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Sample records for enables fluorescent dimming

  1. Research and Development of a New Field Enhanced Low Temperature Thermionic Cathode that Enables Fluorescent Dimming and Loan Shedding without Auxiliary Cathode Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jin

    2009-01-07

    This is the final report for project entitled 'Research and development of a new field enhanced low temperature thermionic cathode that enables fluorescent dimming and load shedding without auxiliary cathode heating', under Agreement Number: DE-FC26-04NT-42329. Under this project, a highly efficient CNT based thermionic cathode was demonstrated. This cathode is capable of emitting electron at a current density two order of magnitude stronger then a typical fluorescent cathode at same temperatures, or capable of emitting at same current density but at temperature about 300 C lower than that of a fluorescent cathode. Detailed fabrication techniques were developed including CVD growth of CNTs and sputter deposition of oxide thin films on CNTs. These are mature technologies that have been widely used in industry for large scale materials processing and device fabrications, thus, with further development work, the techniques developed in this project can be scaled-up in manufacturing environment. The prototype cathodes developed in this project were tested in lighting plasma discharge environment. In many cases, they not only lit and sustain the plasma, but also out perform the fluorescent cathodes in key parameters such like cathode fall voltages. More work will be needed to further evaluate more detailed and longer term performance of the prototype cathode in lighting plasma.

  2. Spectral and structural comparison between bright and dim green fluorescent proteins in Amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Bomati, Erin K.; Haley, Joy E.; Noel, Joseph P.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2014-01-01

    The cephalochordate Amphioxus naturally co-expresses fluorescent proteins (FPs) with different brightness, which thus offers the rare opportunity to identify FP molecular feature/s that are associated with greater/lower intensity of fluorescence. Here, we describe the spectral and structural characteristics of green FP (bfloGFPa1) with perfect (100%) quantum efficiency yielding to unprecedentedly-high brightness, and compare them to those of co-expressed bfloGFPc1 showing extremely-dim brightness due to low (0.1%) quantum efficiency. This direct comparison of structure-function relationship indicated that in the bright bfloGFPa1, a Tyrosine (Tyr159) promotes a ring flipping of a Tryptophan (Trp157) that in turn allows a cis-trans transformation of a Proline (Pro55). Consequently, the FP chromophore is pushed up, which comes with a slight tilt and increased stability. FPs are continuously engineered for improved biochemical and/or photonic properties, and this study provides new insight to the challenge of establishing a clear mechanistic understanding between chromophore structural environment and brightness level. PMID:24968921

  3. Spectral and structural comparison between bright and dim green fluorescent proteins in Amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Bomati, Erin K; Haley, Joy E; Noel, Joseph P; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2014-06-27

    The cephalochordate Amphioxus naturally co-expresses fluorescent proteins (FPs) with different brightness, which thus offers the rare opportunity to identify FP molecular feature/s that are associated with greater/lower intensity of fluorescence. Here, we describe the spectral and structural characteristics of green FP (bfloGFPa1) with perfect (100%) quantum efficiency yielding to unprecedentedly-high brightness, and compare them to those of co-expressed bfloGFPc1 showing extremely-dim brightness due to low (0.1%) quantum efficiency. This direct comparison of structure-function relationship indicated that in the bright bfloGFPa1, a Tyrosine (Tyr159) promotes a ring flipping of a Tryptophan (Trp157) that in turn allows a cis-trans transformation of a Proline (Pro55). Consequently, the FP chromophore is pushed up, which comes with a slight tilt and increased stability. FPs are continuously engineered for improved biochemical and/or photonic properties, and this study provides new insight to the challenge of establishing a clear mechanistic understanding between chromophore structural environment and brightness level.

  4. Fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Honglu; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Mi, Xianqiang

    2017-03-15

    During the past few years, graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have attracted numerous attentions for the potential applications in various fields from energy technology, biosensing to biomedical diagnosis and therapy due to their various functionalization, high volume surface ratio, unique physical and electrical properties. Among which, graphene and graphene oxide based fluorescent biosensors enabled by their fluorescence-quenching properties have attracted great interests. The fluorescence of fluorophore or dye labeled on probes (such as molecular beacon, aptamer, DNAzymes and so on) was quenched after adsorbed on to the surface of graphene. While in the present of the targets, due to the strong interactions between probes and targets, the probes were detached from the surface of graphene, generating dramatic fluorescence, which could be used as signals for detection of the targets. This strategy was simple and economy, together with great programmable abilities of probes; we could realize detection of different kinds of species. In this review, we first briefly introduced the history of graphene and graphene oxide, and then summarized the fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and GO, with a detailed account of the design mechanism and comparison with other nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles). Following that, different sensing platforms for detection of DNAs, ions, biomolecules and pathogens or cells as well as the cytotoxicity issue of graphene and GO based in vivo biosensing were further discussed. We hope that this review would do some help to researchers who are interested in graphene related biosening research work.

  5. Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins enable monochromatic multilabel imaging and dual color fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Martin; Stiel, Andre C; Fölling, Jonas; Wenzel, Dirk; Schönle, Andreas; Egner, Alexander; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be reversibly photoswitched between a fluorescent and a nonfluorescent state are important for innovative microscopy schemes, such as protein tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging, sub-diffraction resolution microscopy and others. However, all available monomeric reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have similar properties and switching characteristics, thereby limiting their use. Here, we introduce two bright green fluorescent RSFPs, bsDronpa and Padron, generated by extensive mutagenesis of the RSFP Dronpa, with unique absorption and switching characteristics. Whereas bsDronpa features a broad absorption spectrum extending into the UV, Padron displays a switching behavior that is reversed to that of all green fluorescent RSFPs known to date. These two RSFPs enable live-cell fluorescence microscopy with multiple labels using a single detection color, because they can be distinguished by photoswitching. Furthermore, we demonstrate dual-color fluorescence microscopy with sub-diffraction resolution using bsDronpa and Dronpa whose emission maxima are separated by <20 nm.

  6. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  7. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  8. Enabling in situ thermometry using transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) has been proposed for use as an assay and detection technique for nuclear security and safeguards applications because of its isotope-specific sensitivity and the penetrating capability of γ -rays. It can also be used for in situ thermometry because the absorbing resonance profile is sensitive to temperature. Using transmission NRF for thermometry could provide a new avenue for studying the ion temperature evolution of laser-induced plasmas using the upcoming ELI-NP facility. It could also be used for applications where thermometry would be otherwise infeasible, such as for determining the average fuel temperature of spent nuclear fuel, a step that would reduce the assay uncertainty using transmission NRF. In this paper, two different transmission NRF thermometry scenarios are presented and analyzed for sensitivity. This analysis demonstrated that thermometry using γ -rays is possible independent of γ -ray beam type and will be feasible with next-generation high-intensity γ -ray sources. Beyond thermometry, an application of temperature effects was found in the improvement of transmission NRF efficacy for assay and detection: using a cryogenic witness target will reduce the required measurement time by 40%.

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  10. Photoswitching-enabled novel optical imaging: innovative solutions for real-world challenges in fluorescence detections.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiyuan; Li, Alexander D Q

    2013-02-19

    to demonstrate the power of photoswitching-enabled fluorescence imaging. Because synthetic photoswitchable probes can be much smaller, more versatile, and more efficient at high-performance modulation experiments, they provide a complement to photoswitchable fluorescent proteins. Although new challenges remain, we foresee a bright future for photoswitching-enabled imaging and detection.

  11. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, William

    2011-01-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge. An alternate explanation is given.

  12. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, William

    2011-12-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge.2 An alternate explanation is given below:

  13. Substrate Engineering Enabling Fluorescence Droplet Entrapment for IVC-FACS-Based Ultrahigh-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fuqiang; Fischer, Michael; Han, Yunbin; Withers, Stephen G; Feng, Yan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-09-06

    In vitro compartmentalization-based fluorescence-activated cell sorting (IVC-FACS) is a powerful screening tool for directed evolution of enzymes. However, the efficiency of IVC-FACS is limited by the tendency of the fluorescent reporter to diffuse out of the droplets, which decouples the genotype and phenotype of the target gene. Herein we present a new strategy called fluorescence droplet entrapment (FDE) to solve this problem. The substrate is designed with a polarity that enables it to pass through the oil phase, react with the enzyme and generate an oil-impermeable and fluorescent product that remains entrapped inside the droplet. Several FDE substrates were designed, using two distinct substrate engineering strategies, for the detection of phosphotriesterases, carboxylesterases, and glycosidases activities. Model screening assays in which rare phosphotriesterase-active cells were enriched from large excesses of inactive cells showed that the enrichment efficiency achievable using an FDE substrate was as high as 900-fold: the highest yet reported in such an IVC-FACS system. Thus, FDE provides a means to tightly control the onset of the enzymatic reaction, minimize droplet cross-talk, and lower the background fluorescence. It therefore may serve as a useful strategy for the IVC-FACS screening of enzymes, antibodies, and other proteins.

  14. Stable J-aggregation enabled dual photoacoustic and fluorescence nanoparticles for intraoperative cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Shakiba, Mojdeh; Ng, Kenneth K; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chan, Harley; Charron, Danielle M; Chen, Juan; Muhanna, Nidal; Foster, F Stuart; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2016-07-07

    J-aggregates display nanoscale optical properties which enable their use in fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging applications. However, control over their optical properties in an in vivo setting is hampered by the conformational lability of the J-aggregate structure in complex biological environments. J-aggregating nanoparticles (JNP) formed by self-assembly of bacteriopheophorbide-lipid (Bchl-lipid) in lipid nanovesicles represents a novel strategy to stabilize J-aggregates for in vivo bioimaging applications. We find that 15 mol% Bchl-lipid embedded within a saturated phospholipid bilayer vesicle was optimal in terms of maximizing Bchl-lipid dye loading, while maintaining a spherical nanoparticle morphology and retaining spectral properties characteristic of J-aggregates. The addition of cholesterol maintains the stability of the J-aggregate absorption band for up to 6 hours in the presence of 90% FBS. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we successfully applied JNPs as a fluorescence contrast agent for real-time intraoperative detection of metastatic lymph nodes in a rabbit head-and-neck cancer model. Lymph node metastasis delineation was further verified by visualizing the JNP within the excised lymph node using photoacoustic imaging. Using JNPs, we demonstrate the possibility of using J-aggregates as fluorescence and photoacoustic contrast agents and may potentially spur the development of other nanomaterials that can stably induce J-aggregation for in vivo cancer bioimaging applications.

  15. Stable J-aggregation enabled dual photoacoustic and fluorescence nanoparticles for intraoperative cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, Mojdeh; Ng, Kenneth K.; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chan, Harley; Charron, Danielle M.; Chen, Juan; Muhanna, Nidal; Foster, F. Stuart; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang

    2016-06-01

    J-aggregates display nanoscale optical properties which enable their use in fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging applications. However, control over their optical properties in an in vivo setting is hampered by the conformational lability of the J-aggregate structure in complex biological environments. J-aggregating nanoparticles (JNP) formed by self-assembly of bacteriopheophorbide-lipid (Bchl-lipid) in lipid nanovesicles represents a novel strategy to stabilize J-aggregates for in vivo bioimaging applications. We find that 15 mol% Bchl-lipid embedded within a saturated phospholipid bilayer vesicle was optimal in terms of maximizing Bchl-lipid dye loading, while maintaining a spherical nanoparticle morphology and retaining spectral properties characteristic of J-aggregates. The addition of cholesterol maintains the stability of the J-aggregate absorption band for up to 6 hours in the presence of 90% FBS. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we successfully applied JNPs as a fluorescence contrast agent for real-time intraoperative detection of metastatic lymph nodes in a rabbit head-and-neck cancer model. Lymph node metastasis delineation was further verified by visualizing the JNP within the excised lymph node using photoacoustic imaging. Using JNPs, we demonstrate the possibility of using J-aggregates as fluorescence and photoacoustic contrast agents and may potentially spur the development of other nanomaterials that can stably induce J-aggregation for in vivo cancer bioimaging applications.J-aggregates display nanoscale optical properties which enable their use in fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging applications. However, control over their optical properties in an in vivo setting is hampered by the conformational lability of the J-aggregate structure in complex biological environments. J-aggregating nanoparticles (JNP) formed by self-assembly of bacteriopheophorbide-lipid (Bchl-lipid) in lipid nanovesicles represents a novel strategy to stabilize J

  16. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  17. Field Commissioning of a Daylight-Dimming Lighting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, David B.; Parker, Danny S.

    A Florida elementary school cafeteria, retrofitted with a fluorescent lighting system that dims in response to available daylight, was evaluated through real time measurement of lighting and air conditioning power, work plane illumination, and interior/exterior site conditions. The new system produced a 27 percent reduction in lighting power due…

  18. Coronal Dimmings and Energetic CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Cliver, E. W.; Nitta, N.; Delannee, C.; Delaboudiniere, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the coronal dimmings for seven fast (> 600 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurring between 23 April and 9 May which were associated with flares from NOAA active region (AR) 8210. These dimming regions were identified by their strong depletion in coronal emission within a half hour of the estimated time of CME lift-off. They included areas which were as dark as quiescent coronal holes as well as other regions with weaker brightness depletions. We found that the extended dimming areas in these events generally mapped out the apparent "footprint" of the CME. In two of the seven cases, a pair of dimmings were more or less symmetrically positioned north and south of the flare site. In the five remaining cases, the dimmings were most prominent to the north of AR 8210 (approximately S15 latitude) and extended well north of the solar equator, consistent with the locations of the CMEs. We discuss the implications of these results for the sigmoid/double dimming/flux rope model of CMEs.

  19. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging endoscopy enabled by structured illumination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Malik, Bilal H.; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system with optical sectioning by structured illumination microscopy (SIM). FLIM measurements were made using a time gated ICCD camera in conjunction with a pulsed nitrogen dye laser operating at 450 nm. Intensity images were acquired at multiple time delays from a trigger initiated by a laser pulse to create a wide-field FLIM image, which was then combined with three phase SIM to provide optical sectioning. Such a mechanism has the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of the FLIM measurements by rejecting background intensity. SIM also provides the opportunity to create volumetric FLIM images with the incorporation of scanning mechanisms for the sample plane. We present multiple embodiments of such a system: one as a free space endoscope and the other as a fiber microendoscope enabled by the introduction of a fiber bundle. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of such an imaging system by imaging dyes embedded in a tissue phantom.

