16000 m2, readout by about 350000 electronic channels. To ensure optimal trigger performance, the RPC operational parameters like cluster size, efficiency and spatial resolution are constantly monitored. In order to achieve the desired precision, the data used for the analysis are extracted directly from the second level of the trigger, hence assuring very high statistics. This dedicated event stream, called Calibration Stream, is sent automatically to the RPC Calibration Center in Naples. Here the analysis is performed using an automatic tool tightly integrated in the ATLAS GRID environment, the Local Calibration Data Splitter (LCDS), which configures and manages all the operations required by the analysis (e.g. software environment initialization, grid jobs configuration and submission, data saving and retrieval, etc). The monitored RPC operational parameters, the performance analysis and the LCDS will be presented.

  2. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  3. Conditions of deep magma chamber beneath Fuji volcano estimated from high- P experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, K.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Ushioda, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Fuji volcano, the largest in volume and eruption rate in Japan, is located at the center of Honshu, where North America, Eurasia and Philippine Sea plates meets. Because of the significance of Fuji volcano both in tectonic settings and potential volcanic hazard (particularly after the M9 earthquake in 2011), precise knowledge on its magma feeding system is essentially important. Composition of magma erupted from Fuji volcano in the last 100ky is predominantly basalt (SiO2=50-52wt%, FeO/MgO=1.5-3.0). Total lack of silica-rich magma (basaltic andesite and andesite) which are always present in other nearby volcanoes (e.g., Hakone, Izu-Oshima, see Fig.1) is an important petrologic feature of Fuji volcano. Purpose of this study is to constrain the depth of magma chamber of Fuji volcano and explain its silica-nonenrichment trend. High pressure melting experiments were carried out using two IHPVs at the Magma Factory, Tokyo Institute of Technology (SMC-5000 and SMC-8600, Tomiya et al., 2010). Basalt scoria Tr-1 which represents the final ejecta of Hoei eruption in AD1707, was adopted as a starting material. At 4kbar, temperature conditions were 1050, 1100 and 1150C, and H2O contents were 1.3, 2.7 and 4.7 wt.%, respectively. At 7kbar, temperature conditions were 1075, 1100 and 1125C, and H2O contents were 1.0, 1.1, 3.6 and 6.3wt.%, respectively. The fO2 was controlled at NNO buffer. At 4kbar, crystallization sequence at 3 wt% H2O is magnetite, plagioclase, clinopyroxene and finally orthopyroxene. At 7 kbar, and ~3 wt% H2O, the three minerals (opx, cpx, pl) appears simultaneously near the liquidus. Compositional trend of melt at 4 kbar and 7 kbar are shown with arrows in Fig.1. Because of the dominant crystallization of silica-rich opx at 7 kbar, composition of melt stays in the range SiO2=50-52wt% as predicted by Fujii (2007). Absence of silica-rich rocks in Fuji volcano may be explained by the tectonic setting of the volcano. Because Fuji volcano locates on the plate

  4. Utilizing ARC EMCS Seedling Cassettes as Highly Versatile Miniature Growth Chambers for Model Organism Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David; Reinsch, S.; DeSimone, Julia C.; Myers, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our ground testing was to demonstrate the capability of safely putting specific model organisms into dehydrated stasis, and to later rehydrate and successfully grow them inside flight proven ARC EMCS seedling cassettes. The ARC EMCS seedling cassettes were originally developed to support seedling growth during space flight. The seeds are attached to a solid substrate, launched dry, and then rehydrated in a small volume of media on orbit to initiate the experiment. We hypothesized that the same seedling cassettes should be capable of acting as culture chambers for a wide range of organisms with minimal or no modification. The ability to safely preserve live organisms in a dehydrated state allows for on orbit experiments to be conducted at the best time for crew operations and more importantly provides a tightly controlled physiologically relevant growth experiment with specific environmental parameters. Thus, we performed a series of ground tests that involved growing the organisms, preparing them for dehydration on gridded Polyether Sulfone (PES) membranes, dry storage at ambient temperatures for varying periods of time, followed by rehydration. Inside the culture cassettes, the PES membranes were mounted above blotters containing dehydrated growth media. These were mounted on stainless steel bases and sealed with plastic covers that have permeable membrane covered ports for gas exchange. The results showed we were able to demonstrate acceptable normal growth of C.elegans (nematodes), E.coli (bacteria), S.cerevisiae (yeast), Polytrichum (moss) spores and protonemata, C.thalictroides (fern), D.discoideum (amoeba), and H.dujardini (tardigrades). All organisms showed acceptable growth and rehydration in both petri dishes and culture cassettes initially, and after various time lengths of dehydration. At the end of on orbit ISS European Modular Cultivation System experiments the cassettes could be frozen at ultra-low temperatures, refrigerated, or chemically

  5. Radon emanation chamber: High sensitivity measurements for the SuperNEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soulé, B.; Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a well-known source of background in ββ0ν experiments due to the high Q{sub β} value of one of its daughter nucleus, {sup 214}Bi. The SuperNEMO collaboration requires a maximum radon contamination of 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} inside its next-generation double beta decay detector. To reach such a low activity, a drastic screening process has been set for the selection of the detector's materials. In addition to a good radiopurity, a low emanation rate is required. To test this parameter, a Radon Emanation Setup is running at CENBG. It consists in a large emanation chamber connected to an electrostatic detector. By measuring large samples and having a low background level, this setup reaches a sensitivity of a few μ Bq. m{sup −2}. d{sup −1} and is able to qualify materials used in the construction of the SuperNEMO detector.

  6. The analog Resistive Plate Chamber detector of the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Panareo, M.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Ruggieri, F.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.

    2015-07-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking from November 2007 till February 2013 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l.). The detector consists of a single layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) (6700 m2) operated in streamer mode. The signal pick-up is obtained by means of strips facing one side of the gas volume. The digital readout of the signals, while allows a high space-time resolution in the shower front reconstruction, limits the measurable energy to a few hundred TeV. In order to fully investigate the 1-10 PeV region, an analog readout has been implemented by instrumenting each RPC with two large size electrodes facing the other side of the gas volume. Since December 2009 the RPC charge readout has been in operation on the entire central carpet (∼5800 m2). In this configuration the detector is able to measure the particle density at the core position where it ranges from tens to many thousands of particles per m2. Thus ARGO-YBJ provides a highly detailed image of the charge component at the core of air showers. In this paper we describe the analog readout of RPCs in ARGO-YBJ and discuss both the performance of the system and the physical impact on the EAS measurements.

  7. Design of Drift Chamber 5 for the COMPASS II polarized Drell-Yan experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallon, James; Compass Dc5 Team

    2014-09-01

    The COMPASS project is a fixed-target nuclear physics experiment at CERN which explores the internal structure of the proton, and COMPASS ll's polarized Drell-Yan experiments will be exploring the quark angular momentum contribution to the spin of the proton through Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering. As a part of this process, Drift Chamber 5 (DC5), based on DC4 built by CEA-Saclay, must be constructed to replace a faulty straw chamber. The 23 total frames of DC5 have an outside measurement of 2.94 m by 2.54 m, with the 8 anode frames having a total of 4616 >2 m-long wires, giving a detection region of 4.19 m2 with a resolution of 200 microns. These wire planes are orientated with the x- and x'-frames in the vertical x-direction, the y- & y'-frames in the horizontal y-direction, the u- & u'- frames offset +10 deg from the vertical x-direction, and the v- &v'-frames offset -10 deg from the vertical x-direction, and are strung with Ø100 micron field wires and Ø20 micron sense wires. In order to solve left-right ambiguity, x', y', u', and v' are shifted by 4mm, or one drift cell. The x- and y-frames have 513 wires strung across them, with the field wires at 400 g of tension, the sense wires at 55 g on the x-frames, and 70 g on the y-frames. The u- and v-frames will have 641 wires, with the field wires at 400 g, and the sense wires at 55 g. DC5 will also have an updated front end electronics setup, using a new pre-amplifier-discriminator chip, in order to allow the recording of more events per second. The COMPASS project is a fixed-target nuclear physics experiment at CERN which explores the internal structure of the proton, and COMPASS ll's polarized Drell-Yan experiments will be exploring the quark angular momentum contribution to the spin of the proton through Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering. As a part of this process, Drift Chamber 5 (DC5), based on DC4 built by CEA-Saclay, must be constructed to replace a faulty straw chamber. The 23 total frames

  8. Supervised Self-Organizing Classification of Superresolution ISAR Images: An Anechoic Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radoi, Emanuel; Quinquis, André; Totir, Felix

    2006-12-01

    The problem of the automatic classification of superresolution ISAR images is addressed in the paper. We describe an anechoic chamber experiment involving ten-scale-reduced aircraft models. The radar images of these targets are reconstructed using MUSIC-2D (multiple signal classification) method coupled with two additional processing steps: phase unwrapping and symmetry enhancement. A feature vector is then proposed including Fourier descriptors and moment invariants, which are calculated from the target shape and the scattering center distribution extracted from each reconstructed image. The classification is finally performed by a new self-organizing neural network called SART (supervised ART), which is compared to two standard classifiers, MLP (multilayer perceptron) and fuzzy KNN ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] nearest neighbors). While the classification accuracy is similar, SART is shown to outperform the two other classifiers in terms of training speed and classification speed, especially for large databases. It is also easier to use since it does not require any input parameter related to its structure.

  9. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaiter, Martin; Järvinen, Emma; Vochezer, Paul; Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Wagner, Robert; Jourdan, Olivier; Mioche, Guillaume; Shcherbakov, Valery N.; Schmitt, Carl G.; Tricoli, Ugo; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    This study reports on the origin of small-scale ice crystal complexity and its influence on the angular light scattering properties of cirrus clouds. Cloud simulation experiments were conducted at the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the -40 to -60 °C range. The experiments were performed for ice clouds generated via homogeneous and heterogeneous initial nucleation. Small-scale ice crystal complexity was deduced from measurements of spatially resolved single particle light scattering patterns by the latest version of the Small Ice Detector (SID-3). It was found that a high crystal complexity dominates the microphysics of the simulated clouds and the degree of this complexity is dependent on the available water vapor during the crystal growth. Indications were found that the small-scale crystal complexity is influenced by unfrozen H2SO4 / H2O residuals in the case of homogeneous initial ice nucleation. Angular light scattering functions of the simulated ice clouds were measured by the two currently available airborne polar nephelometers: the polar nephelometer (PN) probe of Laboratoire de Métérologie et Physique (LaMP) and the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS-HALO) probe of KIT. The measured scattering functions are featureless and flat in the side and backward scattering directions. It was found that these functions have a rather low sensitivity to the small-scale crystal complexity for ice clouds that were grown under typical atmospheric conditions. These results have implications for the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and for the radiative transfer through these clouds.

  10. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaiter, M.; Järvinen, E.; Vochezer, P.; Abdelmonem, A.; Wagner, R.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Shcherbakov, V. N.; Schmitt, C. G.; Tricoli, U.; Ulanowski, Z.; Heymsfield, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study reports on the origin of ice crystal complexity and its influence on the angular light scattering properties of cirrus clouds. Cloud simulation experiments were conducted at the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the -40 to -60 °C range. The experiments were performed for ice clouds generated via homogeneous and heterogeneous initial nucleation. Ice crystal complexity was deduced from measurements of spatially resolved single particle light scattering patterns by the latest version of the Small Ice Detector (SID-3). It was found that a high ice crystal complexity is dominating the microphysics of the simulated clouds and the degree of this complexity is dependent on the available water vapour during the crystal growth. Indications were found that the crystal complexity is influenced by unfrozen H2SO4/H2O residuals in the case of homogeneous initial ice nucleation. Angular light scattering functions of the simulated ice clouds were measured by the two currently available airborne polar nephelometers; the Polar Nephelometer (PN) probe of LaMP and the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS-HALO) probe of KIT. The measured scattering functions are featureless and flat in the side- and backward scattering directions resulting in low asymmetry parameters g around 0.78. It was found that these functions have a rather low sensitivity to the crystal complexity for ice clouds that were grown under typical atmospheric conditions. These results have implications for the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and for the radiative transfer through these clouds.

  11. Ageing and performance studies of drift chamber prototypes for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; MEG Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present the tests aimed at verifying the proper functioning of the tracking systems of MEG II on small prototypes, estimating the achievable resolutions and evaluating the gain loss experienced by the chamber during its operation.

  12. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G.

    2016-07-01

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  13. Investigation of particle and vapor wall-loss effects on controlled wood-smoke smog-chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; May, A. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Smog chambers are extensively used to study processes that drive gas and particle evolution in the atmosphere. A limitation of these experiments is that particles and gas-phase species may be lost to chamber walls on shorter timescales than the timescales of the atmospheric processes being studied in the chamber experiments. These particle and vapor wall losses have been investigated in recent studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but they have not been systematically investigated in experiments of primary emissions from combustion. The semi-volatile nature of combustion emissions (e.g. from wood smoke) may complicate the behavior of particle and vapor wall deposition in the chamber over the course of the experiments due to the competition between gas/particle and gas/wall partitioning. Losses of vapors to the walls may impact particle evaporation in these experiments, and potential precursors for SOA formation from combustion may be lost to the walls, causing underestimates of aerosol yields. Here, we conduct simulations to determine how particle and gas-phase wall losses contributed to the observed evolution of the aerosol during experiments in the third Fire Lab At Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We use the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled with the organic volatility basis set (VBS) and wall-loss formulations to examine the predicted extent of particle and vapor wall losses. We limit the scope of our study to the dark periods in the chamber before photo-oxidation to simplify the aerosol system for this initial study. Our model simulations suggest that over one third of the initial particle-phase organic mass (36%) was lost during the experiments, and roughly half of this particle organic mass loss was from direct particle wall loss (56% of the loss) with the remainder from evaporation of the particles driven by vapor losses to the walls (44% of the loss). We perform a series of sensitivity tests to understand

  14. Investigation of particle and vapor wall-loss effects on controlled wood-smoke smog-chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; May, A. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Smog chambers are extensively used to study processes that drive gas and particle evolution in the atmosphere. A limitation of these experiments is that particles and gas-phase species may be lost to chamber walls on shorter timescales than the timescales of the atmospheric processes being studied in the chamber experiments. These particle and vapor wall losses have been investigated in recent studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but they have not been systematically investigated in experiments of primary emissions from combustion. The semi-volatile nature of combustion emissions (e.g. from wood smoke) may complicate the behavior of particle and vapor wall deposition in the chamber over the course of the experiments due to the competition between gas/particle and gas/wall partitioning. Losses of vapors to the walls may impact particle evaporation in these experiments, and potential precursors for SOA formation from combustion may be lost to the walls, causing underestimations of aerosol yields. Here, we conduct simulations to determine how particle and gas-phase wall losses contributed to the observed evolution of the aerosol during experiments in the third Fire Lab At Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We use the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled with the organic volatility basis set (VBS) and wall-loss formulations to examine the predicted extent of particle and vapor wall losses. We limit the scope of our study to the dark periods in the chamber before photo-oxidation to simplify the aerosol system for this initial study. Our model simulations suggest that over one-third of the initial particle-phase organic mass (41 %) was lost during the experiments, and over half of this particle-organic mass loss was from direct particle wall loss (65 % of the loss) with the remainder from evaporation of the particles driven by vapor losses to the walls (35 % of the loss). We perform a series of sensitivity tests to understand

  15. The FLAME Deluge: organic aerosol emission ratios from combustion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, Matthew; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Collett, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    A high level of variability has been identified amongst organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ER) from biomass burning (BB) under ambient conditions. However, it is difficult to assess the influences of potential drivers for this variability, given the wide range of conditions associated with wildfire measurements. Chamber experiments performed under controlled conditions provide a means of examining the effects of different fuel types and combustion conditions on OA emissions from biomass fuels. ERs have been characterised for 67 burns during the second Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME II), involving 19 different species from 6 fuel types widely consumed in BB events in the US each year. Average normalised dOA/dCO ratios show a high degree of variability, both between and within different fuel types and species, typically exceeding variability between separate plumes in ambient measurements. Relationships with source conditions were found to be complex, with little consistent influence from fuel properties and combustion conditions for the entire range of experiments. No strong correlation across all fires was observed between dOA/dCO and modified combustion efficiency (MCE), which is used as an indicator of the proportional contributions of flaming and smouldering combustion phases throughout each burn. However, a negative correlation exists between dOA/dCO and MCE for some coniferous species, most notably Douglas fir, for which there is also an apparent influence from fuel moisture content. Significant contrasts were also identified between combustion emissions from different fuel components of additional coniferous species. Changes in fire efficiency were also shown to dramatically alter emissions for fires with very similar initial conditions. Although the relationship with MCE is variable between species, there is greater consistency with the level of oxygenation in OA. The ratio of the m/z 44 fragment to total OA mass concentration (f44) as

  16. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Van Auwegem, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Ferrini, M.; Muhammad, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Tytgat, M.

    2016-09-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  17. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  18. Scintillation counter and wire chamber front end modules for high energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; DalMonte, Lou; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    This document describes two front-end modules developed for the proposed MIPP upgrade (P-960) experiment at Fermilab. The scintillation counter module was developed for the Plastic Ball detector time and charge measurements. The module has eight LEMO 00 input connectors terminated with 50 ohms and accepts negative photomultiplier signals in the range 0.25...1000 pC with the maximum input voltage of 4.0 V. Each input has a passive splitter with integration and differentiation times of {approx}20 ns. The integrated portion of the signal is digitized at 26.55 MHz by Analog Devices AD9229 12-bit pipelined 4-channel ADC. The differentiated signal is discriminated for time measurement and sent to one of the four TMC304 inputs. The 4-channel TMC304 chip allows high precision time measurement of rising and falling edges with {approx}100 ps resolution and has internal digital pipeline. The ADC data is also pipelined which allows deadtime-less operation with trigger decision times of {approx}4 {micro}s. The wire chamber module was developed for MIPP EMCal detector charge measurements. The 32-channel digitizer accepts differential analog signals from four 8-channel integrating wire amplifiers. The connection between wire amplifier and digitizer is provided via 26-wire twist-n-flat cable. The wire amplifier integrates input wire current and has sensitivity of 275 mV/pC and the noise level of {approx}0.013 pC. The digitizer uses the same 12-bit AD9229 ADC chip as the scintillator counter module. The wire amplifier has a built-in test pulser with a mask register to provide testing of the individual channels. Both modules are implemented as a 6Ux220 mm VME size board with 48-pin power connector. A custom europack (VME) 21-slot crate is developed for housing these front-end modules.

  19. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  20. Micromegas chambers for the experiment ATLAS at the LHC (A Brief Overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongadze, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    The increase in luminosity and energy of the Large hadron collider (LHC) in the next upgrade (Phase-1) in 2018-2019 will lead to a significant increase in radiation load on the ATLAS detector, primarily in the areas close to the interaction point of the LHC proton beams. One of these regions is the Small Wheel of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. It is planned to be replaced with the New Small Wheel that will have Micromegas chambers as main coordinate detectors. The paper gives an overview of all existing types of Micromegas detectors with special focus on the Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS detector upgrade.

  1. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  2. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques. PMID:27587173

  3. Proton decay and solar neutrino experiment with a liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in development of the liquid argon Time Projection Chamber is reviewed. Application of this technique to a search for proton decay and /sup 8/B solar neutrinos with directional sensitivity is considered. The steps necessary for a large scale application of this technique deep underground are described.

  4. Experiences with large-area frisch grid chambers in low-level alpha spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hötzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1984-06-01

    The properties of parallel-palte gridded ionization chambers with areas of 300 cm 2, developed by us for alpha spectrometry of samples with low specific alpha activity are reported. Several practical hints for optimum operating conditions are presented. The chambers can be operated routinely at atmospheric pressure for several days, without the need for purification of the gas filling (P10). The minimum detectable activity at 5 MeV is 0.01 pCi, based on 4.65 standard deviations of background and 1000 min counting time. At the GSF Research Center ionization chambers of this type are used for the analysis of natural alpha emitters, as well as of transuranium nuclides in environmental samples by: (a) direct alpha spectrometry without any previous treatment of the sample, (b) semi-direct spectrometry after removal of organic matter by low-temperature ashing and (c) spectrometry after chemical separation. Some typical examples of application are given. Furthermore the range of application of the chambers in comparison to semiconductor detectors in the field of low-level alpha spectrometry is discussed.

  5. Emulsions Droplet Capture Mechanism in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidani, Khalil; Polikar, Marcel

    2006-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the physics of emulsion flow in porous media. The objective of experiments were to study the applicability of oil-in-water emulsion as a plugging agent in the vicinity of the well bore for thousands of Canadian gas wells that are continuously leaking gas to surface. The motion of oil droplets and the capture mechanisms were investigated through visualized experiments. Well-characterized emulsions were injected into a micro model resembling a two parallel plate model packed with glass beads. Effects of emulsion properties and wettability of the medium were studied on a plugging mechanism. The results demonstrate the reduction in permeability mainly due to droplets size exclusion compared to the pore constrictions. Also, smaller droplets may lodge and coalesce in pores crevices thereby accelerating the blockage process. Moreover, more viscous emulsions are more effective compared with the less viscous ones due to combined effects of capillary and viscous forces. The deposition of droplets was adjusted through utilizing different preflush solutions. Criteria were set for enhancing emulsion penetration depth thereby defining the extent of the blocked region. In conclusion, this work characterizes the physics of emulsion flow in porous media and demonstrates its application as a novel sealant in near well bore region. The novelty, which constitutes a step-change in technology, is a method that emplaces an emulsion at a desired location in underground media.

  6. Acoustically aided coalescence of droplets in aqueous emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangu, Gautam D.

    the size-evolution of emulsions subjected to an acoustic field and comparing it with the predictions of the global model. It was observed that the model consistently underpredicted the coalescence rate in the experimental system. This was attributed to energy density gradients within the chamber that could give rise to lateral acoustic forces. These forces tend to concentrate the droplets in the regions of local energy density maxima, thereby enhancing the rate of coalescence over that predicted by the model. The existence of energy density gradients in the experimental system was confirmed by performing parallel band line-up and disruption experiments with polystyrene suspensions. An effective energy density value was computed for each of the experiments, and this enabled the model predictions to agree very well with the experimental observations. The inclusion of lateral acoustic forces in the model may improve the accuracy of its predictions.

  7. A new construction technique of high granularity and high transparency drift chambers for modern high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Miccoli, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Primiceri, P.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G. F.

    2016-07-01

    Modern experiments for the search of extremely rare processes require high resolutions (order of 50-200 keV/c) tracking systems for particle momenta in the range of 50-300 MeV/c, dominated by multiple scattering contributions. We will present a newly developed construction technique for ultra-low mass Drift Chambers fulfilling this goal. It consists of (1) a semiautomatic wiring machine with a high degree of control over wire mechanical tensioning (better than 0.2 g) and over wire positioning (of the order of 20 μm) for simultaneous wiring of multi-wire layers; (2) a contact-less IR laser soldering tool designed for a feed-through-less wire anchoring system; (3) an automatic handling system for storing and transporting the multi-wire layers to be placed over the drift chamber end-plates. These techniques have been successfully implemented at INFN-Lecce and University of Salento and are currently being used for the construction of Drift Chamber of the MEG (μ → eγ) upgrade experiment.

  8. IFE Final Optics and Chamber Dynamics Modeling and Experiments Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    F. Najmabadi; M. S. Tillack

    2006-01-11

    Our OFES-sponsored research on IFE technology originally focused on studies of grazing-incidence metal mirrors (GIMM's). After the addition of GIMM research to the High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program, our OFES-sponsored research evolved to include laser propagation studies, surface material evolution in IFE wetted-wall chambers, and magnetic intervention. In 2003, the OFES IFE Technology program was terminated. We continued to expend resources on a no-cost extension in order to complete student research projects in an orderly way and to help us explore new research directions. Those explorations led to funding in the field of extreme ultraviolet lithography, which shares many issues in common with inertial fusion chambers, and the field of radiative properties of laser-produced plasma.

  9. Methane emission estimates using chamber and tracer release experiments for a municipal waste water treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver Kwok, C. E.; Müller, D.; Caldow, C.; Lebègue, B.; Mønster, J. G.; Rella, C. W.; Scheutz, C.; Schmidt, M.; Ramonet, M.; Warneke, T.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.

    2015-07-01

    This study presents two methods for estimating methane emissions from a waste water treatment plant (WWTP) along with results from a measurement campaign at a WWTP in Valence, France. These methods, chamber measurements and tracer release, rely on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy instruments. We show that the tracer release method is suitable for quantifying facility- and some process-scale emissions, while the chamber measurements provide insight into individual process emissions. Uncertainties for the two methods are described and discussed. Applying the methods to CH4 emissions of the WWTP, we confirm that the open basins are not a major source of CH4 on the WWTP (about 10 % of the total emissions), but that the pretreatment and sludge treatment are the main emitters. Overall, the waste water treatment plant is representative of an average French WWTP.

  10. Forward Drift Chamber for the GlueX experiment at the 12 GeV CEBAF machine

    SciTech Connect

    Lubomir Pentchev, Benedikt Zihlmann

    2011-06-01

    The GlueX experiment will search for exotic mesons produced by 9 GeV linearly polarized photons from the upgraded CEBAF machine. It is critical to detect and measure the four-momenta of all the charged particles and photons resulting from the decays of the mesons. The solenoid-based detector system includes tracking detectors and calorimeters. The Forward Drift Chamber, FDC, consists of 24 circular planar drift chambers of 1m diameter. Additional cathode readout is required to achieve efficient pattern recognition. The detection of low energy photons by the electromagnetic calorimeters imposes constraints on the amount of material used in the FDC. The specific features of the detector and the readout electronics will be described. Results from the tests of the full scale prototype will be presented, as well.

  11. Treating oilfield emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book is divided into the following sections: The Treating Problem of Oilfield Emulsion; The Theory of Emulsions; Emulsions and Production Practices; The Basic Principles of Treating; The Application of Heat in Treating; The Principles of Chemical Treating; Treating with Heater-Treaters; Automatic Central Oil-Treating Systems; Sampling Procedures; Testing for Sediment and Water; Treating Cost Records.

  12. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film

  13. Electrochemistry of a single attoliter emulsion droplet in collisions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Jiyeon; Bard, Allen J

    2015-02-18

    We report here the electrochemistry of emulsion droplets by observing single emulsion droplet collisions with selective electrochemical reduction on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). With appropriately applied potentials at an UME, we can observe the electrochemical effects of single collision signals from the complete electrolysis of single emulsion droplets, or selective electrolysis of redox species in single emulsion droplets. This was observed with nitrobenzene (NB), 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), and ionic liquid. The NB, TCNQ, and ionic liquid act as emulsion material, redox specie, and emulsifier (and electrolyte), respectively. NB emulsions and NB (TCNQ) emulsions were made by ultrasonic processing. During the amperometric current-time (i-t) curve measurement with NB/water emulsion at -0.65 V, reduction of NB emulsion droplets was measured. In the case of less negative potentials, e.g., at -0.45 V with a NB (TCNQ) emulsion, selective reduction of TCNQ in NB droplet was measured. Spike-like responses from electrolysis of NB or TCNQ in each experiment were observed. From these single-particle collision results of NB and NB (TCNQ) emulsions, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Determination of longevities, chamber building rates and growth functions for Operculina complanata from long term cultivation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woeger, Julia; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Wolfgang, Eder; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2016-04-01

    Operculina complanata was collected in 20 and 50 m depth around the Island of Sesoko belonging to Japans southernmost prefecture Okinawa in a series of monthly sampling over a period of 16 months (Apr.2014-July2015). A minimum of 8 specimens (4 among the smallest and 4 among the largest) per sampling were cultured in a long term experiment that was set up to approximate conditions in the field as closely as possible. A set up allowing recognition of individual specimens enabled consistent documentation of chamber formation, which in combination with μ-CT-scanning after the investigation period permitted the assignment of growth steps to specific time periods. These data were used to fit various mathematical models to describe growth (exponential-, logistic-, generalized logistic-, Gompertz-function) and chamber building rate (Michaelis-Menten-, Bertalanffy- function) of Operculina complanata. The mathematically retrieved maximum lifespan and mean chamber building rate found in cultured Operculina complanata were further compared to first results obtained by the simultaneously conducted "natural laboratory approach". Even though these comparisons hint at a somewhat stunted growth and truncated life spans of Operculina complanata in culture, they represent a possibility to assess and improve the quality of further cultivation set ups, opening new prospects to a better understanding of the their theoretical niches.

  15. Observation of Hadronic Charm Production in a High Resolution Streamer Chamber Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sandweiss, J.; et al.

    1980-01-01

    Short-lived particles produced in association with muons have been observed in the interactions of 350-GeV/c protons with neon in a high-resolution streamer chamber. The characteristics of these events are consistent with the expected properties of charmed particles if the average lifetime lies between 10/sup -13/ and 2 x 10/sup -12/ sec. With the assumption that the observed events are mainly D/sup + -/ mesons with lieftimes of approximately 10/sup -12/ sec, the production cross section is estimated to lie between 20 and 50 ..mu..b per nucleon.

  16. Methane emission estimates using chamber and tracer release experiments for a municipal waste water treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver-Kwok, C. E.; Müller, D.; Caldow, C.; Lebègue, B.; Mønster, J. G.; Rella, C. W.; Scheutz, C.; Schmidt, M.; Ramonet, M.; Warneke, T.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents two methods for estimating methane emissions from a waste water treatment plant (WWTP) along with results from a measurement campaign at a WWTP in Valence, France. These methods, chamber measurements and tracer release, rely on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments. We show that the tracer release method is suitable to quantify facility- and some process-scale emissions, while the chamber measurements, provide insight into individual process emissions. Uncertainties for the two methods are described and discussed. Applying the methods to CH4 emissions of the WWTP, we confirm that the open basins are not a major source of CH4 on the WWTP (about 10% of the total emissions), but that the pretreatment and sludge treatment are the main emitters. Overall, the waste water treatment plant represents a small part (about 1.5%) of the methane emissions of the city of Valence and its surroundings, which is lower than the national inventories.

  17. Coastal iodine emissions. 1. Release of I₂ by Laminaria digitata in chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Ashu-Ayem, Enowmbi R; Nitschke, Udo; Monahan, Ciaran; Chen, Jun; Darby, Steven B; Smith, Paul D; O'Dowd, Colin D; Stengel, Dagmar B; Venables, Dean S

    2012-10-01

    Tidally exposed macroalgae emit large amounts of I(2) and iodocarbons that produce hotspots of iodine chemistry and intense particle nucleation events in the coastal marine boundary layer. Current emission rates are poorly characterized, however, with reported emission rates varying by 3 orders of magnitude. In this study, I(2) emissions from 25 Laminaria digitata samples were investigated in a simulation chamber using incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS). The chamber design allowed gradual extraction of seawater to simulate tidal emersion of algae. Samples were exposed to air with or without O(3) and to varying irradiances. Emission of I(2) occurred in four distinct stages: (1) moderate emissions from partially submerged samples; (2) a strong release by fully emerged samples; (3) slowing or stopping of I(2) release; and (4) later pulses of I(2) evident in some samples. Emission rates were highly variable and ranged from 7 to 616 pmol min(-1) gFW(-1) in ozone-free air, with a median value of 55 pmol min(-1) gFW(-1) for 20 samples.