  20. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Coronal dimmings are regions of decreased extreme-ultravoilet (EUV) and/or X-ray (originally Skylab, then Yohkoh/SXT) intensities, which are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The large-scale impulsive dimmings have been thoroughly observed and investigated. The pre-flare dimmings before the flare impulsive phase, however, have rarely been studied in detail. Aims: We focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME that was produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. Methods: The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white-light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) on board SOHO. Results: About 96 min before the onset of the flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly, with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8-9 Mm) continued to be nearly constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fan-like twin dimmings appeared and expanded, with a much larger extent and lower intensities than the pre-flare dimmings. The percentage of the 171 Å intensity decrease reaches 40%. The pre-flare dimmings are most striking in 171, 193, and 211 Å with formation temperatures of 0.6-2.5 MK. The northern part of the pre-flare dimmings could also be recognized in 131 and 335 Å. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of pre-flare coronal dimmings; they can be explained by density depletion as a result of the gradual

  1. DIMMING OF THE 17TH CENTURY SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Foukal, Peter; Ortiz, Ada; Schnerr, Roald

    2011-06-01

    Reconstructions of total solar irradiance (TSI) rely mainly on linear relations between TSI variation and indices of facular area. When these are extrapolated to the prolonged 15th-17th century Spoerer and Maunder solar activity minima, the estimated solar dimming is insufficient to explain the mid-millennial climate cooling of the Little Ice Age. We draw attention here to evidence that the relation departs from linearity at the lowest activity levels. Imaging photometry and radiometry indicate an increased TSI contribution per unit area from small network faculae by a factor of 2-4 compared with larger faculae in and around active regions. Even partial removal of this more TSI-effective network at prolonged minima could enable climatically significant solar dimming, yet be consistent with the weakened but persistent 11 yr cycle observed in Be 10 during the Maunder Minimum. The mechanism we suggest would not alter previous findings that increased solar radiative forcing is insufficient to account for 20th century global warming.

  2. One- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy enabling the detection of localized aflatoxin contamination in individual maize kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeesters, L.; Meulebroeck, W.; Raeymaekers, S.; Thienpont, H.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of carcinogenic aflatoxins in food and feed products is a major worldwide problem. To date, the aflatoxin contamination can only be detected by the use of destructive sample-based chemical analyses. Therefore, we developed an optical setup able to detect the localized aflatoxin contamination in individual maize kernels, on the basis of one- and two- photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Our developed optical configuration comprises a tunable titanium-sapphire laser (710nm-830nm) in combination with second harmonic wavelength generation (355nm-415nm), enabling the measurement of both one- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectra. Moreover, an accurate scanning of the kernel's surface was induced by the use of automated translation stages, allowing to study the localized maize contamination. First, the operation of the setup is validated by the characterization of pure aflatoxin B1 powder. Second, the fluorescence spectra of healthy (< 1ppb aflatoxin B1) and contaminated maize kernels (>70ppb aflatoxin B1) were measured, after excitation with 365nm, 730nm, 750nm and 780nm. For both the one- and two- photon induced fluorescence processes, the presence of the aflatoxin inside the contaminated maize kernels influenced the intrinsic fluorescence signals. Based on the fluorescence spectrum between 400nm and 550nm, we defined a detection criterion to identify the contaminated maize kernels. Furthermore, we demonstrate the sensing of the localized contamination level, indicating both contaminated maize kernels with a high contamination level in a limited surface area (as small as 1mm2) as with a lower contamination spread over a large surface area (up to 20mm2). As a result, our developed measurement methodology allows the identification of the localized aflatoxin contamination, paving the way to the non-destructive, real-time and high-sensitive industrial scanning-based detection of aflatoxins in food products.

  3. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  4. Indocyanine green enables near-infrared fluorescence imaging of lipid-rich, inflamed atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Botnaru, Ion; Aikawa, Elena; Calfon, Marcella A; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Folco, Eduardo J; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2011-05-25

    New high-resolution molecular and structural imaging strategies are needed to visualize high-risk plaques that are likely to cause acute myocardial infarction, because current diagnostic methods do not reliably identify at-risk subjects. Although molecular imaging agents are available for low-resolution detection of atherosclerosis in large arteries, a lack of imaging agents coupled to high-resolution modalities has limited molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the smaller coronary arteries. Here, we have demonstrated that indocyanine green (ICG), a Food and Drug Administration-approved near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF)-emitting compound, targets atheromas within 20 min of injection and provides sufficient signal enhancement for in vivo detection of lipid-rich, inflamed, coronary-sized plaques in atherosclerotic rabbits. In vivo NIRF sensing was achieved with an intravascular wire in the aorta, a vessel of comparable caliber to human coronary arteries. Ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging showed high plaque target-to-background ratios in atheroma-bearing rabbits injected with ICG compared to atheroma-bearing rabbits injected with saline. In vitro studies using human macrophages established that ICG preferentially targets lipid-loaded macrophages. In an early clinical study of human atheroma specimens from four patients, we found that ICG colocalized with plaque macrophages and lipids. The atheroma-targeting capability of ICG has the potential to accelerate the clinical development of NIRF molecular imaging of high-risk plaques in humans.

  5. Amplifying the fluorescence of bilirubin enables the real-time detection of heme oxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Klemz, Roman; Mashreghi, Mir-Farzin; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Kotsch, Katja

    2009-01-15

    Heme oxygenases (HO) are the rate-limiting enzymes in the degradation of heme to equimolar amounts of antioxidant bile pigments, the signaling molecule carbon monoxide, and ferric iron. The inducible form HO-1 confers protection on cells and tissues that mediates beneficial effects in many diseases. Consequently, measurement of the enzymatic activity is vital in the investigation of the regulatory role of HO. Here we report that the fluorescence characteristics of bilirubin in complex with serum albumin can be used for the real-time detection of HO activity in enzymatic kinetics measurements. We characterized the enzymatic activity of a truncated human HO-1 and measured the HO activity for various cell types and organs, in either the basal naive or the HO-1-induced state. The bilirubin-dependent increase in fluorescence over time monitored by this assay facilitates a very fast, sensitive, and reliable measurement of HO activity. Our approach offers the basis for a highly sensitive high-throughput screening, which provides, inter alia, the opportunity to discover new therapeutic HO-1-inducing agents.

  6. Fluorescent nanodiamonds enable quantitative tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in miniature pigs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Long-Jyun; Wu, Meng-Shiue; Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Be-Ming; Pan, Lei; Hsu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Huang, Yen-Hua; Ling, Thai-Yen; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of human diseases. While the first use of cells for therapeutic purposes can be traced to the 19th century, there has been a lack of general and reliable methods to study the biodistribution and associated pharmacokinetics of transplanted cells in various animal models for preclinical evaluation. Here, we present a new platform using albumin-conjugated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as biocompatible and photostable labels for quantitative tracking of human placenta choriodecidual membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pcMSCs) in miniature pigs by magnetic modulation. With this background-free detection technique and time-gated fluorescence imaging, we have been able to precisely determine the numbers as well as positions of the transplanted FND-labeled pcMSCs in organs and tissues of the miniature pigs after intravenous administration. The method is applicable to single-cell imaging and quantitative tracking of human stem/progenitor cells in rodents and other animal models as well. PMID:28358111

  7. Comparative studies on dimming capabilities of retrofit LED lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Ciprian; Vasile, Alexandru; Codreanu, Norocel; Negroiu, Rodica

    2016-12-01

    These days many variants for lighting systems are available on the market, and new solutions are about to emerge. Most of the new lamps are offered in form to be retrofitted to existing sockets and luminaires. In this paper, are presented some systematically investigations on different lamps as LEDs, Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs), tungsten, and new available Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps (CCFLs), regarding the light level, dimming performances and also the resulting flicker and power distortion performances. The light level was expressed by the illuminance level, measured for all lamps in the same conditions, at the same distance and on the same surface represented by the photometer probe.

  8. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  9. Fluorescence Imaging Enabled Urethane-Doped Citrate-Based Biodegradable Elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Tran, Richard T.; Qattan, Ibrahim; Tsai, Yi-ting; Tang, Liping; Liu, Chao; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering and drug delivery calls for new measurement tools, non-invasive real-time assays, and design methods for the next wave of innovations. Based on our recent progress in developing intrinsically biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (BPLPs) without conjugating organic dyes or quantum dots, in this paper, we developed a new type urethane-doped biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (UBPLPs) that could potentially serve as a new tool to respond the above call for innovations. Inherited from BPLPs, UBPLPs demonstrated strong inherent photoluminescence and excellent cytocompatibility in vitro. Crosslinked UBPLPs (CUBPLPs) showed soft, elastic, but strong mechanical properties with a tensile strength as high as 49.41±6.17 MPa and a corresponding elongation at break of 334.87±26.31%. Porous triphasic CUBPLP vascular scaffolds showed a burst pressure of 769.33±70.88 mmHg and a suture retention strength of 1.79±0.11 N. Stable but photoluminescent nanoparticles with average size of 103 nm were also obtained by nanoprecipitation. High loading efficiency (91.84%) and sustained release of 5-fluorouracil (up to 120 h) were achieved from UBPLP nanoparticles. With a quantum yield as high as 38.65%, both triphasic scaffold and nanoparticle solutions could be non-invasively detected in vivo. UBPLPs represent an innovation in fluorescent biomaterial design and may offer great potential in advancing the field of tissue engineering and drug delivery where bioimaging has gained increasing interest. PMID:23465824

  10. Tunable White Fluorescent Copper Gallium Sulfide Quantum Dots Enabled by Mn Doping.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Daekyoung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Hyo Jin; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2016-05-18

    Fluorescence of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be tuned by engineering the band gap via size and composition control and further doping them with impurity ions. Targeting on highly bright white-emissive I-III-VI -type copper gallium sulfide (Cu-Ga-S, CGS) host QDs with the entire visible spectral coverage of blue to red, herein, Mn(2+) ion doping, through surface adsorption and lattice diffusion is fulfilled. Upon doping a distinct Mn emission from (4)T1-(6)A1 transition successfully appears in white photoluminescence (PL) of undoped CGS/ZnS core/shell QDs and with varying Mn concentration a systematic white spectral evolution of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs is achievable with high PL quantum yield retained. The origins of white PL of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs that is well decomposed into three emission bands are appropriately assigned. The resulting single-phased, doped QDs are then employed as near-UV-to-white down converters for the fabrication of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Electroluminescent properties of white QD-LEDs depending on Mn concentration of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs and forward current are also discussed in detail.

  11. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-03-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  12. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  13. Fluorescence imaging enabled urethane-doped citrate-based biodegradable elastomers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tran, Richard T; Qattan, Ibrahim S; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Tang, Liping; Liu, Chao; Yang, Jian

    2013-05-01

    The field of tissue engineering and drug delivery calls for new measurement tools, non-invasive real-time assays, and design methods for the next wave of innovations. Based on our recent progress in developing intrinsically biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (BPLPs) without conjugating organic dyes or quantum dots, in this paper, we developed a new type urethane-doped biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (UBPLPs) that could potentially serve as a new tool to respond the above call for innovations. Inherited from BPLPs, UBPLPs demonstrated strong inherent photoluminescence and excellent cytocompatibility in vitro. Crosslinked UBPLPs (CUBPLPs) showed soft, elastic, but strong mechanical properties with a tensile strength as high as 49.41 ± 6.17 MPa and a corresponding elongation at break of 334.87 ± 26.31%. Porous triphasic CUBPLP vascular scaffolds showed a burst pressure of 769.33 ± 70.88 mmHg and a suture retention strength of 1.79 ± 0.11 N. Stable but photoluminescent nanoparticles with average size of 103 nm were also obtained by nanoprecipitation. High loading efficiency (91.84%) and sustained release of 5-fluorouracil (up to 120 h) were achieved from UBPLP nanoparticles. With a quantum yield as high as 38.65%, both triphasic scaffold and nanoparticle solutions could be non-invasively detected in vivo. UBPLPs represent an innovation in fluorescent biomaterial design and may offer great potential in advancing the field of tissue engineering and drug delivery where bioimaging has gained increasing interest.

  14. Irving Langmuir Prize Talk: Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging: Nanoscale Emitters with Photoinduced Switching Enable Superresolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2009-03-01

    In the two decades since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a solid (Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2535 (1989)), much has been learned about the ability of single molecules to probe local nanoenvironments and individual behavior in biological and nonbiological materials in the absence of ensemble averaging that can obscure heterogeneity. The early years concentrated on high-resolution spectroscopy in solids, which provided observations of lifetime-limited spectra, optical saturation, spectral diffusion, optical switching, vibrational spectra, and magnetic resonance of a single molecular spin. In the mid-1990's, much of the field moved to room temperature, where a wide variety of biophysical effects were subsequently explored, but it is worth noting that several features from the low-temperature studies have analogs at high temperature. For example, in our first studies of yellow-emitting variants of green fluorescent protein (EYFP) in the water-filled pores of a gel (Nature 388, 355 (1997)), optically induced switching of the emission was observed, a room-temperature analog of the earlier low-temperature behavior. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic imaging of individual fluorophores leads naturally to superlocalization, or determination of the position of the molecule with precision beyond the optical diffraction limit, simply by digitization of the point-spread function from the single emitter. Recent work has allowed measurement of the shape of single filaments in a living cell simply by allowing a single molecule to move through the filament (PNAS 103, 10929 (2006)). The additional use of photoinduced control of single-molecule emission allows imaging beyond the diffraction limit (superresolution) by several novel approaches proposed by different researchers. For example, using photoswitchable EYFP, a novel protein superstructure can now be directly imaged in a living bacterial cell at

  15. Behavioural environments and niche construction: the evolution of dim-light foraging in bees.

    PubMed

    Wcislo, William T; Tierney, Simon M

    2009-02-01

    Most bees forage for floral resources during the day, but temporal patterns of foraging activity vary extensively, and foraging in dim-light environments has evolved repeatedly. Facultative dim-light foraging behaviour is known in five of nine families of bees, while obligate behaviour is known in four families and evolved independently at least 19 times. The light intensity under which bees forage varies by a factor of 10(8), and therefore the evolution of dim-light foraging represents the invasion of a new, extreme niche. The repeated evolution of dim-light foraging behaviour in bees allows tests of the hypothesis that behaviour acts as an evolutionary pacemaker. With the exception of one species of Apis, facultative dim-light foragers show no external structural traits that are thought to enable visually mediated flight behaviour in low-light environments. By contrast, most obligate dim-light foragers show a suite of convergent optical traits such as enlarged ocelli and compound eyes. In one intensively studied species (Megalopta genalis) these optical changes are associated with neurobiological changes to enhance photon capture. The available ecological evidence suggests that an escape from competition for pollen and nectar resources and avoidance of natural enemies are driving factors in the evolution of obligate dim-light foraging.

  16. Dimming supernovae without cosmic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Csáki, Csaba; Kaloper, Nemanja; Terning, John

    2002-04-22

    We present a simple model where photons propagating in extragalactic magnetic fields can oscillate into very light axions. The oscillations may convert some of the photons, departing a distant supernova, into axions, making the supernova appear dimmer and hence more distant than it really is. Averaging over different configurations of the magnetic field we find that the dimming saturates at about one-third of the light from the supernovae at very large redshifts. This results in a luminosity distance versus redshift curve almost indistinguishable from that produced by the accelerating Universe, if the axion mass and coupling scale are m approximately 10(-16) eV, M approximately 4 x 10(11) GeV. This phenomenon may be an alternative to the accelerating Universe for explaining supernova observations.