  18. Study of the diffusion of an emulsion in the human skin by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy: experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamar, N.; Lahjomri, F.; Chatri, E.; Leblanc, R. M.

    2004-12-01

    We previously used the Pulsed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy to quantify sunscreen chromophore diffusion into human skin, and suggested a methodology to evaluate the time and the depth diffusion profile into human skin. In the present study we present the results obtained for the diffusion of an emulsion in human skin, which is used in the sunscreen compositions. This study shows, for the first time, a particular behaviour due to a chemical reaction inside the skin during the diffusion process. This result brings a particularly interesting technique through the PPAS spectroscopy, to evaluate in situ, the eventual chemical reactions that can occur during drug diffusion into human skin. Numerical simulation allows us to understand the impact of thermal, optical and geometrical parameters on the photoacoustic signal and thus the physics of the diffusion phenomenon. The present simulation shows clearly that the tmax values corresponding to the maximum of the photoacoustic signal magnitude, Δ P max, decrease when the thickness, ell , of the sample decrease. Conclusions about possibilities and limitations of the considered model are discussed.

  19. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  20. [Liberation of active agents from coherent emulsions].

    PubMed

    Erós, I; Csóka, I; Csányi, E; Aref, T

    2000-01-01

    Drug release from coherent emulsions containing high water concentration (50-80 w/w%) was studied. Composition of coherent systems was as follows: self-emulsifying wax and preserved water. Griseofulvin was applied as active agent in suspended form. The liberation experiments were carried out with Hanson vertical diffusion cell, acceptor phase was distilled water, membrane was celophane one. It was established that the time course of liberation of griseofulvin from coherent emulsions can be characterized with a multiplicative function and the exponent of this function is about 0.5. The quantity of released drug increased linearly with the water content and it decreased exponentially with the viscosity of coherent emulsions.

  1. Emulsion formation at the Pore-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Van Den Bos, P.; Berg, S.

    2012-12-01

    The use of surfactant cocktails to produce ultra-low interfacial tension between water and oil is an enhanced oil recovery method. In phase behavior tests three distinct emulsion phases are observed: (1) oil-in-water emulsion; (2) microemulsion; and (3) water-in-oil emulsion. However, it is unknown how phase behavior manifests at the pore-scale in a porous media system. What is the time scale needed for microemulsion formation? Where in the pore-space do the microemulsions form? And in what order do the different emulsion phases arrange during oil bank formation? To answer these questions micromodel experiments were conducted. These experiments are used to build a conceptual model for phase behavior at the pore-scale.

  2. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sodium nitrate. The aim of this campaign was to investigate Henry's law constants for different seed aerosols. During the campaign filter samples were taken to investigate the amount of glyoxal in the particle phase. After filter extraction, the analyte was derivatized and measured using UHPLC

  3. Development of a Novel Contamination Resistant Ion Chamber for Process Tritium Measurement and Use in the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Worth, L.B.C.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Bruce, J.; Banks, J.; Scales, S.

    2005-07-15

    The accuracy of process measurements of tritium with conventional ion chambers is often affected by surface tritium contamination. The measurement of tritium in the exhaust of the JET torus is particularly difficult due to surface contamination with highly tritiated hydrocarbons. JET's first unsuccessful attempt to overcome the contamination problem was to use an ion chamber, with a heating element as the chamber wall so that it could be periodically decontaminated by baking. The newly developed ion chamber works on the principle of minimising the surface area within the boundary of the anode and cathode.This paper details the design of the ion chamber, which utilises a grid of 50-micron tungsten wire to define the ion chamber wall and the collector electrode. The effective surface area which, by contamination, is able to effect the measurement of tritium within the process gas has been reduced by a factor of {approx}200 over a conventional ion chamber. It is concluded that the new process ion chamber enables sensitive accurate tritium measurements free from contamination issues. It will be a powerful new tool for future tritium experiments both to improve tritium tracking and to help in the understanding of tritium retention issues.

  4. Comment to "The pharmacopeial evolution of Intralipid injectable emulsion in plastic containers: from a coarse to a fine emulsion".

    PubMed

    Ellborg, Anders; Ferreira, Denise; Mohammadnejad, Javad; Wärnheim, Torbjörn

    2010-06-15

    The droplet size distribution of 50 batches of multi-chamber bags containing the parenteral nutrition emulsions Intralipid (Kabiven and Kabiven Peripheral) or Structolipid (StructoKabiven and StructoKabiven Peripheral), respectively, has been investigated. The results show that the non-compounded lipid emulsions analysed are in compliance with the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) chapter 729, Method II limit for the droplet size distribution, PFAT(5)<0.05%.

  5. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  6. Preliminary Experiments Using a Passive Detector for Measuring Indoor 220Rn Progeny Concentrations with an Aerosol Chamber.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Kranrod, Chutima; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes preliminary experiments using a passive detector for integrating measurements of indoor thoron (²²⁰Rn) progeny concentrations with an aerosol chamber. A solid state nuclear detector (CR-39) covered with a thin aluminum-vaporized polyethylene plate (Mylar film) was used to detect only alpha particles emitted from ²¹²Po due to ²²⁰Rn progeny deposited on the detector surfaces. The initial experiment showed that Mylar film with area density of more than 5 mg cm⁻² was suitable to cut off completely alpha particles of 7.7 MeV from ²¹⁴Po of ²²²Rn progeny decay. In the experiment using the passive detector, it was observed that the net track density increased linearly with an increase of time-integrating ²²⁰Rn progeny concentration. As a result of dividing deposition rates by atom concentrations, the deposition velocity was given as 0.023 cm s⁻¹ for total ²²⁰Rn progeny. The model estimates of deposition velocities were 0.330 cm s⁻¹ for unattached ²²⁰Rn progeny and 0.0011 cm s⁻¹ for aerosol-attached ²²⁰Rn progeny using Lai-Nazaroff formulae. These deposition velocities were in the same range with the results reported in the literature. It was also found that the exposure experiments showed little influence of vertical profiles and surface orientations of the passive detector in the chamber on the detection responses, which was in good agreement with that in the model estimates. Furthermore, it was inferred that the main uncertainty of the passive detector was inhomogeneous deposition of Rn progeny onto its detection surfaces.

  7. Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles by light polarization in expansion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Järvinen, Emma; Ignatius, Karoliina; Florian Höppel, Niko; Dias, Antonio; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Andrea Christine; Wagner, Robert; Williamson, Christina; Yan, Chao; Connolly, Paul James; Dorsey, James Robert; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Hoyle, Christopher Robert; Bjerring Kristensen, Thomas; Steiner, Gerhard; McPherson Donahue, Neil; Flagan, Richard; Gallagher, Martin William; Kirkby, Jasper; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, António

    2016-03-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather, and general circulation models. The detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud particle-size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarization (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure the variability in polarization state of their backscattered light. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water, and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed-phase clouds and viscous secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid-viscous SOA particle polarization transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarization ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulfate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentrations and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to tropical troposphere layer analysis.

  8. Scaled impulse loading for liquid hydraulic response in IFE thick-liquid chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzen, C.; Peterson, P. F.

    2001-05-01

    In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target chamber using thick-liquid protection, placing liquid surfaces close to the fusion target helps to reduce pumping cost and final-focus stand-off distance. The impulse loading generated by the target on the adjacent jet surfaces provides the most important boundary condition for the subsequent liquid hydraulic response, pocket disruption, droplet generation, and pocket clearing and regeneration. However, liquid jets are difficult to use in current X-ray facilities that can simulate the X-ray ablation process. Instead, it is desirable to study liquid hydraulic response using water jets, employing scaled impulse loads delivered by chemical detonations or shock tubes. Because the pressure load generated by IFE targets is extremely short compared to the time required for significant liquid motion, only the time integrated impulse load is important to the liquid motion, not the detailed pressure history from ablation and venting. In this work, this impulse loading is determined using the 2-D gas dynamic code, TSUNAMI, and a comparison made between the impulse loads generated by IFE targets and by scaled chemical detonations.

  9. Atmospheric turbulence chamber for optical transmission experiment: characterization by thermal method.

    PubMed

    Gamo, H; Majumdar, A K

    1978-12-01

    A turbulence chamber (0.78 x 0.23 x 2.59 m(3)) consisting of ten small electric heater/blowers with an aluminum foil screen and three screens of 2-mm aluminum wire meshes can generate the nearly homogeneous isotropic turbulence within the 0.5 x 0.05 x 2-m(3) region at the 0.11-m height of optical measurements. The temperature structure constant squared C(2)(T) = 52.9 K(2) m(-?) was obtained from the temperature structure function measurements measured by using a differential microthermocouple system. The refractive-index structure constant squared C(2)nat the 632.8-nm wavelength was calculated from C(2)(T):C(2)(n) = 3.00 x 10(-11)m(-?). The average wind velocity and temperature were 0.41 m/sec and 53 degrees C, respectively. From the power spectrum of temperature fluctuations, the inner and outer scales of turbulence are determined: l(o) = 5.0 mm and L(0) = 6.5 cm. The measured temperature structure function and power spectrum of temperature fluctuations satisfy the ? and -5/3 power similarity laws in the inertial subrange, respectively.

  10. Oil emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J. W.

    1985-08-27

    Emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids in mineral oil are disclosed. These emulsions are stabilized by a polydimethylsiloxane-polybutadiene copolymer or a polydimethylsiloxane-hydrogenated polybutadiene copplymer. The emulsions are an effective foam suppressant for organic liquids, especially crude petroleum.

  11. Direct Observation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (SOAaq) in Simulation Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussin, J. F.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Gratien, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many reactions in the atmosphere and form a wide range of oxidised and water-soluble compounds. These compounds can partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and/or less volatile compounds which can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation and thus increase the organic aerosol mass (Ervens et al., 2011; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this hypothesis is frequently discussed in the literature, so far, almost no direct observations of such a process have been provided.The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles.The experiments were performed during the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere), in the CESAM simulation chamber located at LISA. CESAM is a 4.2 m3 stainless steel chamber equipped with realistic irradiation sources and temperature and relative humidity (RH) controls (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene was allowed to oxidize during several hours in the presence on nitrogen oxides under dry conditions. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation was monitored on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, which allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light.In all experiments, we observed that during cloud formation, water-soluble gas-phase oxidation products (e.g., methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) readily partitioned into cloud

  12. Complete fabrication of target experimental chamber and implement initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Dickinson, M.R.; Henestroza, E.; Katayanagi, T.; Jung, J.Y.; Lee, C.W.; Leitner, M.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.; Waldron, W.; Welch, D.

    2008-06-09

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) has completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for future Warm Dense Matter (WDM) experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. This achievement provides to the HIFS-VNL unique and state-of-the-art experimental capabilities in preparation for the planned target heating experiments using intense heavy ion beams.

  13. Choice chamber experiments to test the attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to water of estuarine and riverine origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Nicola C.; Cowley, Paul D.; Whitfield, Alan K.; Kaiser, Horst

    2008-03-01

    Although the recruitment of larvae and juveniles of marine fishes into estuaries has been well documented, little is known about the factors governing the immigration of estuary-associated marine fishes into estuaries. Fishes have a well-developed sense of smell and it has been suggested by several workers that olfactory cues of freshwater or estuarine origin serve as stimuli, attracting larvae and juveniles of estuary-associated species into estuaries. Attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to estuary and river water from the Kowie estuarine system, South Africa, was measured using a rectangular choice chamber. In experiments, conducted during peak recruitment periods, larvae selected estuary and river water with a significantly higher frequency than sea water. This study, the first to assess the possible role of olfaction in the recruitment process of an estuary-associated marine fish species, demonstrates that larvae are able to recognise water from different origins, probably based on odour.

  14. C{sub 5}{sup A} axial form factor from bubble chamber experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, K. M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Kielczewska, D.; Przewlocki, P.

    2009-11-01

    A careful reanalysis of both Argonne National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory data for weak single pion production is done. We consider deuteron nuclear effects and normalization (flux) uncertainties in both experiments. We demonstrate that these two sets of data are in good agreement. For the dipole parametrization of C{sub 5}{sup A}(Q{sup 2}), we obtain C{sub 5}{sup A}(0)=1.19{+-}0.08, M{sub A}=0.94{+-}0.03 GeV. As an application we present the discussion of the uncertainty of the neutral current 1{pi}{sup 0} production cross section, important for the T2K neutrino oscillation experiment.

  15. Cationic bituminous emulsions and emulsion aggregate slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.

    1986-07-01

    A cationic bituminous emulsion is described which consists of from about 30% to about 80% by weight of bitumen, from about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of reaction products of a polyamine reacted with a member of the group consisting of epoxidized unsaturated fatty acids of chain lengths between C/sub 8/ and C/sub 22/ and the esters thereof and adding water to make up 100% by weight, the emulsion having a pH in the range of from 2-7.

  16. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  17. Fish Oil–Based Lipid Emulsions in the Treatment of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease: An Ongoing Positive Experience123

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Muralidhar H.; Carter, Beth A.; Hawthorne, Keli M.; King, Kristi; Abrams, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas in the use of FOLE in treatment of PNALD as presented at the 2013 Experimental Biology meeting. We describe the findings of a single center, prospective, observational study of infants <6 mo of age with PNALD who received parenteral FOLE as monotherapy. A total of 97 infants received FOLE under the compassionate-use protocol for the treatment of PNALD. Eighty-three (86%) survived with resolution of cholestasis and 14 (14%) died. The median conjugated bilirubin (CB) concentration at the initiation of FOLE therapy was 4.8 mg/dL (range 2.1–26). The median time to resolution of cholestasis was 40 d (range 3–158). Compared with infants with mild cholestasis (CB of 2.1–5 mg/dL at the initiation of FOLE), nonsurvivors were significantly more premature and took longer to resolve their cholestasis. Gestational age at birth correlated inversely with CB at the beginning of FOLE and peak CB. Infants with an initial CB >10 mg/dL had a higher mortality rate than infants with an initial CB <5 mg/dL (35% vs. 6%; P < 0.05). Our experience with the use of FOLE in PNALD continues to be encouraging. Prematurity continues to be a major determinant in mortality and severity of cholestasis. This calls for further controlled studies designed to optimize dose and timing of intervention in the use of FOLE in neonates. PMID:24425724

  18. A small-sized MWPC with 1 mm wire spacing as a beam/target chamber for nuclear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, M.; Arai, I.; Manabe, A.; Nunokawa, H.; Tanaka, M.; Tomizawa, K.; Yagi, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Chiba, J.; Nakai, K.; Sano, H.; Sasaki, S.; Nagae, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Sekimoto, M.

    1988-11-01

    We developed a small-sized multiwire proportional chamber with 1 mm wire spacing for a study of backward Λ production in high energy hadron-nucleus reactions. Two chambers were installed in a cylindrical drift chamber of the large aperture spectrometer FANCY in order to determine beam trajectories precisely. A position resolution of about 0.6 mm was obtained with a counting efficiency of 97%.

  19. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  20. Comparison of batch, stirred flow chamber, and column experiments to study adsorption, desorption and transport of carbofuran within two acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Different methods (batch, column and stirred flow chamber experiments) used for adsorption and desorption of carbofuran studies were compared. All tested methods showed that the carbofuran adsorption was higher in the soil with the higher organic matter content, whereas the opposite behaviour was observed for the percentage of carbofuran desorbed. However, different methods have revealed some discrepancies in carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics. Although batch method showed interesting data on equilibrium experiments, such as a low heterogeneity for the carbofuran adsorption sites independent of soil organic matter content, it had some disadvantages for carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetic studies. The disadvantages were related with the excessive limitations of this method on kinetics, i.e., no difference could be detected between different soils. However, with column and stirred flow chamber methods the carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics of different soils could be compared. Moreover, the absolute values of carbofuran adsorption/desorption and its rate were higher in the stirred flow chamber than in the batch and column experiments. Using stirred flow chamber experiments the carbofuran desorption was significantly faster than its adsorption, whereas carbofuran using column experiments they were similar. These discrepancies should be considered when the results obtained only with one method is discussed.

  1. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  2. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  3. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  4. Paragenesis of Diamond and Minerals of Peridotites and Carbonatites in the Mantle Magma Chambers Based on Experiments Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyura, Anastasia; Simonova, Dariya; Litvin, Yury

    2014-05-01

    It is considered that role of carbonate melts is important in processes of mantle metasomatism; according to other representations, it is also assumed that they could be formed at partial melting of carbonated peridotite. Dissolving of peridotite minerals and carbon in carbonate melts are responsible for formation of completely miscible carbonate-silicate-carbon magmas parental for diamonds. It can be expected that such carbonate magmas are capable to assimilate an form parental magama "chambers" within the hosting mantle peridotite. While natural cooling of the chambers dissolved in carbonate melts components of the peridotite crystallize forming minerals similar to these of the host mantle peridotite. The recrystallized peridotite minerals are fragmentarily included hermetically within growing diamonds and occur as syngenetic inclusions in them. Therefore experimental modeling of origin of the upper mantle carbonate-silicate diamond-forming melts, their consolidations in the magmatic chambers and evolutions at conditions of equilibrium and fractional crystallization are especially significant for understanding of processes of deep magmatic petrology and genetic mineralogy, including genesis of diamond. In the study at 6 GPa model approximations of mineral phases, significant in compositions of probable metasomatic agents, the upper mantle peridotites, and also syngenetic inclusions in diamonds were used: starting mixtures were model peridotite with composition Ol48Opx16Cpx16Grt20, close to model compositions of the primitive mantle and real mantle xenolithes, as well as multicomponent carbonate (CaCO3)20(Na2CO3)20(FeCO3)20(Na2CO3)20(K2CO3)20 modeling carbonatite inclusions in natural diamonds. Spectral pure graphite was used as a source of carbon in the system. Pressure and temperature were reached using apparatus of toroidal type 'anvil-with-hole'. Electron microprobe and SEM researches were carried out on the polished surfaces with carbon covering at IEM RAS

  5. [Proposal of a cloud chamber experiment using diagnostic X-ray apparatus and an analysis assisted by a simulation code].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Hanamitsu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Ueno, Junji; Miyoshi, Hirokazu

    2013-04-01

    A cloud chamber is a radiation detector that can visualize the tracks of charged particles. In this study, we developed a middle-type cloud chamber for use in practical training using a diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Because our cloud chamber has a heater to vaporize ethanol and features antifogging glass, it is possible to observe the vapor trails for a long time without the need for fine adjustments. X-rays with a tube voltage of 40 kV or of 120 kV (with a 21-mm aluminum filter) were irradiated at the chamber and the various phenomena were observed. We explain these phenomena in terms of the range of electrons and/or interactions between X-rays and matter and conclude that our analysis is consistent with analysis using the Monte Carlo simulation code EGS5.

  6. [Proposal of a cloud chamber experiment using diagnostic X-ray apparatus and an analysis assisted by a simulation code].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Hanamitsu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Ueno, Junji; Miyoshi, Hirokazu

    2013-04-01

    A cloud chamber is a radiation detector that can visualize the tracks of charged particles. In this study, we developed a middle-type cloud chamber for use in practical training using a diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Because our cloud chamber has a heater to vaporize ethanol and features antifogging glass, it is possible to observe the vapor trails for a long time without the need for fine adjustments. X-rays with a tube voltage of 40 kV or of 120 kV (with a 21-mm aluminum filter) were irradiated at the chamber and the various phenomena were observed. We explain these phenomena in terms of the range of electrons and/or interactions between X-rays and matter and conclude that our analysis is consistent with analysis using the Monte Carlo simulation code EGS5. PMID:23609860

  7. Bromine Explosions In Smog Chamber Experiments: A comparison of Cavity-Enhanced (CE) and White-cell DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, J.; Hoch, D. J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Platt, U.; Bleicher, S.; Balzer, N.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS), such as Cl, Br or BrO, can significantly influence chemical processes in the troposphere, including the destruction of ozone, change in the chemical balance of hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2), increased deposition of toxic compounds (like mercury) with potential consequences for the global climate. Previous studies have shown that salt lakes can be significant sources for gaseous RHS. Environmental conditions such as salt composition, relative humidity (RH), pH, and temperature (T) can strongly influence reactive bromine levels, but are difficult to quantify in the field. Therefore, we conducted laboratory experiments by exposing NaCl salt containing 0.33% (by weight) NaBr to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog-chamber under various conditions of RH and ozone concentrations. BrO levels were observed by a Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectrometer (DOAS) in combination with a multi-reflection cell (White-cell). The concentrations of OH- and Cl- radicals were quantified by the radical clock method. We present the first direct observation of BrO from the "Bromine Explosion" (auto catalytic release of reactive bromine from salt surfaces - key to ozone destruction) in the laboratory above a simulated salt pan. The maximum BrO mixing ratio of 6419±71 ppt at 60% RH was observed to be one order of magnitude higher than at 37% RH and 2% RH. The release of RHS from the salt pan is possibly controlled by the thickness of the quasi liquid layer, covering the reactive surface of the halide crystals, as the layer thickness strongly depends on RH. Furthermore, a new cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) instrument was designed and successfully used in chamber experiments. For the first time, such an instrument uses a spectral interval in the UV - wavelength range (325-365 nm) to identify BrO. We show a comparison of the CE-DOAS and White-cell DOAS instrument in a series of experiments, where e.g. a peak BrO mixing ratio up to 380 ppt within the first

  8. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  9. How does oil type determine emulsion characteristics in concentrated Na-caseinate emulsions?

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Lin; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2013-08-01

    Macroscopic properties and ensemble average diffusion of concentrated (dispersed phase 50-60 wt%) Na-caseinate-stabilised emulsions for three different oils (soybean oil, palm olein and tetradecane) were explored. On a volume fraction basis, pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE)-NMR data show that droplet dynamics for all three systems are similar within a region of the emulsion morphology diagram. The exact limits of the emulsion space depend however on which oil is considered. The reduced solubility of tetradecane in water, and Na-caseinate in tetradecane, result in the stabilisation of flocs during formulation. Floc formation is not observed when soybean oil or palm olein is used under identical emulsion formulation conditions. Linear rheology experiments provide indirect evidence that the local structure and the properties of the thin film interfacial domain of tetradecane emulsions vary from those of soybean oil and palm olein emulsions. Collectively these data indicate that protein/oil interactions within a system dominate over specific oil droplet structure and size distribution, which are similar in the three systems. PMID:23683496

  10. [Liberation of active agents from coherent emulsions].

    PubMed

    Erós, I; Csóka, I; Csányi, E; Aref, T

    2000-01-01

    Drug release from coherent emulsions containing high water concentration (50-80 w/w%) was studied. Composition of coherent systems was as follows: self-emulsifying wax and preserved water. Griseofulvin was applied as active agent in suspended form. The liberation experiments were carried out with Hanson vertical diffusion cell, acceptor phase was distilled water, membrane was celophane one. It was established that the time course of liberation of griseofulvin from coherent emulsions can be characterized with a multiplicative function and the exponent of this function is about 0.5. The quantity of released drug increased linearly with the water content and it decreased exponentially with the viscosity of coherent emulsions. PMID:11379037

  11. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  12. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  13. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  14. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer. PMID:25581402

  15. Linear oil displacement by the emulsion entrapment process. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lack of mobility control is one of the major impediments to successful enhanced oil recovery, especially for high viscosity oils. This work presents experimental and theoretical results for linear secondary oil displacements using dilute, stable suspensions of oil drops. The major hypothesis is that emulsions provide mobility control through entrapment or local permeability reduction, not through viscosity ratio improvement. In order to describe the displacement process, previous emulsion filtration theory is extended to longer cores and to two-phase flow. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory for continuous secondary oil displacement with various drop-size emulsions in unconsolidated sand packs of permeabilities ranging from 0.7 ..mu..m/sup 2/ to 3.3 ..mu..m/sup 2/. Linear emulsion floods are shown to be most effective when the mean drop-size to pore-size ratio is in the region between straining and interception at the emulsion shock. Floods are more effective when the emulsion concentration is high which minimizes retention lag. Additionally, a parallel flooding apparatus is utilized to determine qualitatively the macroscopic benefits of emulsion mobility control. Direct analogies are established between augmented oil recovery with dilute emulsions and with entrapping polymers.

  16. An ultra-high vacuum chamber for scattering experiments featuring in-vacuum continuous in-plane variation of the angle between entrance and exit vacuum ports

    SciTech Connect

    Englund, Carl-Johan; Agåker, Marcus Fredriksson, Pierre; Olsson, Anders; Johansson, Niklas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Nordgren, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    A concept that enables in-vacuum continuous variation of the angle between two ports in one plane has been developed and implemented. The vacuum chamber allows for measuring scattering cross sections as a function of scattering angle and is intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The angle between the ports can be varied in the range of 30°-150°, while the pressure change is less than 2 × 10{sup −10} mbars.

  17. Simulation of SOA formation and composition from oxidation of toluene and m-xylene in chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Liu, Y.; Nakao, S.; Cocker, D.; Griffin, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons contribute an important fraction of anthropogenic reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the urban atmosphere. Photo-oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons leads to secondary organic products that have decreased volatilities or increased solubilities and can form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Despite the crucial role of aromatic-derived SOA in deteriorating air quality and harming human health, its formation mechanism is not well understood and model simulation of SOA formation still remains difficult. The dependence of aromatic SOA formation on nitrogen oxides (NOx) is not captured fully by most SOA formation models. Most models predict SOA formation under high NOx levels well but underestimate SOA formation under low NOx levels more representative of the ambient atmosphere. Thus, it is crucial to investigate the NOx-dependent chemistry in aromatic photo-oxidation systems and correspondingly update SOA formation models. In this study, NOx-dependent mechanisms of toluene and m-xylene SOA formation are updated using the gas-phase Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (CACM) coupled to a gas/aerosol partitioning model. The updated models were optimized by comparing to eighteen University of California, Riverside United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chamber experiment runs under both high and low NOx conditions. Correction factors for vapor pressures imply uncharacterized aerosol-phase association chemistry. Simulated SOA speciation implies the importance of ring-opening products in governing SOA formation (up to 40%~60% for both aromatics). The newly developed model can predict strong decreases of m-xylene SOA yield with increasing NOx. Speciation distributions under varied NOx levels implies that the well-known competition between RO2 + HO2 and RO2 + NO (RO2 = peroxide bicyclic radical) may not be the only factor influencing SOA formation. The reaction of aromatic peroxy radicals with NO competing with its self

  18. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  19. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  20. Automated Track Recognition and Event Reconstruction in Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines-Jones, P.; Cherry, M. L.; Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.; Kolganova, E. D.; Kudzia, D.; Nilsen, B. S.; Olszewski, A.; Pozharova, E. A.; Sengupta, K.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Waddington, C, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.

    1998-01-01

    The major advantages of nuclear emulsion for detecting charged particles are its submicron position resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionizing particles. These must be balanced, however, against the difficult manual microscope measurement by skilled observers required for the analysis. We have developed an automated system to acquire and analyze the microscope images from emulsion chambers. Each emulsion plate is analyzed independently, allowing coincidence techniques to be used in order to reject back- ground and estimate error rates. The system has been used to analyze a sample of high-multiplicity Pb-Pb interactions (charged particle multiplicities approx. 1100) produced by the 158 GeV/c per nucleon Pb-208 beam at CERN. Automatically reconstructed track lists agree with our best manual measurements to 3%. We describe the image analysis and track reconstruction techniques, and discuss the measurement and reconstruction uncertainties.

  1. Overview of the Focused Isoprene eXperiments at California Institute of Technology (FIXCIT): mechanistic chamber studies on the oxidation of biogenic compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, T. B.; Crounse, J. D.; Schwantes, R. H.; Teng, A. P.; Bates, K. H.; Zhang, X.; St. Clair, J. M.; Brune, W. H.; Tyndall, G. S.; Keutsch, F. N.; et al

    2014-08-25

    The Focused Isoprene eXperiment at the California Institute of Technology (FIXCIT) was a collaborative atmospheric chamber campaign that occurred during January 2014. FIXCIT was the laboratory component of a synergistic field and laboratory effort aimed toward (1) better understanding the chemical details behind ambient observations relevant to the Southeastern United States, (2) advancing the knowledge of atmospheric oxidation mechanisms of important biogenic hydrocarbons, and (3) characterizing the behavior of field instrumentation using authentic standards. Approximately 20 principal scientists from 14 academic and government institutions performed parallel measurements at a forested site in Alabama and at the atmospheric chambers at Caltech.more » During the four-week campaign period, a series of chamber experiments was conducted to investigate the dark- and photo-induced oxidation of isoprene, α-pinene, methacrolein, pinonaldehyde, acylperoxy nitrates, isoprene hydroxy nitrates (ISOPN), isoprene hydroxy hydroperoxides (ISOPOOH), and isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) in a highly-controlled and atmospherically-relevant manner. Pinonaldehyde and isomer-specific standards of ISOPN, ISOPOOH, and IEPOX were synthesized and contributed by campaign participants, which enabled explicit exploration into the oxidation mechanisms and instrument responses for these important atmospheric compounds. The present overview describes the goals, experimental design, instrumental techniques, and preliminary observations from the campaign. Insights from FIXCIT are anticipated to significantly aid in interpretation of field data and the revision of mechanisms currently implemented in regional and global atmospheric models.« less

  2. Overview of the Focused Isoprene eXperiment at the California Institute of Technology (FIXCIT): mechanistic chamber studies on the oxidation of biogenic compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, T. B.; Crounse, J. D.; Schwantes, R. H.; Teng, A. P.; Bates, K. H.; Zhang, X.; St. Clair, J. M.; Brune, W. H.; Tyndall, G. S.; Keutsch, F. N.; et al

    2014-12-19

    The Focused Isoprene eXperiment at the California Institute of Technology (FIXCIT) was a collaborative atmospheric chamber campaign that occurred during January 2014. FIXCIT is the laboratory component of a synergistic field and laboratory effort aimed toward (1) better understanding the chemical details behind ambient observations relevant to the southeastern United States, (2) advancing the knowledge of atmospheric oxidation mechanisms of important biogenic hydrocarbons, and (3) characterizing the behavior of field instrumentation using authentic standards. Approximately 20 principal scientists from 14 academic and government institutions performed parallel measurements at a forested site in Alabama and at the atmospheric chambers at Caltech.more » During the 4 week campaign period, a series of chamber experiments was conducted to investigate the dark- and photo-induced oxidation of isoprene, α-pinene, methacrolein, pinonaldehyde, acylperoxy nitrates, isoprene hydroxy nitrates (ISOPN), isoprene hydroxy hydroperoxides (ISOPOOH), and isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) in a highly controlled and atmospherically relevant manner. Pinonaldehyde and isomer-specific standards of ISOPN, ISOPOOH, and IEPOX were synthesized and contributed by campaign participants, which enabled explicit exploration into the oxidation mechanisms and instrument responses for these important atmospheric compounds. The present overview describes the goals, experimental design, instrumental techniques, and preliminary observations from the campaign. This work provides context for forthcoming publications affiliated with the FIXCIT campaign. Insights from FIXCIT are anticipated to aid significantly in interpretation of field data and the revision of mechanisms currently implemented in regional and global atmospheric models.« less

  3. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  4. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  5. Outdoor smog chamber experiments: reactivity of methanol exhaust. Part 2. Quality assurance and data processing system description

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.; Kamens, R.M.; Holleman, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    The report describes the Quality Assurance and Data Processing procedures and systems used at the UNC Outdoor Smog Chamber Facility. The primary product of research conducted at this facility is information in the form of measurements of reactants and products in photochemical systems and measurements of the critical parameters that influence the chemical transformations system. Generating useful data begins with understanding the goals of the project and the special needs and concerns of conducting a successful smog-chamber operation. The system components are designed to collect, transfer, process, and report accurate, high-resolution data without loss or distortion. The system components in the Quality Assurance and Data Processing system are: people, hardware, software, checklists, and data bases. Quality-assurance checks are made at every level of the program. Pressurized gas-tank and liquid mixtures were used to establish experimental conditions of HC assuring consistency throughout the program. Several NBS traceable standards and liquid injections into the chamber used for calibration have been intercompared and show good agreement.