  17. Wavelengths for EVE coronal dimming signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Simoes, P. J. D. A.; Kukstas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO detects post-flare dimmings, mainly in the spectral regions of Fe IX-XII in its MEGS-A range. We have shown that dimmings occurred in most of the 31 X-class flares that occurred between SDO launch and the end of April 2014. Based upon earlier X-ray observations, we interpret these dimmings as the result of CME mass ejections from the low corona. We can estimate the masses involved in these dimmings by deriving a best pre-event temperature and emission measure in the dimmed region from EVE, and a source volume from AIA images. The dimming for SOL2011-02-15, the first of these events, "peaked" at -3.4% in Fe IX in terms of the pre-event emission from the whole Sun, with smaller relative depletions in higher ionization states of Fe. Because of its high photon throughput, EVE data determine line centroids with precisions of a few km/s equivalent. In the present study we analyze the wavelengths of the dimmed regions, characterizing their displacements from the mean wavelengths as functions of heliographic position, time, event magnitude, and excitation state of Fe.

  18. Project starlight: an approach to wide-range dimming for AMLCD backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanney, Neil R.

    1994-06-01

    AMLCD's used in cockpit applications are transmissive devices and therefore require backlighting. The nominal luminance at the front panel is 200 fl for sunlight and 0.1 fl for night vision goggle operation. This corresponds to a backlight luminance of approximately 5000 and 2.5 fl respectively. The industry has been struggling to provide this dimming ratio of 2000:1. Recently dimming ratios of 4000:1 and 8000:1 have been requested to provide better compatibility with night vision goggles. This is analogous to operation from sun light to star light. The problem with conventional lamp systems has been that the lamps stop fluorescing at low levels. This paper presents a summary of the methods developed to control conduction and hence luminance. When the methods were implemented, it was demonstrated that dimming ratios of 50,000:1 are achievable.

  19. [Development of novel fluorescence-derivatization-HPLC methods enabling highly sensitive and selective analysis of biological compounds].

    PubMed

    Todoroki, Kenichiro

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence-derivatization-HPLC methods are powerful tools for performing the analysis of bioactive compounds with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this paper, the author reviews the development of the following four types of novel fluorescence-derivatization-HPLC analytical systems: (1) simultaneous HPLC analysis of melatonin and its related compounds through post-column electrochemical demethylation and fluorescence derivatization, (2) HPLC analysis of 5-hydroxyindoles based on fluorescence derivatization by online pre-column photocatalytic oxidation with benzylamine, (3) reagent peak-free HPLC analysis for aliphatic amines and amino acids using F-trap pyrene as a fluorous tag-bound fluorescence derivatization reagent, and (4) reagent peak-free HPLC analysis for carboxylic acids using a fluorous scavenging-derivatization method. The authors have also successfully applied these systems to biological and pharmaceutical analyses.

  20. Quantitative fluorescence imaging enabled by spatial frequency domain optical-property mapping in the sub-diffusive regime for surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibai, Mira; Veilleux, Israel; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Leblond, Frederic; Roberts, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence guidance enables maximum safe resection of, for example, glioblastomas by providing surgeons with real-time tumor optical contrast. Specifically, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence guided resection can improve surgical outcomes by better defining tumor margins and identifying satellite tumor foci. However, visual assessment of PpIX fluorescence is subjective and limited by the distorting effects of light attenuation (absorption and scattering) by tissue and background tissue autofluorescence. We have previously shown, using a point fluorescence-reflectance fiberoptic probe, that non-invasive measurement of the absolute PpIX concentration, [PpIX], further improves sensitivity and specificity, leading to the demonstration that the technique can also detect low-grade gliomas as well as otherwise undetectable residual tumor foci in high-grade disease. Here, we extend this approach to wide-field quantitative fluorescence imaging (qFI) by implementing spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) to recover the tissue optical absorption and transport scattering coefficients across the field of view. We report on the performance of this approach to determine the intrinsic fluorescence intensity in tissue-simulating phantoms in both the fully diffusive (i.e. scatter-dominated) and sub-diffusive (low transport albedo) regimes, for which higher spatial frequencies are used. The performance of qFI is compared to a Born- normalization correction scheme, as well as to the values obtained using the fiberoptic probe on homogeneous tissue phantoms containing PpIX.

  1. A sensitive dual-fluorescence reporter system enables positive selection of ras suppressors by suppression of ras-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Alla; Shen, Sylvie; Millington, Michelle; Passioura, Toby; Pedler, Michelle; Rasko, John Edward Joshua; Symonds, Geoff

    2003-10-01

    We have developed a novel dual-fluorescence reporter system incorporating green (GFP) and red (RFP) fluorescent proteins to monitor expression of the N-ras(m) gene and an N-ras(m) suppressor, respectively. Retroviral vectors were produced in which human N-ras(m) (codon 13 mutation) was coexpressed with GFP, and a ribozyme specifically targeting N-ras(m) was coexpressed with RFP. N-Ras(m) suppression was monitored by measurement of GFP fluorescence in dual-fluorescent (GFP and RFP) cells. We demonstrated that the degree of N-ras(m) suppression was dependent on the ribozyme dose, proportional to red fluorescence, in dual-fluorescent cells. We further showed that ribozyme-mediated N-ras(m)suppression inhibited growth of NIH3T3 and CD34-positive TF-1 cells. In these cultures, ras suppressor activity resulted in the depletion of suppressor-positive cells due to inhibition of cell growth. In contrast, N-ras(m) suppression produced a growth advantage to human leukemic K562 cells, presumably by inhibiting N-ras(m)-induced apoptosis. In K562 cells, ras suppression resulted in the outgrowth of suppressor-positive cells. This provides a platform to identify suppressors of ras that is based on function.

  2. High-efficiency fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes enabled by triplet-triplet annihilation and horizontal emitter orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Christian Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2014-11-03

    A green organic light-emitting diode with the fluorescent emitter Coumarin 545T shows an external quantum efficiency (η{sub EQE}) of 6.9%, clearly exceeding the classical limit of 5% for fluorescent emitters. The analysis of the angular dependent photoluminescence spectrum of the emission layer reveals that 86% of the transition dipole moments are horizontally oriented. Furthermore, transient electroluminescence measurements demonstrate the presence of a delayed emission originating from triplet-triplet annihilation. A simulation based efficiency analysis reveals quantitatively the origin for the high η{sub EQE}: a radiative exciton fraction higher than 25% and a light-outcoupling efficiency of nearly 30%.

  3. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gather, Malte C.; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here, we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (-7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet=22 cm-1 96 dB cm-1). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (<100 pJ, outperforming organic semiconductor lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles.

  4. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers

    PubMed Central

    Gather, Malte C.; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (−7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet = 22 cm−1; 96 dB cm−1). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (<100 pJ, outperforming organic semiconductor lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles. PMID:25483850

  5. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-08

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here, we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (-7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet=22 cm(-1); 96 dB cm(-1)). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (<100 pJ, outperforming organic semiconductor lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles.

  6. Oxidative synthesis of highly fluorescent boron/nitrogen co-doped carbon nanodots enabling detection of photosensitizer and carcinogenic dye.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Shanaz; Mansoor, Farrukh; Naz, Shagufta; Lei, Jianping; Kanwal, Shamsa

    2013-11-05

    Current research efforts have demonstrated the facile hydrothermal oxidative synthetic route to develop highly fluorescent boron/nitrogen co-doped carbon nanodots (CNDs). During this process, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)glycine served as a source of N doping and a carbon precursor as well, while boric acid H3BO3 is used as an oxidizing agent in the N2 environment. Surface passivation through ultrasonic treatment of CNDs was performed to induce modifications by using various surface passivating agents. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) remarkably enhanced the fluorescence performance and monodispersity of polymerized carbon nanodots (P-CNDs) in aqueous phase with an enhanced quantum yield of 23.71%, along with an increase in size from ~3 nm to ~200 nm. For characterization of CNDs and P-CNDs, UV, infrared, photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectra, and atomic force microscopy techniques were utilized. Application potentials of synthesized P-CNDs were developed via introduction of protoporphyrin (PPD, a photosensitizer) which has great doping affinity with polymer PEI to switch-off the fluorescence of P-CNDs, leading to the production of dye-doped nanoprobes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was also observed during dye-doping, and PPD was detected with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 15 pM. The fluorescence recovery of this switched-off nanoprobe was made possible by using Sudan red III (carcinogenic dye), which was oxidized by PPD doped in P-CNDs. Sudan red III was detected in the concentration range of 9.9 pM-0.37 nM. Meanwhile, it was also confirmed that the dye-doped nanoprobe is highly selective and exceptionally sensitive to detect this carcinogenic agent in commercial products with a LOD (3σ) of 90 fM.

  7. Fluorescent sensors for the basic metabolic panel enable measurement with a smart phone device over the physiological range.

    PubMed

    Awqatty, Becker; Samaddar, Shayak; Cash, Kevin J; Clark, Heather A; Dubach, J Matthew

    2014-10-21

    The advanced functionality of portable devices such as smart phones provides the necessary hardware to potentially perform complex diagnostic measurements in any setting. Recent research and development have utilized cameras and data acquisition properties of smart phones to create diagnostic approaches for a variety of diseases or pollutants. However, in concentration measurements, such as blood glucose, the performance of handheld diagnostic devices depends largely on the sensing mechanism. To expand measurements to multiple components, often necessary in medical tests, with a single diagnostic device, robust platform based sensors are needed. Here, we developed a suite of dual wavelength fluorescent sensors with response characteristics necessary to measure each component of a basic metabolic panel, a common clinical measurement. Furthermore, the response of these sensors could be measured with a simple optical setup to convert a smart phone into a fluorescence measurement instrument. This approach could be used as a mobile basic metabolic panel measurement system for point of care diagnostics.

  8. Two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy enables multiplexed molecular imaging in the alveolar space of human lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajić, Nikola; Akram, Ahsan R.; Choudhary, Tushar R.; McDonald, Neil; Tanner, Michael G.; Pedretti, Ettore; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Scholefield, Emma; Girkin, John M.; Moore, Anne; Bradley, Mark; Dhaliwal, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a fast two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy system capable of simultaneously detecting several disease targets in intact human ex vivo lung tissue. We characterize the system for light throughput from the excitation light emitting diodes, fluorescence collection efficiency, and chromatic focal shifts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the instrument by imaging bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in ex vivo human lung tissue. We describe a mechanism of bacterial detection through the fiber bundle that uses blinking effects of bacteria as they move in front of the fiber core providing detection of objects smaller than the fiber core and cladding (˜3 μm). This effectively increases the measured spatial resolution of 4 μm. We show simultaneous imaging of neutrophils, monocytes, and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus) in ex vivo human lung tissue. The instrument has 10 nM and 50 nM sensitivity for fluorescein and Cy5 solutions, respectively. Lung tissue autofluorescence remains visible at up to 200 fps camera acquisition rate. The optical system lends itself to clinical translation due to high-fluorescence sensitivity, simplicity, and the ability to multiplex several pathological molecular imaging targets simultaneously.

  9. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-01

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one

  10. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  11. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  12. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  13. The Nature of CME-flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.; Qiu, J.; Sullivan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map foot-points of the erupting flux rope. As emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may be used to diagnose initiation of CMEs. We analyze three events of flare, CME, and coronal dimming. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV variability Experiment (EVE) are used for observations of the dimming, and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatorys EUVI, COR1 and COR2 are used to obtain velocity for the associated CMEs. We also calculate the magnetic reconnection rate from the Helioseismic and Magnetic (HMI) combined with AIA 1600. The magnetic reconnection fluxes are correlated well with CME height profiles while the reconnection rate peaks at the CME acceleration maximum. In two events, the dimming light curve also shows good correlation with the CME height evolution. We model the dimming evolution based on several different assumptions of CME expansion: isothermal or adiabatic, self-similar or one-dimensional. The observed dimming light curves agree with the calculations based on one dimensional, isothermal CME expansion model. Dimming in the third event cannot be described by the above CME expansion models, and we speculate that the nature of dimming associated with the third CME event is different from the other two.

  14. Nature of CME-flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianxia; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect properties of CMEs in the early phase of eruption. We analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on December 26, 2011. Data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatories (SDO) are used for disk observations of the dimming, and images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories are used to obtain height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also calculate magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to flare ribbons, and is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution well tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. Spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From dimming analysis, we infer the process of CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  15. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP provided significant contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional microscopy through imaging different multi-cellular fluorescent structures, including 3-D branched cells in vitro and live zebrafish embryos. Imaging with the integration of PIP greatly reduced out-of-focus contamination and generated sharper contrast in acquired 2-D plane images when compared with the stand-alone inverted microscope. As a result, the dynamic fluid domain of the beating zebrafish heart was clearly segmented and the functional monitoring of the heart was achieved. Furthermore, the enhanced axial resolution established by thin plane illumination of PIP enabled the 3-D reconstruction of the branched cellular structures, which leads to the improvement on the functionality of the wide field microscopy. PMID:26819828

  16. Identification of DIM-7, a protein required to target the DIM-5 H3 methyltransferase to chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Zachary A.; Adhvaryu, Keyur K.; Honda, Shinji; Shiver, Anthony L.; Selker, Eric U.

    2010-01-01

    Functionally distinct chromatin domains are delineated by distinct posttranslational modifications of histones, and in some organisms by differences in DNA methylation. Proper establishment and maintenance of chromatin domains is critical but not well understood. We previously demonstrated that heterochromatin in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is marked by cytosine methylation directed by trimethylated Lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3). H3K9me3 is the product of the DIM-5 Lysine methyltransferase and is recognized by a protein complex containing heterochromatin protein-1 and the DIM-2 DNA methyltransferase. To identify additional components that control the establishment and function of DNA methylation and heterochromatin, we built a strain harboring two selectable reporter genes that are silenced by DNA methylation and employed this strain to select for mutants that are defective in DNA methylation (dim). We report a previously unidentified gene (dim-7) that is essential for H3K9me3 and DNA methylation. DIM-7 homologs are found only in fungi and are highly divergent. We found that DIM-7 interacts with DIM-5 in vivo and demonstrated that a conserved domain near the N terminus of DIM-7 is required for its stability. In addition, we found that DIM-7 is essential for recruitment of DIM-5 to form heterochromatin. PMID:20404183

  17. Solar dimming/brightening in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambezidis, Harry; Demetriou, Dora; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris; Nastos, Panagiotis

    2010-05-01

    Early analyses of solar radiation records have pointed to a widespread decline of surface solar radiation from the 1950s up to the 1980s in various parts of the world. This phenomenon was attributed to increasing air pollution and has been named "global dimming". More recent analyses with data records updated to near present suggested that surface solar radiation shows no sign of decrease anymore since the 1980s or even started to recover at many locations. This recovery has been named "solar brightening". Air pollution control and the economic breakdown of the former communist countries are the major influential factors for this transition. Further the influence of the recovery from the dimming caused by Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991 and internal climate variability with associated cloud variations were suggested to contribute to the brightening in the 1990s. Despite the interest in the solar dimming/brightening phenomenon the Mediterranean area has not attracted the attention of the scientists in this respect so far. Therefore, the present work tries to fill this gap by providing spatio-temporal analysis of the incoming short-wave solar radiation in the whole area of the Mediterranean Sea in the period 1979-2004 taken from satellites. To give better spatial information about the phenomenon the Mediterranean region has been divided into three sub-regions: the West Mediterranean, from Gibraltar to Corsica, the Central Mediterranean, from Corsica to the Ionian Sea, and the East Mediterranean, from the Ionian Sea to the shores of Syria. The analysis shows that the three sub-regions have not undergone the same spatio-temporal pattern of the phenomenon probably due to the different distribution of aerosols in the region.