  6. Transport and Retention of Emulsion Droplets in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esahani, S. G.; Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used as amendments during remediation; yet, the processes controlling the distribution of droplets within the subsurface are not well understood. Given that inadequate spatial and/or temporal delivery of amendments often leads to ineffective treatment, there is a need to better understand emulsion transport. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of emulsion droplets in columns containing Ottawa sands. Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles from these experiments were interrogated using a mathematical model capable of describing attachment, detachment, and straining to begin to elucidate the physical processes controlling delivery. Emulsions were constructed by stabilizing soybean oil droplets within a continuous aqueous phase. Physical properties of the resulting oil-in-water emulsions were favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50). Emulsions were introduced to the columns for approximately two pore volumes and followed by an extended flush of background solution. Effluent droplet size distributions did not vary significantly over the course of the experiment and remained similar to those measured for the influent emulsion. Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibited tailing, and deposition profiles were found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Depending on emulsion composition and flow characteristics, 10-30% of the injected emulsion was retained on the sand suggesting a non-negligible influence on accessible porosity over the course of the experiment. Experimental results were further interpreted using a droplet transport model that accounts for temporal and spatial variation in porosity due to the retention of the emulsion droplets. At present the model assumes a uniform size distribution of inelastic emulsion droplets which are transported by advection and dispersion, and exchanged with the solid

  7. Preparation and stabilization of D-limonene Pickering emulsions by cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chunxia; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao; Vriesekoop, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate D-limonene Pickering emulsion stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and factors that may affect its properties. CNCs were prepared by ammonium persulfate hydrolysis of corncob cellulose, and D-limonene Pickering emulsions were generated by ultrasonic homogenizing method. The morphology and size of the prepared emulsions with different CNCs concentrations were studied by optical microscopy and laser light diffraction. In addition, factors that may affect the stability of emulsions such as ionic concentration, pH and temperature were also studied. As indicated by the experiment data, when temperature rose, the stability to of emulsions would be increased, and the stability of emulsions was reduced with low pH or high salt concentration due to electrostatic screening of the negatively charged CNC particles. In conclusion, high stability of D-limonene Pickering emulsions could be obtained by CNCs.

  8. Preparation and stabilization of D-limonene Pickering emulsions by cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chunxia; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao; Vriesekoop, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate D-limonene Pickering emulsion stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and factors that may affect its properties. CNCs were prepared by ammonium persulfate hydrolysis of corncob cellulose, and D-limonene Pickering emulsions were generated by ultrasonic homogenizing method. The morphology and size of the prepared emulsions with different CNCs concentrations were studied by optical microscopy and laser light diffraction. In addition, factors that may affect the stability of emulsions such as ionic concentration, pH and temperature were also studied. As indicated by the experiment data, when temperature rose, the stability to of emulsions would be increased, and the stability of emulsions was reduced with low pH or high salt concentration due to electrostatic screening of the negatively charged CNC particles. In conclusion, high stability of D-limonene Pickering emulsions could be obtained by CNCs. PMID:25129799

  9. Double Emulsion Templated Celloidosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga, Laura R.; Marquez, Samantha M.; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Chang, Connie; Wilking, Jim; Monroy, Francisco; Marquez, Manuel; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel approach for fabricating celloidosomes, which represent a hollow and spherical three-dimensional self-assembly of living cells encapsulating an aqueous core. Glass- capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion templates using lipids as stabilizers. Such templates allow for obtaining single but also double concentric celloidosomes. In addition, after a solvent removal step the double emulsion templates turn into monodisperse lipid vesicles, whose membrane spontaneously phase separates when choosing the adequate lipid composition, providing the adequate scaffold for fabricating Janus-celloidosomes. These structures may find applications in the development of bioreactors in which the synergistic effects of two different types of cells selectively adsorbed on one of the vesicle hemispheres may be exploited.

  10. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  11. Remediation of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs by biodegradable oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Chul; Kwon, Tae-Soon; Yang, Jung-Seok; Yang, Ji-Won

    2007-02-01

    Emulsion-based remediation with biodegradable vegetable oils was investigated as an alternative technology for the treatment of subsurface DNAPLs (dense non-aqueous phase liquids) such as TCE (trichloroethylene) and PCE (perchloroethylene). Corn and olive oil emulsions obtained by homogenization at 8000rpm for 15min were used. The emulsion droplets prepared with corn and olive oil gave a similar size distribution (1-10microm) and almost all of initially injected oil, >90%, remained in a dispersed state. In batch experiments, 2% (v/v) oil emulsion could adsorb up to 11,000ppm of TCE or 18,000ppm of PCE without creating a free phase. Results of one-dimensional column flushing studies indicated that contaminants with high aqueous solubility could be efficiently removed by flushing with vegetable oil emulsions. Removal efficiencies exceeded 98% for TCE and PCE with both corn and olive oil emulsions. The results of this study show that flushing with biodegradable oil emulsion can be used for the remediation of groundwater contaminated by DNAPLs.

  12. Pickering emulsions with controllable stability.

    PubMed

    Melle, Sonia; Lask, Mauricio; Fuller, Gerald G

    2005-03-15

    We prepare solid-stabilized emulsions using paramagnetic particles at an oil/water interface that can undergo macroscopic phase separation upon application of an external magnetic field. A critical field strength is found for which emulsion droplets begin to translate into the continuous-phase fluid. At higher fields, the emulsions destabilize, leading to a fully phase-separated system. This effect is reversible, and long-term stability can be recovered by remixing the components with mechanical agitation. PMID:15752002

  13. Tranilast alleviates endothelial dysfunctions and insulin resistance via preserving glutathione peroxidase 1 in rats fed a high-fat emulsion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Feng, Lei; Li, Changjiang; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of treatment with tranilast on vascular and metabolic dysfunction induced by a high-fat emulsion intragastric administration. Wistar rats were randomized to receive water or high-fat emulsion with or without tranilast treatment (400 mg/kg per day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was determined with a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment and short insulin tolerance test. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using aortic rings in organ chambers. Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) expressions, eNOS phosphorylation and activity, MCP-1, H2O2 formation, and NO production were determined in vascular or soleus tissues. Tranilast treatment was found to prevent alterations in vascular reactivity and insulin sensitivity and to prevent increases in plasma glucose and insulin noted in the high-fat emulsion-treated rats. These were associated with increased antioxidant enzyme GPX1 expression, eNOS phosphorylation and activity, and NO production, but reductions in H2O2 accumulation. Moreover, tranilast preserved GPX1 expression in palmitic acid (PA)-treated endothelial cells with a consequent decreased ROS formation and increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Therefore, oxidative stress induced by a relatively short-term high-fat diet could cause the early development of vascular and metabolic abnormalities in rats, and tranilast has a beneficial effect in vascular dysfunctions and insulin resistance via preserving GPX1 and alleviating oxidative stress. PMID:24389817

  14. Observing rearrangements in a 2D emulsion flowing through a hopper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dandan; Desmond, Ken; Weeks, Eric R.

    2010-03-01

    Jamming in granular flow through a hopper has been well studied, and structures such as arches have been found in simulations both with and without friction, and in experiments with friction. To study if jamming can happen in other frictionless systems, we pump dense emulsions (oil in water) through a glass hopper. The oil droplets experience a viscous friction but do not have static friction acting between touching droplets, in contrast to granular particles. For easy imaging, we squeeze the droplets into quasi two-dimensional disks by injecting the emulsion into a thin chamber made from two parallel glass plates. Movies of the flow are taken from the top by a microscope. Due to the narrowing confinement in the hopper, droplets are forced to rearrange, and we observe topological changes such as T1 events. At the same time, the interdroplet forces are measured from the deformation of the droplets. By varying the hopper gap width and angle, we study how the constriction affects the particles' motions, and how this relates to the interdroplet forces.

  15. On a possibility of inelasticity partial coefficient K sub gamma determination in pi C and pi Pb interactions at 10 to the 14th power eV (experiment PAMIR 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A. S.; Cherdyntseva, K. V.; Guseva, Z. M.; Denisova, V. G.; Dunaevsky, A. M.; Kanevskaya, E. A.; Maximenko, V. M.; Nam, R. A.; Pashkov, S. V.; Puchkov, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation of hadron-nuclear interactions in Pamir experiment is carried out by means of X-ray emulsion chambers of two types: carbon (C) and lead (Pb). While comparing the results from the chambers of both types it was found a discrepancy in n sub h and E sub h(1)R values. The observed discrepancy in C and Pb chambers is connected with the difference in values of effective coefficients of energy transfer to the soft component K sub eff for C and Pb chambers.

  16. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers.

  17. Review of straw chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.H.

    1990-03-01

    This is a review of straw chambers used in the HRS, MAC, Mark III, CLEO, AMY, and TPC e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments. The straws are 6--8 mm in diameter, operate at 1--4 atmospheres and obtain resolutions of 45--100 microns. The designs and constructions are summarized and possible improvements discussed.

  18. Showing Emulsion Properties with Common Dairy Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Diaz, Carlos; Gonzalez-Romero, Elisa

    1996-09-01

    Foods are mixtures of different chemical compounds, and the quality we sense (taste, texture, color, etc.) are all manifestations of its chemical properties. Some of them can be visualized with the aid of simple, safe and inexpensive experiments using dairy products that can be found in any kitchen and using almost exclusively kitchen utensils. In this paper we propose some of them related with food emulsions. Food emulsions cover an extremely wide area of daily-life applications such as milk, sauces, dressings and beverages. Experimentation with some culinary recipes to prepare them and the analyisis of the observed results is close to ideal subject for the introduction of chemical principles, allowing to discuss about the nature and composition of foods, the effects of additives, etc. At the same time it allows to get insights into the scientific reasons that underlie on the recipes (something that it is not usually found in most cookbooks). For example, when making an emulsion like mayonnaise, why the egg yolks and water are the first materials in the bowl , and the oil is added to them rather than in the other way around? How you can "rescue" separate emulsions (mayonnaise)? Which parameters affect emulsion stability? Since safety, in its broad sense, is the first requisite for any food, concerns about food exist throughout the world and the more we are aware of our everyday life, the more likely we will be to deal productively with the consequences. On the other hand, understanding what foods are and how cooking works destroys no delightful mystery of the art of cuisine, instead the mystery expands.

  19. Cyclodextrin stabilised emulsions and cyclodextrinosomes.

    PubMed

    Mathapa, Baghali G; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2013-11-01

    We report the preparation of o/w emulsions stabilised by microcrystals of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes. The inclusion complexes are formed by threading cyclodextrins from the aqueous phase on n-tetradecane or silicone oil molecules from the emulsion drop surface which grow further into microrods and microplatelets depending on the type of cyclodextrin (CD) used. These microcrystals remain attached on the surface of the emulsion drops and form densely packed layers which resemble Pickering emulsions. The novelty of this emulsion stabilisation mechanism is that molecularly dissolved cyclodextrin from the continuous aqueous phase is assembled into colloid particles directly onto the emulsion drop surface, i.e. molecular adsorption leads to effective Pickering stabilisation. The β-CD stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were so stable that we used this system as a template for preparation of cyclodextrinosomes. These structures were produced solely through formation of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes and their assembly into a crystalline phase on the drop surface retained its stability after the removal of the core oil. The structures of CD-stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were characterised using optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cross-polarised light microscopy and WETSEM while the cyclodextrinosomes were characterised by SEM. We also report the preparation of CD-stabilised emulsions with a range of other oils, including tricaprylin, silicone oil, isopropyl myristate and sunflower oil. We studied the effect of the salt concentration in the aqueous phase, the type of CD and the oil volume fraction on the type of emulsion formed. The CD-stabilised emulsions can be applied in a range of surfactant-free formulations with possible applications in cosmetics, home and personal care. Cyclodextrinosomes could find applications in pharmaceutical formulations as microencapsulation and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:24043288

  20. Rubberized asphalt emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, E.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of making a rubberized asphalt composition which comprises the steps of: (a) combining asphalt with a hydrocarbon oil having a flash point of 300/sup 0/F. or more to provide a homogenous asphalt-oil mixture or solution, (b) then combining the asphalt-oil mixture with a particulate rubber at a temperature sufficient to provide a homogenous asphalt-rubber-oil gel, and (c) emulsifying the asphalt-rubber-oil gel by passing the gel, water, and an emulsifying agent through a colloid mill to provide an emulsion.

  1. Solar thermal plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonometti, Joseph; Buchele, Donald R.; Castle, Charles H.; Gregory, Don A.

    2001-11-01

    A unique solar thermal chamber has been designed and fabricated to produce the maximum concentration of solar energy and highest temperature possible. Its primary purpose was for solar plasma propulsion experiments and related material specimen testing above 3000 Kelvin. The design not only maximized solar concentration, but also, minimized infrared heat loss. This paper provides the underlining theory and operation of the chamber and initial optical correlation to the actual fabricated hardware. The chamber is placed at the focal point of an existing primary concentrator with a 2.74-meter (9 foot) focal length. A quartz lens focuses a smaller sun image at the inlet hole of the mirrored cavity. The lens focuses two image planes at prescribed positions; the sun at the cavity's entrance hole, and the primary concentrator at the junction plane of two surfaces that form the cavity chamber. The back half is an ellipsoid reflector that produces a 1.27 cm diameter final sun image. The image is 'suspended in space' 7.1cm away from the nearest cavity surface, to minimize thermal and contaminate damage to the mirror surfaces. A hemisphere mirror makes up the front chamber and has its center of curvature at the target image, where rays leaving the target are reflected back upon themselves, minimizing radiation losses.

  2. Genesis of emulsion texture due to magma mixing: a case study from Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex of Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bibhuti; Saikia, Ashima; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2016-04-01

    The emulsion texture is a rare magma mixing feature in which rounded bodies of one magmatic phase remain dispersed in the other coherent phase (Freundt and Schmincke, 1992). This type of special texture in hybrid rocks can significantly contribute toward understanding the mechanisms facilitating magma mixing and magma chamber dynamics involving two disparate magmas as the exact processes by which mixing occurs still remain unclear. Recent developments in microfluidics have greatly helped us to understand the complex processes governing magma mixing occurring at micro-level. Presented work uses some of the results obtained from microfluidic experiments with a view to understand the formation mechanism of emulsions preserved in the hybrid rocks of the Ghansura Rhyolite Dome (GRD) of Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC), Eastern India. The GRD has preserved hybrid rocks displaying emulsion texture that formed due to the interaction of a phenocryst-rich basaltic magma and host rhyolite magma. The emulsions are more or less spherical in shape and dominantly composed of amphibole having biotite rinds set in a matrix of biotite, plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Amphibole compositions were determined from the core of the emulsions to the rim with a view to check for cationic substitutions. The amphibole constituting the emulsions is actinolite in composition, and commonly shows tschermakite (Ts) and pargasite (Prg) substitutions. From petrographical and mineral-chemical analyses we infer that when mafic magma, containing phenocrysts of augite, came in contact with felsic magma, diffusion of cations like H+, Al3+and others occurred from the felsic to the mafic system. These cations reacted with the clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the mafic magma to form amphibole (actinolite) crystals. The formation of amphibole crystals in the mafic system greatly increased the viscosity of the system allowing the amphibole crystals to venture into the adjacent felsic

  3. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods. PMID:25865459

  4. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods.

  5. Sub-micron alignment for nuclear emulsion plates using low energy electrons caused by radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Ariga, A.; Fukuda, T.; Kazuyama, M.; Komatsu, M.; Nakano, T.; Niwa, K.; Sato, O.; Takahashi, S.

    2007-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion plates are employed in three-dimensional charged particle detectors that have sub-micron position resolution over 1 m2 with no dead space and no dead time. These detectors are suitable for the study of short-lived particle decays, and direct detection of neutrino interactions of all flavors. Typically emulsion plates are used in a stacked structure. Precise alignment between plates is required for physics analysis. The most accurate alignment method is to use tracks passing through the emulsion plates. The accuracy is about 0.2 μm. However, in an experiment with low track density alignment accuracy decreases to 20 μm because of plate distortion and it becomes more difficult to perform the analysis. This paper describes a new alignment method between emulsion plates by using trajectories of low energy electrons originating from environmental radioactive isotopes. As a trial emulsion plates were exposed to β-rays and γ-rays from K40. The trajectories which passed through emulsion layers were detected by a fully automated emulsion readout system. Using this method, the alignment between emulsion plates is demonstrated to be sub-micron. This method can be applied to many nuclear emulsion experiments. For example, the location of neutrino interaction vertices in the OPERA experiment can benefit from this new technique.

  6. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments.

  7. Investigation of effects of Giardia duodenalis on transcellular and paracellular transport in enterocytes using in vitro Ussing chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Tysnes, Kristoffer R; Robertson, Lucy J

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms by which different genotypes of Giardia duodenalis result in different symptoms remain unresolved. In particular, we lack detailed knowledge on which transport mechanisms (transcellular or paracellular) are affected by different Giardia isolates. Using horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and creatinine as transcellular and paracellular probes, respectively, we developed a robust assay that can be used with an Ussing chamber to investigate epithelial transport, as well as short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport. We investigated 2 Giardia isolates, both Assemblage A, one a lab-adapted strain and the other a field isolate. Results indicate that products from sonicated Giardia trophozoites increase both transcellular and paracellular transport. A non-significant increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and short-circuit current were also noted. The paracellular transport was increased significantly more in the field isolate than in the lab-adapted strain. Our results indicate that while both transcellular and paracellular transport mechanisms may be increased following exposure of cells to Giardia trophozoite sonicate, perhaps by inducing non-specific increases in cellular traffic, it is important that in vitro studies of Giardia pathophysiology are conducted with different Giardia isolates, not just lab-attenuated strains. PMID:25395017

  8. Preparation of Pickering Double Emulsions Using Block Copolymer Worms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)–poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 μm using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 μm aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25834923

  9. Formation and stability of polychlorinated biphenyl Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Perreault, Andréanne; Kueper, Bernard H.; Rawson, Jim

    2005-03-01

    An emulsion stabilized by colloidal suspensions of finely divided solids is known as a Pickering emulsion. The potential for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to form Pickering emulsions ex situ when in contact with powdered solids, such as clays and metal oxides, is investigated here. Bentonite, iron oxide and magnesium oxide dispersions proved to be robust Pickering emulsion stabilizers, whereas manganese oxide dispersions were not. Batch experiments revealed that emulsions can be formed using a moderately low energy input and can be stabilized with solid concentrations as low as 0.5 wt.%. For the base conditions (volumetric oil fraction ( ϕoil)=30 vol.%; solid concentration ( χ)=2 wt.%), the formed emulsions were indefinitely stable and the initial average droplet diameters varied from 80 to 258 μm, depending on the solid used in the colloidal dispersion. The average droplet size varied at early time, but for most conditions stabilized to a steady-state value 1 week after preparation. The effect of Ostwald ripening was limited. At greater than 0.5 wt.% concentration, the efficiency of the solid dispersion as a stabilizer was dependant on the volumetric oil fraction but not on the solid concentration. Generally, systems with volumetric oil fractions outside of the 20-70 vol.% range were unstable. The emulsions' droplet stability, average droplet size and size distribution were observed to vary as a function of the amount of energy provided to the system, the volumetric oil fraction, and the concentration of the solid in the aqueous dispersion. It is hypothesized that drilling through fractured rock in the immediate vicinity of dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) PCBs may provide both the energy and solid material necessary to form Pickering emulsions.

  10. Preparation of Pickering double emulsions using block copolymer worms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Mable, Charlotte J; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Mathew J; Fielding, Lee A; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-14

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 μm using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 μm aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers.

  11. Chamber propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, B.

    1991-01-16

    Propagation of a heavy ion beam to the target appears possible under conditions thought to be realizable by several reactor designs. Beam quality at the lens is believed to provide adequate intensity at the target -- but the beam must pass through chamber debris and its self fields along the way. This paper reviews present consensus on propagation modes and presents recent results on the effects of photoionization of the beam ions by thermal x-rays from the heated target. Ballistic propagation through very low densities is a conservative mode. The more-speculative self-pinched mode, at 1 to 10 Torr, offers reactor advantages and is being re-examined by others. 13 refs.

  12. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  13. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  14. Removal of metals and water-insoluble materials from desalter emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, S.K.; Mosby, J.F.; Treadman, J.E. II.

    1993-06-15

    A process for removing metals and insoluble materials from crude oil is described comprising the steps of: blending crude oil with water and desalting chemicals; charging the oil blend to a desalting chamber and passing it through an electrical field whereby agglomeration of suspended insoluble materials occurs and layers of clean oil, brine and oil-brine interface emulsion are formed; withdrawing the oil and brine; measuring the volume of the emulsion layer; withdrawing a portion of the emulsion layer; blending the withdrawn emulsion with up to 2 volumes of aromatic-rich hydrocarbon containing at least 20% aromatics by volume; maintaining the blend at a temperature of 100 to 300 F and a positive pressure; and subjecting the blend to a force of at least about 500 g, whereby oil free of at least 90% of suspended particulates and water results.

  15. Hydrolysis and gas-particle partitioning of organic nitrates formed from the oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, J. K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.

    2015-07-01

    Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates (ON) influences their role as sinks and sources of NOx and their effects on the formation of tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol (OA). Organic nitrates were formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments under varying conditions. A hydrolysis rate of 2 day-1 was found for particle-phase ONs at a relative humidity of 22 % or higher; no significant ON hydrolysis was observed at lower relative humidity. The ON gas-particle partitioning is dependent on total OA concentration and temperature, consistent with absorptive partitioning theory. In a volatility basis set the ON partitioning is consistent with mass fractions of [0 0.19 0.29 0.52] at saturations mass concentrations (C*) of [1 10 100 1000] μg m-3.

  16. Uniform-Temperature Walls for Cloud Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G.

    1985-01-01

    Flat heat pipes rapidly transfer heat to and from experimental volumes. Heat pipe vapor chamber carries heat to and from thermo electric modules. Critical surface acts as evaporator or condenser in cloud physics experiments. Used as walls of spaceborne atmospheric cloud chambers. On Earth, used as isothermal floors for environmental test chambers.

  17. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  18. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  19. Rheology of hydrate forming emulsions.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Karanjkar, Prasad U; Lee, Jae W; Morris, Jeffrey F

    2010-07-20

    Results are reported on an experimental study of the rheology of hydrate-forming water-in-oil emulsions. Density-matched concentrated emulsions were quenched by reducing the temperature and an irreversible transition was observed where the viscosity increased dramatically. The hydrate-forming emulsions have characteristic times for abrupt viscosity change dependent only on the temperature, reflecting the importance of the effect of subcooling. Mechanical transition of hydrate-free water-in-oil emulsions may require longer times and depends on the shear rate, occurring more rapidly at higher rates but with significant scatter which is characterized through a probabilistic analysis. This rate dependence together with dependence on subcooling reflects the importance of hydrodynamic forces to bring drops or particles together.

  20. The Preparation and Testing of a Common Emulsion and Personal Care Product: Lotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Suzanne T.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical analysis of lotions, which comprises of categorizations of moisturizers and emulsions, with the preparation and testing of three lotions, is done. The experiment piques students' interest in preparing lotions and emulsions, and proves the value of chemistry in satisfying the needs of everyday life.

  1. Transport and Retention of Concentrated Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Esahani, S. G.; Steven, C. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are widely employed to promote biotic reduction of contaminants; however, emulsions can also be used to encapsulate and deliver active ingredients required for long-term subsurface treatment. Our research focuses on encapsulating alkalinity-releasing particles in oil-in-water emulsions for sustained control of subsurface pH. Typical characteristics of these emulsions include kinetically stable for >20 hr; 20% soybean oil; 1 g/mL density; 8-10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50, with emulsions developed for favorable subsurface delivery. The viscosity of the oil-in-water emulsions was found to be a function of oil content. Ultimately we aim to model both emulsion delivery and alkalinity release (from retained emulsion droplets) to provide a description of pH treatment. Emulsion transport and retention was investigated via a series of 1-d column experiments using varying particle size fractions of Ottawa sand. Emulsions were introduced for approximately two pore volumes followed by a flush of background solution (approx. ρ=1 g/mL; μ=1cP). Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibit an early fall on the backside of the breakthrough curve along with tailing. Deposition profiles are found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Particle transport models established for dilute suspensions are unable to describe the transport of the concentrated emulsions considered here. Thus, we explore the relative importance of additional processes driving concentrated droplet transport and retention. Focus is placed on evaluating the role of attachment-detachment-straining processes, as well as the influence of mixing from both viscous instabilities and variable water saturation due to deposited mass.

  2. Color changes in hydrocarbon oil-in-water emulsions caused by Ostwald ripening.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; McClements, D J

    2001-09-01

    The influence of Ostwald ripening on the optical properties of hydrocarbon oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate was investigated. The droplet size, spectral reflectance, and tristimulus color coordinates (L, a, and b) of a series of n-hexadecane and n-octadecane oil-in-water emulsions were measured in the presence and absence of a water-soluble red dye (FD&C Red No. 40). The droplets grew more rapidly in the emulsion containing n-hexadecane than in the emulsion containing n-octadecane because of the higher solubility of n-hexadecane molecules in the aqueous phase. Ostwald ripening caused appreciable changes in n-hexadecane emulsion spectral reflectance and color L, a, and b values due to the growth of emulsion droplets. L, a, and b color values and spectral reflectances of n-octadecane emulsions did not significantly change during the course of the experiment. The results were explained in terms of Ostwald ripening theory and a previously described light scattering theory. The model enables emulsion manufacturers to predict color changes in oil-in-water emulsions that exhibit transcondensational ripening. PMID:11559140

  3. Color changes in hydrocarbon oil-in-water emulsions caused by Ostwald ripening.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; McClements, D J

    2001-09-01

    The influence of Ostwald ripening on the optical properties of hydrocarbon oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate was investigated. The droplet size, spectral reflectance, and tristimulus color coordinates (L, a, and b) of a series of n-hexadecane and n-octadecane oil-in-water emulsions were measured in the presence and absence of a water-soluble red dye (FD&C Red No. 40). The droplets grew more rapidly in the emulsion containing n-hexadecane than in the emulsion containing n-octadecane because of the higher solubility of n-hexadecane molecules in the aqueous phase. Ostwald ripening caused appreciable changes in n-hexadecane emulsion spectral reflectance and color L, a, and b values due to the growth of emulsion droplets. L, a, and b color values and spectral reflectances of n-octadecane emulsions did not significantly change during the course of the experiment. The results were explained in terms of Ostwald ripening theory and a previously described light scattering theory. The model enables emulsion manufacturers to predict color changes in oil-in-water emulsions that exhibit transcondensational ripening.

  4. A cosmic ray super high multicore family event. 1: Experiment and general features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    Information on the fragmentation region in super high energy hadronic interactions can be obtained through the observations of gamma-ray families produced by cosmic rays. Gamma-ray families with the sum of E sub gamma or 1000 TeV are receiving increasing interests in emulsion chamber experiments. There exist some complications caused by the superposition of nuclear and electromagnetic cascades and the uncertainty in the nature of the primary particles. These complications usually make the conclusions drawn from various interesting phenomena observed in family events not so definite. An interesting family event KO E19, which is likely to have suffered only very slight disturbances is described. It was found in the Mt. Kambala emulsion chamber experiment. The production height of the event is determined to be H=(70 + or - 30)m and some conclusions are given.

  5. Large outdoor chamber experiments and computer simulations: (I) Secondary organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of a mixture of d-limonene and α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianfeng; Hu, Di; Leungsakul, Sirakarn; Kamens, Richard M.

    This work merges kinetic models for α-pinene and d-limonene which were individually developed to predict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from these compounds. Three major changes in the d-limonene and α-pinene combined mechanism were made. First, radical-radical reactions were integrated so that radicals formed from both individual mechanisms all reacted with each other. Second, all SOA model species from both compounds were used to calculate semi-volatile partitioning for new semi-volatiles formed in the gas phase. Third particle phase reactions for particle phase α-pinene and d-limonene aldehydes, carboxylic acids, etc. were integrated. Experiments with mixtures of α-pinene and d-limonene, nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), and diurnal natural sunlight were carried out in a dual 270 m 3 outdoor Teflon film chamber located in Pittsboro, NC. The model closely simulated the behavior and timing for α-pinene, d-limonene, NO, NO 2, O 3 and SOA. Model sensitivities were tested with respect to effects of d-limonene/α-pinene ratios, initial hydrocarbon to NO x (HC 0/NO x) ratios, temperature, and light intensity. The results showed that SOA yield ( YSOA) was very sensitive to initial d-limonene/α-pinene ratio and temperature. The model was also used to simulate remote atmospheric SOA conditions that hypothetically could result from diurnal emissions of α-pinene, d-limonene and NO x. We observed that the volatility of the simulated SOA material on the aging aerosol decreased with time, and this was consistent with chamber observations. Of additional importance was that our simulation did not show a loss of SOA during the daytime and this was consistent with observed measurements.

  6. Coastal iodine emissions: part 2. Chamber experiments of particle formation from Laminaria digitata-derived and laboratory-generated I₂.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Ciaran; Ashu-Ayem, Enowmbi R; Nitschke, Udo; Darby, Steven B; Smith, Paul D; Stengel, Dagmar B; Venables, Dean S; O'Dowd, Colin D

    2012-10-01

    Laboratory studies into particle formation from Laminaria digitata macroalgae were undertaken to elucidate aerosol formation for a range of I(2) (0.3-76 ppb(v)) and O(3) (<3-96 ppb(v)) mixing ratios and light levels (E(PAR) = 15, 100, and 235 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). No clear pattern was observed for I(2) or aerosol parameters as a function of light levels. Aerosol mass fluxes and particle number concentrations, were, however, correlated with I(2) mixing ratios for low O(3) mixing ratios of <3 ppb(v) (R(2) = 0.7 and 0.83, respectively for low light levels, and R(2) = 0.95 and 0.98, respectively for medium light levels). Additional experiments into particle production as a function of laboratory-generated I(2), over a mixing ratio range of 1-8 ppb(v), were conducted under moderate O(3) mixing ratios (∼24 ppb(v)) where a clear, 100-fold or greater, increase in the aerosol number concentrations and mass fluxes was observed compared to the low O(3) experiments. A linear relationship between particle concentration and I(2) was found, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. Scaling the laboratory relationship to aerosol concentrations typical of the coastal boundary layer suggests a I(2) mixing ratio range of 6-93 ppt(v) can account for the observed particle production events. Aerosol number concentration produced from I(2) is more than a factor of 10 higher than that produced from CH(2)I(2) for the same mixing ratios.