  18. 21 CM searches for DIM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Mike; Banks, Gareth

    1997-04-01

    We review very strong selection effects which operate against the detection of dim (i.e. low surface brightness) galaxies. The Parkes multibeam instrument offers a wonderful opportunity to turn up new populations of such galaxies. However, to explore the newly accessible parameter space, it will be necessary to survey both a very deep patch (105 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 1018 cm-2) and a deep patch (104 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 3 × 1018 cm-2) in carefully selected areas, and we outline the case to do this.

  19. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy enables multiscale spatial visualization of ions involved in fungal lignocellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kirker, Grant; Zelinka, Sam; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vine, David; Finney, Lydia; Chen, Si; Hong, Young Pyo; Uyarte, Omar; Vogt, Stefan; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry; Jakes, Joseph E

    2017-01-31

    The role of ions in the fungal decay process of lignocellulose biomaterials, and more broadly fungal metabolism, has implications for diverse research disciplines ranging from plant pathology and forest ecology, to carbon sequestration. Despite the importance of ions in fungal decay mechanisms, the spatial distribution and quantification of ions in lignocellulosic cell walls and fungal hyphae during decay is not known. Here we employ synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map and quantify physiologically relevant ions, such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn, in wood being decayed by the model brown rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. Two-dimensional XFM maps were obtained to study the ion spatial distributions from mm to submicron length scales in wood, fungal hyphae with the dried extracellular matrix (ECM) from the fungus, and Ca oxalate crystals. Three-dimensional ion volume reconstructions were also acquired of wood cell walls and hyphae with ECM. Results show that the fungus actively transports some ions, such as Fe, into the wood and controls the distribution of ions at both the bulk wood and cell wall length scales. These measurements provide new insights into the movement of ions during decay and illustrate how synchrotron-based XFM is uniquely suited study these ions.

  20. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy enables multiscale spatial visualization of ions involved in fungal lignocellulose deconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirker, Grant; Zelinka, Sam; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vine, David; Finney, Lydia; Chen, Si; Hong, Young Pyo; Uyarte, Omar; Vogt, Stefan; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry; Jakes, Joseph E.

    2017-01-01

    The role of ions in the fungal decay process of lignocellulose biomaterials, and more broadly fungal metabolism, has implications for diverse research disciplines ranging from plant pathology and forest ecology, to carbon sequestration. Despite the importance of ions in fungal decay mechanisms, the spatial distribution and quantification of ions in lignocellulosic cell walls and fungal hyphae during decay is not known. Here we employ synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map and quantify physiologically relevant ions, such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn, in wood being decayed by the model brown rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. Two-dimensional XFM maps were obtained to study the ion spatial distributions from mm to submicron length scales in wood, fungal hyphae with the dried extracellular matrix (ECM) from the fungus, and Ca oxalate crystals. Three-dimensional ion volume reconstructions were also acquired of wood cell walls and hyphae with ECM. Results show that the fungus actively transports some ions, such as Fe, into the wood and controls the distribution of ions at both the bulk wood and cell wall length scales. These measurements provide new insights into the movement of ions during decay and illustrate how synchrotron-based XFM is uniquely suited study these ions.

  1. Microencapsulation of inorganic nanocrystals into PLGA microsphere vaccines enables their intracellular localization in dendritic cells by electron and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schliehe, Christopher; Schliehe, Constanze; Thiry, Marc; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I; Hentschel, Joachim; Weller, Horst; Groettrup, Marcus

    2011-05-10

    Biodegradable poly-(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres (PLGA-MS) are approved as a drug delivery system in humans and represent a promising antigen delivery device for immunotherapy against cancer. Immune responses following PLGA-MS vaccination require cross-presentation of encapsulated antigen by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). While the potential of PLGA-MS as vaccine formulations is well established, the intracellular pathway of cross-presentation following phagocytosis of PLGA-MS is still under debate. A part of the controversy stems from the difficulty in unambiguously identifying PLGA-MS within cells. Here we show a novel strategy for the efficient encapsulation of inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) into PLGA-MS as a tool to study their intracellular localization. We microencapsulated NCs as an electron dense marker to study the intracellular localization of PLGA-MS by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and as fluorescent labels for confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using this method, we found PLGA-MS to be rapidly taken up by dendritic cells and macrophages. Co-localization with the lysosomal marker LAMP1 showed a lysosomal storage of PLGA-MS for over two days after uptake, long after the initiation of cross-presentation had occurred. Our data argue against an escape of PLGA-MS from the endosome as has previously been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate cross-presentation of PLGA-MS encapsulated antigen.

  2. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy enables multiscale spatial visualization of ions involved in fungal lignocellulose deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kirker, Grant; Zelinka, Sam; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vine, David; Finney, Lydia; Chen, Si; Hong, Young Pyo; Uyarte, Omar; Vogt, Stefan; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry; Jakes, Joseph E.

    2017-01-01

    The role of ions in the fungal decay process of lignocellulose biomaterials, and more broadly fungal metabolism, has implications for diverse research disciplines ranging from plant pathology and forest ecology, to carbon sequestration. Despite the importance of ions in fungal decay mechanisms, the spatial distribution and quantification of ions in lignocellulosic cell walls and fungal hyphae during decay is not known. Here we employ synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map and quantify physiologically relevant ions, such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn, in wood being decayed by the model brown rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. Two-dimensional XFM maps were obtained to study the ion spatial distributions from mm to submicron length scales in wood, fungal hyphae with the dried extracellular matrix (ECM) from the fungus, and Ca oxalate crystals. Three-dimensional ion volume reconstructions were also acquired of wood cell walls and hyphae with ECM. Results show that the fungus actively transports some ions, such as Fe, into the wood and controls the distribution of ions at both the bulk wood and cell wall length scales. These measurements provide new insights into the movement of ions during decay and illustrate how synchrotron-based XFM is uniquely suited study these ions. PMID:28139778

  3. New Dioxaborolane Chemistry Enables [(18)F]-Positron-Emitting, Fluorescent [(18)F]-Multimodality Biomolecule Generation from the Solid Phase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Erik A; Wang, Ye; Crisp, Jessica L; Vera, David R; Tsien, Roger Y; Ting, Richard

    2016-05-18

    New protecting group chemistry is used to greatly simplify imaging probe production. Temperature and organic solvent-sensitive biomolecules are covalently attached to a biotin-bearing dioxaborolane, which facilitates antibody immobilization on a streptavidin-agarose solid-phase support. Treatment with aqueous fluoride triggers fluoride-labeled antibody release from the solid phase, separated from unlabeled antibody, and creates [(18)F]-trifluoroborate-antibody for positron emission tomography and near-infrared fluorescent (PET/NIRF) multimodality imaging. This dioxaborolane-fluoride reaction is bioorthogonal, does not inhibit antigen binding, and increases [(18)F]-specific activity relative to solution-based radiosyntheses. Two applications are investigated: an anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) monoclonal antibody (mAb) that labels prostate tumors and Cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mAb (FDA approved) that labels lung adenocarcinoma tumors. Colocalized, tumor-specific NIRF and PET imaging confirm utility of the new technology. The described chemistry should allow labeling of many commercial systems, diabodies, nanoparticles, and small molecules for dual modality imaging of many diseases.

  4. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy enables multiscale spatial visualization of ions involved in fungal lignocellulose deconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Kirker, Grant; Zelinka, Sam; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; ...

    2017-01-31

    Ions play an important role in the growth and development of filamentous fungi, particularly in the fungal decay process of lignocellulose materials. The role of ions in wood degradation, and more broadly fungal metabolism, have implications for diverse research disciplines ranging from plant pathology and forest ecology, to wood protection. Despite the importance of ions in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic fungal decay mechanisms, the spatial distribution of ions in wood and fungal hyphae during decay is not known. Here we employ synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map physiologically relevant ions, such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn,more » in wood being decayed by the model brown rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. Two-dimensional XFM maps were obtained to study the ion spatial distributions from mm to submicron length scales in wood and hyphae. Three-dimensional ion volume reconstructions with submicron spatial resolution were also acquired of wood cell walls and fungal hyphae, and an estimation of oxalate concentration at the microscale was made. Results show that the fungus actively transports some ions, such as Fe, into the wood and controls the distribution of ions at both the bulk wood and cellular length scales. Within the fungal hyphae, ion volume reconstructions show inhomogeneous ion distributions at the micron length scale and this localization may be indicative of both physiological status and requirements or in some cases, potentially sites associated with the initiation of metal-catalyzed wood degradation. Finally, these measurements illustrate how synchrotron based XFM is uniquely qualified for probing the role of ions in the growth and metabolic processes of filamentous fungi.« less

  5. STUDY OF THE RECURRING DIMMING REGION DETECTED AT AR 11305 USING THE CORONAL DIMMING TRACKER (CoDiT)

    SciTech Connect

    Krista, Larisza D.; Reinard, Alysha

    2013-01-10

    We present a new approach to coronal dimming detection using the COronal DImming Tracker tool (CODIT), which was found to be successful in locating and tracking multiple dimming regions. This tool, an extension of a previously developed coronal hole tracking software, allows us to study the properties and the spatial evolution of dimming regions at high temporal and spatial cadence from the time of their appearance to their disappearance. We use Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 193 A wavelength observations and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager magnetograms to study dimmings. As a demonstration of the detection technique we analyzed six recurrences of a dimming observed near AR 11305 between 2011 September 29 and October 2. The dimming repeatedly appeared and formed in a similar way, first expanding then shrinking and occasionally stabilizing in the same location until the next eruption. The dimming areas were studied in conjunction with the corresponding flare magnitudes and coronal mass ejection (CME) masses. These properties were found to follow a similar trend during the observation period, which is consistent with the idea that the magnitude of the eruption and the CME mass affect the relative sizes of the consecutive dimmings. We also present a hypothesis to explain the evolution of the recurrent single dimming through interchange reconnection. This process would accommodate the relocation of quasi-open magnetic field lines and hence allow the CME flux rope footpoint (the dimming) to expand into quiet-Sun regions. By relating the properties of dimmings, flares, and CMEs we improve our understanding of the magnetic field reconfiguration caused by reconnection.

  6. Mystery of a Dimming White Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    In the wake of the recent media attention over an enigmatic, dimming star, another intriguing object has been discovered: J1529+2928, a white dwarf that periodically dims. This mystery, however, may have a simple solution with interesting consequences for future surveys of white dwarfs.Unexpected VariabilityJ1529+2928 is an isolated white dwarf that appears to have a mass of slightly more than the Sun. But rather than radiating steadily, J1529+2928 dims once every 38 minutes almost as though it were being eclipsed.The team that discovered these variations, led by Mukremin Kilic (University of Oklahoma), used telescopes at the Apache Point Observatory and the McDonald Observatory to obtain follow-up photometric data of J1529+2928 spread across 66 days. The team also took spectra of the white dwarf with the Gemini North telescope.Kilic and collaborators then began, one by one, to rule out possible causes of this objects variability.Eliminating OptionsThe period of the variability is too long for J1529+2928 to be a pulsating white dwarf with luminosity variation caused by gravity-wave pulsations.The variability cant be due to an eclipse by a stellar or brown-dwarf companion, because there isnt any variation in J1529+2928s radial velocity.Its not due to the orbit of a solid-body planetary object; such a transit would be too short to explain observations.It cant be due to the orbit of a disintegrated planet; this wouldnt explain the light curves observed in different filters plus the light curve doesnt change over the 66-day span.Spotty SurfaceTop and middle two panels: light curves from three different nights observing J1529+2928s periodic dimming. Bottom panel: The Fourier transform shows a peak at 37.7 cycles/day (and another, smaller peak at its first harmonic). [Kilic et al. 2015]So what explanation is left? The authors suggest that J1529+2928s variability is likely caused by a starspot on the white dwarfs surface that rotates into and out of our view. Estimates

  7. Dimmings as a footprint of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Allred, Joel C.; Kay, Christina; Krista, Larisza Diana; Mason, James; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Reinard, Alysha; Webb, David F.

    2016-05-01

    Large regions of coronal dimming often accompany coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Of all of the EUV signatures of CMEs, dimmings (when present) are the best match to the location and extent of the coronagraph CME observations. They last on timescales from minutes to hours, are sometimes patchy in appearance, and can extend far (>1 RSun) from the flaring region. They are known to be good indicators of the site of evacuated material, and have been extensively studied as a CME mass source. We investigate the possibility that dimmings also serve as a magnetic footprint of CMEs. Dimmings develop during or soon after the eruption, and may trace field lines locally opened during the CME. These dimming regions can be extensive, representing at least part of the “base” of a CME and the mass and magnetic flux transported outward by it. We report on three-dimensional observations of the co-development of dimmings in EUV and coronagraph images, magnetic field topologies represented by the dimmings, and (when available) in situ observations that can be used as a diagnostic of the erupting field topology.

  8. EUV Coronal Dimming and its Relationship to Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    As a coronal mass ejection (CME) departs from the inner solar atmosphere, it leaves behind a void. This region of depleted plasma results in a corresponding decrease in coronal emissions that can be observed by instruments tuned to measure the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These coronal dimmings can be observed with EUV imagers and EUV spectral irradiance instruments. Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) provide complementary observations; together they can be used to obtain high spatial and spectral resolution. AIA provides information about the location, extent, and spatial evolution of the dimming while EVE data are important to understand plasma temperature evolution. Concurrent processes with similar timescales to mass-loss dimming also impact the observations, which makes a deconvolution method necessary for the irradiance time series in order to have a “clean” mass-loss dimming light curve that can be parameterized and compared with CME kinematics. This presentation will first provide background on these various physical processes and the deconvolution method developed. Two case studies will then be presented, followed by a semi-statistical study (~30 events) to establish a correlation between dimming and CME parameters. In particular, the slope of the deconvolved irradiance dimming light curve is representative of the CME speed, and the irradiance dimming depth can serve as a proxy for CME mass. Finally, plans and early results from a more complete statistical study of all dimmings in the SDO era, based on an automated detection routine using EVE data, will be described and compared with independently derived dimmings automatically detected with AIA data.