  7. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  8. Understanding Isoprene Photo-oxidation from Continuous-Flow Chamber Experiments: Unexpectedly High SOA Yields and New Insights into Isoprene Oxidation Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; D'Ambro, E.; Lee, B. H.; Zaveri, R. A.; Thornton, J. A.; Shilling, J.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a substantial fraction of tropospheric aerosol and has significant impacts on climate and human health. Results from the CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study) field mission suggested that isoprene oxidation moderated by anthropogenic emissions plays a dominant role in SOA formation, but current literature isoprene yields and oxidation mechanisms are unable to explain the CARES observations. In this study, we conducted a series of continuous-flow chamber experiments to investigate the yield and chemical composition of SOA formed from isoprene photo-oxidation as a function of NOx concentration. Under low-NOx (< 1ppbv) conditions, we measure SOA mass yields that are significantly larger than previously reported, reaching up to 20%, and the yields are strongly dependent on H2O2 concentrations. The higher yields are likely a result of differences between batch mode and continuous-flow experiments and the photochemical fate of the ISOPOOH intermediate under the high HO2 conditions of the chamber experiments. Online analysis of the SOA using the University of Washington FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS instrument shows that a C5H12O6 compound can explain a significant fraction of the mass measured by the AMS. We tentatively identify this compound as a dihydroxy dihydroperoxide produced from the oxidation of ISOPOOH. To our knowledge, we believe this represents the most direct confirmation that such dihydroperoxides form during isoprene oxidation and contribute to SOA. A van Krevelen analysis of HR-AMS data is consistent with hydroperoxide species forming the majority of the SOA. As progressively more NO was added to the system, yields initially increase to a maximum at an NO:isoprene ratio of ~1, and then rapidly decrease, to 3.6% at an NO:isoprene ratio of 4. As NO concentrations increased, alkyl nitrates accounts for an increasing portion of the SOA mass, though hydroperoxides remain significant. These observations of

  9. Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates formed from the oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Jeffrey K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea

    2016-02-01

    Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates (ON) influences their role as sinks and sources of NOx and their effects on the formation of tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol (OA). In this work, organic nitrates were formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments under different conditions. Particle-phase ON hydrolysis rates, consistent with observed ON decay, exhibited a nonlinear dependence on relative humidity (RH): an ON decay rate of 2 day-1 was observed when the RH ranged between 20 and 60 %, and no significant ON decay was observed at RH lower than 20 %. In experiments when the highest observed RH exceeded the deliquescence RH of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol, the particle-phase ON decay rate was as high as 7 day-1 and more variable. The ON gas-particle partitioning was dependent on total OA concentration and temperature, consistent with absorptive partitioning theory. In a volatility basis set, the ON partitioning was consistent with mass fractions of [0 0.11 0.03 0.86] at saturation mass concentrations (C*) of [1 10 100 1000] µg m-3.

  10. Optimizing organoclay stabilized Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; Threlfall, Mhairi; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2011-04-15

    Oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using montmorillonite clay platelets, pre-treated with quaternary amine surfactants. In previous work, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been used. In this study, two more hydrophilic quaternary amine surfactants, Berol R648 and Ethoquad C/12, were used and formed Pickering emulsions, which were more stable than the emulsions prepared using CTAB coated clay. The droplets were also more mono-disperse. The most hydrophilic surfactant Berol R648 stabilizes the emulsions best. Salt also plays an important role in forming a stable emulsion. The droplet size decreases with surfactant concentration and relatively mono-disperse droplets can be obtained at moderate surfactant concentrations. The time evolution of the droplet size indicates a good stability to coalescence in the presence of Berol R648. Using polarizing microscopy, the clay platelets were found to be lying flat at the water oil interface. However, a significant fraction (about 90%) of clay stayed in the water phase and the clay particles at the water-oil interface formed stacks, each consisting of four clay platelets on average.

  11. SU-E-T-448: On the Perturbation Factor P-cav of the Markus Parallel Plate Ion Chambers in Clinical Electron Beams, Monte Carlo Based Reintegration of An Historical Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: All present dosimetry protocols recommend well-guarded parallel-plate ion chambers for electron dosimetry. For the guard-less Markus chamber an energy dependent fluence perturbation correction pcav is given. This perturbation correction was experimentally determined by van der Plaetsen by comparison of the read-out of a Markus and a NACP chamber, which was assumed to be “perturbation-free”. Aim of the present study is a Monte Carlo based reiteration of this experiment. Methods: Detailed models of four parallel-plate chambers (Roos, Markus, NACP and Advanced Markus) were designed using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc and placed in a water phantom. For all chambers the dose to the active volume filled with low density water was calculated for 13 clinical electron spectra (E{sub 0}=6-21 MeV) at the depth of maximum and at the reference depth under reference conditions. In all cases the chamber's reference point was positioned at the depth of measurement. Moreover, the dose to water DW was calculated in a small water voxel positioned at the same depth. Results: The calculated dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus}, which according to van der Plaetsen reflects the fluence perturbation correction of the Markus chamber, deviates less from unity than the values given by van der Plaetsen's but exhibits a similar energy dependence. The same holds for the dose ratios of the other well guarded chambers. But, in comparison to water, the Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction which is nearly energy independent at both investigated depths. Conclusion: The simulations principally confirm the energy dependence of the dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus} as published by van der Plaetsen. But, as shown by our simulations of the ratio D{sub W}/D{sub Markus}, the conclusion drawn in all dosimetry protocols is questionable: in contrast to all well-guarded chambers the guard-less Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction and

  12. The effect of oil components on the physicochemical properties and drug delivery of emulsions: tocol emulsion versus lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Feng; Fang, Chia-Lang; Liao, Mei-Hui; Fang, Jia-You

    2007-04-20

    An emulsion system composed of vitamin E, coconut oil, soybean phosphatidylcholine, non-ionic surfactants, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives (referred to as the tocol emulsion) was characterized in terms of its physicochemical properties, drug release, in vivo efficacy, toxicity, and stability. Systems without vitamin E (referred to as the lipid emulsion) and without any oils (referred to as the aqueous micelle system) were prepared for comparison. A lipophilic antioxidant, resveratrol, was used as the model drug for emulsion loading. The incorporation of Brij 35 and PEG derivatives reduced the vesicle diameter to <100nm. The inclusion of resveratrol into the emulsions and aqueous micelles retarded the drug release. The in vitro release rate showed a decrease in the order of aqueous micelle system>tocol emulsion>lipid emulsion. Treatment of resveratrol dramatically reduced the intimal hyperplasia of the injured vascular wall in rats. There was no significant difference in this reduction when resveratrol was delivered by either emulsion or the aqueous micelle system. The percentages of erythrocyte hemolysis by the emulsions and aqueous micelle system were approximately 0 and approximately 10%, respectively. Vitamin E prevented the aggregation of emulsion vesicles. The mean vesicle size of the tocol emulsion remained unchanged during 30 days at 37 degrees C. The lipid emulsion and aqueous micelle system, respectively, showed 11- and 16-fold increases in vesicle size after 30 days of storage.

  13. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamic Characteristics of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhaoqi; Han, Yunfeng; Ren, Yingyu; Yang, Qiuyi; Jin, Ningde

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions under the addition of surfactant were experimentally investigated. Firstly, based on the vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow experiment in 20 mm inner diameter (ID) testing pipe, dynamic response signals of oil-in-water emulsions were recorded using vertical multiple electrode array (VMEA) sensor. Afterwards, the recurrence plot (RP) algorithm and multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane (MS-WCECP) were employed to analyse the nonlinear characteristics of the signals. The results show that the certainty is decreasing and the randomness is increasing with the increment of surfactant concentration. This article provides a novel method for revealing the nonlinear dynamic characteristics, complexity, and randomness of oil-in-water emulsions with experimental measurement signals.

  15. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    SciTech Connect

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-31

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m{sup 2}/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  16. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m2/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  17. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  18. Advances with holographic DESA emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünkel, Lothar; Eichler, Jürgen; Schneeweiss, Claudia; Ackermann, Gerhard

    2006-02-01

    DESA emulsions represent layer systems based on ultra-fine grained silver halide (AgX) technology. The new layers have an excellent performance for holographic application. The technology has been presented repeatedly in recent years, including the emulsion characterization and topics of chemical and spectral sensitization. The paper gives a survey of actual results referring to panchromatic sensitization and other improvements like the application of silver halide sensitized gelatine (SHSG) procedure. These results are embedded into intensive collaborations with small and medium enterprises (SME's) to commercialize DESA layers. Predominant goals are innovative products with holographic components and layers providing as well as cost effectiveness and high quality.

  19. Lipid nano/submicron emulsions as vehicles for topical flurbiprofen delivery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia-You; Leu, Yann-Lii; Chang, Chia-Chun; Lin, Chia-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2004-01-01

    The application of lipid nano/submicron emulsions as topical drug carrier systems for the percutaneous absorption of flurbiprofen was investigated. The lipid emulsions were made up of isopropyl myristate (IPM), soybean oil, or coconut oil as the oil phase, egg lecithin as the predominant emulsifier, and double-distilled water as the external phase. Stearylamine (SA) and deoxycholic acid (DA) also were used to produce positively and negatively charged emulsions. To evaluate the physicochemical properties of the lipid emulsions, particle size by laser light scattering, the image of atomic force microscopy, and relaxation time values by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were determined. The in vitro permeation data showed that incorporation of SA significantly reduced the topical delivery of flurbiprofen. On the other hand, incorporation of DA exhibited no or a negligible effect on drug permeation. Enhancement of drug absorption was observed when adding oleic acid as part of the oil phase. The in vivo topical application of flurbiprofen from selected lipid emulsions showed a similar trend to the in vitro status. Furthermore, the intersubject variability was considerably reduced by lipid emulsions than by aqueous suspensions in both the in vitro and in vivo experiments. The irritant profiles of lipid emulsions showed that IPM elicited higher irritation than soybean oil. The incorporation of oleic acid also produced skin disruption. The results in the present study suggest the feasibility of lipid emulsions for the topical delivery of flurbiprofen.

  20. Rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 in nonionic emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ying; Jin Chao

    2011-01-15

    Zeolite ZSM-5 was synthesized for the first time in a nonionic emulsion composed of polyoxyethylated alkylphenol, butanol, cyclohexane and tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH)-containing zeolite synthesis mixture. The crystallization kinetics in the emulsion was investigated and the ZSM-5 product was characterized in detail by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TG, N{sub 2} adsorption and CHN analysis techniques. Compared with the conventionally hydrothermal synthesis with the same structure directing agent TEAOH, the emulsion system allows rapid crystallization of ZSM-5. The ZSM-5 product exhibits unusual agglomerated structure and possesses larger specific surface area. The FT-IR, TG results plus CHN analysis show the encapsulation of a trace of emulsion components in the emulsion ZSM-5. Control experiments show the emulsion system exerts the crystallization induction and morphological adjustment effects mainly during the aging period. The effects are tentatively attributed to the confined space domains, surfactant-water interaction as well as surfactant-growing crystals interaction existing in the emulsion. -- Graphical abstract: The nonionic emulsion synthesis allows rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 compared with the conventional hydrothermal synthesis. Display Omitted

  1. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype.

  2. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  3. Multiple pickering emulsions stabilized by microbowls.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Kobayashi, Naoto; Nakagawa, Naoki

    2011-04-19

    Some researchers have focused on the adsorption of solid particles at fluid-fluid interfaces and prepared emulsions and foams called "Pickering emulsions/foams". However, while several reports exist on simple spherical emulsions, few reports are available on the formation of more complex structures. Here, we show that holes on particle surfaces are a key factor in establishing the variety and complexity of mesoscale structures. Microbowls, which are hollow particles with holes on their surfaces, form multiple emulsions (water-in-oil-in-water and oil-in-water-in-oil emulsions) by simply mixing them with water and oil. Furthermore, stable potato-like or coffee-bean-like emulsions are also obtained, although nonspherical emulsions are usually unstable because of their larger interfacial energies. These findings are useful in designing the building blocks of complex supracolloidal systems for pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  4. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  5. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  6. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-03-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) ×106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2=0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK and toluene had been added. However, this discrepancy has a large uncertainty and

  7. Tests of anechoic chamber for aeroacoustics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Bersenev, Yu. V.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Belyaev, I. V.; Korin, I. A.; Sorokin, E. V.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of qualification tests in the new anechoic chamber of Perm National Research Polytechnic University (PNRPU) built in 2014-2015 and evaluation of the chamber quality in aeroacoustic experiments. It describes design features of the chamber and its sound-absorption lining. The qualification tests were carried out with tonal and broadband noise sources in the frequency range 100 Hz - 20 kHz for two different cases of the source arrangement. In every case, measurements were performed in three directions by traverse microphones. Qualification tests have determined that in the chamber there is a free acoustic field within radius of 2 m for tonal noise and 3 m for broadband noise. There was also evaluated acoustic quality of the chamber by measurements of the jet noise and vortex ring noise. The results of the experiments demonstrate that PNRPU anechoic chamber allows the aeroacoustic measurements to be performed to obtain quantitative results.

  8. Response of potato to discontinuous exposures of atmospheric ethylene: results of a long-term experiment in open-top chambers and crop growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueck, Th. A.; Van Dijk, C. J.; Grashoff, C.; Groenwold, J.; Schapendonk, A. H. C. M.; Tonneijck, A. E. G.

    A field experiment in open-top chambers (OTCs) was performed to quantitatively assess the growth and yield response of potato to discontinuous exposures to atmospheric ethylene (200, 400 and 800 ppb, applied twice weekly and 200 and 400 ppb applied 4 times weekly, each for 3 h/event). To evaluate the effect of ethylene on potato tuber yield, a module was developed for an existing crop growth simulation model by incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis. Explorations with the model showed that in a worst case scenario, ethylene-induced epinasty had only a marginal effect on tuber yield. Short-term exposures to ethylene under laboratory conditions inhibited photosynthesis, but it recovered within 48 h. When exposed to ethylene for longer than 12 h, irreversible damage of the photosynthesis apparatus occurred. Exposure to ethylene in the OTCs resulted in epinasty and reduced flowering. The number of flowers on potato decreased with increasing concentrations of ethylene, irrespective of the exposure frequency. Calculations showed that the number of flowers was significantly reduced at ca. 170 ppb ethylene, averaged over the hours of exposure. Ethylene concentrations up to 800 ppb, administered 4 times weekly for 3 h during the growing season, did not affect vegetative growth and yield in fumigated potatoes. Under these experimental conditions, the modified simulation model incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis forecasts a 5% effect on tuber yield at concentrations of 1600 ppb. All results indicate that ethylene concentrations higher than 800 ppb are required to adversely affect tuber yield of potato.

  9. NEWS: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, Natalia; NEWS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In the field of direct Dark Matter search a different and promising approach is the directionality: the observation of the incoming apparent direction of WIMPs would in fact provide a new and unambiguous signature. The NEWS project is a very innovative approach for a high sensitivity experiment aiming at the directional detection of WIMPs: the detector is based on a novel emulsion technology called NIT (Nano Imaging Trackers) acting both as target and tracking device. In this paper we illustrate the features of a NIT-based detector and the newly developed read-out systems allowing to reach a spatial resolution of the order of 10 nm. We present the background studies and the experimental design. Finally we report about the time schedule of the experiment and the expected sensitivity for DM searches.

  10. Research on the influence of ozone dissolved in the fuel-water emulsion on the parameters of the CI engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojs, M. K.; Orliński, P.; Kamela, W.; Kruczyński, P.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of empirical research on the impact of ozone dissolved in fuel-water emulsion on combustion process and concentration of toxic substances in CI engine. The effect of ozone presence in the emulsion and its influence on main engine characteristics (power, torque, fuel consumption) and selected parameters that characterize combustion process (levels of pressures and temperatures in combustion chamber, period of combustion delay, heat release rate, fuel burnt rate) is shown. The change in concentration of toxic components in exhausts gases when engine is fueled with ozonized emulsion was also identified. The empirical research and their analysis showed significant differences in the combustion process when fuel-water emulsion containing ozone was used. These differences include: increased power and efficiency of the engine that are accompanied by reduction in time of combustion delay and beneficial effects of ozone on HC, PM, CO and NOX emissions.

  11. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  12. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  13. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  14. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  15. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  16. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  17. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  18. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  19. Formation of curcumin nanoparticles by flash nanoprecipitation from emulsions.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Katherine; Magdassi, Shlomo; Lee, Han Seung; Macosko, Christopher W

    2014-11-15

    Nanometric particles of a model hydrophobic substance curcumin were prepared by a novel method, namely, flash nanoprecipitation from a coarse oil-in-water emulsion. The method employs turbulent co-mixing of water with curcumin-loaded emulsion using manually-operated confined impingement jets mixer. A clear and stable dispersion of nanoparticles was formed in this process, and could be converted to dry, easily water-dispersible powder by spray drying. The mean size of the particles was about 40 nm by DLS, confirmed by Cryo-TEM. The obtained particles contained 20.4 wt% curcumin, X-ray analysis showed it was amorphous. The significant advantages of the studied process are its feasibility, speed and low cost. It does not require any special high-energy input equipment to reduce the droplet size of the initial emulsion as required by the vast majority of other methods, and relies on rapid turbulent mixing and on flow-induced shear stress formed in the simple, manually-operated mixer. Control experiments clearly indicate that employing emulsion, instead of a plain solution and flash nanoprecipitation instead of a simple antisolvent precipitation are advantageous in terms of particle size and stability. PMID:25168584

  20. Removal of pesticides from aqueous solutions using liquid membrane emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, V.M. III.

    1991-01-01

    Extractive liquid membrane technology is based on a water-in-oil emulsion as the vehicle to effect separation. An aqueous internal reagent phase is emulsified into an organic phase containing a surfactant and optional complexing agents. The emulsion, presenting a large membrane surface area, is then dispersed in an aqueous continuous phase containing the species to be removed. The desired species is transferred from the continuous, phase through the organic liquid membrane and concentrated in the internal reagent phase. Extraction and stripping occur simultaneously rather than sequentially as in conventional solvent extraction. Experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of using liquid membranes to extract pesticides from rinsewaters typical of those generated by fertilizer/agrichemical dealers. A liquid membrane emulsion containing 10% NaOH as the internal reagent phase was used to extract herbicides from aqueous solution at a continuous phase:emulsion ratio of 5:1. Removals of 2,4-D, MCPA, Carbaryl, Diazinon, and Atrazine were investigated.

  1. Removal of pesticides from aqueous solutions using liquid membrane emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, V.M. III

    1991-12-31

    Extractive liquid membrane technology is based on a water-in-oil emulsion as the vehicle to effect separation. An aqueous internal reagent phase is emulsified into an organic phase containing a surfactant and optional complexing agents. The emulsion, presenting a large membrane surface area, is then dispersed in an aqueous continuous phase containing the species to be removed. The desired species is transferred from the continuous, phase through the organic liquid membrane and concentrated in the internal reagent phase. Extraction and stripping occur simultaneously rather than sequentially as in conventional solvent extraction. Experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of using liquid membranes to extract pesticides from rinsewaters typical of those generated by fertilizer/agrichemical dealers. A liquid membrane emulsion containing 10% NaOH as the internal reagent phase was used to extract herbicides from aqueous solution at a continuous phase:emulsion ratio of 5:1. Removals of 2,4-D, MCPA, Carbaryl, Diazinon, and Atrazine were investigated.

  2. Creating Chamber Music Enthusiasts in High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummiskey, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Fairfield High School Chamber Music Honors Program for students in grades nine through twelve in Fairfield (Connecticut). Explains that the program's goal is to provide students with a positive experience in chamber music. Highlights the creation and the first two years of the program. (CMK)

  3. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE.

  4. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. PMID:27021875

  5. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10–15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  6. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  7. Use of micro-emulsion technology for the directed evolution of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Buhr, Diane L; Acca, Felicity E; Holland, Erika G; Johnson, Katie; Maksymiuk, Gail M; Vaill, Ada; Kay, Brian K; Weitz, David A; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2012-09-01

    Affinity reagents, such as antibodies, are needed to study protein expression patterns, sub-cellular localization, and post-translational modifications in complex mixtures and tissues. Phage Emulsion, Secretion, and Capture (ESCape) is a novel micro-emulsion technology that utilizes water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions for the identification and isolation of cells secreting phage particles that display desirable antibodies. Using this method, a large library of antibody-displaying phage will bind to beads in individual compartments. Rather than using biopanning on a large mixed population, phage micro-emulsion technology allows us to individually query clonal populations of amplified phage against the antigen. The use of emulsions to generate microdroplets has the promise of accelerating phage selection experiments by permitting fine discrimination of kinetic parameters for binding to targets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of phage micro-emulsion technology to distinguish two scFvs with a 300-fold difference in binding affinities (100nM and 300pM, respectively). In addition, we describe the application of phage micro-emulsion technology for the selection of scFvs that are resistant to elevated temperatures.

  8. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-12-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and the corresponding SOA formation at atmospherically relevant concentrations for three in-use diesel vehicles with different exhaust aftertreatment systems. One vehicle lacked exhaust aftertreatment devices, one vehicle was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and the third vehicle used both a DOC and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The experiments presented here were obtained from the vehicles at conditions representative of idle mode, and for one car in addition at a speed of 60 km/h. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used to measure the organic aerosol (OA) concentration and to obtain information on the chemical composition. For the conditions explored in this paper, primary aerosols from vehicles without a particulate filter consisted mainly of black carbon (BC) with a low fraction of organic matter (OM, OM/BC < 0.5), while the subsequent aging by photooxidation resulted in a consistent production of SOA only for the vehicles without a DOC and with a deactivated DOC. After 5 h of aging ~80% of the total organic aerosol was on average secondary and the estimated "emission factor" for SOA was 0.23-0.56 g/kg fuel burned. In presence of both a DOC and a DPF, only 0.01 g SOA per kg fuel burned was produced within 5 h after lights on. The mass spectra indicate that POA was mostly a non-oxidized OA with an oxygen to carbon atomic ratio (O/C) ranging from 0.10 to 0.19. Five hours of oxidation led to a more oxidized OA with an O/C range of 0

  9. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-06-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and the corresponding SOA formation at atmospherically relevant concentrations for three in-use diesel vehicles with different exhaust aftertreatment systems. One vehicle lacked exhaust aftertreatment devices, one vehicle was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and the final vehicle used both a DOC and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The experiments presented here were obtained from the vehicles at conditions representative of idle mode, and for one car in addition at a speed of 60 km/h. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used to measure the organic aerosol (OA) concentration and to obtain information on the chemical composition. For the conditions explored in this paper, primary aerosols from vehicles without a particulate filter consisted mainly of black carbon (BC) with a low fraction of organic matter (OM, OM/BC<0.5), while the subsequent aging by photooxidation resulted in a consistent production of SOA only for the vehicles without a DOC and with a deactivated DOC. After 5 h of aging ~80% of the total organic aerosol was on average secondary and the estimated "emission factor" for SOA was 0.23-0.56 g/kg fuel burned. In presence of both a DOC and a DPF, primary particles with a mobility diameter above 5 nm were 300±19 cm-3, and only 0.01 g SOA per kg fuel burned was produced within 5 h after lights on. The mass spectra indicate that POA was mostly a non-oxidized OA with an oxygen to carbon atomic ratio (O/C) ranging from 0.097 to 0

  10. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  11. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  12. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  13. Stove with multiple chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Black, A.

    1987-04-21

    A stove is described for burning a solid fuel such as wood. The wall means defines a main air inlet, a combustion gas outlet, and four chambers through which gas passes sequentially from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet. The chambers comprises a pre-heat plenum chamber into which the main air inlet opens. A main combustion chamber contains solid fuel to be burned into which gas passes from the pre-heat plenum chamber, a second combustion chamber which is downstream of the main combustion chamber with respect to the flow of gas from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet, and a third combustion chamber from which the combustion gas outlet opens. The stove also comprises a plate having a restricted opening for providing communication between the second and third combustion chambers. And a catalytic converter comprises a body of solid material formed with passageways, the body of solid material being fitted in the restricted opening so that gas passes from the second combustion chamber to the third combustion chamber by way of the passageways in the body.

  14. Nano-Emulsions:. Overview and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Vandamme, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Nano-emulsions, also called sub-micrometer emulsions, are one of the most important nanocarriers in nanomedicine. More than 40% active susbtances are hydrophobic and therefore they are difficult to be formulated using conventional approaches. Nano-emulsion systems are considered as new vehicles for hydrophobic drug administration because they can enhance the penetration and absorption of these hydrophobic active compounds and provide safer and more patient-compliant dosage forms. This chapter describes the conception and methods of preparation of nano-emulsions, their characterization methods and their applications in pharmacetical areas.

  15. Controlled generation of double emulsions in air.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingsheng; Hakimi, Bejan; Volny, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Chen, Xudong; Turecek, Frantisek; Chiu, Daniel T

    2013-07-01

    This Letter describes the controlled generation of double emulsions in the gas phase, which was carried out using an integrated emitter in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chip. The integrated emitter was formed using a molding approach, in which metal wires with desirable diameters were used as emitter molds. The generation of double emulsions in air was achieved with electrohydrodynamics actuation, which offers controllable force exerting on the double emulsions. We developed this capability for future integration of droplet microfluidics with mass spectrometry (MS), where each aqueous droplet in the microchannel is introduced into the gas phase as a double emulsion for subsequent ionization and MS analysis. PMID:23767768

  16. Drop size stability assessment of fluorocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krafft, M P; Postel, M; Riess, J G; Ni, Y; Pelura, T J; Hanna, G K; Song, D

    1992-01-01

    The aging of fluorocarbon emulsions prepared with natural egg yolk phospholipids (EYP) has been studied and a linear variation (r2 greater than 0.95) of the mean average volume of the droplets with time has been observed. The slope of the experimental lines, called "Stability Parameter, S" can thus be taken as a representation of the rate of aging of the emulsions. Examples are given of use of parameter S to assess the effect of formulation and processing parameters on the stability of diverse fluorocarbon emulsions. S is a useful tool to compare emulsions and ascertain any factors of stabilization/destabilization. PMID:1391525

  17. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G H; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions-liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid-are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number-the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  18. Recent Studies of Pickering Emulsions: Particles Make the Difference.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Ma, Guang-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, emulsions stabilized by micro- or nanoparticles (known as Pickering emulsions) have attracted much attention. Micro- or nanoparticles, as the main components of the emulsion, play a key role in the preparation and application of Pickering emulsions. The existence of particles at the interface between the oil and aqueous phases affects not only the preparation, but also the properties of Pickering emulsions, affording superior stability, low toxicity, and stimuli-responsiveness compared to classical emulsions stabilized by surfactants. These advantages of Pickering emulsions make them attractive, especially in biomedicine. In this review, the effects of the characteristics of micro- and nanoparticles on the preparation and properties of Pickering emulsions are introduced. In particular, the preparation methods of Pickering emulsions, especially uniform-sized emulsions, are listed. Uniform Pickering emulsions are convenient for both mechanistic research and applications. Furthermore, some biomedical applications of Pickering emulsions are discussed and the problems hindering their clinical application are identified.

  19. Measuring the Free Fall of Antihydrogen with Emulsion Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistillo, C.

    2014-06-01

    The AEgIS experiment at CERN is designed to perform the first direct measurement of gravitational interaction between antimatter and matter by detecting the fall of a horizontally accelerated cold antihydrogen beam in the Earth's gravitational field. The spatial resolution of the position sensitive detector is a key issue for the success of the experiment. For this reason, the employment of emulsion film detectors is being considered and an intense R&D is being conducted to define the use of this technology in the AEgIS apparatus. We present the results of test beams conducted in 2012, when emulsion film detectors were directly exposed to a ˜ 100 keV antiproton beam and annihilation vertices successfully reconstructed with a few micrometers resolution. The prospects for the realization of the final detector are also presented.

  20. Gas gain operations with single photon resolution using an integrating ionization chamber in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, R. H.; Sarvestani, A.; Besch, H. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Amenitsch, H.; Bernstorff, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. Initially, MicroCAT was thought of as a shielding grid (Frisch-grid) but later was used as an active electron amplification device that enables single X-ray photon resolution measurements at low fluxes even with integrating readout electronics. Moreover, the adjustable gas gain that continuously covers the entire range from pure ionization chamber mode up to high gas gains (30 000 and more) provides stable operation yielding a huge dynamic range of about 10 8 and more. First measurements on biological samples using small angle X-ray scattering techniques with synchrotron radiation will be presented.

  1. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  2. Effects of solid particle content on properties of o/w Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Frelichowska, Justyna; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Chevalier, Yves

    2010-11-15

    The control of droplet size and stability of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions stabilized by hydrophobized fumed silica was investigated. Three regimes were observed according to the silica content: instability at low silica content, stable emulsions with droplet size controlled by the silica content, and emulsions of constant size set by the emulsification process at high silica concentrations. The oil-to-silica ratio was the relevant parameter of the size control in the medium concentration regime. Centrifugation experiments and particle size distribution measurements gave evidence of the presence of excess silica present as dispersion in the aqueous phase in the high silica content regime. Adsorption of silica to the droplet surface did not follow adsorption equilibrium; strong adsorption prevailed. Lastly, aggregation of silica particles appeared a crucial parameter. Oil adsorption and capillary condensation of oil within the silica aggregates provided a supplementary mechanism of silica aggregation that contributed to the stability of emulsions.

  3. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  4. Metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Medforth, Craig J

    2013-10-29

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  5. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  6. Flows of Wet Foamsand Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemer, Martin B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was is to advance a microstructural understanding of foam and emulsion flows. The dynamics of individual surfactant-covered drops and well as the collective behavior of dilute and concentrated was explored using numerical simulations. The long-range goal of this work is the formulation of reliable microphysically-based statistical models of emulsion flows.

  7. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  8. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (θ lesssim 30°) where θ is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  9. Unifying the relative hindered velocity in suspensions and emulsions of nondeformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin; Huber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Although the relative velocity of a single crystal or bubble in a quiescent fluid (melt) is well characterized, the interplay of crystals/bubbles in multiparticle systems and its effect on their settling/rising velocity is poorly quantified. We propose a theoretical model for the hindered velocity of non-Brownian emulsions and suspensions of nondeformable fluid and solid particles in the creeping flow regime. The model is based on three sets of correction: two on the drag coefficient experienced by each particle to account for both return flow and Smoluchowski effects and a correction on the rheology to account for nonlocal interactions introduced as a mean-field effective viscosity. Our model is tested against new and published experimental data over a wide range of particle volume fraction and viscosity ratio between the fluids. We find an excellent agreement between our model and experiments. The model is then applied to show that hindered settling can increase mineral residence time by up to an order of magnitude in convecting magma chambers.

  10. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  11. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-21

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16-240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  12. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-21

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16-240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration.

  13. Aging mechanism in model Pickering emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloux, Sarah; Malloggi, Florent; Daillant, Jean; Thill, Antoine

    We study the stability of a model Pickering emulsion system. A special counter-flow microfluidics set-up was used to prepare monodisperse Pickering emulsions, with oil droplets in water. The wettability of the monodisperse silica nanoparticles (NPs) could be tuned by surface grafting and the surface coverage of the droplets was controlled using the microfluidics setup. A surface coverage as low as 23$\\%$ is enough to stabilize the emulsions and we evidence a new regime of Pickering emulsion stability where the surface coverage of emulsion droplets of constant size increases in time, in coexistence with a large amount of dispersed phase. Our results demonstrate that the previously observed limited coalescence regime where surface coverage tends to control the average size of the final droplets must be put in a broader perspective.

  14. Spectra, composition and interactions of nuclei above 10 TeV using magnet-interferometric chambers (SCIN/MAGIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Initial definition studies were performed for the SCIN/MAGIC experiment selected as an Astromag investigation on Space Station Freedom. The study focused on Science Objectives and Science Requirement, Accommodation on both the STS and the Astromag facility, Data extraction techniques and Background Studies. The detectors are emulsion chambers which will be exposed for approximately 90 days and then recovered from orbit for subsequent processing and analysis in the laboratory. Such a technique is the only means to obtain information on the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and their nuclear interactions. The SCIN/MAGIC investigation can supply unique data in relatively unexplored energy region and address many of the fundamental questions in particle astrophysics.

  15. Oxygen isotope ratios (18O/16O) of hemicellulose-derived sugar biomarkers in plants, soils and sediments as paleoclimate proxy I: Insight from a climate chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Michael; Mayr, Christoph; Tuthorn, Mario; Leiber-Sauheitl, Katharina; Glaser, Bruno

    2014-02-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose is a valuable proxy in paleoclimate research. However, its application to sedimentary archives is challenging due to extraction and purification of cellulose. Here we present compound-specific δ18O results of hemicellulose-derived sugar biomarkers determined using gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which is a method that overcomes the above-mentioned analytical challenges. The biomarkers were extracted from stem material of different plants (Eucalyptus globulus, Vicia faba and Brassica oleracea) grown in climate chamber experiments under different climatic conditions. The δ18O values of arabinose and xylose range from 31.4‰ to 45.9‰ and from 28.7‰ to 40.8‰, respectively, and correlate highly significantly with each other (R = 0.91, p < 0.001). Furthermore, δ18Ohemicellulose (mean of arabinose and xylose) correlate highly significantly with δ18Oleaf water (R = 0.66, p < 0.001) and significantly with modeled δ18Ocellulose (R = 0.42, p < 0.038), as well as with relative air humidity (R = -0.79, p < 0.001) and temperature (R = -0.66, p < 0.001). These findings confirm that the hemicellulose-derived sugar biomarkers, like cellulose, reflect the oxygen isotopic composition of plant source water altered by climatically controlled evapotranspirative 18O enrichment of leaf water. While relative air humidity controls most rigorously the evapotranspirative 18O enrichment, the direct temperature effect is less important. However, temperature can indirectly exert influence via plant physiological reactions, namely by influencing the transpiration rate which affects δ18Oleaf water due to the Péclet effect. In a companion paper (Tuthorn et al., this issue) we demonstrate the applicability of the hemicellulose-derived sugar biomarker δ18O method to soils and provide evidence from a climate transect study confirming that relative air humidity exerts the dominant control on evapotranspirative 18O

  16. MPS II drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  17. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  18. [On bitumen emulsions in water].

    PubMed

    Rivas, Hercilio; Gutierrez, Xiomara; Silva, Felix; Chirinos, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The most important factors, controlling the process of emulsification of highly viscous hydrocarbons in water, which are responsible for keeping the stability and other properties of these systems, are discused in this article. The effect of non-ionic surfactants, such as nonil phenol ethoxilated compounds on the interfacial behavior of bitumen/water systems is analyzed. The effect of the natural surfactants in presence or in absence of electrolytes is also analyzed. The procedures followed in order to obtain the optimal conditions of formulation and formation of bitumen in water emulsions, are discussed and the effect of some parameters on the mean droplet diameter and distribution are also considered. It was found that keeping constant mixing speed and time of mixing, the mean droplet diameter decreases as the bitumen concentration increases. Emulsion stability, which can be monitored by following the changes in mean droplet diameters and viscosity as a function of the storage time, is deeply affected by the type and concentration of surfactant. PMID:15916176

  19. Dynamical and structural signatures of the glass transition in emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Gnan, Nicoletta; Mason, Thomas G.; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We investigate structural and dynamical properties of moderately polydisperse emulsions across an extended range of droplet volume fractions ϕ, encompassing fluid and glassy states up to jamming. Combining experiments and simulations, we show that when ϕ approaches the glass transition volume fraction {φg} , dynamical heterogeneities and amorphous order arise within the emulsion. In particular, we find an increasing number of clusters of particles having five-fold symmetry (i.e. the so-called locally favoured structures, LFS) as ϕ approaches {φg} , saturating to a roughly constant value in the glassy regime. However, contrary to previous studies, we do not observe a corresponding growth of medium-range crystalline order; instead, the emergence of LFS is decoupled from the appearance of more ordered regions in our system. We also find that the static correlation lengths associated with the LFS and with the fastest particles can be successfully related to the relaxation time of the system. By contrast, this does not hold for the length associated with the orientational order. Our study reveals the existence of a link between dynamics and structure close to the glass transition even in the absence of crystalline precursors or crystallization. Furthermore, the quantitative agreement between our confocal microscopy experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations indicates that emulsions are and will continue to be important model systems for the investigation of the glass transition and beyond.

  20. Evaluating factors affecting the permeability of emulsions used to stabilize radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device.

    PubMed

    Fox, Garey A; Medina, Victor F

    2005-05-15

    Present strategies for alleviating radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or dirty bomb involve either demolishing and removing radioactive surfaces or abandoning portions of the area near the release point. In both cases, it is imperative to eliminate or reduce migration of the radioisotopes until the cleanup is complete or until the radiation has decayed back to acceptable levels. This research investigated an alternative strategy of using emulsions to stabilize radioactive particulate contamination. Emergency response personnel would coat surfaces with emulsions consisting of asphalt or tall oil pitch to prevent migration of contamination. The site can then be evaluated and cleaned up as needed. In order for this approach to be effective, the treatment must eliminate migration of the radioactive agents in the terror device. Water application is an environmental condition that could promote migration into the external environment. This research investigated the potential for water, and correspondingly contaminant, migration through two emulsions consisting of Topein, a resinous byproduct during paper manufacture. Topein C is an asphaltic-based emulsion and Topein S is a tall oil pitch, nonionic emulsion. Experiments included water adsorption/ mobilization studies, filtration tests, and image analysis of photomicrographs from an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and a stereomicroscope. Both emulsions were effective at reducing water migration. Conductivity estimates were on the order of 10(-80) cm s(-1) for Topein C and 10(-7) cm s(-1) for Topein S. Water mobility depended on emulsion flocculation and coalescence time. Photomicrographs indicate that Topein S consisted of greater and more interconnected porosity. Dilute foams of isolated spherical gas cells formed when emulsions were applied to basic surfaces. Gas cells rose to the surface and ruptured, leaving void spaces that penetrated throughout the emulsion. These

  1. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  2. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  3. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  4. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  5. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. The crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenbach, Kimberly

    1993-01-01

    The Crop Growth Research Chamber (CGRC) has been defined by CELSS principle investigators and science advisory panels as a necessary ground-based tool in the development of a regenerative life support system. The focus of CGRC research will be on the biomass production component of the CELSS system. The ground-based Crop Growth Research Chamber is for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments isolated from the external environment. The chamber has importance in three areas of CELSS activities: (1) crop research; (2) system control and integration, and (3) flight hardware design and experimentation. The laboratory size of the CGRC will be small enough to allow duplication of the unit, the conducting of controlled experiments, and replication of experiments, but large enough to provide information representative of larger plant communities. Experiments will focus on plant growth in a wide variety of environments and the effects of those environments on plant production of food, water, oxygen, toxins, and microbes. To study these effects in a closed system, tight control of the environment is necessary.

  7. Emulsion-based encapsulation and delivery of nanoparticles for the controlled release of alkalinity within the subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, C. A.; Muller, K.; Gill, J.

    2012-12-01

    Many current approaches to managing groundwater contamination rely on further advances in amendment delivery in order to initiate and sustain contaminant degradation or immobilization. In fact, limited or ineffective delivery is often cited when treatment objectives are not attained. Emulsions, specifically oil-in-water emulsions, have demonstrated potential to aid delivery of remediation amendments. Emulsions also afford opportunities to control the release of active ingredients encapsulated within the droplets. Our research is currently focused on the controlled release of nanoparticle-based buffering agents using oil-in-water emulsions. This interest is motivated by the fact that chemical and biological processes employed for the remediation and stewardship of contaminated sites often necessitate control of pH during treatment and, in some cases, long thereafter. Alkalinity-release nanoparticles (e.g., CaCO3, MgO) were suspended within soybean oil and subsequently encapsulated by through the creation of oil-in-water emulsions. These oil-in-water emulsions are designed to have physical properties which are favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet diameter). Buffer capacity titrations suggest that MgO particles are moderately more accessible within the oil phase and nearly twice as effective (on a per mass basis) at releasing alkalinity (as compared to the CaCO3 particles). Results from experiments designed to assess the release kinetics suggest that a linear driving force model is capable of describing the release process and mass transfer coefficients are constant through the reactive life of the emulsion. The release kinetics in emulsions containing MgO particles were found to be three orders of magnitude faster than those quantified for emulsions containing CaCO3. The slower release kinetics of the emulsions containing CaCO3 particles may prove beneficial when considering pH control at sites

  8. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P. Chergui, Majed; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  9. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  10. Optimization of cell-wall skeleton derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG Tokyo 172 (SMP-105) emulsion in delayed-type hypersensitivity and antitumor models.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, M; Murata, M; Fukushima, A; Sato, T; Nakagawa, M; Fujii, T; Koseki, N; Chiba, N; Kashiwazaki, Y

    2012-08-01

    Cell-wall skeleton prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-CWS) is known as a potent adjuvant and has been shown to possess antitumor activity in many non-clinical and clinical studies. As there are no approved BCG-CWS formulations for cancer therapy, we investigated the potential for cancer immunotherapy of SMP-105, our originally produced BCG-CWS. For optimizing SMP-105 emulsion, we compared the effects of drakeoland squalane-based SMP-105 emulsions on IFN-γ production in rats and evaluated their ability to induce skin reaction in guinea pigs. Both emulsions had the same activity in both experiments. We selected squalane as base material and produced two types of squalane-based formulations (vialed emulsion and pumped emulsion) that can easily be prepared as oil-in-water emulsions. Although the vialed emulsion showed the same pattern of distribution as a usual homogenized emulsion, the pumped emulsion showed more uniform distribution than the other two emulsions. Whereas both emulsions enhanced strong delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in a mouse model, the pumped emulsion induced slightly smaller edema. Data on oil droplet size distribution suggest that few micrometer oil droplet size might be appropriate for oil-in-water microemulsion of SMP-105. The antitumor potency of SMP-105 emulsion was stronger than that of some of the launched toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists (Aldara cream, Picibanil, and Immunobladder). Aldara and Picibanil showed limited antitumor effectiveness, while Immunobladder had almost the same effect as SMP-105 at the highest dose, but needed about 10 times the amount of SMP-105. These findings first indicate that SMP-105 has great potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed

  12. Squalene and squalane emulsions as adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Allison, A C

    1999-09-01

    Microfluidized squalene or squalane emulsions are efficient adjuvants, eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses. Microfluidization stabilizes the emulsions and allows sterilization by terminal filtration. The emulsions are stable for years at ambient temperature and can be frozen. Antigens are added after emulsification so that conformational epitopes are not lost by denaturation and to facilitate manufacture. A Pluronic block copolymer can be added to the squalane or squalene emulsion. Soluble antigens administered in such emulsions generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes able to lyse target cells expressing the antigen in a genetically restricted fashion. Optionally a relatively nontoxic analog of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or another immunomodulator can be added; however, the dose of MDP must be restricted to avoid systemic side effects in humans. Squalene or squalane emulsions without copolymers or MDP have very little toxicity and elicit potent antibody responses to several antigens in nonhuman primates. They could be used to improve a wide range of vaccines. Squalene or squalane emulsions have been administered in human cancer vaccines, with mild side effects and evidence of efficacy, in terms of both immune responses and antitumor activity.

  13. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  14. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  15. Two years experience with quality assurance protocol for patient related Rapid Arc treatment plan verification using a two dimensional ionization chamber array

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To verify the dose distribution and number of monitor units (MU) for dynamic treatment techniques like volumetric modulated single arc radiation therapy - Rapid Arc - each patient treatment plan has to be verified prior to the first treatment. The purpose of this study was to develop a patient related treatment plan verification protocol using a two dimensional ionization chamber array (MatriXX, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Method Measurements were done to determine the dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, beam direction, and field size. Also the reproducibility of the measurements was checked. For the patient related verifications the original patient Rapid Arc treatment plan was projected on CT dataset of the MatriXX and the dose distribution was calculated. After irradiation of the Rapid Arc verification plans measured and calculated 2D dose distributions were compared using the gamma evaluation method implemented in the measuring software OmniPro (version 1.5, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results The dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, field size and beam direction has shown a passing rate of 99% for field sizes between 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm for measurements of single arc. For smaller and larger field sizes than 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm the passing rate was less than 99%. The reproducibility was within a passing rate of 99% and 100%. The accuracy of the whole process including the uncertainty of the measuring system, treatment planning system, linear accelerator and isocentric laser system in the treatment room was acceptable for treatment plan verification using gamma criteria of 3% and 3 mm, 2D global gamma index. Conclusion It was possible to verify the 2D dose distribution and MU of Rapid Arc treatment plans using the MatriXX. The use of the MatriXX for Rapid Arc treatment plan verification in clinical routine is reasonable. The passing rate should be 99% than the verification

  16. Investigating 14CO2 chamber methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The radiogenic isotope of carbon (14C) is an exceptionally useful tool in studying soil respired CO2, providing information about soil turnover rates, depths of production and the biological sources of production through partitioning. Unfortunately, little work has been done to thoroughly investigate the possibility of inherent biases in the current measurement techniques for 14CO2, caused by disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime, because of high costs and sampling logistics. Our aim in this study is to investigate the degree of bias present in the current sampling methodologies using a numerical model and laboratory calibration device. Four chamber techniques were tested numerically with varying fraction modern of production, δ13C of production, collar lengths, flux rates and diffusivities. Two of the chambers were then tested on the lab calibration device. One of these chambers, Iso-FD, has recently been tested for its use as a 13CO2 chamber and it does not induce gas transport fractionation biases present in other 13CO2 sampling methodologies. We then implemented it in the field to test its application as a 14CO2 chamber because of its excellent performance as a 13CO2chamber. Presented here are the results from the numerical modeling experiment, the laboratory calibration experiment and preliminary field results from the Iso-FD chamber.

  17. The morphology of emulsion polymerized latex particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, G.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Linne, M.A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L.H.; Wai, M.P.; Gelman, R.A.; Fatica, M.G.; Hoerl, R.H.; Fisher, L.W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structre as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10/sup 4/ < M < 6 x 10/sup 6/ g/mol. For M > 10/sup 6/ the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10/sup 6/ g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The Morphology of Emulsion Polymerized Latex Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wignall, G. D.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Linne, M. A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L. H.; Wai, M. P.; Gelman, R. A.; Fatica, M. G.; Hoerl, R. H.; Fisher, L. W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structure as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10{sup 4} 10{sup 6} the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10{sup 6} g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights.

  19. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  20. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Simple cloud chambers using gel ice packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-07-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry ice or liquid nitrogen. The gel can be frozen in normal domestic freezers, and can be used repeatedly by re-freezing. The tracks of alpha-ray particles can be observed continuously for about 20 min, and the operation is simple and easy.

  2. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of bacteriophage-K via stabilization using oil-in-water nano-emulsions.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Patricia Perez; Alves, Diana R; Enright, Mark C; Bean, Jessica E; Gaudion, Alison; Jenkins, A T A; Young, Amber E R; Arnot, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage therapy is a promising new treatment that may help overcome the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria, which are increasingly identified in hospitalized patients. The development of biocompatible and sustainable vehicles for incorporation of viable bacterial viruses into a wound dressing is a promising alternative. This article evaluates the antimicrobial efficacy of Bacteriophage K against Staphylococcus aureus over time, when stabilized and delivered via an oil-in-water nano-emulsion. Nano-emulsions were formulated via thermal phase inversion emulsification, and then bacterial growth was challenged with either native emulsion, or emulsion combined with Bacteriophage K. Bacteriophage infectivity, and the influence of storage time of the preparation, were assessed by turbidity measurements of bacterial samples. Newly prepared Bacteriophage K/nano-emulsion formulations have greater antimicrobial activity than freely suspended bacteriophage. The phage-loaded emulsions caused rapid and complete bacterial death of three different strains of S. aureus. The same effect was observed for preparations that were either stored at room temperature (18-20°C), or chilled at 4°C, for up to 10 days of storage. A response surface design of experiments was used to gain insight on the relative effects of the emulsion formulation on bacterial growth and phage lytic activity. More diluted emulsions had a less significant effect on bacterial growth, and diluted bacteriophage-emulsion preparations yielded greater antibacterial activity. The enhancement of bacteriophage activity when delivered via nano-emulsions is yet to be reported. This prompts further investigation into the use of these formulations for the development of novel anti-microbial wound management strategies.

  3. Formaldehyde vapor produced from hexamethylenetetramine and pesticide: Simultaneous monitoring of formaldehyde and ozone in chamber experiments by flow-based hybrid micro-gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Akira; Hozumi, Naruto; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Asako; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3 was performed by the developed flow analysis system to prove that HCHO vapor is produced from solid pesticide in the presence of O3. HCHO is produced in many ways, including as primary emissions from fuel combustion and in secondary production from anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds by photochemical reactions. In this work, HCHO production from pesticides was investigated for the first time. Commonly pesticide contains surfactant such as hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), which is a heterocyclic compound formed from six molecules of HCHO and four molecules of NH3. HMT can react with gaseous oxidants such as ozone (O3) to produce HCHO. In the present study, a flow analysis system was developed for simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3, and this system was used to determine if solid pesticides produced HCHO vapor in the presence of O3. HMT or the pesticide jimandaisen, which contains mancozeb as the active ingradient and HMT as a stabilizer was placed at the bottom of a 20-L stainless steel chamber. Air in the chamber was monitored using the developed flow system. Analyte gases were collected into an absorbing solution by a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber that was previously developed for a micro gas analysis system (μGAS). Subsequently, indigotrisulfonate, a blue dye, was added to the absorbing solution to detect O3, which discolored the solution. HCHO was detected after mixing with the Hantzsch reaction reagent. Both gases could be detected at concentrations ranging from parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 1000 ppbv with good linearity. Both HMT and jimandaisen emitted large amount of HCHO in the presence of O3. PMID:26653496

  4. Coagulation and electrocoagulation of oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, Pablo; Martínez, Fabiola; Jiménez, Carlos; Sáez, Cristina; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2008-02-28

    In this work the efficiencies of the chemical and the electrochemical break-up of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with hydrolyzing aluminium salts are compared. It has been obtained that the efficiency of the processes does not depend directly on the dosing technology, but on the total concentration of aluminium and pH. This latter parameter changes in a different way in the chemical and the electrochemical processes: the pH increases during the electrochemical experiments since the electrochemical system leads to the formation of aluminum hydroxide as a net final product, but it decreases in the conventional ones due to the acid properties of the aluminum salts added (AlCl3 or Al2(SO4)3). The break-up of the emulsions only takes place in the range of pHs between 5 and 9, and the amount of aluminium necessary to produce the destabilization of the emulsion is proportional to the oil concentration. Electrolytes containing chlorides improve COD removal as compared with those containing sulphate ions. Aluminium hydroxide precipitates were found to be the primary species present in solution in the conditions in which the breaking process is favoured. Consequently, the attachment of more than one droplet of oil at a time to a charged precipitate-particle (bridging flocculation) was proposed as the primary destabilization mechanism. PMID:17583426

  5. How does a bubble chamber work?

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, D.; Homsi, W.; Luzuriaga, J.; Su, C.K.; Weilert, M.A.; Maris, H.J.

    1998-11-01

    A charged particle passing through a bubble chamber produces a track of bubbles. The way in which these bubbles are produced has been a matter of some controversy. The authors consider the possibility that in helium and hydrogen bubble chambers the production of bubbles is primarily a mechanical process, rather than a thermal process as has often been assumed. The model the authors propose gives results which are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  6. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  7. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  8. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  9. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-12

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions-the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  10. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  11. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  12. Fluorocarbon emulsions--the stability issue.

    PubMed

    Postel, M; Riess, J G; Weers, J G

    1994-01-01

    Long-term room temperature stability of ready-to-use concentrated fluorocarbon emulsions is necessary in order to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of fluorocarbons. Consequently, considerable efforts have been directed at investigating the physical nature of such emulsions, the mechanisms which lead to their degradation and the means of counteracting these. The particles which constitute typical fluorocarbon/egg yolk phospholipid emulsions have been identified to be surfactant-coated fluorocarbon droplets and lipid vesicles. Better understanding has been gained on the formation, structure and evolution of these particles during processing and storage. This has led to optimized formulations and processing, better control of emulsion characteristics and significantly improved stability. Molecular diffusion (Ostwald ripening or transcondensation) has been shown to be the maun mechanism of degradation when particles are less than 1 micron in diameter, even for the highly concentrated (volume fraction of fluorocarbon up to 50%) second generation fluorocarbon emulsions. Significant emulsion stabilization has been accomplished by adding fluorochemicals which are both less volatile and less water soluble, and nevertheless have an organ dwell time acceptable for intravascular use. The rate of molecular diffusion can also be reduced by decreasing the fluorocarbon/water interfacial tension; this was effectively achieved with appropriate, well-defined fluorinated surfactants. A further, novel means of stabilizing fluorocarbon-in-water emulsions makes use of mixed fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon amphiphiles which act as molecular dowels to reinforce the adhesion between the fluorocarbon phase and the lipophilic zone of the surfactant film. Both long-term room temperature stability, and particle-size control over a large range of diameter, have been achieved by applying this principle. All in all it can be said that the challenge of producing injectable fluorocarbon emulsions

  13. Microgel-stabilized smart emulsions for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Susanne; Spiess, Antje C; Richtering, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Emulsions stabilized by stimuli-responsive microgels were used to perform enzyme catalysis. Many substrates are poorly water-soluble, while enzymes naturally require aqueous environments, thus resulting in a two-phase aqueous-organic system. Smart microgels allow an enzyme-catalyzed reaction to be performed in an emulsion that can be broken under controlled conditions to separate the reaction product and to recycle the enzyme (E) and the microgel.

  14. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings. PMID:20701369

  15. Pickering emulsions stabilized by charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ridel, Laure; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Gilon-Delepine, Nicole; Dugas, Pierre-Yves; Chevalier, Yves

    2016-09-28

    The stabilization of o/w Pickering emulsions in cases of weak adsorption of solid particles at the surface of oil droplets is addressed. Though the adsorption is usually very strong and irreversible when partial wetting conditions are fulfilled, electrostatic repulsions between charged solid particles act against the adsorption. The regime of weak adsorption was reached using charged silica nanoparticles at high pH and low ionic strength. O/w Pickering emulsions of the diisopropyl adipate oil were stabilized by colloidal nanoparticles of Ludox® AS40 consisting of non-aggregated particles of bare silica (hydrophilic). The combination of stability assessment, droplet size and electrokinetic potential measurements at various pH values, adsorption isotherms and cryo-SEM observations of the adsorbed layers disclosed the specificities of the stabilization of Pickering emulsions by adsorption of solid nanoparticles against strong electrostatic repulsions. Not only the long-term stability of emulsions was poor under strong electrostatic repulsions at high pH, but emulsification failed since full dispersion of oil could not be achieved. Emulsion stability was ensured by decreasing electrostatic repulsions by lowering the pH from 9 to 3. Stable emulsions were stabilized by a monolayer of silica particles at 54% coverage of the oil droplet surface at low silica content and an adsorption regime as multilayers was reached at higher concentrations of silica although there was no aggregation of silica in the bulk aqueous phase.

  16. Bond Graph Modeling and Validation of an Energy Regenerative System for Emulsion Pump Tests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  17. Plant growth chamber based on space proven controlled environment technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Ronald W.; Ignatius, Matt H.; Imberti, Henry J.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum Devices, Inc., in conjunction with Percival Scientific, Inc., and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) have developed a controlled environment plant growth chamber for terrestrial agricultural and scientific applications. This chamber incorporates controlled environment technology used in the WCSAR ASTROCULTURE™ flight unit for conducting plant research on the Space Shuttle. The new chamber, termed CERES 2010, features air humidity, temperature, and carbon dioxide control, an atmospheric contaminant removal unit, an LED lighting system, and a water and nutrient delivery system. The advanced environment control technology used in this chamber will increase the reliability and repeatability of environmental physiology data derived from plant experiments conducted in this chamber.

  18. A method for the characterization of emulsions, thermogranulometry: application to water-in-crude oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Clausse, D; Gomez, F; Dalmazzone, C; Noik, C

    2005-07-15

    Emulsions are used in a wide range of applications and industries. Their size distribution is an important parameter because it influences most of the emulsion properties of emulsions. Several techniques of characterization are used to determine the granulometric distribution of emulsions, but they are generally limited to dilute samples and are based on complex algorithms. We describe a method that allows characterization of the droplet size distribution of emulsions using thermal analysis (thermogranulometry). This method permits the use of very concentrated samples without any dilution or perturbation of the system. We first define our method by a thermodynamic and kinetic approach. We studied a real system, i.e., crude oil emulsions, which form very concentrated, viscous, and opaque emulsions with water. We present a correlation between the size of droplets and their freezing temperature, corresponding to our system. Then we compare the size distributions obtained by our method with those derived by direct microscopy observations. The results obtained show that thermogranulometry may be an interesting method of characterization of emulsions, even for concentrated systems. PMID:15925639

  19. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  20. The Use of Fish Oil Lipid Emulsion in the Treatment of Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease (IFALD)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melissa I.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, fish oil based lipid emulsions have been used in the treatment of intestinal failure associated liver disease, with a noticeable impact on decreasing the incidence of morbidity and mortality of this often fatal condition. With this new therapy, however, different approaches have emerged as well as concerns about potential risks with using fish oil as a monotherapy. This review will discuss the experience to date with this lipid emulsion along with the rational for its use, controversies and concerns. PMID:23363993

  1. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols as well as imidazole formation in the presence of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected[3]. Besides this particulate glyoxal is able to undergo heterogeneous chemistry with gaseous ammonia to form imidazoles. This plays an important role for regions with aerosols exhibiting alkaline pH values for example from lifestock or soil dust because imidazoles as nitrogen containing compounds change the optical properties of aerosols[4]. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols

  2. Posterior chamber collagen copolymer phakic intraocular lens with a central hole for moderate-to-high myopia: First experience in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinfang; Wu, Weiliang; Wang, Yang; Xie, Chen; Tong, Jianping; Shen, Ye

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) (Visian Implantable Collamer Lens V4c) for the correction of moderate to high myopia in Chinese eyes.The article is designed as a retrospective case series.This study included the first consecutive eyes that had implantation of a new pIOL design with a central hole, at our department by the same surgeon. The safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, and adverse events of the surgery were evaluated over 6 months.The study enrolled 63 eyes (32 patients). The mean spherical equivalent decreased from -12.81 ± 3.11 diopters (D) preoperatively to -0.05 ± 0.27 D 6 months postoperatively; 96.8% of eyes were within ±0.50 D of the target and 100% of eyes were within ±1.00 D. All eyes had a decimal uncorrected distance visual acuity of 0.5 (20/40) or better at every follow-up visit. The safety and efficacy indices were 1.42 ± 0.34 and 1.11 ± 0.19, respectively. Postoperatively, the intraocular pressure (IOP) remained stable over time. No significant rises in IOP (including pupillary block) and no secondary cataract were found. After 6 months, the mean vault was 505.2 ± 258.9 μm (range 120-990 μm), and the mean endothelial cell loss was 2.0%.Implantation of the pIOL was safe, effective, predictable, and stable in the correction of moderate-to-high myopia in Han Chinese patients, even without peripheral iridectomy.

  3. Posterior chamber collagen copolymer phakic intraocular lens with a central hole for moderate-to-high myopia: First experience in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinfang; Wu, Weiliang; Wang, Yang; Xie, Chen; Tong, Jianping; Shen, Ye

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) (Visian Implantable Collamer Lens V4c) for the correction of moderate to high myopia in Chinese eyes.The article is designed as a retrospective case series.This study included the first consecutive eyes that had implantation of a new pIOL design with a central hole, at our department by the same surgeon. The safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, and adverse events of the surgery were evaluated over 6 months.The study enrolled 63 eyes (32 patients). The mean spherical equivalent decreased from -12.81 ± 3.11 diopters (D) preoperatively to -0.05 ± 0.27 D 6 months postoperatively; 96.8% of eyes were within ±0.50 D of the target and 100% of eyes were within ±1.00 D. All eyes had a decimal uncorrected distance visual acuity of 0.5 (20/40) or better at every follow-up visit. The safety and efficacy indices were 1.42 ± 0.34 and 1.11 ± 0.19, respectively. Postoperatively, the intraocular pressure (IOP) remained stable over time. No significant rises in IOP (including pupillary block) and no secondary cataract were found. After 6 months, the mean vault was 505.2 ± 258.9 μm (range 120-990 μm), and the mean endothelial cell loss was 2.0%.Implantation of the pIOL was safe, effective, predictable, and stable in the correction of moderate-to-high myopia in Han Chinese patients, even without peripheral iridectomy. PMID:27603356

  4. Optimization of a closed-loop gas system for the operation of Resistive Plate Chambers at the Large Hadron Collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capeans, M.; Glushkov, I.; Guida, R.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), thanks to their fast time resolution (˜1 ns), suitable space resolution (˜1 cm) and low production cost (˜50 €/m2), are widely employed for the muon trigger systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their large detector volume (they cover a surface of about 4000 m2 equivalent to 16 m3 of gas volume both in ATLAS and CMS) and the use of a relatively expensive Freon-based gas mixture make a closed-loop gas circulation unavoidable. It has been observed that the return gas of RPCs operated in conditions similar to the difficult experimental background foreseen at LHC contains a large amount of impurities potentially dangerous for long-term operation. Several gas-cleaning agents are currently in use in order to avoid accumulation of impurities in the closed-loop circuits. We present the results of a systematic study characterizing each of these cleaning agents. During the test, several RPCs were operated at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in a high radiation environment in order to observe the production of typical impurities: mainly fluoride ions, molecules of the Freon group and hydrocarbons. The polluted return gas was sent to several cartridges, each containing a different cleaning agent. The effectiveness of each material was studied using gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry techniques. Results of this test have revealed an optimized configuration of filters that is now under long-term validation.Gas optimization studies are complemented with a finite element simulation of gas flow distribution in the RPCs, aiming at its eventual optimization in terms of distribution and flow rate.