  9. Photic niche invasions: phylogenetic history of the dim-light foraging augochlorine bees (Halictidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Simon M.; Sanjur, Oris; Grajales, Grethel G.; Santos, Leandro M.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Wcislo, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Most bees rely on flowering plants and hence are diurnal foragers. From this ancestral state, dim-light foraging in bees requires significant adaptations to a new photic environment. We used DNA sequences to evaluate the phylogenetic history of the most diverse clade of Apoidea that is adapted to dim-light environments (Augochlorini: Megalopta, Megaloptidia and Megommation). The most speciose lineage, Megalopta, is distal to the remaining dim-light genera, and its closest diurnal relative (Xenochlora) is recovered as a lineage that has secondarily reverted to diurnal foraging. Tests for adaptive protein evolution indicate that long-wavelength opsin shows strong evidence of stabilizing selection, with no more than five codons (2%) under positive selection, depending on analytical procedure. In the branch leading to Megalopta, the amino acid of the single positively selected codon is conserved among ancestral Halictidae examined, and is homologous to codons known to influence molecular structure at the chromophore-binding pocket. Theoretically, such mutations can shift photopigment λmax sensitivity and enable visual transduction in alternate photic environments. Results are discussed in light of the available evidence on photopigment structure, morphological specialization and biogeographic distributions over geological time. PMID:21795273

  10. Photic niche invasions: phylogenetic history of the dim-light foraging augochlorine bees (Halictidae).

    PubMed

    Tierney, Simon M; Sanjur, Oris; Grajales, Grethel G; Santos, Leandro M; Bermingham, Eldredge; Wcislo, William T

    2012-02-22

    Most bees rely on flowering plants and hence are diurnal foragers. From this ancestral state, dim-light foraging in bees requires significant adaptations to a new photic environment. We used DNA sequences to evaluate the phylogenetic history of the most diverse clade of Apoidea that is adapted to dim-light environments (Augochlorini: Megalopta, Megaloptidia and Megommation). The most speciose lineage, Megalopta, is distal to the remaining dim-light genera, and its closest diurnal relative (Xenochlora) is recovered as a lineage that has secondarily reverted to diurnal foraging. Tests for adaptive protein evolution indicate that long-wavelength opsin shows strong evidence of stabilizing selection, with no more than five codons (2%) under positive selection, depending on analytical procedure. In the branch leading to Megalopta, the amino acid of the single positively selected codon is conserved among ancestral Halictidae examined, and is homologous to codons known to influence molecular structure at the chromophore-binding pocket. Theoretically, such mutations can shift photopigment λ(max) sensitivity and enable visual transduction in alternate photic environments. Results are discussed in light of the available evidence on photopigment structure, morphological specialization and biogeographic distributions over geological time.

  11. Spatial dimming scheme for optical OFDM based visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zeng, Zhimin; Cheng, Julian; Guo, Caili

    2016-12-26

    A new dimming control scheme termed spatial dimming orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (SD-OFDM) is proposed for multiple-input and multiple output OFDM based visible light communication. The basic idea of SD-OFDM is that the illumination can be represented by the number of glared light emitting diodes (LEDs) in an LED lamp. As the biasing level of LEDs does not adjust to represent the required illumination level, the proposed scheme can significantly mitigate the clipping noise compared to analogue dimming schemes. Furthermore, unlike digital dimming schemes that control illumination levels by setting different duty cycles of pulse width modulation, the proposed scheme is always in the "on-state" for varied illumination levels. Both analytical and simulation results indicate that the proposed scheme is an efficient and feasible dimmable scheme.

  12. Neural Summation in the Hawkmoth Visual System Extends the Limits of Vision in Dim Light.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Anna Lisa; O'Carroll, David Charles; Warrant, Eric James

    2016-03-21

    Most of the world's animals are active in dim light and depend on good vision for the tasks of daily life. Many have evolved visual adaptations that permit a performance superior to that of manmade imaging devices [1]. In insects, a major model visual system, nocturnal species show impressive visual abilities ranging from flight control [2, 3], to color discrimination [4, 5], to navigation using visual landmarks [6-8] or dim celestial compass cues [9, 10]. In addition to optical adaptations that improve their sensitivity in dim light [11], neural summation of light in space and time-which enhances the coarser and slower features of the scene at the expense of noisier finer and faster features-has been suggested to improve sensitivity in theoretical [12-14], anatomical [15-17], and behavioral [18-20] studies. How these summation strategies function neurally is, however, presently unknown. Here, we quantified spatial and temporal summation in the motion vision pathway of a nocturnal hawkmoth. We show that spatial and temporal summation combine supralinearly to substantially increase contrast sensitivity and visual information rate over four decades of light intensity, enabling hawkmoths to see at light levels 100 times dimmer than without summation. Our results reveal how visual motion is calculated neurally in dim light and how spatial and temporal summation improve sensitivity while simultaneously maximizing spatial and temporal resolution, thus extending models of insect motion vision derived predominantly from diurnal flies. Moreover, the summation strategies we have revealed may benefit manmade vision systems optimized for variable light levels [21].

  13. Dim Object Detection and Characterization Through Multi-frame Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-05

    TERMS EOARD, target identification , Adaptive Optics, Image Processing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0003 Dim Object Detection and Characterization Through Multi-frame Imaging Szymon Gladysz European...2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 30 March 2009 – 30 March 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dim Object Detection and

  14. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  15. Understanding Coronal Dimming and its Relation to Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, J. P.; Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Hock, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    When extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting material in the corona is lost during a coronal mass ejection (CME), the solar spectral irradiance is impacted and these effects are observed in data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). This process is one of the physical mechanisms that can lead to the observation of 'coronal dimming,' a phenomenon lasting eight hours on average and rarely persisting longer than one day. Other mechanisms that can cause observed dimming include obscuration of bright material (e.g., flare arcade) by dark material (e.g., filament), temperature evolution (e.g., cool plasma being heated causing transient decreases in characteristic emission lines), and propagation of global waves. Each of these processes has a unique spectral signature, which will be explained and exemplified. In particular, the 7 August 2010 M1.0 flare with associated ~870 km/s CME will be analyzed in detail using both AIA and EVE to demonstrate new techniques for isolating dimming due to the CME ('core dimming'). Further analysis will estimate CME mass and velocity using only parameterization of core dimming and compare these estimates to traditionally calculated CME kinetics.

  16. A new look at solar dimming and brightening in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yawen; Wild, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Published estimates on the magnitude of solar dimming and brightening in China show large discrepancies and inconsistencies in its seasonal variations. A nationwide reorganization of the surface solar radiation (SSR) network during 1990-1993 contributed to these uncertainties, which is reflected in a sudden upward jump in the published composite SSR time series. This jump is found to be prevalent in 23 out of 130 stations due to both natural (7 stations) and operational factors (16 stations). After eliminating the stations containing artifacts and discontinuous records, a new magnitude of solar dimming and brightening was estimated for China, and seasonal trends were determined. A transition from dimming to brightening remains in the SSR trend in China after excluding the affected stations and associated jump, in line with the global SSR trend.

  17. Dim light at night increases body mass of female mice.

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Jenkins, Richelle; Nelson, Randy J

    2015-05-01

    During the past century, the prevalence of light at night has increased in parallel with obesity rates. Dim light at night (dLAN) increases body mass in male mice. However, the effects of light at night on female body mass remain unspecified. Thus, female mice were exposed to a standard light/dark (LD; 16 h light at ∼150 lux/8 h dark at ∼0 lux) cycle or to light/dim light at night (dLAN; 16 h light at ∼150 lux/8 h dim light at ∼5 lux) cycles for six weeks. Females exposed to dLAN increased the rate of change in body mass compared to LD mice despite reduced total food intake during weeks five and six, suggesting that dLAN disrupted circadian rhythms resulting in deranged metabolism.

  18. Research on the detection technology to dim and small target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Feng; Huang, Jianming; Wei, Xiangquan

    2015-03-01

    With the development of Space Technology, the demand to Space Surveillance System is more urgent than before. The paper studies the dim and small target of long range. Firstly, it describes the research status of dim and small target abroad and the two detection principle of DBT and TBD. Secondly, it focuses on the higher-order correlation method, dynamic programming method and projection transformation method of TBD. Finally, it studies the image sequence simulation of different signal to noise ratio (SNR) with the real-time data from the aircraft in orbit. The image sequence is used to experimental verification. The test results show the dim and small target detection capability and applicable occasion of different methods. At the same time, it provides a new idea to the development of long-distance optical detector.

  19. Dim Light at Night Increases Body Mass of Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Jenkins, Richelle; Nelson, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    During the past century the prevalence of light at night has increased in parallel with obesity rates. Dim light at night (dLAN) increases body mass in male mice. However, the effects of light at night on female body mass remain unspecified. Thus, female mice were exposed to a standard light/dark (LD; 16h light at ~150 lux/8h dark at ~0 lux) cycle or to light/dim light at night (dLAN; 16h light at ~150 lux/8h dim light at ~5 lux) cycles for six weeks. Females exposed to dLAN increased the rate of change in body mass compared to LD mice despite reduced total food intake during weeks five and six, suggesting that dLAN disrupted circadian rhythms resulting in deranged metabolism. PMID:25431079

  20. Explicit examples of DIM constraints for network matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Mironov, Andrei; Morozov, Alexei; Morozov, Andrey; Ohkubo, Yusuke; Zenkevich, Yegor

    2016-07-01

    Dotsenko-Fateev and Chern-Simons matrix models, which describe Nekrasov functions for SYM theories in different dimensions, are all incorporated into network matrix models with the hidden Ding-Iohara-Miki (DIM) symmetry. This lifting is especially simple for what we call balanced networks. Then, the Ward identities (known under the names of Virasoro/ {W} -constraints or loop equations or regularity condition for qq-characters) are also promoted to the DIM level, where they all become corollaries of a single identity.

  1. How dim is dim? Precision of the celestial compass in moonlight and sunlight.

    PubMed

    Dacke, M; Byrne, M J; Baird, E; Scholtz, C H; Warrant, E J

    2011-03-12

    Prominent in the sky, but not visible to humans, is a pattern of polarized skylight formed around both the Sun and the Moon. Dung beetles are, at present, the only animal group known to use the much dimmer polarization pattern formed around the Moon as a compass cue for maintaining travel direction. However, the Moon is not visible every night and the intensity of the celestial polarization pattern gradually declines as the Moon wanes. Therefore, for nocturnal orientation on all moonlit nights, the absolute sensitivity of the dung beetle's polarization detector may limit the precision of this behaviour. To test this, we studied the straight-line foraging behaviour of the nocturnal ball-rolling dung beetle Scarabaeus satyrus to establish when the Moon is too dim--and the polarization pattern too weak--to provide a reliable cue for orientation. Our results show that celestial orientation is as accurate during crescent Moon as it is during full Moon. Moreover, this orientation accuracy is equal to that measured for diurnal species that orient under the 100 million times brighter polarization pattern formed around the Sun. This indicates that, in nocturnal species, the sensitivity of the optical polarization compass can be greatly increased without any loss of precision.

  2. Thresholds and noise limitations of colour vision in dim light.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Yovanovich, Carola; Olsson, Peter

    2017-04-05

    Colour discrimination is based on opponent photoreceptor interactions, and limited by receptor noise. In dim light, photon shot noise impairs colour vision, and in vertebrates, the absolute threshold of colour vision is set by dark noise in cones. Nocturnal insects (e.g. moths and nocturnal bees) and vertebrates lacking rods (geckos) have adaptations to reduce receptor noise and use chromatic vision even in very dim light. In contrast, vertebrates with duplex retinae use colour-blind rod vision when noisy cone signals become unreliable, and their transition from cone- to rod-based vision is marked by the Purkinje shift. Rod-cone interactions have not been shown to improve colour vision in dim light, but may contribute to colour vision in mesopic light intensities. Frogs and toads that have two types of rods use opponent signals from these rods to control phototaxis even at their visual threshold. However, for tasks such as prey or mate choice, their colour discrimination abilities fail at brighter light intensities, similar to other vertebrates, probably limited by the dark noise in cones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  3. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  4. Performance of dimming control scheme in visible light communication system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixiong; Zhong, Wen-De; Yu, Changyuan; Chen, Jian; Francois, Chin Po Shin; Chen, Wei

    2012-08-13

    We investigate the performance of visible light communication (VLC) system with a pulse width modulation (PWM) dimming control scheme. Under this scheme, the communication quality in terms of number of transmitted bits and bit error rate (BER) of less than 10(-3) should be guaranteed. However, for on-off-keying (OOK) signal, the required data rate becomes 10 times as high as the original data rate when the duty cycle of dimming control signal is 0.1. To make the dimming control scheme easy to be implemented in VLC system, we propose the variable M-QAM OFDM VLC system, where M is adjusted according to the brightness of LED light in terms of duty cycle. The results show that with different duty cycles the required data rates are not higher than the original value and less LED lamp power is required to guarantee the communication quality, which makes the dimming control system that satisfies both communication and illumination requirements easy to be implemented and power-saving.

  5. Molecular Effects of 13C/DIM in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    2004), suggesting that I3C and DIM could have some beneficial effects on pancreatic cancer. Curcumin Curcumin is a compound from Curcuma longa ...tumeric). C. longa is a plant widely cultivated in tropical regions of Asia and Central America. Curcumin has recently received considerable attention due

  6. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissauer, Karin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenic, Jasmina

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s-1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283. This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T˜ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution. We identify on-disk coronal dimming regions in SDO/AIA, reminiscent of core dimmings, that have no corresponding on-disk dimming signatures in STEREO-A/EUVI. Reconstructing the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction in STEREO-A clearly shows that the observed SDO on-disk dimming areas are not the footprints of the erupting fluxrope but result from decreased emission from the expanding CME body integrated along the LOS. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ˜ 2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  7. Image-classification-based global dimming algorithm for LED backlights in LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qibin, Feng; Huijie, He; Dong, Han; Lei, Zhang; Guoqiang, Lv

    2015-07-01

    Backlight dimming can help LCDs reduce power consumption and improve CR. With fixed parameters, dimming algorithm cannot achieve satisfied effects for all kinds of images. The paper introduces an image-classification-based global dimming algorithm. The proposed classification method especially for backlight dimming is based on luminance and CR of input images. The parameters for backlight dimming level and pixel compensation are adaptive with image classifications. The simulation results show that the classification based dimming algorithm presents 86.13% power reduction improvement compared with dimming without classification, with almost same display quality. The prototype is developed. There are no perceived distortions when playing videos. The practical average power reduction of the prototype TV is 18.72%, compared with common TV without dimming.