  5. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be substantially underestimated owing to deposition of SOA-forming compounds to chamber walls. We present here an experimental protocol to constrain the nature of wall deposition of organic vapors in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. The dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αw,i), which can be correlated through its volatility (Ci*) with the number of carbons (nC) and oxygens (nO) in the molecule. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is approached by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and chamber walls. Gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is established relatively rapidly in the presence of perfect accommodation of organic vapors onto particles or when a sufficiently large concentration of suspended particles is present. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will be dominant for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber walls even with perfect particle accommodation.

  6. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be underestimated, owing to deposition of SOA-forming vapors to the chamber wall. We present here an experimental protocol and a model framework to constrain the vapor-wall interactions in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is exhibited by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. By optimizing the model output to the observed vapor decay profiles, we identified that the dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αwi), which can be correlated through its volatility with the number of carbons and oxygens in the molecule. By doing so, the wall-induced deposition rate of intermediate/semi-volatile organic vapors can be reasonably predicted based on their molecular constituency. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and the chamber wall. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will dominate wall deposition for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For compounds characterized by relatively large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber wall even with perfect particle accommodation.

  7. Bespoke contrast-matched diblock copolymer nanoparticles enable the rational design of highly transparent Pickering double emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymaruk, Matthew J.; Thompson, Kate L.; Derry, Matthew J.; Warren, Nicholas J.; Ratcliffe, Liam P. D.; Williams, Clive N.; Brown, Steven L.; Armes, Steven P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the preparation of highly transparent oil-in-water Pickering emulsions using contrast-matched organic nanoparticles. This is achieved via addition of judicious amounts of either sucrose or glycerol to an aqueous dispersion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56-poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)500 [PGMA-PTFEMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles prior to high shear homogenization with an equal volume of n-dodecane. The resulting Pickering emulsions comprise polydisperse n-dodecane droplets of 20-100 μm diameter and exhibit up to 96% transmittance across the visible spectrum. In contrast, control experiments using non-contrast-matched poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56-poly(benzyl methacrylate)300 [PGMA56-PBzMA300] diblock copolymer nanoparticles as a Pickering emulsifier only produced conventional highly turbid emulsions. Thus contrast-matching of the two immiscible phases is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the preparation of highly transparent Pickering emulsions: it is essential to use isorefractive nanoparticles in order to minimize light scattering. Furthermore, highly transparent oil-in-water-in-oil Pickering double emulsions can be obtained by homogenizing the contrast-matched oil-in-water Pickering emulsion prepared using the PGMA56-PTFEMA500 nanoparticles with a contrast-matched dispersion of hydrophobic poly(lauryl methacrylate)39-poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)800 [PLMA39-PTFEMA800] diblock copolymer nanoparticles in n-dodecane. Finally, we show that an isorefractive oil-in-water Pickering emulsion enables fluorescence spectroscopy to be used to monitor the transport of water-insoluble small molecules (pyrene and benzophenone) between n-dodecane droplets. Such transport is significantly less efficient than that observed for the equivalent isorefractive surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Conventional turbid emulsions do not enable such a comparison to be made because the intense light scattering leads to substantial spectral

  8. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  9. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  10. Controlled release of insect sex pheromones from paraffin wax and emulsions.

    PubMed

    Atterholt, C A; Delwiche, M J; Rice, R E; Krochta, J M

    1999-02-22

    Paraffin wax and aqueous paraffin emulsions can be used as controlled release carriers for insect sex pheromones for mating disruption of orchard pests. Paraffin can be applied at ambient temperature as an aqueous emulsion, adheres to tree bark or foliage, releases pheromone for an extended period of time, and will slowly erode from bark and biodegrade in soil. Pheromone emulsions can be applied with simple spray equipment. Pheromone release-rates from paraffin were measured in laboratory flow-cell experiments. Pheromone was trapped from an air stream with an adsorbent, eluted periodically, and quantified by gas chromatography. Pheromone release from paraffin was partition-controlled, providing a constant (zero-order) release rate. A typical paraffin emulsion consisted of 30% paraffin, 4% pheromone, 4% soy oil, 1% vitamin E, 2% emulsifier, and the balance water. Soy oil and vitamin E acted as volatility suppressants. A constant release of oriental fruit moth pheromone from paraffin emulsions was observed in the laboratory for more than 100 days at 27 degreesC, with release-rates ranging from 0.4 to 2 mg/day, depending on the concentration and surface area of the dried emulsion. The use of paraffin emulsions is a viable method for direct application of insect pheromones for mating disruption. Sprayable formulations can be designed to release insect pheromones to the environment at a rate necessary for insect control by mating disruption. At temperatures below 38 degreesC, zero-order release was observed. At 38 degreesC and higher, pheromone oxidation occurred. A partition-controlled release mechanism was supported by a zero-order pheromone release-rate, low air/wax partition coefficients, and pheromone solubility in paraffin. PMID:9895411

  11. Controlled release of insect sex pheromones from paraffin wax and emulsions.

    PubMed

    Atterholt, C A; Delwiche, M J; Rice, R E; Krochta, J M

    1999-02-22

    Paraffin wax and aqueous paraffin emulsions can be used as controlled release carriers for insect sex pheromones for mating disruption of orchard pests. Paraffin can be applied at ambient temperature as an aqueous emulsion, adheres to tree bark or foliage, releases pheromone for an extended period of time, and will slowly erode from bark and biodegrade in soil. Pheromone emulsions can be applied with simple spray equipment. Pheromone release-rates from paraffin were measured in laboratory flow-cell experiments. Pheromone was trapped from an air stream with an adsorbent, eluted periodically, and quantified by gas chromatography. Pheromone release from paraffin was partition-controlled, providing a constant (zero-order) release rate. A typical paraffin emulsion consisted of 30% paraffin, 4% pheromone, 4% soy oil, 1% vitamin E, 2% emulsifier, and the balance water. Soy oil and vitamin E acted as volatility suppressants. A constant release of oriental fruit moth pheromone from paraffin emulsions was observed in the laboratory for more than 100 days at 27 degreesC, with release-rates ranging from 0.4 to 2 mg/day, depending on the concentration and surface area of the dried emulsion. The use of paraffin emulsions is a viable method for direct application of insect pheromones for mating disruption. Sprayable formulations can be designed to release insect pheromones to the environment at a rate necessary for insect control by mating disruption. At temperatures below 38 degreesC, zero-order release was observed. At 38 degreesC and higher, pheromone oxidation occurred. A partition-controlled release mechanism was supported by a zero-order pheromone release-rate, low air/wax partition coefficients, and pheromone solubility in paraffin.

  12. A model for the prediction of droplet size in Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2014-08-12

    Colloidal particles irreversibly adsorb at fluid-fluid interfaces stabilizing what are commonly called "Pickering" emulsions and foams. A simple geometrical model, the limited coalescence model, was earlier proposed to estimate droplet sizes in emulsions. This model assumes that all of the particles are effective in stabilization. The model predicts that the average emulsion drop size scales inversely with the total number of particles, confirmed qualitatively with experimental data on Pickering emulsions. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in synthesizing emulsions with oppositely charged particles (OCPs). In our experimental study, we observed that the drop size varies nonmonotonically with the number ratio of oppositely charged colloids, even when a fixed total number concentration of colloids is used, showing a minimum. We develop a mathematical model to predict this dependence of drop size on number ratio in such a mixed particle system. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that oppositely charged colloids form stable clusters due to the strong electrostatic attraction between them and that these clusters are the effective stabilizing agents. The proposed model is a two-parameter model, parameters being the ratio of effective charge of OCPs (denoted as k) and the size of the aggregate containing X particles formed due to aggregation of OCPs. Because the size of aggregates formed during emulsification is not directly measurable, we use suitable values of parameters k and X to best match the experimental observations. The model predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimentally observed nonmonotonic variation of droplet sizes. Using experiments and theory, we present a physical insight into the formation of OCP stabilized Pickering emulsions. Our model upgrades the existing Wiley's limited coalescence model as applied to emulsions containing a binary mixture of oppositely charged particles.

  13. Impact of model fat emulsions on sensory perception using repeated spoon to spoon ingestion.

    PubMed

    Appelqvist, I A M; Poelman, A A M; Cochet-Broch, M; Delahunty, C M

    2016-06-01

    Eating is a dynamic behaviour, in which food interacts with the mechanical and physiological environment of the mouth. This dynamic interaction changes the oral surfaces leaving particles of food and building up a film on the oral surfaces, which may impact on the temporal perception during the eating experience. The effect of repeated spoon to spoon ingestion of oil in water emulsion products (2%-50% w/w oil) was evaluated using descriptive in-mouth and after swallowing sensory attributes. Descriptive sensory analysis indicated that fatty mouthfeel and afterfeel perception (measured post swallowing) increased with the number of spoonfuls for emulsions containing 50% fat. This effect is likely due to the build-up of oil droplet layers deposited on the mouth surfaces. There was an enhancement of fatty afterfeel intensity for 50% fat emulsions containing the more lipophilic aroma ethylhexanoate compared to ethyl butanoate, indicating a cross-modal interaction. No increase in these attributes from spoon to spoon was observed for the low oil emulsions; since most of the oil in the emulsion was swallowed and very little oil was likely to be left in the mouth. Sweetness perception increased as fat level increased in the emulsion due to an increase in the effective concentration of sugar in the aqueous phase. However, the sweetness perceived did not change from spoon to spoon, suggesting that any oil-droplets deposited on the oral surfaces did not form a complete barrier, restricting access of the sucrose to the taste buds. This study highlights the importance of measuring the dynamic nature of eating and demonstrated change in sensory perception occurring with repeated ingestion of model emulsions, which was likely due to a change in mouth environment. PMID:27063245

  14. The atomization of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniarz-Press, L.; Ochowiak, M.; Rozanski, J.; Woziwodzki, S.

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on atomization of the emulsions flowing through twin-fluid atomizers obtained by the use of the digital microphotography method. The main elements of the test installation were: nozzle, reservoir, pump and measurement units of liquid flow. The photographs were taken by a digital camera with automatic flash at exposure time of 1/8000 s and subsequently analyzed using Image Pro-Plus. The oils used were mineral oils 20-90, 20-70, 20-50 and 20-30. The studies were performed at flow rates of liquid phase changed from 0.0014 to 0.011 (dm{sup 3}/s) and gas phase changed from 0.28 to 1.4 (dm{sup 3}/s), respectively. The analysis of photos shows that the droplets being formed during the liquid atomization have very different sizes. The smallest droplets have diameters of the order of 10 {mu}m. The experimental results showed that the changes in physical properties of a liquid phase lead to the significant changes in the spray characteristics. The analysis of the photos of water and emulsions atomization process showed that the droplet sizes are dependent on gas and liquid flow rates, construction of nozzle and properties of liquid. The differences between characteristics of atomization for water and emulsions have been observed. Analysis of photos on forming the droplets in air-water and air-emulsions systems showed that droplets are bigger in air-emulsion system (at the same value of gas to liquid mass ratio). The values of Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increased with increase of volume fraction of oil in emulsion. The droplet size increased with emulsion viscosity. (author)

  15. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Park, Jinhee; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  16. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  17. Emulsions stability, from dilute to dense emulsions -- role of drops deformation.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Steinchen, Annie

    2008-07-01

    The present paper starts with a review of fundamental descriptions based on physico-chemical laws derived for emulsions with a special interest for eventual evidences of drops deformation. A critical analysis of theories and experiments is given that leads the authors to propose new static and dynamic models for the approach to flocculation and coalescence of two deformable drops in dense and dilute environments of other neighboring drops. The model developed is based on an old paper by Albers and Overbeek for W/O dense emulsions with non-deformable particles, that has been improved recently first by Sengupta and Papadopoulos and then by Mishchuk et al. to account for all the interaction forces (electrostatic, van der Waals and steric). The basic idea here rests in the assumption that the flat surface area of the two coalescing drops, interacting in the field of other particles, increases when the distance between the particles decreases according to an exponential law with a characteristic length related to the disjoining force in the inter-particle film and to the capillary pressure that opposes flattening. The difficulty lies, indeed, in manifold interpretations on experimental observations so that no clear conclusion can be derived on mechanisms responsible for the deformation of droplets. This is why, from a pure theoretical and physical point of view, according to rather complicated models, we propose a much more simple approach that permits to define a capillary length as part of virtual operations. In a static approach, this length is based on analogy with electricity, namely repulsion leads to flatness while attraction to hump. Therefore this brings us to a definition of a length depending on the maximum value of the disjoining pressure in competition with the capillary pressure. Gravity also promotes flocculation, therefore we compare the maximum values of the surface forces acting between the surfaces of two floculating particles to gravity. Finally

  18. A Muon Exposure in the Tohoku High Resolution Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.; Shapire, A.; Widgoff, M.; Childress, S.; Murphy, T.; Alyea, E.D.; Mao, C.; Tai, Y.; Wang, S.; Wu, Y.; Xu, S.W.; /IHEP /MIT /Tohoku U. /Tohoku Gakuin U.

    1986-01-01

    The authors would like to propose an experiment to investigate muon induced interactions in the Tohoku freon bubble chamber, a high resolution 4{pi} detector. The Tohoku bubble chamber is located in Lab F on the neutrino beam line. The NT test beam line, which passes 4.5 meters east of the bubble chamber, has carried a muon beam to Lab F in the past. it appears possible to bend this beam to the west sufficiently to send muons of approximately 200 GeV to the present position of the Tohoku chamber. A bubble chamber experiment will have better systematics than a comparable muons cattering experiment using counters, but will have lower statistics. With the chamber, direct observation of neutral strange particle and charm particle production will make possible a unique clean study of the virtual photon interactions involved.

  19. Bespoke contrast-matched diblock copolymer nanoparticles enable the rational design of highly transparent Pickering double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rymaruk, Matthew J; Thompson, Kate L; Derry, Matthew J; Warren, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, Liam P D; Williams, Clive N; Brown, Steven L; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-14

    We report the preparation of highly transparent oil-in-water Pickering emulsions using contrast-matched organic nanoparticles. This is achieved via addition of judicious amounts of either sucrose or glycerol to an aqueous dispersion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56-poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)500 [PGMA-PTFEMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles prior to high shear homogenization with an equal volume of n-dodecane. The resulting Pickering emulsions comprise polydisperse n-dodecane droplets of 20-100 μm diameter and exhibit up to 96% transmittance across the visible spectrum. In contrast, control experiments using non-contrast-matched poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56-poly(benzyl methacrylate)300 [PGMA56-PBzMA300] diblock copolymer nanoparticles as a Pickering emulsifier only produced conventional highly turbid emulsions. Thus contrast-matching of the two immiscible phases is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the preparation of highly transparent Pickering emulsions: it is essential to use isorefractive nanoparticles in order to minimize light scattering. Furthermore, highly transparent oil-in-water-in-oil Pickering double emulsions can be obtained by homogenizing the contrast-matched oil-in-water Pickering emulsion prepared using the PGMA56-PTFEMA500 nanoparticles with a contrast-matched dispersion of hydrophobic poly(lauryl methacrylate)39-poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)800 [PLMA39-PTFEMA800] diblock copolymer nanoparticles in n-dodecane. Finally, we show that an isorefractive oil-in-water Pickering emulsion enables fluorescence spectroscopy to be used to monitor the transport of water-insoluble small molecules (pyrene and benzophenone) between n-dodecane droplets. Such transport is significantly less efficient than that observed for the equivalent isorefractive surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Conventional turbid emulsions do not enable such a comparison to be made because the intense light scattering leads to substantial spectral

  20. Bespoke contrast-matched diblock copolymer nanoparticles enable the rational design of highly transparent Pickering double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rymaruk, Matthew J; Thompson, Kate L; Derry, Matthew J; Warren, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, Liam P D; Williams, Clive N; Brown, Steven L; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-14

    We report the preparation of highly transparent oil-in-water Pickering emulsions using contrast-matched organic nanoparticles. This is achieved via addition of judicious amounts of either sucrose or glycerol to an aqueous dispersion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56-poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)500 [PGMA-PTFEMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles prior to high shear homogenization with an equal volume of n-dodecane. The resulting Pickering emulsions comprise polydisperse n-dodecane droplets of 20-100 μm diameter and exhibit up to 96% transmittance across the visible spectrum. In contrast, control experiments using non-contrast-matched poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56-poly(benzyl methacrylate)300 [PGMA56-PBzMA300] diblock copolymer nanoparticles as a Pickering emulsifier only produced conventional highly turbid emulsions. Thus contrast-matching of the two immiscible phases is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the preparation of highly transparent Pickering emulsions: it is essential to use isorefractive nanoparticles in order to minimize light scattering. Furthermore, highly transparent oil-in-water-in-oil Pickering double emulsions can be obtained by homogenizing the contrast-matched oil-in-water Pickering emulsion prepared using the PGMA56-PTFEMA500 nanoparticles with a contrast-matched dispersion of hydrophobic poly(lauryl methacrylate)39-poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)800 [PLMA39-PTFEMA800] diblock copolymer nanoparticles in n-dodecane. Finally, we show that an isorefractive oil-in-water Pickering emulsion enables fluorescence spectroscopy to be used to monitor the transport of water-insoluble small molecules (pyrene and benzophenone) between n-dodecane droplets. Such transport is significantly less efficient than that observed for the equivalent isorefractive surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Conventional turbid emulsions do not enable such a comparison to be made because the intense light scattering leads to substantial spectral

  1. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  2. Internal combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.L.

    1988-03-08

    In combination with a high-powered reciprocating piston internal combustion engine, an internal combustion cylinder assembly is described comprising: a cylinder head made of weldable material; a cylinder liner for containing and guiding a reciprocating piston of the engine, a coolant jacket adapted to receive a cooling fluid, mounted on and surrounding the cylinder liner, the jacket being attached to the cylinder head and detachably supported by the cylinder liner, and forming a cooling chamber around the cylinder liner; means to supply the cooling fluid to the cooling chamber and to discharge the cooling fluid therefrom.

  3. Kinetic Release of Alkalinity from Particle-Containing Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are typically employed during remediation to promote biotic reduction of contaminants. Emulsions, however, hold promise for encapsulated delivery of many types of active ingredients required for successful site remediation or long-term site stewardship. Our research is currently focused on using alkalinity-containing particles held within oil-in-water emulsions to sustain control of subsurface pH. Here we describe results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling conducted to quantify the kinetics associated with the emulsion delivery and alkalinity release process. Kinetically stable oil-in-water emulsions containing (~60 nmCaCO3 or ~100 nm MgO particles) were previously developed using soybean oil and Gum Arabic as a stabilizing agent. Batch and column experiments were employed to assess the accessibility and release of the alkalinity from the emulsion. Successive additions of HCl were used in batch systems to produce several pH responses (pH rebounds) that were subsequently modeled to elucidate release mechanisms and rates for varying emulsion compositions and particle types. Initial results suggest that a linear-driving-force model is generally able to capture the release behavior in the batch system when the temporally-constant, lumped mass-transfer coefficient is scaled by the fraction of particle mass remaining within the droplets. This result suggests that the rate limiting step in the release process may be the interphase transfer of reactive species at the oil-water interface. 1-d column experiments were also completed in order to quantify the extent and rate of alkalinity release from emulsion droplets retained in a sandy medium. Alkalinity release from the retained droplets treated a pH 4 influent water for 25-60 pore volumes (the duration depended on particle type and mass loading), and the cessation in treatment corresponded to exhaustion of the particle mass held within the oil. Column experiments were simulated

  4. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  5. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  6. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  7. Tuneable Rheological Properties of Fluorinated Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon Orellana, Laura Andreina; Riechers, Birte; Caen, Ouriel; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    Pickering emulsions are an appealing approach to stabilize liquid-liquid dispersions without surfactants. Recently, amphiphilic silica nanoparticles have been proposed as an alternative to surfactants for droplet microfluidics applications, where aqueous drops are stabilized in fluorinated oils. This system, proved to be effective in preventing the leakage of resorufin, a model dye that was known to leak in surfactant-stabilized drops. The overall capabilities of droplet-based microfluidics technology is highly dependent on the dynamic properties of droplets, interfaces and emulsions. Therefore, fluorinated pickering emulsions dynamic properties need to be characterized, understood and controlled to be used as a substitute of already broadly studied emulsions for droplet microfluidics applications. In this study, fluorinated pickering emulsions have been found to behave as a Herschel Bulkley fluid, representing a challenge for common microfluidic operations as re-injection and sorting of droplets. We found that this behavior is controlled by the interaction between the interfacial properties of the particle-laden interface and the bulk properties of the two phases

  8. Pickering emulsions with α-cyclodextrin inclusions: Structure and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Salmeron, Raul; Chaab, Ismail; Carn, Florent; Djabourov, Madeleine; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2016-11-15

    This paper explores structural, interfacial and thermal properties of two types of Pickering emulsions containing α-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: on one hand, emulsions were obtained between aqueous solutions of α-cyclodextrin and different oils (fatty acids, olive oil, silicone oil) and on the other hand, emulsions were obtained between these oils, water and micro or nano-platelet suspensions with inclusion complexes of hydrophobically-modified polysaccharides. The emulsions exhibit versatile properties according to the molecular architecture of the oils. Experiments were performed by microcalorimetry, X-ray diffraction and confocal microscopy. The aptitude of oil molecules to be threaded in α-cyclodextrin cavity is a determining parameter in emulsification and thermal stability. The heat flow traces and images showed dissolution, cooperative melting and de-threading of inclusion complexes which take place progressively, ending at high temperatures, close or above 100°C. Another important feature observed in the emulsions with micro-platelets is the partial substitution of the guest molecules occurring at room temperature at the oil/water interfaces without dissolution, possibly by a diffusion mechanism of the oil. Accordingly, the dissolution and the cooperative melting temperatures of the inclusion crystals changed, showing marked differences upon the type of guest molecules. The enthalpies of dissolution of crystals were measured and compared with soluble inclusions. PMID:27491001

  9. Pickering emulsions with α-cyclodextrin inclusions: Structure and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Salmeron, Raul; Chaab, Ismail; Carn, Florent; Djabourov, Madeleine; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2016-11-15

    This paper explores structural, interfacial and thermal properties of two types of Pickering emulsions containing α-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: on one hand, emulsions were obtained between aqueous solutions of α-cyclodextrin and different oils (fatty acids, olive oil, silicone oil) and on the other hand, emulsions were obtained between these oils, water and micro or nano-platelet suspensions with inclusion complexes of hydrophobically-modified polysaccharides. The emulsions exhibit versatile properties according to the molecular architecture of the oils. Experiments were performed by microcalorimetry, X-ray diffraction and confocal microscopy. The aptitude of oil molecules to be threaded in α-cyclodextrin cavity is a determining parameter in emulsification and thermal stability. The heat flow traces and images showed dissolution, cooperative melting and de-threading of inclusion complexes which take place progressively, ending at high temperatures, close or above 100°C. Another important feature observed in the emulsions with micro-platelets is the partial substitution of the guest molecules occurring at room temperature at the oil/water interfaces without dissolution, possibly by a diffusion mechanism of the oil. Accordingly, the dissolution and the cooperative melting temperatures of the inclusion crystals changed, showing marked differences upon the type of guest molecules. The enthalpies of dissolution of crystals were measured and compared with soluble inclusions.

  10. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  11. Flame-Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental chamber provides controlled environment for observation and measurement of flames propagating in expanding plume of flammable air/fuel mixture under atmospheric conditions. Designed to evaluate quenching capability of screen-type flame arresters in atmospheric vents of fuel cargo tanks aboard marine cargo vessels.

  12. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  13. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  14. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  15. Stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsions: recent advances and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juntao; Quinlan, Patrick James; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-05-14

    Pickering emulsions possess many advantages over traditional surfactant stabilized emulsions. For example, Pickering emulsions impart better stability against coalescence and, in many cases, are biologically compatible and environmentally friendly. These characteristics open the door for their use in a variety of industries spanning petroleum, food, biomedicine, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Depending on the application, rapid, but controlled stabilization and destabilization of an emulsion may be necessary. As a result, Pickering emulsions with stimuli-responsive properties have, in recent years, received a considerable amounts of attention. This paper provides a concise and comprehensive review of Pickering emulsion systems that possess the ability to respond to an array of external triggers, including pH, temperature, CO2 concentration, light intensity, ionic strength, and magnetic field. Potential applications for which stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsion systems would be of particular value, such as emulsion polymerization, enhanced oil recovery, catalyst recovery, and cosmetics, are discussed.

  16. Stability of whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions during chilled storage and temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, Sotirios; Reiffers-Magnani, Christel K; Bot, Arjen

    2004-06-16

    The stability of heat-treated and/or acidified, partly-crystalline-fat-based, whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions against partial coalescence was investigated during chilled storage (at 5 degrees C) and repeated temperature cycling (three times between 5 and 25 degrees C). Experiments focused on the evolution of firmness and droplet size (using pulsed field gradient NMR and scanning electron microscopy). Besides the effects of denaturation and/or acidification, the influence of the droplet size of the dispersed phase on emulsion stability was investigated also. It was found that heat treatment or acidification before emulsification led to unstable emulsions during temperature cycling, whereas heat treatment after acidification resulted in stable emulsions. PMID:15186103

  17. Optical transmission measurements for in-line monitoring of turbid oil-water emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Philipp; Dopf, Katja; Aichholz, Markus; Riedel, Boris; Lemmer, Uli; Freudig, Barbara; Zimmermann, Clifton; Gerken, Martina

    2014-05-01

    For absorbing media the concentration may be calculated directly from the optical transmission following the logarithmic dependence given in the Lambert-Beer law. Due to multiple scattering events in oil-water emulsions (e.g. milk, cream, etc.), these exhibit a nonlinear relationship between the attenuation and the oil concentration. We demonstrate that for increasing oil content in oil-water emulsions the attenuation first increases, then levels out, and finally even decreases for a fat content of 60%. Single-wavelength optical transmission measurements are found to be well suited for the in-line monitoring of oil-water emulsions of fat contents below 20%, e.g., for the in-line fat content monitoring of milk. Using experiments and ray-tracing simulations we evaluate system optimization.

  18. Pickering emulsions stabilized by hydrophilic nanoparticles: in situ surface modification by oil.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Yin, Dezhong

    2016-08-10

    We propose a novel route for the stabilization of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions using inherently hydrophilic nanoparticles. In the case of dialkyl adipate oils, in situ hydrophobisation of the particles by dissolved oil molecules in the aqueous phase enables stable emulsions to be formed. Emulsion stability is enhanced upon decreasing the chain length of the oil due to its increased solubility in the precursor aqueous phase. The oil thus acts like a surfactant in this respect in which hydrogen bonds form between the carbonyl group of the ester oil and the hydroxyl group on particle surfaces. The particles chosen include both fumed and precipitated anionic silica and cationic zirconia. Complementary experiments including relevant oil-water-solid contact angles and infra-red analysis of dried particles after contact with oil support the proposed mechanism. PMID:27452321

  19. Designing an Active Target Test Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, James; Tan Ahn Collaboration, Dr.; Nicolas Dixneuf Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The development of instrumentation in nuclear physics is crucial for advancing our ability to measure the properties of exotic nuclei. One limitation of the use of exotic nuclei in experiment is their very low production intensities. Recently, detectors, called active-target dectectors, have been developed to address this issue. Active-target detectors use a gas medium to image charged-particle tracks that are emitted in nuclear reactions. Last semester, I designed a vacuum chamber to be used in developing Micro-Pattern Gas detectors that will upgrade the capabilities of an active-target detector called the Prototype AT-TPC. With the exterior of the chamber complete, I have now been using an electric field modeling program, Garfield, developed by CERN to design a field cage to be placed within the vacuum chamber. The field cage will be a box-like apparatus consisting of two parallel metal plates connected with a resistor chain and attached to wires wrapped between them. The cage will provide a uniform electric field within the chamber to drift electrons from nuclear reactions down to the detector in the bottom of the chamber. These signals are then amplified by a proportional counter, and the data is sent to a computer. For the long term, we would like to incorporate a Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors in the interior of the chamber and eventually use the AT-TPC to examine various nuclei. Dr. Ahn is my advising professor.

  20. Annatto Polymeric Microparticles: Natural Product Encapsulation by the Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Zaine; Duran, Nelson; Guterres, Silvia S.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, the extract from annatto seeds was encapsulated in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) particles by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The particles were washed and centrifuged to remove excess stabilizer and then freeze-dried. The main compound of annatto seeds, bixin, has antioxidant properties as well…

  1. Responsive emulsions stabilized by stimuli-sensitive microgels: emulsions with special non-Pickering properties.

    PubMed

    Richtering, Walter

    2012-12-18

    Recent studies revealing the unique properties of microgel-stabilized responsive emulsions are discussed, and microgels are compared to classical rigid-particle Pickering stabilizers. Microgels are strongly swollen, lyophilic particles that become deformed at the oil-water interface and protrude only a little into the oil phase. Temperature- and pH-sensitive microgels allow us to prepare temperature- and pH-sensitive emulsions and thus enable us to prepare and break emulsions on demand. Although such emulsions are sensitive to pH, the stabilization of droplets is not due to electrostatic repulsion, instead the viscoelastic properties of the interface seem to dominate droplet stability. Being soft and porous, microgels behave distinctly differently from rigid particles at the interface: they are deformed and strongly flattened especially in the case of oil-in-water emulsions. The microgels are located mainly on the water side of the interface for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions. In contrast to rigid, solid particles, the behavior of microgels at oil-water interfaces does not depend only on the interfacial tension but also on the balance among the interfacial tension, swelling, elasticity, and deformability of the microgel, which needs to be considered. It is obvious that microgels as soft, porous particles are significantly different from classical rigid colloidal stabilizers in Pickering emulsions and we suggest avoiding the term Pickering emulsion when swollen microgels are employed. Microgel-stabilized emulsions require the development of new theoretical models to understand their properties. They open the door to new sophisticated applications.

  2. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  3. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C.; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions—the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  4. Detection of low energy antimatter with emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bollani, M.; Dei Cas, E.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Giammarchi, M.; Pistillo, C.; Romé, M.; Sala, S.; Scampoli, P.

    2016-06-01

    Emulsion detectors feature a very high position resolution and consequently represent an ideal device when particle detection is required at the micrometric scale. This is the case of quantum interferometry studies with antimatter, where micrometric fringes have to be measured. In this framework, we designed and realized a new emulsion based detector characterized by a gel enriched in terms of silver bromide crystal contents poured on a glass plate. We tested the sensitivity of such a detector to low energy positrons in the range 10–20 keV . The obtained results prove that nuclear emulsions are highly efficient at detecting positrons at these energies. This achievement paves the way to perform matter-wave interferometry with positrons using this technology.

  5. Optical diffusers based on silicone emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jui-Hao; Lien, Shui-Yang; Ho, Jeng-Rong; Shih, Teng-Kai; Chen, Chia-Fu; Chen, Chien-Chung; Whang, Wha-Tzong

    2009-12-01

    The present study provides an experimental approach for fabricating optical diffuser films based on silicone emulsions. The silicone emulsion consisting of silicone polymer (Sylgard 184) and NaCl aq. solution was used as the optical material of diffusers, wherein NaCl aq. solution was severed as surfactant to stabilize the emulsions. After stirring mechanically, microscaled water drop with various sizes distributed randomly in silicone polymer, wherein water drop was used as scattering diffusion particles. To modulate the volume of NaCl aq. solution, the diffusing performance of diffusers could be change by different amount drop particles. Thereafter, an optical examination was carried out to characterize optical properties, transmittance, and light diffusivity of volumetric diffuser films.

  6. Pickering emulsions and capsules stabilized by wool powder particles.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Takako; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2011-01-01

    We prepared emulsions and capsules that were stabilized by wool powder particles. These powder particles were adsorbed on oil-water interfaces, and they formed both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions. These emulsions were observed in ternary systems containing silicone oil, n-dodecane, fluoric oil, oleic acid, or linoleic acid as the oil phase.

  7. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  8. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  9. 44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING DRAIN PIPE FROM SUMP - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  10. 61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION PPP) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  11. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  12. 50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ENCLOSURE (LOCATION III) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  13. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  14. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  15. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  16. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  17. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Vaccum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. SEPAC system test in NASDA space chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kuriki, K.; Kawashima, N.; Nagatomo, M.; Kudo, I.; Ninomiya, K.; Ushirokawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Sasaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    Test results of the second NASDA space chamber test using SEPAC (Space Experiment with Particle Acceleration) prototype models are reviewed. A safety level of electrical charge is determined, the electromagnetic interference effect caused by an electron beam and MPD arcjet firing is evaluated, and beam spread for EBA software mask design is measured.

  20. [Perfluorocarbon emulsions and other corpuscular systems influence on neutrophil activity].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, D G; Safronova, V G; Sklifas, A N; Alovskaia, A A; Gapeev, A B; Obraztsov, V V; Chemeris, N K

    1997-01-01

    Influence of perfluorodecalin, perfluoromethilcyclohexylpiperidine, perfluorotributylamine emulsions on active oxygen form (AOF) generation by neutrophils has been studied. All investigated emulsions stabilized both proxanol 268 and egg yolk phospholipids inhibited PMA-stimulated neutrophil activity. Castor oil emulsion also inhibited the neutrophil activity. Neutrophil response for chemotactic peptide, was unchanged in the presence of all tested emulsions. We suppose that fast hydrophobic attachment of inert submicrone emulsion particles to cell surface provokes alteration of neutrophil plasma membrane function resulting in a decrease of AOF generation. PMID:9490112

  1. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops.

  2. Evaporation from an ionic liquid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Stig E

    2007-03-15

    The conditions during evaporation in a liquid crystal-in-ionic liquid microemulsion (LC/microEm) were estimated using the phase diagram of the system. The equations for selected tie lines were established and the coordinates calculated for the sites, at which the evaporation lines crossed the tie lines. These values combined with the coordinates for the phases connecting the tie lines were used to calculate the amounts and the composition of the fractions of the two phases present in the emulsion during the evaporation. One of the emulsion phases was a lamellar liquid crystal and high energy emulsification would lead to the liquid crystal being disrupted to form vesicles. Such a system tenders a unique opportunity to study the interaction between vesicles and normal micelles, which gradually change to inverse micelles over bi-continuous structures. The amount of vesicles in the liquid phase versus the fraction liquid crystal was calculated for two extreme cases of vesicle core size and shell thickness. The limit of evaporation while retaining the vesicle structure was calculated for emulsions of different original compositions assuming the minimum continuous liquid phase to be 50% of the emulsion.

  3. Evaporation from an ionic liquid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Stig E

    2007-03-15

    The conditions during evaporation in a liquid crystal-in-ionic liquid microemulsion (LC/microEm) were estimated using the phase diagram of the system. The equations for selected tie lines were established and the coordinates calculated for the sites, at which the evaporation lines crossed the tie lines. These values combined with the coordinates for the phases connecting the tie lines were used to calculate the amounts and the composition of the fractions of the two phases present in the emulsion during the evaporation. One of the emulsion phases was a lamellar liquid crystal and high energy emulsification would lead to the liquid crystal being disrupted to form vesicles. Such a system tenders a unique opportunity to study the interaction between vesicles and normal micelles, which gradually change to inverse micelles over bi-continuous structures. The amount of vesicles in the liquid phase versus the fraction liquid crystal was calculated for two extreme cases of vesicle core size and shell thickness. The limit of evaporation while retaining the vesicle structure was calculated for emulsions of different original compositions assuming the minimum continuous liquid phase to be 50% of the emulsion. PMID:17207810

  4. Surface active agent for emulsion fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Y.; Furuyama, Y.; Moriyama, N.

    1980-01-08

    A method is claimed for preparing a water-in-oil emulsion fuel which comprises emulsifying water in oil, in the presence of an emulsifying agency. The improvement comprises using as the emulsifying agent, a surfactant. The formula of this surfactant is presented.

  5. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  6. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  7. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  8. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-10-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  9. The stability of high internal phase emulsions at low surfactant concentration studied by small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Philip A; McGillivray, Duncan J; Mata, Jitendra P; Yaron, Peter N; White, John W

    2010-09-15

    The changes in structure of high internal phase emulsions at low concentrations and at elevated temperature are reported for comparison with the same emulsions under conditions well away from instability. Small angle neutron scattering measurements on aqueous ammonium nitrate droplets dispersed in hexadecane and stabilized by very small quantities of a polyisobutylene-based surfactant (PIBSA) as well as related inverse micellar solutions in hexadecane, have been made as a function of temperature and surfactant concentration. Experimental conditions here favour larger and more deformable droplets than in previous studies. Besides the expected micelles and adsorbed surfactant, planar bilayers of micron lateral extent between touching droplets cover 20% of the droplet surface. Another difference from previous experiments is that the oil phase in the emulsions, and corresponding inverse micellar solutions are different in micellar radii and composition. The differences, and changes with surfactant concentration and temperature, are attributed to fractionation of the polydisperse PIBSA in the emulsions, but not the inverse micellar solutions. At low PIBSA concentration and high temperature the SANS shows emulsion decomposing into separate oil and aqueous phases. This occurs when the micelle concentration reaches a very small but measurable value. The inverse micelles may suppress by steric action long wavelength unstable capillary waves in the bilayers. Depletion repulsion forces here have a minor role in the emulsion stabilization.

  10. Microfluidic preparation and self diffusion PFG-NMR analysis of monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Eric; Maan, Abid Aslam; Acquistapace, Simone; Burbidge, Adam; Johns, Michael L; Gunes, Deniz Z; Clausen, Pascal; Syrbe, Axel; Hugo, Julien; Schroen, Karin; Miralles, Vincent; Atkins, Tim; Gray, Richard; Homewood, Philip; Zick, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) double emulsions have been prepared using microfluidic glass devices designed and built primarily from off the shelf components. The systems were easy to assemble and use. They were capable of producing double emulsions with an outer droplet size from 100 to 40 μm. Depending on how the devices were operated, double emulsions containing either single or multiple water droplets could be produced. Pulsed-field gradient self-diffusion NMR experiments have been performed on the monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions to obtain information on the inner water droplet diameter and the distribution of the water in the different phases of the double emulsion. This has been achieved by applying regularization methods to the self-diffusion data. Using these methods the stability of the double emulsions to osmotic pressure imbalance has been followed by observing the change in the size of the inner water droplets over time. PMID:22964093

  11. Mixed O/W emulsions stabilized by solid particles: a model system for controlled mass transfer triggered by surfactant addition.

    PubMed

    Drelich, Audrey; Grossiord, Jean-Louis; Gomez, François; Clausse, Danièle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2012-11-15

    This article deals with a model mixed oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion system developed to study the effect of surfactants on mass transfer between dispersed oil droplets of different composition. In this purpose, our goal was to formulate O/W emulsions without any surface active agents as stabilizer, which was achieved by replacing surfactants by a mixture of hydrophilic/hydrophobic silica particles. Then, to study the specific role of surfactants in the oil transfer process, different types and concentrations of surfactants were added to the mixed emulsion after its preparation. In such a way, the same original emulsion can be used for all experiments and the influence of various surface active molecules on the oil transfer mechanism can be directly studied. The model mixed emulsion used consists of a mixture of hexadecane-in-water and tetradecane-in-water emulsions. The transfer between tetradecane and hexadecane droplets was monitored by using differential scanning calorimetry, which allows the detection of freezing and melting signals characteristic of the composition of the dispersed oil droplets. The results obtained showed that it is possible to trigger the transfer of tetradecane towards hexadecane droplets by adding surfactants at concentrations above their critical micellar concentration, measured in presence of solid particles, through micellar transport mechanism. PMID:22909967

  12. Particle-Stabilized Powdered Water-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of powdered water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions by gentle aeration of w/o emulsions stabilized by hydrophobic fumed silica particles in the presence of oleophobic fluorinated clay particles is reported for an alkane and a triglyceride oil. The resultant powders consist of water drops dispersed in oil globules themselves dispersed in air (w/o/a). They contain ∼80 wt % of the precursor w/o emulsion and were stable to phase separation for over 1 year but release oil and water when sheared on a substrate. Above a certain ratio of w/o emulsion:fluorinated clay particles, the powdered emulsions partially invert to an emulsion paste, composed of air bubbles and water droplets dispersed in oil. The tap density and angle of repose of the powdered emulsions were measured and compared with those of the corresponding powdered oils making up the continuous phase of the precursor emulsions. The contact angles of water droplets under oil on glass slides spin coated with silica particles and oil drops and w/o emulsion droplets in air on compressed disks of fluorinated clay particles are consistent with the stabilization of w/o emulsions and powdered emulsions, respectively. PMID:27002604

  13. Pickering w/o emulsions: drug release and topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Frelichowska, Justyna; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Mouaziz, Hanna; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Chevalier, Yves

    2009-02-23

    The skin absorption from Pickering emulsions as a new dosage form was investigated for the first time. Pickering emulsions are stabilized by adsorbed solid particles instead of emulsifier molecules. They are promising dosage forms that significantly differ from classical emulsions within several features. The skin permeation of a hydrophilic model penetrant (caffeine) was investigated from a w/o Pickering emulsion and compared to a w/o classical emulsion stabilized with an emulsifier. Both emulsions had the same composition and physicochemical properties in order to focus on the effect of the interfacial layer on the drug release and skin absorption processes. The highest permeation rates were obtained from the Pickering emulsion with a pseudo-steady state flux of 25 microg cm(-2)h(-1), threefold higher than from a classical emulsion (9.7 microg cm(-2)h(-1)). After 24h exposure, caffeine was mostly in the receptor fluid and in the dermis; cumulated amounts of caffeine were higher for the Pickering emulsion. Several physicochemical phenomena were investigated for clearing up the mechanisms of enhanced permeation from the Pickering emulsion. Among them, higher adhesion of Pickering emulsion droplets to skin surface was disclosed. The transport of caffeine adsorbed on silica particles was also considered relevant since skin stripping showed that aggregates of silica particles entered deeply the stratum corneum.

  14. Particle-Stabilized Powdered Water-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of powdered water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions by gentle aeration of w/o emulsions stabilized by hydrophobic fumed silica particles in the presence of oleophobic fluorinated clay particles is reported for an alkane and a triglyceride oil. The resultant powders consist of water drops dispersed in oil globules themselves dispersed in air (w/o/a). They contain ∼80 wt % of the precursor w/o emulsion and were stable to phase separation for over 1 year but release oil and water when sheared on a substrate. Above a certain ratio of w/o emulsion:fluorinated clay particles, the powdered emulsions partially invert to an emulsion paste, composed of air bubbles and water droplets dispersed in oil. The tap density and angle of repose of the powdered emulsions were measured and compared with those of the corresponding powdered oils making up the continuous phase of the precursor emulsions. The contact angles of water droplets under oil on glass slides spin coated with silica particles and oil drops and w/o emulsion droplets in air on compressed disks of fluorinated clay particles are consistent with the stabilization of w/o emulsions and powdered emulsions, respectively.

  15. [The enhancement effect of emulsion in flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-hang; Shen, Chun-yu

    2002-08-01

    A enhancement method of FAAS with emulsion as enhancement agent has been developed. The enhancement effect of emulsion made of three organic solvents (benzene, benzene-propanone, xylene), one organic reagent (dibutyl phthalate) and three emulsifiers (Tween-80, Triton X-100, OP) for iron, nickel, zinc, manganese and lead was studied. The results indicated that the enhancement is satisfactory. The emulsion with maximum enhancement percentage are respectively emulsion of benzene-OP-dibutyl phthalate with 89%, emulsion of xylene-Trition-100-dibutyl phthal with 34%, emulsion of benzene-Trition-100 with 121%, emulsion of benzene-Trition-100-dibutyl phthalate with 38% and 69% in sequence of the above elements. PMID:12938401

  16. Characteristics of Nano-emulsion for Cold Thermal Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi

    Phase change emulsion (PCE) is novel kind of heat storage and heat transfer fluids. It has characteristics as follows; greater apparent specific heat and higher heat transfer abilities in the phase change temperature range than conventional single phase heat transfer fluid. In this paper, a phase change emulsion, which has droplet diameter distribution of nanometer, were prepared. The Nano-emulsion was formed by low energy emulsification methods, as known the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method. Physical properties, such as viscosity, diameter and its distribution of emulsion were investigated. Especially, the relationships between preparation method and the concentration of surfactant have been discussed in detail. The results show that the viscosity of the Nano-emulsion is lower than the micro-emulsion, which was made by same mixing ratio of surfactant and concentration of phase change material. In addition, the Nano-emulsion clarified that stability was higher than microemulsions.

  17. Stabilization of perflubron emulsions with egg yolk phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Pelura, T J; Johnson, C S; Tarara, T E; Weers, J G

    1992-01-01

    Egg Yolk Phospholipid(EYP) has been used extensively as the primary surfactant in parenteral fat emulsions for many years. The simplicity, functionality and physiologic tolerance of EYP has contributed greatly to its success in the intravenous emulsion arena. The mechanism of stabilization in triglyceride emulsions is well understood; however, this is not the case with perfluorocarbon emulsions. Interfacial models, as well as emulsion stability studies, have been conducted utilizing EYP of varied composition in order to derive a structure/function relationship. Our studies indicate that minor components, total unsaturation, acyl chain length and presence of charged species have significant impact on the functional properties of EYP and the subsequent stability of the emulsion product. These findings contribute to our ability to design and manipulate natural surfactants with superior properties for use in medical applications of perfluorocarbon emulsions. PMID:1391521

  18. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the

  19. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  20. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  1. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  2. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  3. Partitioning of Laponite Clay Platelets in Pickering Emulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Brunier, Barthélémy; Sheibat-Othman, Nida; Chevalier, Yves; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2016-01-12

    Partitioning of laponite disklike clay platelets between polymer particles and bulk aqueous phase was investigated in Pickering surfactant-free emulsion polymerization of styrene. Adsorption of laponite clay platelets plays an important role in the stabilization of this system, influencing the particle size and the number of particles, and, hence, the reaction rate. Adsorption isotherms show that, while the laponite clay platelets are almost fully exfoliated in water, they form multilayers on the surface of the polymer particles by the end of polymerization, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This observation is supported by quartz crystal microbalance, conductivity, and TEM measurements, which reveal interactions between the clay and polystyrene, as a function of the ionic strength. The strong adsorption of clay platelets leaves a low residual concentration in the aqueous phase that cannot cause further nucleation of polymer particles, as demonstrated during seeded emulsion polymerization experiments in the presence of a high excess of clay. A Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-type model for laponite adsorption on polystyrene particles matches the adsorption isotherms.

  4. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  5. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W. ); Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J. ); Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome ); Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized ({approx}1 {times} 2 m{sup 2}) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers.

  7. Visible leaf injury in young trees of Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus robur L. in relation to ozone uptake and ozone exposure. An Open-Top Chambers experiment in South Alpine environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, G; Marzuoli, R; Desotgiu, R; Bussotti, F; Ballarin-Denti, A

    2008-03-01

    An Open-Top Chambers experiment on Fagus sylvatica and Quercus robur seedlings was conducted in order to compare the performance of an exposure-based (AOT40) and a flux-based approaches in predicting the appearance of ozone visible injuries on leaves. Three different ozone treatments (charcoal-filtered; non-filtered; and open plots) and two soil moisture treatments (watered and non-watered plots) were performed. A Jarvisian stomatal conductance model was drawn up and parameterised for both species and typical South Alpine environmental conditions, thus allowing the calculation of ozone stomatal fluxes for every treatment. A critical ozone flux level for the onset of leaf visible injury in beech was clearly identified between 32.6 and 33.6 mmolO3 m(-2). In contrast, it was not possible to identify an exposure critical level using the AOT40 index. Water stress delayed the onset of the leaf visible injuries, but the flux-based approach was able to take it into account accurately.

  8. Study of hadron bundles observed in Chacaltaya two-story emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, H.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of hadron-rich families associated with few gamma-ray emission named Centauro and Mini-Centauro phemonena was reported. It was investigated whether these are produced by the special type of interaction different from the ordinary pion multiple production or not. The experimental results are compared with simulation calculation based on ordinary multiple pion production model. Both hadron multiplicity distribution, obtained from the present observation and the simulation calculation, show almost the same distribution which means that hadron bundles of such smaller multiplicities are considered to originate from successive interactions of surviving nucleon with the nature of multiple production during passage through the atmosphere.

  9. Ultrasonication-assisted preparation and characterization of emulsions and emulsion gels for topical drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Behera, Baikuntha; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal

    2015-03-01

    The current study describes the use of ultrasonication for the preparation of biphasic emulsions and emulsion gels for topical drug delivery. Sorbitan monostearate (SMS) was used as the surfactant for stabilizing the interface of sesame oil (apolar phase) and water (polar phase). Emulsions were formed at lower concentrations of SMS, whereas emulsion gels were formed at higher concentrations of SMS. The formulations were characterized by fluorescent microscopy, X-ray diffraction, viscosity, stress relaxation, spreadability, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Fluorescence microscopy suggested formation of oil-in-water type of formulations. There was an increase in the viscosity, bulk resistance, and firmness of the formulations as the proportions of SMS was increased. The emulsion gels were viscoelastic in nature. Thermal studies suggested higher thermodynamic stability at higher proportions of either SMS or water. Metronidazole, a model antimicrobial drug, was incorporated within the formulations. The release of the drug from the formulations was found to be diffusion mediated. The drug-loaded formulations showed sufficient antimicrobial efficiency to be used as carriers for topical antimicrobial drug delivery. PMID:25470664

  10. Automatic track recognition for large-angle minimum ionizing particles in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, T.; Fukunaga, S.; Ishida, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuo, T.; Mikado, S.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Sudou, J.; Ariga, A.; Tufanli, S.

    2014-12-01

    We previously developed an automatic track scanning system which enables the detection of large-angle nuclear fragments in the nuclear emulsion films of the OPERA experiment. As a next step, we have investigated this system's track recognition capability for large-angle minimum ionizing particles (1.0 <= |tan θ| <= 3.5). This paper shows that, for such tracks, the system has a detection efficiency of 95% or higher and reports the achieved angular accuracy of the automatically recognized tracks. This technology is of general purpose and will likely contribute not only to various analyses in the OPERA experiment, but also to future experiments, e.g. on low-energy neutrino and hadron interactions, or to future research on cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions carried by balloons.

  11. The membrane chamber: a new type of in vitro recording chamber.

    PubMed

    Hill, M R H; Greenfield, S A

    2011-01-30

    In vitro brain slice electrophysiology is a powerful and highly successful technique where a thin slice is cut from the brain and kept alive artificially in a recording chamber. The design of this recording chamber is pivotal to the success and the quality of such experiments. Most often one of two types of chambers is used today, the interface chamber or the submerged chamber. These chambers, however, have the disadvantage that they are limited in either their experimental or their physiological properties respectively. Here we present a new working principle for an in vitro chamber design which aims at combining the advantages of the classical designs whilst overcoming their disadvantages. This is achieved by using a semipermeable membrane on which the slice is placed. The membrane allows for a fast flow of artificial cerebrospinal fluid of up to at least 17 ml/min. Due to a Bernoulli effect, this high speed flow also causes a 64% increase in flow of solution across the membrane on which the slice rests. The fact that the membrane is transparent introduces the possibility of wide field inverted optical imaging to brain slice electrophysiology. The utility of this setup was demonstrated in the recording of local field potential, single cell and voltage sensitive dye imaging data simultaneously from an area smaller then 1/8mm(2). The combination of all these features in the membrane chamber make it a versatile and promising device for many current and future in vitro applications, especially in the regard to optical imaging. PMID:21075142

  12. Droplet Dynamics of a Flowing Emulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cypull, Olivia; Feitosa, Klebert

    The inner workings of glassy systems have long been a topic of interest for soft material scientists. Similarities between the jamming behavior of emulsions and the glass transition of glassy systems have prompted the conjecture that they might share the same underlying mechanism. Here we study a dense oil-in-water emulsion system forced to flow through a narrow microchannel. By matching the index of refraction of the two phases, we image the internal dynamics of the droplets in a confocal microscope. At low velocity speeds, we find that the velocity along the edge of the microchannel was not significantly different than then the average droplet velocity in the bulk suggesting a near plug flow. By contrast the droplets near the edge experienced more movement perpendicular to the flow indicating the fluidization effect of the confining walls.

  13. Heavy crude oils/particle stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Iva; Sjöblom, Johan; Øye, Gisle; Simon, Sébastien; Grimes, Brian A; Paso, Kristofer

    2011-12-12

    Fluid characterization is a key technology for success in process design for crude oil mixtures in the future offshore. In the present article modern methods have been developed and optimized for crude oil applications. The focus is on destabilization processes in w/o emulsions, such as creaming/sedimentation and flocculation/coalescence. In our work, the separation technology was based on improvement of current devices to promote coalescence of the emulsified systems. Stabilizing properties based on particles was given special attention. A variety of particles like silica nanoparticles (AEROSIL®), asphalthenes, wax (paraffin) were used. The behavior of these particles and corresponding emulsion systems was determined by use of modern analytical equipment, such as SARA fractionation, NIR, electro-coalescers (determine critical electric field), Langmuir technique, pedant drop technique, TG-QCM, AFM.

  14. Oil-based emulsion vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Strioga, Marius; Ascarateil, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are critical components in experimental and licensed vaccines used in human and veterinary medicine. When aiming to evoke an immune response to a purified antigen, the administration of antigen alone is often insufficient, unless the antigen contains microbial structures or has a natural particulate structure. In most cases, the rationale to use an adjuvant is obvious to the experimental immunologist or the professional vaccinologist, who is familiar with the nature of the antigen, and the aim of the vaccine to elicit a specific antibody response and/or a specific type of T cell response. In this unit, we describe protocols to formulate antigens with oil-based emulsions. Such emulsions represent a major prototype adjuvant category that is frequently used in experimental preclinical vaccines, as well as veterinary and human vaccines.

  15. Analytical applications of emulsions and microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Burguera, José Luis; Burguera, Marcela

    2012-07-15

    Dispersion systems like emulsions and microemulsions are able to solubilize both polar and non-polar substances due to the special arrangement of the oil and aqueous phases. The main advantages of using emulsions or microemulsions in analytical chemistry are that they do not require the previous destruction of the sample matrix or the use of organic solvents as diluents, and behave similarly to aqueous solutions, frequently allowing the use of aqueous standard solutions for calibration. However, it appears that there are many contradictory concepts and misunderstandings often related to terms definition when referring to such systems. The main aim of this review is to outline the differences between these two aggregates and to give an overview of the most recent advances on their analytical applications with emphasis on the potentiality of the on-line emulsification processes. PMID:22817921

  16. Heavy crude oils/particle stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Iva; Sjöblom, Johan; Øye, Gisle; Simon, Sébastien; Grimes, Brian A; Paso, Kristofer

    2011-12-12

    Fluid characterization is a key technology for success in process design for crude oil mixtures in the future offshore. In the present article modern methods have been developed and optimized for crude oil applications. The focus is on destabilization processes in w/o emulsions, such as creaming/sedimentation and flocculation/coalescence. In our work, the separation technology was based on improvement of current devices to promote coalescence of the emulsified systems. Stabilizing properties based on particles was given special attention. A variety of particles like silica nanoparticles (AEROSIL®), asphalthenes, wax (paraffin) were used. The behavior of these particles and corresponding emulsion systems was determined by use of modern analytical equipment, such as SARA fractionation, NIR, electro-coalescers (determine critical electric field), Langmuir technique, pedant drop technique, TG-QCM, AFM. PMID:22047991

  17. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of a virgin coconut oil emulsion and commercial food supplement emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yih Phing; Koh, Soo Peng; Long, Kamariah; Long, Shariah; Ahmad, Sharifah Zarah Syed; Tan, Chin Ping

    2014-07-01

    Food manufacturers are interested in developing emulsion-based products into nutritional foods by using beneficial oils, such as fish oil and virgin coconut oil (VCO). In this study, the physicochemical properties of a VCO oil-in-water emulsion was investigated and compared to other commercial oil-in-water emulsion products (C1, C2, C3, and C4). C3 exhibited the smallest droplet size of 3.25 µm. The pH for the emulsion samples ranged from 2.52 to 4.38 and thus were categorised as acidic. In a texture analysis, C2 was described as the most firm, very adhesive and cohesive, as well as having high compressibility properties. From a rheological viewpoint, all the emulsion samples exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour, which manifested as a shear-thinning property. The G'G'' crossover illustrated by the VCO emulsion in the amplitude sweep graph but not the other commercial samples illustrated that the VCO emulsion had a better mouthfeel. In this context, the VCO emulsion yielded the highest zeta potential (64.86 mV), which was attributed to its strong repulsive forces, leading to a good dispersion system. C2 comprised the highest percentage of fat among all emulsion samples, followed by the VCO emulsion, with 18.44% and 6.59%, respectively.

  18. Emulsion characteristics, chemical and textural properties of meat systems produced with double emulsions as beef fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, double emulsions are stated to have a promising potential in low-fat food production, however, there are very few studies on their possible applications in meat matrices. We aimed to investigate the quality of beef emulsion systems in which beef fat was totally replaced by double emulsions (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil and sodium caseinate (SC) by two-step emulsification procedure. Incorporation of W1/O/W2 emulsion resulted in reduced lipid, increased protein content, and modified fatty acid composition. W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments had lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with beef fat. Increased concentrations of W1/O/W2 emulsions resulted in significant changes in texture parameters. TBA values were lower in W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments than control treatment after 60days of storage. In conclusion, our study confirms that double emulsions had promising impacts on modifying fatty acid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable beef emulsion systems. PMID:26995773

  19. Double emulsions based on silicone-fluorocarbon-water and their skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Mahrhauser, Denise-Silvia; Fischer, Claudia; Valenta, Claudia

    2016-02-10

    Double emulsions have significant potential in pharmacy and cosmetics due to the feasibility of combining incompatible substances in one product and the protection of sensitive compounds by incorporating them into their innermost phase. However, a major drawback of double emulsions is their thermodynamic instability and their strong tendency to coalesce. In the present study, the physicochemical stability, the skin permeation and the skin penetration potential of modified semi-solid double emulsions was investigated. The double emulsions were prepared of the cosmetically applied perfluoropolyethers Fomblin HC/04 or Fomblin HC-OH, silicone, carbomer and water. Measurement of the droplet size and examination of the microscopic images confirmed their physicochemical stability over the observation period of eight weeks. Franz-type diffusion cell experiments revealed no increase in curcumin permeation due to the employed perfluoropolyethers compared to the respective control formulations. The formulations used as control were O/W macroemulsions with or without a Polysorbate 80/Sorbitane monooleate 80 surfactant combination. Likewise, tape stripping studies showed no penetration enhancing effect of the employed perfluoropolyethers which is desirable as both perfluoropolyethers are commonly applied components in human personal-care products. PMID:26688033

  20. Ultrasonic attenuation spectroscopy of emulsions with droplet sizes greater than 10 microm.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andreas; Voigt, Tino; Ripperger, Siegfried

    2007-11-15

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurement is a frequently used tool for non-destructive determination of dispersion characteristics. Useful information like particle or droplet size and their concentration can be obtained, if the relation between size and attenuation of the dispersion is known. In this work, the theoretical model by Faran for the intermediate sound wave regime (IWR) is presented in combination with experimental data. In the IWR, the acoustic behavior is governed by elastic scattering rather than by dissipative effects. Experiments with emulsion of droplet sizes greater than 10 mum were carried out. Silicone oil, sunflower oil and olive oil were selected for the disperse phase of the oil-in-water emulsions. First, emulsions having droplets in the micrometer range were created. Afterwords, attenuation measurements of different concentrated emulsion were carried out. Some adjustments reflecting concentration influence were performed to outline the agreement between calculations and measurements. The validity of the model can be confirmed, if the volume fraction of the disperse phase is considered as a variable. Finally, droplet size distributions from theoretical attenuation spectra could be calculated based on a log-normal distribution.

  1. Effect of a perfluorochemical emulsion on the radiation response of BA1112 rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Martin, D F; Porter, E A; Fischer, J J; Rockwell, S

    1987-10-01

    The effect of treatment with a perfluorochemical emulsion (Fluosol DA, 20%), carbogen, or the combination of these two agents on the radiation response of BA1112 tumors in WAG/rij rats was examined. Fluosol and carbogen as single agents had only small effects on the tumor cell survival curve. The combination of Fluosol plus carbogen had a larger effect on tumor cell survival, reducing the hypoxic fraction of the tumor from 23 to 1.6%. The amount of sensitization was a function of the Fluosol dose, with maximal augmentation of the radiation response obtained at doses of 7.5-15 ml/kg. Carbogen pretreatments ranging from 5 to 60 min in duration all had similar effects on tumor radiosensitivity. The effect of the perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen on the survival of irradiated tumor cells appears to reflect changes in tumor oxygenation, rather than cytotoxic or immunological effects, since the perfluorochemical emulsion (with or without carbogen) had no effect on the viability of cells in unirradiated tumors. These experiments extend previous studies by ourselves and others using mouse tumors to show that the combination of a perfluorochemical emulsion and carbogen breathing can also increase the radiation response of a nonimmunogenic rat tumor. PMID:3116598

  2. Feasibility of low frequency ultrasound for water removal from crude oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Antes, Fabiane G; Diehl, Liange O; Pereira, Juliana S F; Guimarães, Regina C L; Guarnieri, Ricardo A; Ferreira, Bianca M S; Dressler, Valderi L; Flores, Erico M M

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of indirect application of low frequency ultrasound for demulsification of crude oil was investigated without using chemical demulsifiers. Experiments were performed in an ultrasonic bath with frequency of 35 kHz. Synthetic emulsions with water content of 12%, 35% and 50% and median of droplet size distribution (DSD), median D(0.5), of 5, 10 and 25 μm were prepared from crude oil with API density of 19 (heavy crude oil) and submitted to the proposed ultrasound-assisted demulsification procedure. Experimental conditions as temperature, time of exposition to ultrasound and ultrasonic power were evaluated. Separation of water from crude oil emulsion was observed for all emulsions investigated. Demulsification efficiency up to 65% was obtained for emulsion with 50% of water content and DSD of 10 μm. Higher efficiency of demulsification was achieved using US temperature of 45 °C and ultrasound power of 160 W by 15 min. Results obtained in this study showed that ultrasound could be considered a promising technology for industrial crude oil treatment and respective water removal.