  8. Directed evolution of a far-red fluorescent rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, R. Scott; Engqvist, Martin K. M.; Wannier, Timothy; Rosenthal, Adam Z.; Herwig, Lukas; Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Lanyi, Janos K.; Balashov, Sergei P.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Arnold, Frances H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photoactive transmembrane proteins found in all three domains of life. A member of this protein family, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) of halobacterium Halorubrum sodomense, was recently shown to function as a fluorescent indicator of membrane potential when expressed in mammalian neurons. Arch fluorescence, however, is very dim and is not optimal for applications in live-cell imaging. We used directed evolution to identify mutations that dramatically improve the absolute brightness of Arch, as confirmed biochemically and with live-cell imaging (in Escherichia coli and human embryonic kidney 293 cells). In some fluorescent Arch variants, the pKa of the protonated Schiff-base linkage to retinal is near neutral pH, a useful feature for voltage-sensing applications. These bright Arch variants enable labeling of biological membranes in the far-red/infrared and exhibit the furthest red-shifted fluorescence emission thus far reported for a fluorescent protein (maximal excitation/emission at ∼620 nm/730 nm). PMID:25157169

  9. DIM (3,3′-diindolylmethane) confers protection against ionizing radiation by a unique mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Saijun; Meng, Qinghui; Xu, Jiaying; Jiao, Yang; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Brown, Milton L.; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Rosen, Eliot M.

    2013-01-01

    DIM (3,3′-diindolylmethane), a small molecule compound, is a proposed cancer preventive agent that can be safely administered to humans in repeated doses. We report that administration of DIM in a multidose schedule protected rodents against lethal doses of total body irradiation up to 13 Gy, whether DIM dosing was initiated before or up to 24 h after radiation. Physiologic submicromolar concentrations of DIM protected cultured cells against radiation by a unique mechanism: DIM caused rapid activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a nuclear kinase that regulates responses to DNA damage (DDR) and oxidative stress. Subsequently, multiple ATM substrates were phosphorylated, suggesting that DIM induces an ATM-dependent DDR-like response, and DIM enhanced radiation-induced ATM signaling and NF-κB activation. DIM also caused activation of ATM in rodent tissues. Activation of ATM by DIM may be due, in part, to inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A, an upstream regulator of ATM. In contrast, DIM did not protect human breast cancer xenograft tumors against radiation under the conditions tested. In tumors, ATM was constitutively phosphorylated and was not further stimulated by radiation and/or DIM. Our findings suggest that DIM is a potent radioprotector and mitigator that functions by stimulating an ATM-driven DDR-like response and NF-κB survival signaling. PMID:24127581

  10. DIM (3,3'-diindolylmethane) confers protection against ionizing radiation by a unique mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Saijun; Meng, Qinghui; Xu, Jiaying; Jiao, Yang; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Brown, Milton L; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Rosen, Eliot M

    2013-11-12

    DIM (3,3'-diindolylmethane), a small molecule compound, is a proposed cancer preventive agent that can be safely administered to humans in repeated doses. We report that administration of DIM in a multidose schedule protected rodents against lethal doses of total body irradiation up to 13 Gy, whether DIM dosing was initiated before or up to 24 h after radiation. Physiologic submicromolar concentrations of DIM protected cultured cells against radiation by a unique mechanism: DIM caused rapid activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a nuclear kinase that regulates responses to DNA damage (DDR) and oxidative stress. Subsequently, multiple ATM substrates were phosphorylated, suggesting that DIM induces an ATM-dependent DDR-like response, and DIM enhanced radiation-induced ATM signaling and NF-κB activation. DIM also caused activation of ATM in rodent tissues. Activation of ATM by DIM may be due, in part, to inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A, an upstream regulator of ATM. In contrast, DIM did not protect human breast cancer xenograft tumors against radiation under the conditions tested. In tumors, ATM was constitutively phosphorylated and was not further stimulated by radiation and/or DIM. Our findings suggest that DIM is a potent radioprotector and mitigator that functions by stimulating an ATM-driven DDR-like response and NF-κB survival signaling.

  11. Dimming-discrete-multi-tone (DMT) for simultaneous color control and high speed visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2014-04-07

    Visible light communication (VLC) using LEDs has attracted significant attention recently for the future secure, license-free and electromagnetic-interference (EMI)-free optical wireless communication. Dimming technique in LED lamp is advantageous for energy efficiency. Color control can be performed in the red-green-blue (RGB) LEDs by using dimming technique. It is highly desirable to employ dimming technique to provide simultaneous color and dimming control and high speed VLC. Here, we proposed and demonstrated a LED dimming control using dimming-discrete-multi-tone (DMT) modulation. High speed DMT-based VLC with simultaneous color and dimming control is demonstrated for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Demonstration and analyses for several modulation conditions and transmission distances are performed, for instance, demonstrating the data rate of 103.5 Mb/s (using RGB LED) with fast Fourier transform (FFT) size of 512.

  12. FAST EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DIMMING ASSOCIATED WITH A CORONAL JET SEEN IN MULTI-WAVELENGTH AND STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi; Innes, D. E.; Shibata, K.; Park, Y.-D.

    2013-03-20

    We have investigated a coronal jet observed near the limb on 2010 June 27 by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS), and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), and by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and on the disk by STEREO-A/EUVI. From EUV (AIA and EIS) and soft X-ray (XRT) images we have identified both cool and hot jets. There was a small loop eruption seen in Ca II images of the SOT before the jet eruption. We found that the hot jet preceded its associated cool jet by about 2 minutes. The cool jet showed helical-like structures during the rising period which was supported by the spectroscopic analysis of the jet's emission. The STEREO observation, which enabled us to observe the jet projected against the disk, showed dimming at 195 A along a large loop connected to the jet. We measured a propagation speed of {approx}800 km s{sup -1} for the dimming front. This is comparable to the Alfven speed in the loop computed from a magnetic field extrapolation of the photospheric field measured five days earlier by the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the loop densities obtained from EIS Fe XIV {lambda}264.79/274.20 line ratios. We interpret the dimming as indicating the presence of Alfvenic waves initiated by reconnection in the upper chromosphere.

  13. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  14. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B.; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G.; Werner, John S.; Burns, Marie E.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed. PMID:26114038

  15. Quantification of the effect of urbanization on solar dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Pinhas; Kishcha, Pavel

    2008-04-01

    During the 25-year period (1964-1989), a noticeable decline in surface solar radiation, termed global dimming, over worldwide sites was essentially a local phenomenon associated with human activity as expressed by the sites' population density. Specifically, our findings indicate that solar dimming was observed only over a limited part (~30%) of the total land area, restricted to highly-populated sites with population density higher than 10 person/km2. Dimming was dominated by anthropogenic aerosol emissions: the decline in surface solar radiation intensified from -0.05 W/m2/yr to -0.32 W/m2/yr, with population density increasing from 10 to 200 person/km2. At sites with population density >200 person/km2, a saturation effect was observed: declining trends were much less pronounced than those over sites with a lower population density. Overall, it is demonstrated that urban areas obtained less solar radiation, compared to rural areas, in the amount of ~12 W/m2 which is equivalent to about 8%.

  16. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    PubMed

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (<300 nm) allows label-free detection of a broader range of analytes but also mandates the use of expensive fused silica glass, which is transparent to UV light. Herein, we report the first application of label-free deep UV fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer microfluidic devices. This was achieved by means of two-photon excitation in the visible range (λex = 532 nm). Issues associated with the low optical transmittance of plastics in the UV range were successfully circumvented in this way. The technique was investigated by application to microchip electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples.

  17. Thermal oxidation process accelerates degradation of the olive oil mixed with sunflower oil and enables its discrimination using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazal; Boqué, Ricard; Folcarelli, Rita; Busto, Olga; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Hussain, Javid

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the effect of thermal treatment on the discrimination of pure extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) samples from EVOO samples adulterated with sunflower oil. Two groups of samples were used. One group was analyzed at room temperature (25 °C) and the other group was thermally treated in a thermostatic water bath at 75 °C for 8 h, in contact with air and with light exposure, to favor oxidation. All samples were then measured with synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectra were acquired by varying the excitation wavelength in the region from 250 to 720 nm. In order to optimize the differences between excitation and emission wavelengths, four constant differential wavelengths, i.e., 20 nm, 40 nm, 60 nm and 80 nm, were tried. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to discriminate between pure and adulterated oils. It was found that the 20 nm difference was the optimal, at which the discrimination models showed the best results. The best PLS-DA models were those built with the difference spectra (75-25 °C), which were able to discriminate pure from adulterated oils at a 2% level of adulteration. Furthermore, PLS regression models were built to quantify the level of adulteration. Again, the best model was the one built with the difference spectra, with a prediction error of 1.75% of adulteration.

  18. Gradual Solar Coronal Dimming and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejection in the Early Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Cheng, Jianxia

    2017-03-01

    We report observations of a two-stage coronal dimming in an eruptive event of a two-ribbon flare and a fast coronal mass ejection (CME). Weak gradual dimming persists for more than half an hour before the onset of the two-ribbon flare and the fast rise of the CME. It is followed by abrupt rapid dimming. The two-stage dimming occurs in a pair of conjugate dimming regions adjacent to the two flare ribbons, and the flare onset marks the transition between the two stages of dimming. At the onset of the two-ribbon flare, transient brightenings are also observed inside the dimming regions, before rapid dimming occurs at the same places. These observations suggest that the CME structure, most probably anchored at the twin dimming regions, undergoes a slow rise before the flare onset, and its kinematic evolution has significantly changed at the onset of flare reconnection. We explore diagnostics of the CME evolution in the early phase with analysis of the gradual dimming signatures prior to the CME eruption.

  19. Marker based watershed to segment dim infrared target through image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fugen; Bai, Xiangzhi; Xie, Yongchun; Jin, Ting

    2008-10-01

    A novel marker based watershed through image enhancement is proposed to segment the dim infrared target. The dim infrared target is firstly enhanced by CB top-hat transformation and image quantization. Then, the accurate marker of the target can be easily obtained through image binarisation and marker filtering. To calculate an efficient gradient image of the dim target for the watershed segmentation, the gradient image is firstly calculated through Sobel operator and then efficiently enhanced through pseudo top-hat transformation and gradient quantization. Because of the enhancement of the dim target and the gradient image, the watershed can efficiently segment the dim infrared image. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is much efficient for dim infrared target segmentation.

  20. Tampa Bay Study Data and Information Management System (DIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, N. T.; Johnston, J. B.; Yates, K.; Smith, K. E.

    2005-05-01

    Providing easy access to data and information is an essential component of both science and management. The Tampa Bay Data and Information Management System (DIMS) catalogs and publicizes data and products which are generated through the Tampa Bay Integrated Science Study. The publicly accessible interface consists of a Web site (http://gulfsci.usgs.gov), a digital library, and an interactive map server (IMS). The Tampa Bay Study Web site contains information from scientists involved in the study, and is also the portal site for the digital library and IMS. Study information is highlighted on the Web site according to the estuarine component: geology and geomorphology, water and sediment quality, ecosystem structure and function, and hydrodynamics. The Tampa Bay Digital Library is a web-based clearinghouse for digital products on Tampa Bay, including documents, maps, spatial and tabular data sets, presentations, etc. New developments to the digital library include new search features, 150 new products over the past year, and partnerships to expand the offering of science products. The IMS is a Web-based geographic information system (GIS) used to store, analyze and display data pertaining to Tampa Bay. Upgrades to the IMS have improved performance and speed, as well as increased the number of data sets available for mapping. The Tampa Bay DIMS is a dynamic entity and will continue to evolve with the study. Beginning in 2005, the Tampa Bay Integrated Coastal Model will have a more prominent presence within the DIMS. The Web site will feature model projects and plans; the digital library will host model products and data sets; the IMS will display spatial model data sets and analyses. These tools will be used to increase communication of USGS efforts in Tampa Bay to the public, local managers, and scientists.

  1. Projection Effects in Coronal Dimmings and Associated EUV Wave Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissauer, K.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Vanninathan, K.; Magdalenić, J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s-1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures in particular, we observe an intermittent “disappearance” of the front for 120 s in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T ˜ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A. We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO/AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination of their individual intensities, e.g., the expanding CME body, the enhanced EUV wave, and the CME front. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, and 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ˜2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  2. A Doppler dimming determination of coronal outflow velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strachan, Leonard; Kohl, John L.; Weiser, Heinz; Withbroe, George L.; Munro, Richard H.

    1993-01-01

    Outflow velocities in a polar coronal hole are derived from observations made during a 1982 sounding rocket flight. The velocity results are derived from a Doppler dimming analysis of resonantly scattered H I Ly-alpha. This analysis indicates radial outflow velocities of 217 km/s at 2 solar radii from sun-center with an uncertainty range of 153 to 251 km/s at a confidence level of 67 percent. These results are best characterized as strong evidence for supersonic outflow within 2 solar radii of sun-center in a polar coronal hole. Several means for obtaining improved accuracy in future observations are discussed.

  3. Is global dimming and brightening limited to urban areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Imamovic, Adel; Folini, Doris; Ohmura, Atsumu; Wild, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Efforts have been put into place for decades around the world to understand the surface energy budget of the Earth. One of the pillars of such activities is the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) project (Ohmura and Lang 1989), which established a database for the measurements of Surface Solar Radiation (SSR) and other parameters around the world. A major finding from the GEBA project is "global dimming and brightening" (Ohmura and Lang 1989; Wild 2009), which refers originally to the secular trend of SSR on the decadal time scale in Europe that had declined till around 1980s and then has been rising ever since. Secular trends have also been found elsewhere in the world, but the strength and the direction of the trend differ across regions (Ohmura 2009; Skeie et al. 2011; Wild et al. 2005). As a number of observations are made in or close to urban areas, speculations have arisen that the observed SSR trends may be influenced by local atmospheric pollution (with the direct aerosol effects being predominant (Kvalevåg and Myhre 2007)) and also by enhanced cloud cover over urban areas (Shepherd 2005). Thus, this raises a question: to what extent the observed global dimming and brightening is limited to urban areas. To date, only a few studies address this problem including a statistical study based on population data (Alpert et al. 2005) and model studies inspecting SSR trends (e.g. Dwyer et al. 2010; Skeie et al. 2011). Answers are, however, inconclusive and remain debated. We investigate whether the observed global dimming and brightening is a large scale phenomenon or limited to urban areas by using the following two complementary approaches: 1) We focus on a set of selected 14 stations in Japan that yield various high quality measurements since 1961 with three of them being least influenced by urbanization (based on expert elicitation). We look into seasonal time-series of SSR, cloud amount, and sunshine duration (Source: Japanese Meteorological Agency) as well

  4. Doppler Shifts in the Boundary of the Dimming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, S.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Asai, A.; Kamio, S.; Matsuzaki, K.; Harra, L. K.; Mariska, J. T.

    2008-09-01

    We present Hinode/EIS raster scan observations of the GOES X3.2 flare that occurred on 2006 December 13. There was a small transient coronal hole which was located 200 arcsec east of the flare arcade. The transient coronal hole was strongly affected by the X-class flare, and the strong upflows were observed in Fe XV line 284.2 Å (log{T/{K}} = 6.3) at the boundary of dimming region. In this paper, we discuss how to obtain the velocity map by correcting the instrumental effects.

  5. Group statistical channel coding dimming scheme in visible light communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Kaiyu; Huang, Zhitong; Zhang, Ruqi; Li, Jianfeng; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a group statistical channel coding (GSCC) scheme, which achieves dimming by changing the ratio of the 0-1 symbol of the original data stream through probabilistic statistics method. The simulation under various brightness conditions displays that the GSCC maintains good performance comparing to PWM dimming with half satisfice of transmission rate and a larger dimming intensity. Simulation of GSCC after combining with other channel coding schemes reflects that GSCC has good compatibility to arbitrary access coded signal.

  6. Evaluation of a new optic-enabled portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry instrument for measuring toxic metals/metalloids in consumer goods and cultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Diana; Praamsma, Meredith L.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a rapid, non-destructive multi-elemental analytical technique used for determining elemental contents ranging from percent down to the μg/g level. Although detection limits are much higher for XRF compared to other laboratory-based methods, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ICP-optical emission spectrometry (OES) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), its portability and ease of use make it a valuable tool, especially for field-based studies. A growing necessity to monitor human exposure to toxic metals and metalloids in consumer goods, cultural products, foods and other sample types while performing the analysis in situ has led to several important developments in portable XRF technology. In this study, a new portable XRF analyzer based on the use of doubly curved crystal optics (HD Mobile®) was evaluated for detecting toxic elements in foods, medicines, cosmetics and spices used in many Asian communities. Two models of the HD Mobile® (a pre-production and a final production unit) were investigated. Performance parameters including accuracy, precision and detection limits were characterized in a laboratory setting using certified reference materials (CRMs) and standard solutions. Bias estimates for key elements of public health significance such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb ranged from - 10% to 11% for the pre-production, and - 14% to 16% for the final production model. Five archived public health samples including herbal medicine products, ethnic spices and cosmetic products were analyzed using both XRF instruments. There was good agreement between the pre-production and final production models for the four key elements, such that the data were judged to be fit-for-purpose for the majority of samples analyzed. Detection of the four key elements of interest using the HD Mobile® was confirmed using archived samples for which ICP-OES data were available based on digested sample materials. The HD

  7. Nanotechnology - Enabled Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-07

    via subwavelength confinement of optical fields near metallic nanostructures, as shown in Figure 2.3. When a single cadmium selenide quantum dot is...optical modulator uses a coating of cadmium selenide quantum dots to convert two light beams into surface plasmon polaritons. (Reprinted by permission...helpful. Two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals can enable new sensing systems based on fluorescent molecules and/or quantum dots and

  8. From Solar Dimming to Solar Brightening: Observations, Modeling, Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.; Feichter, J.; Stier, P.; Robock, A.; Li, H.

    2005-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth surface is not stable over time but exhibits significant decadal variations. These variations, in addition to the changes in thermal radiation induced by alterations in greenhouse gases, cause changes in radiative forcings which may significantly affect surface climate. Observations from the Global Energy Balanced Archive (GEBA) and Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) databases at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology suggest that surface solar radiation, after decades of dimming, reversed into a brightening since the mid 1980s at widespread locations. These changes are in line with a recovery of atmospheric transparency, possibly related to reduced aerosol loadings due to air pollution control and the breakdown of industry in formerly Communist countries. Not many GCMs currently represent aerosol effects with a degree of sophistication to capture such effects, but we used a special version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology GCM which includes a detailed aerosol scheme, ECHAM5-HAM, to investigate the observed trends. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of the variations in surface radiation on other elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, which shows changes in line with the changes in radiation. Reference: Wild, M., Gilgen, H., Roesch, A., Ohmura, A., Long, C., Dutton, E., Forgan, B., Kallis, A., Russak, V., Tsvetkov, A., 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science , 308, 847-850

  9. Global Dimming and brightening: an update beyond 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Martin F.; Trussel, Barbara; Ohmura, Atsumu; Long, Charles N.; Konig-Langlo, G.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Tsvetkov, Anatoly V.

    2009-05-16

    This study investigates the recent variations in surface solar radiation inferred from a comprehensive set of ground-based observational records updated to 2005. Surface radiation data beyond 2000 are thereby particularly interesting, as they can provide independent and complementary information to the ambitious satellite programs which became operational after 2000. The surface records suggest a continuation of the upward tendency in surface solar radiation (“brightening”) beyond 2000 at numerous stations in Europe and in the US as well as parts of East Asia (Korea). The upward tendency in Antarctica over the 1990s, largely caused by a recovery from the high turbitity induced by the mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption, seem to fade after 2000. The brightening tendency also seems to level off in Japan. In China there is some indication for a renewed decline in dimming, after the stabilization in the 1990s. A continuation of the long lasting dimming is also noted at the sites in India. Overall, the available data suggest also beyond 2000 a widespread continuation of the brightening at many location, which is, however, less pronounced and homogeneous than during the 1990s.

  10. Multivariate analysis of dim elves from ISUAL observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offroy, Marc; Farges, Thomas; Gaillard, Pierre; Kuo, Cheng Ling; Chen, Alfred Bing-Chih; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    The Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning (ISUAL) on the FORMOSAT-2 satellite, launched in 2004, records Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). ISUAL has an imager and a spectrophotometer that observe TLEs all over the globe. Among these phenomena, elves are particularly difficult to detect. ISUAL often records events that correspond to significant far ultraviolet (FUV) emissions in the spectrophotometer but have no discernible TLEs in the imager. These FUV events are called "dim" elves. Therefore, it is important to develop mathematical tools to analyze the data to obtain a better evaluation of the number of elves and their occurrence. Multivariate approaches are applied to characterize the unlabeled events. The first approach is the principal component analysis which distinguishes two different groups, one including elves and dim elves. The second approach is the PARallel FACtor analysis which provides a waveform model for each group. These methodologies confirm that FUV signal is the evidence of TLE presence. A crude classification method was then suggested taking into account these results. The proportion of elves, relatively to the considered ISUAL data set, is found to be about 40%. It is similar to previous results and confirms that relatively weak lightning peak current is sufficient to produce elves. This new strategy demonstrates the potential for discriminating between lightning and TLEs without prior knowledge within the selectivity of the FUV spectral band.

  11. Dim waters: side effects of geoengineering using ocean albedo modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, J.; Neumann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to check how the recently proposed geoengineering by injection of clean or coated microbubbles into the ocean mixed layer would impact in-water light fields. We show that due to massive multiscattering inside a bubble cloud, coating the bubbles with surfactant, needed to stabilize them, would not increase their albedo change effectiveness as much as expected basing on their backscattering coefficients. However, the bubble effect on reflectance is larger than estimated previously using a discrete ordinate method of solving the radiative transfer problem. We show significant side effects of ocean albedo change needed to counter global warming expected in this century and beyond (reduction of euphotic zone depth by respectively 20% and 50% in the case of global ocean albedo change corresponding to -1.25 K and -6 K global surface temperature change and irradiance decrease at 10 m depth by respectively 40% and over 80%) even if all ocean surface was "brightened". We discuss the possible negative side effect of such in-water light dimming on marine life. We conclude that the proposed "ocean brightening" is in fact "ocean dimming" as concerns the marine environment, on a scale that in any other circumstances would be called catastrophic. Finally, we briefly discuss other possible side effect of making the surface ocean waters turbid (both optically and acoustically), of adding large amounts of surfactants to the surface ocean layers and of surface cooling of the ocean, especially within the tropics.

  12. Nonstationary EO/IR Clutter Suppression and Dim Object Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, A.; Brown, A.; Brown, J.

    2010-09-01

    We develop and evaluate the performance of advanced algorithms which provide significantly improved capabilities for automated detection and tracking of ballistic and flying dim objects in the presence of highly structured intense clutter. Applications include ballistic missile early warning, midcourse tracking, trajectory prediction, and resident space object detection and tracking. The set of algorithms include, in particular, adaptive spatiotemporal clutter estimation-suppression and nonlinear filtering-based multiple-object track-before-detect. These algorithms are suitable for integration into geostationary, highly elliptical, or low earth orbit scanning or staring sensor suites, and are based on data-driven processing that adapts to real-world clutter backgrounds, including celestial, earth limb, or terrestrial clutter. In many scenarios of interest, e.g., for highly elliptic and, especially, low earth orbits, the resulting clutter is highly nonstationary, providing a significant challenge for clutter suppression to or below sensor noise levels, which is essential for dim object detection and tracking. We demonstrate the success of the developed algorithms using semi-synthetic and real data. In particular, our algorithms are shown to be capable of detecting and tracking point objects with signal-to-clutter levels down to 1/1000 and signal-to-noise levels down to 1/4.

  13. Dimming over the oceans: Transient anthropogenic aerosol plumes in the twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, T. N.; Folini, D.; Knutti, R.; Wild, M.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols reduce incoming surface solar radiation (SSR), but the magnitude of this effect for reducing sea surface temperatures (SST) is still debated. Using simulations from the global climate model ECHAM5 with the Hamburg Aerosol Module and prescribed SSTs, we quantify anthropogenic aerosol dimming over sea surfaces by comparing ensembles, which only differ in anthropogenic aerosol emissions. We isolate the anthropogenic aerosol effect on SSR with sufficiently large ensemble sizes to provide statistically significant results. The following simulation results are obtained: Dimming plumes extend from their source regions with clear seasonality. The latter is predominantly shaped by atmospheric circulation, while interdecadal changes follow the gradual increase in anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Comparing the 1990s with the 1870s, on average, 9.4% (clear-sky SSR) or 15.4% (all-sky SSR) of the entire ocean surface was affected by anthropogenic aerosol dimming larger than -4 Wm-2 (decadal mean). Comparing the same time periods, global average anthropogenic dimming over oceans is -2.3 Wm-2 and -3.4 Wm-2 for clear-sky and all-sky SSR, respectively. Surface dimming is hemispherically asymmetrical with stronger Northern Hemispheric dimming by 2.3 Wm-2 and 4.5 Wm-2 for clear-sky and all-sky SSR, respectively. Zonal average clear-sky dimming reaches its maximum (-5.5 Wm-2) near the equator. All-sky dimming peaks at 40°N (-8 Wm-2) and is regionally larger than clear-sky dimming. Regionally, surface dimming can reach values up to 9.5 Wm-2 (clear-sky) and 25 Wm-2 (all-sky). Results are a contribution toward better quantifying spatially heterogeneous and time-dependent anthropogenic dimming effects on SSTs.

  14. Dimming over the Oceans: Transient Anthropogenic Aerosol Plumes in the 20th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols reduce incoming surface solar radiation (SSR), but the magnitude of this effect for reducing sea surface temperature (SST) is still debated. Using simulations from the global climate model ECHAM5 with the Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM) and prescribed SSTs, we quantify anthropogenic aerosol dimming over sea surfaces by comparing ensembles, which only differ in anthropogenic aerosol emissions. We isolate the anthropogenic aerosol effect on SSR with sufficiently large ensemble sizes to provide statistically significant results. The following simulation results are obtained: Dimming plumes extend from their source regions with clear seasonality. The latter is predominantly shaped by atmospheric circulation, while interdecadal changes follow the gradual increase in anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Comparing the 1990s with the 1870s, on average, 9.4% (clearsky SSR) or 15.4% (allsky SSR) of the entire ocean surface was affected by anthropogenic aerosol dimming larger than -4 W m-2 (annual mean). Comparing the same time periods, global average anthropogenic dimming over oceans is -2.3 W m-2and -3.4 W m-2 for clearsky and allsky SSR, respectively. Surface dimming is hemispherically asymmetrical with stronger Northern Hemispheric dimming by 2.3 W m-2 and 4.5 W m-2 for clearsky and allsky SSR, respectively. Zonal average clearsky dimming reaches its maximum (5.5 W m-2 ) near the Equator. Allsky dimming peaks at 40° N (-8 W m-2 ) and is regionally larger than clearsky dimming. Regionally, surface dimming can go beyond -20 W m-2 (clearsky) and -40 W m-2 (allsky). Results are a contribution towards better quantifying spatially heterogeneous and time-dependent anthropogenic dimming effects on SSTs.

  15. Molecular Effects of I3C/DIM in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    13C-induced apoptosis, we metals, hydrogen peroxide , etc.), endotoxin (LPS, etc.), apo- investigated Bax localization, mitochondrial potential, and...demonstrated that some dietary components such as isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (13C), 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM), curcumin , (-)-epigallocatechin-3...8217-diindolylmethane (DIM), curcumin , (-)- ER pathways are more important signaling pathways epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), apigenin, have in- related to

  16. Optimum spatiotemporal receptive fields for vision in dim light.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Andreas; Warrant, Eric J

    2009-04-22

    Many nocturnal insects depend on vision for daily life and have evolved different strategies to improve their visual capabilities in dim light. Neural summation of visual signals is one strategy to improve visual performance, and this is likely to be especially important for insects with apposition compound eyes. Here we develop a model to determine the optimum spatiotemporal sampling of natural scenes at gradually decreasing light levels. Image anisotropy has a strong influence on the receptive field properties predicted to be optimal at low light intensities. Spatial summation between visual channels is predicted to extend more strongly in the direction with higher correlations between the input signals. Increased spatiotemporal summation increases signal-to-noise ratio at low frequencies but sacrifices signal-to-noise ratio at higher frequencies. These results, while obtained from a model of the insect visual system, are likely to apply to visual systems in general.

  17. A quantitative dimming method for LED based on PWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiyong; Mou, Tongsheng; Wang, Jianping; Tian, Xiaoqing

    2012-10-01

    Traditional light sources were required to provide stable and uniform illumination for a living or working environment considering performance of visual function of human being. The requirement was always reasonable until non-visual functions of the ganglion cells in the retina photosensitive layer were found. New generation of lighting technology, however, is emerging based on novel lighting materials such as LED and photobiological effects on human physiology and behavior. To realize dynamic lighting of LED whose intensity and color were adjustable to the need of photobiological effects, a quantitative dimming method based on Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) and light-mixing technology was presented. Beginning with two channels' PWM, this paper demonstrated the determinacy and limitation of PWM dimming for realizing Expected Photometric and Colorimetric Quantities (EPCQ), in accordance with the analysis on geometrical, photometric, colorimetric and electrodynamic constraints. A quantitative model which mapped the EPCQ into duty cycles was finally established. The deduced model suggested that the determinacy was a unique individuality only for two channels' and three channels' PWM, but the limitation was an inevitable commonness for multiple channels'. To examine the model, a light-mixing experiment with two kinds of white LED simulated variations of illuminance and Correlation Color Temperature (CCT) from dawn to midday. Mean deviations between theoretical values and measured values were obtained, which were 15lx and 23K respectively. Result shows that this method can effectively realize the light spectrum which has a specific requirement of EPCQ, and provides a theoretical basis and a practical way for dynamic lighting of LED.