  3. Effect of fibrous filter properties on the oil-in-water-emulsion separation and filtration performance.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Swarna; von Arnim, Volkmar; Stegmaier, Thomas; Planck, Heinrich

    2011-06-15

    Separation of secondary emulsions of dispersed droplet size less than 10 μm, by means of fibrous medium is a very complex but important process. The study investigates the influence of thin fibrous filter properties, i.e. surface energy, pore size and porosity on the separation performance of an isooctane in water emulsion (0.2%, mean drop size 2 μm). Experiments were carried out on five different filter media with a wide variation in their pore size (2-51 μm), surface energy (14-46 mN/m) and porosity (0.46-0.87) at similar process conditions. Filter media with different wettability are obtained by applying various hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings. All the used coatings contain nanoparticles (25 nm) to impart nanoscale surface roughness at the single fiber surface. Besides emulsion properties and operating conditions, the phase separation mechanism and performance highly depends on pore size, surface energy and porosity of the filter media. More complete coalescence takes place at reduced pore size and at a surface preferentially wetted by the dispersed phase. Whereas when the pore size equals to the influent droplet size, then the surface wettability of filter is less effective and the separation mechanism is governed by inflow velocity. The emulsion inflow velocity and pressure drop are significantly affected by the filter media air permeability but do not depend on filter surface energy.

  4. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  5. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  6. Environmental calibration chamber operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal vacuum capabilities are provided for the development, calibration, and functional operation checks of flight sensors, sources, and laboratory and field instruments. Two systems are available. The first is a 46 cm diameter diffusion pumped vacuum chambler of the bell jar variety. It has an internal thermal shroud, LN2 old trap, two viewing ports, and various electrical and fluid feedthroughs. The other, also an oil diffusion pumped system, consists of a 1.8 m diameter by 2.5 m long stainless steel vacuum tank, associated pumping and control equipment, a liquid nitrogen storage and transfer system and internal IR/visible calibration sources. This is a two story system with the chamber located on one floor and the pumping/cryogenic systems located on the floor below.

  7. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-02-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  8. [Multiple emulsions; bioactive compounds and functional foods].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The continued appearance of scientific evidence about the role of diet and/or its components in health and wellness, has favored the emergence of functional foods which currently constitute one of the chief factors driving the development of new products. The application of multiple emulsions opens new possibilities in the design and development of functional foods. Multiple emulsions can be used as an intermediate product (food ingredient) into technological strategies normally used in the optimization of the presence of bioactive compounds in healthy and functional foods. This paper presents a summary of the types, characteristics and formation of multiple emulsions, possible location of bioactive compounds and their potential application in the design and preparation of healthy and functional foods. Such applications are manifested particularly relevant in relation to quantitative and qualitative aspects of lipid material (reduced fat/calories and optimization of fatty acid profile), encapsulation of bioactive compounds mainly hydrophilic and sodium reduction. This strategy offers interesting possibilities regarding masking flavours and improving sensory characteristics of foods. PMID:24160194

  9. Simple and double emulsions via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrero, Antonio; Loscertales, Ignacio G.

    2005-11-01

    Generation of nanoemulsions is of great interest in medical and pharmaceutical applications; drug delivery or antiviral emulsions are typical examples. The use of electrosprays for dispersing liquids inside liquid insulator baths have been recently reported, (Barrero et al. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 272, 104, 2004). Capsules, nanotubes and coaxial nanofibers have been obtained from electrified coaxial jets (Loscertales et al. Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; J. American Chem. Soc. 126, 5376, 2004). Here we present a method for making double emulsions (both water-oil-water and o/w/o) based on the generation of compound electrosprays inside insulator liquid baths. Basically, a conducting liquid injected throughout a capillary needle is electroatomized in cone-jet mode inside a dielectric liquid bath. A third insulating liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone to form a second meniscus. Then, a steady coaxial jet, in which the insulating liquid is coated by the conducting one, develops. A double emulsion forms as a result of the jet breaking up into compound droplets electrically charged. Experimental results carried out with glycerine and different oils in a bath of heptane are reported.

  10. [Multiple emulsions; bioactive compounds and functional foods].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The continued appearance of scientific evidence about the role of diet and/or its components in health and wellness, has favored the emergence of functional foods which currently constitute one of the chief factors driving the development of new products. The application of multiple emulsions opens new possibilities in the design and development of functional foods. Multiple emulsions can be used as an intermediate product (food ingredient) into technological strategies normally used in the optimization of the presence of bioactive compounds in healthy and functional foods. This paper presents a summary of the types, characteristics and formation of multiple emulsions, possible location of bioactive compounds and their potential application in the design and preparation of healthy and functional foods. Such applications are manifested particularly relevant in relation to quantitative and qualitative aspects of lipid material (reduced fat/calories and optimization of fatty acid profile), encapsulation of bioactive compounds mainly hydrophilic and sodium reduction. This strategy offers interesting possibilities regarding masking flavours and improving sensory characteristics of foods.

  11. Evaluation on oxidative stability of walnut beverage emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Liu, Fuguo; Xue, Yanhui; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-07-15

    Walnut beverage emulsions were prepared with walnut kernels, mixed nonionic emulsifiers and xanthan gum. The effects of food antioxidants on the physical stability and lipid oxidation of walnut beverage emulsions were investigated. The results showed that tea polyphenols could not only increase the droplet size of the emulsions, but also enhance physical stability during the thermal storage at 62 ± 1 °C. However, water-dispersed oil-soluble vitamin E and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin obviously decreased the physical stability of the emulsion system during the thermal storage. BHT and natural antioxidant extract had scarcely influenced on the physical stability of walnut beverage emulsions. Tea polyphenols and BHT could significantly retard lipid oxidation in walnut beverage emulsions against thermal and UV light exposure during the storage. Vitamin E exhibited the prooxidant effect during the thermal storage and the antioxidant attribute during UV light exposure. Other food antioxidants had no significant effect on retarding lipid oxidation during thermal or light storage.

  12. Turbulent flow of oil-water emulsions with polymer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhai, V. N.; Monkam Clovis Le Grand, Monkam; Abdousaliamov, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    The article outlines direct and reverse oil-water emulsions. Microphotography study of these emulsions was carried out. The effect of water-soluble and oil soluble polymers on the emulsion structure and their turbulent flow velocity in cylindrical channel was investigated. It has been experimentally proven that if the fluid being transported is not homogeneous, but a two-phase oil-water emulsion, only the polymer that is compatible with dispersion medium and capable of dissolving in this medium can reduce the hydrodynamic resistance of the fluid flow. Thus, the resistance in direct emulsions can be reduced by water- soluble polyacrylamide, while oil-soluble polyhexene can be applied for reverse emulsions.

  13. Automatic readout for nuclear emulsions in muon radiography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Bozza, C.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Kose, U.; Lauria, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Montesi, C.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Russo, A.; Sirignano, C.; Stellacci, S. M.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear emulsions are an effective choice in many scenarios of volcano radiography by cosmic-ray muons. They are cheap and emulsion-based detectors require no on-site power supply. Nuclear emulsion films provide sub-micrometric tracking precision and intrinsic angular accuracy better than 1 mrad. Imaging the inner structure of a volcano requires that the cosmic-ray absorption map be measured on wide angular range. High-absorption directions can be probed by allowing for large statistics, which implies a large overall flux, i.e. wide surface for the detector. A total area of the order of a few m2 is nowadays typical, thanks to the automatic readout tools originally developed for high-energy physics experiments such as CHORUS, PEANUT, OPERA. The European Scanning System is now being used to read out nuclear emulsion films exposed to cosmic rays on the side of volcanoes. The structure of the system is described in detail with respect to both hardware and software. Its present scanning speed of 20 cm2/h/side/microscope is suitable to fulfil the needs of the current exposures of nuclear emulsion films for muon radiograph, but it is worth to notice that applications in volcano imaging are among the driving forces pushing to increase the performances of the system. Preliminary results for the Unzen volcano of a joint effort by research groups in Italy and Japan show that the current system is already able to provide signal/background ratio in the range 100÷10000:1, depending on the quality cuts set in the off-line data analysis. The size of the smallest detectable structures in that experimental setup is constrained by the available statistics in the region of highest absorption to about 50 mrad, or 22 m under the top of the mountain. Another exposure is currently taking data at the Stromboli volcano. Readout of the exposed films is expected to begin in March 2012, and preliminary results will be available soon after. An effort by several universities and INFN has

  14. In Situ Assembly of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Nanoparticles at Oil-Water Interfaces as a Versatile Strategy To Form Stable Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Amitesh; John, Vijay T; Bose, Arijit

    2015-09-30

    We report a conceptually new strategy for forming particle-stabilized emulsions. We begin with stable, dilute suspensions of highly hydrophilic nanoparticles in water and hydrophobic nanoparticles in oil. When the two suspensions are mixed, attractive interactions between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic particles cause them to assemble at the oil-water interfaces into partially wettable or Janus-like clusters that effectively stabilize emulsions. By tuning the ratio of hydrophilic to hydrophobic particles in the clusters, both water-in-oil as well as oil-in-water emulsions can be formed. The van der Waals interaction energy between two particle types across an aqueous-organic interface provide a systematic guide to particle and liquid combinations that can form stable emulsions using our strategy, or identify when emulsions will not form. Our experiments and analysis provide a new platform for the formation of particle-stabilized emulsions and can be used to combine particles of different functionalities at emulsion droplet surfaces for generating novel materials.

  15. [Carnol as a stabilizer of the emulsion I system].

    PubMed

    De Almeida Cunha, B C; Dini, M E

    1975-01-01

    "Carnol" insaponificable fraction from "chalky" carnauba wax, was tested for its emulsified system estabilizing abilities. The required HLB of test system, made up of mineral oil, water, polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate and sorbitam monooleate, was 9.0. 1% of carnol (w/v) formed A/O emulsions (HLB less than or equal to 7.0), 2% carnol estabilized O/A emulsions with the required HLB of the test system and 3% carnol estabilized both types of emulsions. PMID:1228835

  16. [Carnol as a stabilizer of the emulsion I system].

    PubMed

    De Almeida Cunha, B C; Dini, M E

    1975-01-01

    "Carnol" insaponificable fraction from "chalky" carnauba wax, was tested for its emulsified system estabilizing abilities. The required HLB of test system, made up of mineral oil, water, polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate and sorbitam monooleate, was 9.0. 1% of carnol (w/v) formed A/O emulsions (HLB less than or equal to 7.0), 2% carnol estabilized O/A emulsions with the required HLB of the test system and 3% carnol estabilized both types of emulsions.

  17. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  18. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  19. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Hepatic uptake of lipid-soluble drugs from fat emulsion.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, K; Karino, A; Hayashi, M; Tahara, K; Kimura, A; Awazu, S

    1991-10-01

    Oil violet in a fat emulsion was taken up into the parenchymal cells of rat liver in vitro. The uptake was greater at 37 degrees C than 25 degrees C or 4 degrees C, and it was increased by addition of postheparin plasma including lipoprotein lipase activity into the reaction medium. The uptake from the emulsion with smaller particles was greater than that from the emulsion with larger particles. The hepatic uptake of 14C-cholesteryl oleate in the emulsion by recirculating perfusion of the liver in situ was also increased by postheparin plasma in the perfusion medium. Its enhancing effect was found for distribution in the parenchymal cells but not in the Kupffer cells. The previous perfusion of Intralipos of the commercial fat emulsion reduced the hepatic uptake of 14C-cholesteryl oleate in the emulsion. The emulsion particle sizes were reduced by postheparin plasma both in vitro and in situ. Consequently, it was suggested that a lipid-soluble compound entrapped in the fat emulsion is taken up into the parenchymal cells by receptor-mediated process via the reduced particle sizes emulsion (remnant), which is a mechanism similar to the dietary fat metabolism.

  1. Costs and Benefits of Underground Pupal Chambers Constructed by Insects: A Test Using Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Jonathan C; Woods, H Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Many holometabolous insects metamorphose in belowground pupal chambers. Although the chambers may be elaborate and their construction costly, their functions are unknown. Using laboratory and field experiments, we examined the costs and functions of chambers made by the hawk moth Manduca sexta (Sphingidae). Costs were large in some circumstances; prepupal larvae lost up to 60% of their body mass when constructing chambers in dry soils. We tested three alternative hypotheses about what, if anything, chambers do for the individuals that make them: (1) chambers provide critical open space underground, allowing room for ecdysis and preventing soil from deforming the metamorphosing individual; (2) chambers raise the local relative humidity, so that cuticular and respiratory water losses are minimized; and (3) chamber walls prevent predators and pathogens from attacking. The data support the first hypothesis (about open space) and largely exclude the other two. These results provide a simple and potentially broad explanation for the evolution of chamber building in metamorphosing insects. PMID:26658249

  2. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  3. Dependency of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) fluxes to wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) leaves from NO 2 concentration, light intensity, temperature and relative humidity determined from controlled dynamic chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Rennenberg, H.

    The dynamic chamber technique was applied to investigate the dependency of nitrogen dioxide fluxes to wheat leaves from atmospheric NO 2 concentration, light intensity, air temperature and relative humidity. Experiments were performed with 4- to 5-weeks-old wheat plants under controlled environmental conditions. When exposed to NO 2-free air wheat leaves emitted 3.7 ng N m -2 s -1into the atmosphere. With increasing NO 2 concentrations the flux of NO 2 changed from emission to deposition. Up to NO 2 concentrations of 60 nl ℓ -1 the NO 2 flux increased linearly; at higher concentrations of NO 2 the NO 2 flux further increased, but the increment declined. In the range of NO 2 concentrations studied (0-90 nl ℓ -1) neither transpiration nor photosynthesis was affected by the NO 2 exposure. With increasing light intensity NO 2 deposition increased from 29 ng N m -2 s -1 in the dark to 120 ng N m -2 s -1 at 510 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR, when wheat plants were exposed to 30 nl ℓ -1 NO 2. This effect could be attributed to the light dependent increase in stomatal aperture. With increasing air temperature from 17 to 40°C NO 2 deposition decreased, most likely due to decreasing solubility of NO 2 in the aqueous phase of the apoplastic space. NO 2 deposition also increased with increasing relative humidity. This increase could not be explained by changes in stomatal aperture, but may at least partially be due to the formation of ultra thin water films on the surface of the wheat leaves, and the solubilization of atmospheric NO 2 within these water films.

  4. Chemistry and formation of water-in-oil emulsions and tar balls

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.R.; Phillips, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Significant research of the last four years includes sitings, investigations at spills-of-opportunity, recent studies, as well as new research form Arctic and sub-Arctic oil weathering experiments and observations on behavior of crude oil in the presence of ice. This book also contains research and practical information of interest to petroleum companies, scientists, engineers, environmentalists, chemical and biological oceanographers, and oil spill response coordinators. When crude oil or refined products are released at sea, they are subjected immediately to a wide variety of weathering processes. These processes cause significant changes in the rheological properties of the oil, several orders of magnitude increases in viscosity, factor of two changes in interfacial surface tensions, and appreciable (5-10/sup 6/) changes in oil density. All these alterations have important implications for the subsequent spill cleanup or contaminant strategy. The increase in volume due to incorporation of water in emulsions can cause further problems for storing the collected product. Specific laboratory studies on water-in-oil emulsions with a variety of crude and refined petroleum products are discussed in detail along with data on the component concentrations of wax, asphaltene, and other surface-active materials. This information facilitates reliable predictions on whether or not a particular crude or refined product will form a stable emulsion. The information covers case histories of real spill events with discussion of specific studies of water in oil emulsions and the chemistry of emulsion formation and behavior. The chemical composition of tar balls, their sources, fate, and global distribution are discussed. Conclusions and critical citation review for easy reference is presented in addition to details on particular topics.

  5. Hydrologic Impacts of a Surface-Applied, Organic Emulsion on Arid Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Goreham, J.; Meadows, D. G.; Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; McDonald, E. V.

    2005-12-01

    In-place stabilization of environmental contaminants over land areas poses interesting logistical challenges, especially when considering the impact of the stabilizing agent on soil hydrologic processes like infiltration and surface runoff. As one part of a larger field-based study, we investigated the potential hydrologic impacts of using an organic-based emulsion which was designed to stabilize disturbed and undisturbed desert soils. The emulsion, a blend of organic esters, surfactants, water, and a proprietary chelating agent, was tested at the Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ. The goal of the study was to determine whether, and to what extent, field application of this emulsion altered the soil hydraulic properties and hence the infiltration and runoff potential. A randomized complete block design was used to investigate the effects of soil age (old vs young), treatment concentration (control vs two dilution levels), disturbance level (disturbed vs undisturbed), and time (1 year exposure) on the soil hydraulic properties. Hydraulic properties were determined using a 20 cm diameter tension infiltrometer (triplicate measurements for each treatment combination). Initial results show a significant reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity by nearly two orders of magnitude following treatment with the emulsion. Triplicate rainfall simulation experiments were also conducted on the test plots to investigate rainfall-runoff processes. Results immediately following treatment show a reduced time to ponding and a higher potential for surface runoff. Tests conducted quarterly for one year after application, however, indicate that hydrologic impacts diminished with time. Targeted laboratory tests are ongoing to better identify the breakdown mechanisms of the emulsion. The field and laboratory results will help guide larger-scale field applications based on actual field conditions.

  6. Characteristics of a large system of pad readout wire proportional chambers for the HPC calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Camporesi, T.; Cavallo, F.R.; Giordano, V.; Laurenti, G.; Molinari, G.; Navarria, F.L.; Privitera, P.; Rovelli, T.; Valenti, G.; Zucchini, A.

    1989-02-01

    A large system of wire proportional chambers is being constructed for the readout of the High-Density Projection Chamber (HPC) of the DELPHI experiment at the Large Electron-Positron storage ring. The system consists of 144 chambers, each 0.3 m/sup 2/ wide and read out via cathode pads, located at the end of the HPC drift volume.

  7. On Orbit Daytime Solar Heating Effects: A Comparison of Ground Chamber Arcing Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the current experiment is to make direct comparisons between the arcing results obtained from the diffusion pumped vertical chamber and our newly renovated Teney vacuum chamber which is equipped with a cryogenic pump. Recall that the prior reported results obtained for the Vertical chamber were nominal at best, showing only a slight reduction in the arc rate after 5 heating cycles at the lower bias potentials and virtually no changes at high potential biases. It was concluded that the vertical chamber was unable to remove enough water vapor from the chamber to adequately test the arcing criterion. Because the cryo-pumped Teney chamber has a ten times better pumping speed, (40,000 liters per sec compared to 4,000 liters per sec for the diffusion pumped vertical chamber), a decision was made to retest that experiment in both the Teney and Vertical vacuum chambers. A comparison of the various data is presented with encouraging results.

  8. On-Orbit Daytime Solar Heating Effects: A Comparison of Ground Chamber Arcing Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the current experiment is to make direct comparisons between the arcing results obtained from the diffusion pumped vertical chamber and our newly renovated Teney vacuum chamber which is equipped with a cryogenic pump. Recall that the prior reported results obtained for the Vertical chamber were nominal at best, showing only a slight reduction in the arc rate after five heating cycles at the lower bias potentials and virtually no changes at high potential biases. It was concluded that the vertical chamber was unable to remove enough water vapor from the chamber to adequately test the arcing criterion. Because the cryo-pumped Teney chamber has a ten times better pumping speed, (40,000 liters per sec compared to 4,000 liters per sec for the diffusion pumped vertical chamber), a decision was made to retest that experiment in both the Teney and Vertical vacuum chambers. A comparison of the various data is presented with encouraging results.

  9. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  10. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  11. Chamber Music: Skills and Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarrubia, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the benefits of participating in chamber music ensembles, such as the development of a heightened level of awareness, and considers the role of the music educator/conductor. Provides tools and exercises that teachers can introduce to chamber music players to improve their rehearsals and performances. (CMK)

  12. Calibration of PICO Bubble Chamber Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaotianzi; PICO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. I will present the suite of calibration experiments performed to measure the sensitivity of these chambers to nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal) and to gamma rays (a common background to the WIMP signal). These calibrations include measurements with a 10-ml C3F8 bubble chamber at Northwestern University and with a 30-ml C3F8 bubble chamber deployed in the University of Montreal's tandem Van de Graaf facility, giving the bubble chamber response to a variety of gamma rays, broad-spectrum neutron sources, and mono-energetic low energy neutrons. I will compare our measured sensitivities to those predicted by a simple thermodynamic model and will show how the results impact our ability to detect dark matter, with a focus on light WIMP searches. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-SC0012161.

  13. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  14. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  15. Crude oil emulsions containing a compatible fluorochemical surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Karydas, A.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a crude oil in water emulsion, which is stable to both breakdown and phase inversion up to at least about 50{degrees} C., the emulsion containing an effective, compatible, emulsion stabilizing amount of a fluorochemical surfactant of the formula (R{sub {ital f}}){sub {ital n}}A{sub {ital m}}Q wherein R{sub {ital f}} is an inert, stable, oleophobic and hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group having up to about 20 carbon atoms; n is an integer from 1 to 3; A is a direct bond or an organic linking group and is covalently bonded to both R{sub {ital f}} and Q; Q is an anionic, nonionic or amphoteric group; and m is an integer from 1 to 3; wherein the amount of weight of the fluorochemical surfactant present in the emulsion being between about 0.001 and 1% by weight of the emulsion, in the presence of absence of up to about 2% by weight of a crude oil emulsion promoting hydrocarbon surfactant, with the proviso that at least about 0.005% by weight total fluorochemical and hydrocarbon surfactant is present, based upon the weight of emulsion, and wherein the emulsion contains bout 15 to about 90 percent by weight water, based upon the weight of emulsion, such that the viscosity of the emulsion is less than about 50% of the viscosity of the crude oil, and wherein the emulsion spontaneously breaks down into an aqueous and crude oil phase at a temperature between about 55{degrees} and 75{degrees} C.

  16. High-energy Physics with Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.

    1958-03-07

    Recent experience with liquid hydrogen bubble chambers of 25 and 40 cm dia. in high-energy physics experiments is discussed. Experiments described are: interactions of K{sup -} mesons with protons, interactions of antiprotons with protons, catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions by muons, and production and decay of hyperons from negative pions. (W.D.M.)

  17. Telerobotic Tending of Space Based Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, P. G.; Long, M. K.; Das, H.

    1994-01-01

    The kinematic design of a telerobotic mechanism for tending a plant growth space science experiment chamber is described. Ground based control of tending mechanisms internal to space science experiments will allow ground based principal investigators to interact directly with their space science experiments.

  18. Large-format, high-speed, X-ray pnCCDs combined with electron and ion imaging spectrometers in a multipurpose chamber for experiments at 4th generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strüder, Lothar; Epp, Sascha; Rolles, Daniel; Hartmann, Robert; Holl, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Soltau, Heike; Eckart, Rouven; Reich, Christian; Heinzinger, Klaus; Thamm, Christian; Rudenko, Artem; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Bauer, Christian; Schröter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robert; Techert, Simone; Miessner, Danilo; Porro, Matteo; Hälker, Olaf; Meidinger, Norbert; Kimmel, Nils; Andritschke, Robert; Schopper, Florian; Weidenspointner, Georg; Ziegler, Alexander; Pietschner, Daniel; Herrmann, Sven; Pietsch, Ullrich; Walenta, Albert; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Graafsma, Heinz; Hirsemann, Helmut; Gärtner, Klaus; Richter, Rainer; Foucar, Lutz; Shoeman, Robert L.; Schlichting, Ilme; Ullrich, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Fourth generation accelerator-based light sources, such as VUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FEL), deliver ultra-brilliant (˜10 12-10 13 photons per bunch) coherent radiation in femtosecond (˜10-100 fs) pulses and, thus, require novel focal plane instrumentation in order to fully exploit their unique capabilities. As an additional challenge for detection devices, existing (FLASH, Hamburg) and future FELs (LCLS, Menlo Park; SCSS, Hyogo and the European XFEL, Hamburg) cover a broad range of photon energies from the EUV to the X-ray regime with significantly different bandwidths and pulse structures reaching up to MHz micro-bunch repetition rates. Moreover, hundreds up to trillions of fragment particles, ions, electrons or scattered photons can emerge when a single light flash impinges on matter with intensities up to 10 22 W/cm 2. In order to meet these challenges, the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) within the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has designed the CFEL-ASG MultiPurpose (CAMP) chamber. It is equipped with specially developed photon and charged particle detection devices dedicated to cover large solid-angles. A variety of different targets are supported, such as atomic, (aligned) molecular and cluster jets, particle injectors for bio-samples or fixed target arrangements. CAMP houses 4π solid-angle ion and electron momentum imaging spectrometers ("reaction microscope", REMI, or "velocity map imaging", VMI) in a unique combination with novel, large-area, broadband (50 eV-25 keV), high-dynamic-range, single-photon-counting and imaging X-ray detectors based on the pnCCDs. This instrumentation allows a new class of coherent diffraction experiments in which both electron and ion emission from the target may be simultaneously monitored. This permits the investigation of dynamic processes in this new regime of ultra-intense, high-energy radiation—matter interaction. After an introduction into the salient features of the CAMP chamber and

  19. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  20. Starting a High School Chamber Music Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Presents ideas on how to begin a chamber music ensemble. Discusses how to find time to accomplish chamber music playing in and around the school day. Presents short descriptions of chamber music that can be used with ensembles. Includes chamber music resources and additional chamber works. (CMK)

  1. Maximizing the stability of pyrolysis oil/diesel fuel emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several emulsions consisting of biomass pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in diesel fuel were produced and analyzed for stability over time. An ultrasonic probe was used to generate microscopic droplets of bio-oil suspended in diesel fuel, and this emulsion was stabilized using surfactant chemicals. The most...

  2. Water-in-diesel emulsions and related systems.

    PubMed

    Lif, Anna; Holmberg, Krister

    2006-11-16

    Water-in-diesel emulsions are fuels for regular diesel engines. The advantages of an emulsion fuel are reductions in the emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters, which are both health hazardous, and reduction in fuel consumption due to better burning efficiency. An important aspect is that diesel emulsions can be used without engine modifications. This review presents the influence of water on the emissions and on the combustion efficiency. Whereas there is a decrease in emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters, there is an increase in the emissions of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide with increasing water content of the emulsion. The combustion efficiency is improved when water is emulsified with diesel. This is a consequence of the microexplosions, which facilitate atomization of the fuel. The review also covers related fuels, such as diesel-in-water-in-diesel emulsions, i.e., double emulsions, water-in-diesel microemulsions, and water-in-vegetable oil emulsions, i.e., biodiesel emulsions. A brief overview of other types of alternative fuels is also included.

  3. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  4. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  5. Mannans as stabilizers of oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant polysaccharides and gums such as gum arabic (GA) are commonly used as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. O-acetyl-galactoglucomannan (GGM), a by-product from mechanical pulping of spruce wood, is able to stabilize colloidal wood resin emulsions (Hannuksela and Holmbom, 2004), but its use a...

  6. Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

  7. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains 5 milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000859 in §...

  8. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains 5 milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000859 in §...

  9. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  10. Synthesis of metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2011-12-13

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  11. Gas and aerosol wall losses in Teflon film smog chambers

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Grosjean, D.

    1985-12-01

    Large smog chambers (approx.60 m/sup 3/) constructed of FEP Teflon film are frequently used to study photochemistry and aerosol formation in model chemical systems. In a previous paper a theory for aerosol wall loss rates in Teflon film smog chambers was developed; predicted particle loss rates were in good agreement with measured rates. In the present paper, measurements of wall deposition rates and the effects of wall losses on measurements of gas-to-particle conversion in smog chambers are discussed. Calculations indicate that a large fraction of the aerosol formed in several smog chamber experiments was on the chamber walls at the end of the experiment. Estimated values for particulate organic carbon yield for several precursor hydrocarbons increased by factors of 1.3-6.0 when wall deposition was taken into account. The theory is also extended to loss rates of gaseous species. Such loss rates are either limited by diffusion through a concentration boundary layer near the surface or by uptake at the surface. It is shown that for a typical 60-m/sup 3/ Teflon film smog chamber, gas loss rates are limited by surface reaction rates if mass accommodation coefficients are less than 6 x 10/sup -6/. It follows that previously reported loss rates of several gases in a chamber of this type were limited by surface reactions.

  12. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  13. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  14. Chitin nanocrystals for Pickering high internal phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Emilie; Bizot, Hervé; Cathala, Bernard; Capron, Isabelle

    2014-10-13

    Chitin is a natural polymer of glucosamine bearing N-acetyl groups. Chitin nanocrystals (ChiNCs), resulting from the acid hydrolysis of amorphous regions of chitin, are crystalline positively charged rod-like particles. ChiNCs show some interfacial properties and very efficiently stabilize oil/water interfaces, leading to the so-called Pickering emulsions. In accordance with the irreversible adsorption of particles, these Pickering emulsions proved stable over time, with constant emulsion volume for several months, even though natural creaming may occur. The emulsions produced are not clearly susceptible to ionic strength or pH in terms of average droplet diameter. However, when mixed with a large amount of oil, high internal phase emulsions (HIPE) containing up to 96% of internal phase are formed as a gel with a texture that can be modulated from soft to solid gel by adjusting concentration, pH, and ionic strength.

  15. Pickering emulsions for food applications: background, trends, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C; Schroën, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions, also referred to as Pickering emulsions, have garnered exponentially increasing interest in recent years. This has also led to the first food applications, although the number of related publications is still rather low. The involved stabilization mechanisms are fundamentally different as compared to conventional emulsifiers, which can be an asset in terms of emulsion stability. Even though most of the research on Pickering emulsions has been conducted on model systems, with inorganic solid particles, recent progress has been made on the utilization of food-grade or food-compatible organic particles for this purpose. This review reports the latest advances in that respect, including technical challenges, and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Pickering emulsions for food applications, as an alternative to conventional emulsifier-based systems.

  16. Domain and droplet sizes in emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions are commonly used in various industrial applications. These emulsions can present in different forms, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be distinguished by their different topologies and rheology. We numerically investigate the effect of the volume fraction and the uniform wettability of the stabilizing spherical particles in mixtures of two fluids. For this, we use the well-established three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added colloidal particles with non-neutral wetting properties. We obtain data on the domain sizes in the emulsions by using both structure functions and the Hoshen-Kopelman (HK) algorithm, and we demonstrate that both methods have their own (dis)advantages. We confirm an inverse dependence between the concentration of particles and the average radius of the stabilized droplets. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effect of particles detaching from interfaces on the emulsion properties and domain-size measurements.

  17. An exclusively based parenteral fish-oil emulsion reverses cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Triana Junco, Miryam; García Vázquez, Natalia; Zozaya, Carlos; Ybarra Zabala, Marta; Abrams, Steven; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; Sáenz de Pipaón Marcos, Miguel

    2014-10-25

    Prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to liver damage. Recent interest has focused on the lipid component of PN. A lipid emulsion based on w-3 fatty acids decrease conjugated bilirubin. A mixed lipid emulsion derived from soybean, coconut, olive, and fish oils reverses jaundice. Here we report the reversal of cholestasis and the improvement of enteral feeding tolerance in 1 infant with intestinal failure-associated liver disease. Treatment involved the substitution of a mixed lipid emulsion with one containing primarily omega-3 fatty acids during 37 days. Growth and biochemical tests of liver function improved significantly. This suggests that fat emulsions made from fish oils may be more effective means of treating this condition compared with an intravenous lipid emulsion containing soybean oil, medium -chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil.

  18. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  19. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J.

    1995-05-01

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  20. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.