  18. Ocellar adaptations for dim light vision in a nocturnal bee.

    PubMed

    Berry, Richard P; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2011-04-15

    Growing evidence indicates that insect ocelli are strongly adapted to meet the specific functional requirements in the environment in which that insect lives. We investigated how the ocelli of the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis are adapted to life in the dim understory of a tropical rainforest. Using a combination of light microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction, we found that the retinae contain bar-shaped rhabdoms loosely arranged in a radial pattern around multi-layered lenses, and that both lenses and retinae form complex non-spherical shapes reminiscent of those described in other ocelli. Intracellular electrophysiology revealed that the photoreceptors have high absolute sensitivity, but that the threshold location varied widely between 10(9) and 10(11) photons cm(-2) s(-1). Higher sensitivity and greater visual reliability may be obtained at the expense of temporal resolution: the corner frequencies of dark-adapted ocellar photoreceptors were just 4-11 Hz. Spectral sensitivity profiles consistently peaked at 500 nm. Unlike the ocelli of other flying insects, we did not detect UV-sensitive visual pigments in M. genalis, which may be attributable to a scarcity of UV photons under the rainforest canopy at night. In contrast to earlier predictions based on anatomy, the photoreceptors are not sensitive to the e-vector of polarised light. Megalopta genalis ocellar photoreceptors possess a number of unusual properties, including inherently high response variability and the ability to produce spike-like potentials. These properties bear similarities to photoreceptors in the compound eye of the cockroach, and we suggest that the two insects share physiological characteristics optimised for vision in dim light.

  19. CME Mass Estimates via EVE Coronal Dimmings for X-class Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.; Hannah, Iain; Schrijver, Karel

    2014-06-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO detects post-flare dimmings, mainly in the spectral regions of Fe IX-XII in its MEGS-A range, which is available for most of the 29 X-class flares that have occurred between SDO launch and the end of April 2014. Based upon earlier X-ray observations we interpret these dimmings as the result of CME mass ejection from the low corona. We estimate the masses involved in these dimmings by deriving a best pre-event temperature and emission measure in the dimmed region from EVE, and a source volume from AIA images. The dimming for SOL2011-02-15, the first of these events, "peaked"at -3.4% in Fe IX in terms of the pre-event emission from the whole Sun, with smaller relative depletions in higher ionization states of Fe. The "maximum" occurred more than one hour after GOES peak. The dimming signature is generally cleanly measurable in the EVE/MEGS-A spectral samples at10 s cadence, with the dominant source of uncertainty stemming from the "sun-as-a-star" integrations; for example flare-related excess emission at a given wavelength tends to compensate for the dimming,and in this sense the mass estimate must be considered a lower limit. We address these uncertainties for the solar case by appealing to the AIA images, but for analogous processes in stellar flares one would not have this luxury.

  20. Automated Detection and Extraction of Coronal Dimmings from SDO/AIA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Alisdair R.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Wills-Davey, M. J.

    2010-05-01

    The sheer volume of data anticipated from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) highlights the necessity for the development of automatic detection methods for various types of solar activity. Initially recognised in the 1970s, it is now well established that coronal dimmings are closely associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and are particularly recognised as an indicator of front-side (halo) CMEs, which can be difficult to detect in white-light coronagraph data. An automated coronal dimming region detection and extraction algorithm removes visual observer bias from determination of physical quantities such as spatial location, area and volume. This allows reproducible, quantifiable results to be mined from very large datasets. The information derived may facilitate more reliable early space weather detection, as well as offering the potential for conducting large-sample studies focused on determining the geoeffectiveness of CMEs, coupled with analysis of their associated coronal dimmings. We present examples of dimming events extracted using our algorithm from existing EUV data, demonstrating the potential for the anticipated application to SDO/AIA data. Metadata returned by our algorithm include: location, area, volume, mass and dynamics of coronal dimmings. As well as running on historic datasets, this algorithm is capable of detecting and extracting coronal dimmings in near real-time. The coronal dimming detection and extraction algorithm described in this poster is part of the SDO/Computer Vision Center effort hosted at SAO (Martens et al., 2009). We acknowledge NASA grant NNH07AB97C.

  1. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011 plus an event on 2010 August 7, analyzed in a previous paper to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are \\begin{eqnarray*}{v}{CME} ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{{{s}}}\\right] & ≈ & 2.36× {10}6 ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{ % }\\right]× {s}\\dim ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{ % }{{{s}}}\\right]\\ {m}{CME} [{{g}}] & ≈ & 2.59× {10}15≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{g}{ % }\\right]× \\sqrt{{d}\\dim } [ % ].\\end{eqnarray*} These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  2. A modified VPPM algorithm of VLC systems suitable for fast dimming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Ahn, Byung-Gu; Ju, MinChul; Park, Youngil

    2016-04-01

    As LED applications with fast dimming appears, it is required that the variable pulse position modulation (VPPM)-based visible light communications (VLC) scheme works in this environment also. With the previous VPPM scheme, however, transmission was made possible only in different dimming levels, not in the transition period. In this work, we propose a novel VPPM scheme to operate even in rapid brightness fluctuation environment. For this purpose, we adopt a stepwise brightness change at the LED and moving average correlation masks to cope with the changing brightness. The implemented VLC testbed demonstrates that the proposed scheme is appropriate for fast dimming environment.

  3. Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers. The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N. J.; Poplawski, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    DOE GATEWAY program report reviewing how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps these dimmers were originally designed to control, and how those differences can lead to complications when attempting to dim LEDs. Providing both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects—as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures—the report aims to reduce the chance of experiencing compatibility-related problems and, if possible, ensure good dimming performance.

  4. Cooperative effects and slow dynamics of fluorescence intensity from quantum emitters in a dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozing, N. A.; Gladush, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    We study theoretically the possibility of spontaneous switching between dim and bright fluorescence modes from a cooperative ensemble of two-level atoms driven by a cw-laser. A numerical analysis of transient regimes and transformations of the fluorescence spectrum are reported.

  5. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-02-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane.

  6. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-01-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane. PMID:11806917

  7. Simulated O VI Doppler dimming measurements of coronal outflow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strachan, Leonard; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining O(5+) outflow velocities by using a Doppler dimming analysis of the resonantly scattered intensities of O VI lambda 1031.9 and lambda 1037.6 is addressed. The technique is sensitive to outflow velocities, W, in the range W greater than 30 and less than 250 km/s and can be used for probing regions of the inner solar corona, where significant coronal heating and solar wind acceleration may be occurring. These velocity measurements, when combined with measurements of other plasma parameters (temperatures and densities of ions and electrons) can be used to estimate the energy and mass flux of O(5+). In particular, it may be possible to locate where the flow changes from subsonic to supersonic and to identify source regions for the high and low speed solar wind. The velocity diagnostic technique is discussed with emphasis placed on the requirements needed for accurate outflow velocity determinations. Model determinations of outflow velocities based on simulated Doppler observations are presented.

  8. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position—behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active. PMID:27683546

  9. NoMaDS: The Northern Massive Dim Stars Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Anne; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Barbá, R. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present the Northern Massive Dim Stars Survey (NoMaDS), a high-resolution spectroscopic campaign at the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The project aims at building the most complete and homogeneous spectroscopic database of hot, massive Galactic OB stars. NoMaDS is part of an international collaboration that combines observations from Chilean, Spanish, and Texan facilities. The contribution of NoMaDS is to complement the other sister surveys by providing high signal-to-noise echelle spectra (R=30000) of Galactic OB stars that are too faint for smaller ground-based telescopes. NoMaDS will provide a sample of about 200 stars, many of which have never been observed before at such a high resolution. Here we present the details of the survey, as well as echelle spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph since May 2011. This includes spectra of standard OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, binary systems, and oblique magnetic rotators. This survey will provide unprecedented spectroscopic database for a more accurate spectral classification, a quantitative analysis using atmosphere modeling, the detection and follow up of the orbits of massive spectroscopic binaries as well as the study of diffuse interstellar bands.

  10. A Study of Dim Object Detection for the Space Surveillance Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    LINEAR Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research LRT Likelihood Ratio Test MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology NASA National Aeronautics and Space...Problem Statement Dim object detection is the practice of deciding whether a very dim object, such as an asteroid or faint satellite, is present in a...such as space debris, satellites, asteroids , and other near earth objects (NEOs). This research deals primarily with qualitatively and

  11. Challenges in Physical Characterization of Dim Space Objects: What Can We Learn from NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J.; Thirouin, A.; Rivera-Valentin, E.; Ryan, W.; Ryan, E.; Mokovitz, N.; Tegler, S.

    2016-09-01

    Physical characterization of dim space objects in cis-lunar space can be a challenging task. Of particular interest to both natural and artificial space object behavior scientists are the properties beyond orbital parameters that can uniquely identify them. These properties include rotational state, size, shape, density and composition. A wide range of observational and non-observational factors affect our ability to characterize dim objects in cis-lunar space. For example, phase angle (angle between Sun-Target-Observer), temperature, rotational variations, temperature, and particle size (for natural dim objects). Over the last two decades, space object behavior scientists studying natural dim objects have attempted to quantify and correct for a majority of these factors to enhance our situational awareness. These efforts have been primarily focused on developing laboratory spectral calibrations in a space-like environment. Calibrations developed correcting spectral observations of natural dim objects could be applied to characterizing artificial objects, as the underlying physics is the same. The paper will summarize our current understanding of these observational and non-observational factors and present a case study showcasing the state of the art in characterization of natural dim objects.

  12. Anthropogenic Aerosol Dimming Over Oceans: A Regional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, T. N.; Folini, D.; Knutti, R.; Wild, M.

    2015-12-01

    The role of anthropogenic aerosols in shaping 20th century SSTs through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR) is still subject to debate. Identifying and quantifying the relationship between aerosol-induced changes in SSR and the corresponding SST response is difficult due to the masking effect of numerous feedback mechanisms and general variability of the atmosphere-ocean system. We therefore analysed potential anthropogenic aerosol effects on SST with a cascade of experiments of increasing complexity: From atmosphere-only over mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments, to fully coupled transient ocean-atmosphere simulations, with and without greenhouse gases and / or aerosols, using the general circulation model ECHAM with explicit aerosol representation. We find anthropogenic aerosols to be crucial to obtain realistic SSR and SST patterns, although co-location of changes in individual variables (aerosol optical depth, SSR, SST) is weak. The effect of greenhouse gases and aerosols in the MLO simulations is essentially additive on global and regional scales, an assumption frequently made in the literature. With atmosphere-only simulations we identified regions most prone to anthropogenic aerosol dimming throughout the 20th century using a strict criterion. From MLO equilibria representative of different decades throughout the 20th century, we identified ocean regions, whose SSTs are most sensitive to changing anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The surface temperature response patterns in our MLO simulations are more sensitive towards the choice of prescribed deep-ocean heat flux if anthropogenic aerosols were included as compared to greenhouse gas only simulations. This implies that ocean dynamics might mask some of the response and cautions against the use of just one set of deep-ocean heat fluxes in MLO studies. Our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for SST responses, but also highlight the complexity and non-locality of the

  13. Impact of Surface Solar Dimming and Brightening on the Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.

    2007-05-01

    The author's institute maintains two databases for the worldwide measured solar radiation incident at the Eart's surface, the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA), and the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). An analysis of these comprehensive datasets suggests that solar radiation incident at the surface has not been stable over time but underwent significant decadal variations. This is seen in a decline in surface solar radiation from the 1960s to the 1980s ("global dimming"), with a recovery thereafter at widespread locations ("global brightening"). As potential explanation for these variations, both changes in clouds and aerosol have been put forward. An analysis of synop and satellite-based cloud data over Europe suggests, that changes in cloud amount cannot explain the distinct reversal from solar dimming to brightening seen over Europe. This points to aerosol direct/indirect effects as a key explanation for the dimming to brightening transition. The reversal from dimming to brightening may be related to reduced aerosol concentration due to more effective air pollution measures and the breakdown of the economy in the former communist countries, leading to cleaner and more transparent atmospheres. Changes in surface solar radiation may also leave their imprint in the diurnal temperature range. Trends in diurnal temperature ranges show, after decades of decline, a distinct tendency to level off since the mid 1980s. They suggest that surface solar dimming was effective in masking greenhouse warming, but only up to the 1980s, when dimming gradually transformed into brightening. With this transition, the uncovered greenhouse effect started to reveal its full dimension, as manifested in a rapid temperature rise. The reversal from surface solar dimming to brightening may also affect biomass productivity in energy-limited environments, and should leave a significant imprint on vegetation. Wild, M et al. 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in

  14. Dust Impact Monitor DIM onboard Rosetta/Philae: Laboratory Calibration with Impact Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, H.; Ossowski, T.; Seidensticker, K.; Apathy, I.; Fischer, H.-H.; Hirn, A.; Jünemann, M.; Loose, A.; Peter, A.; Sperl, M.

    2011-10-01

    The Rosetta lander spacecraft Philae, which will land on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko in late 2014, is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor instrument (DIM). The DIM sensor, which is part of the SESAME instrument package [Seidensticker et al., 2007], consists of three piezoelectric detectors, each one mounted on the outer side of a cube facing in three orthogonal directions. The total sensor area is approximately 70 cm2. DIM will measure impacts of sub-millimeter and millimeter sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma by the escaping gas flow. A grain-size dependent fraction of the emitted grains is expected to fall back to the nucleus surface due to gravity. DIM will be able to detect both these components, the backfalling particles as well as the grains hitting the detector on direct trajectories from the surface. With DIM we will be able to measure fluxes, impact directions as well as the speed and size of the impacting cometary particles. Two particle acceleration devices for impact calibration experiments are presently available at Max- Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Katlenburg-Lindau: With (a) a dedicated dropping device and (b) a small air gun we can simulate impacts with particles of different materials (steel, glass, ruby, polyethylen, etc.), radii between 0.2 and 1mm and impact speeds up to 2msec-1. We have performed a large number of impact experiments with two flight spare units of the DIM sensor at MPS. We present the results from our impact experiments and discuss their implications for the calibration of the DIM flight instrument.

  15. New approaches for dim target detection and clutter rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Ren-Jean

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation presents a new method for clutter rejection and dim target track detection from infrared (IR) satellite data using neural networks. A method referred to as 'high order correlation method' is developed which recursively computes the spatio-temporal cross-correlations between data of consecutive scans. The implementation of this scheme using a connectionist network is also proposed. Several important properties of the high order correlation method are established which indicate that the resultant filtered images capture all the target information. Simulation results using this approach show at least 93% clutter rejection under moderate clutter density. Further improvement in the clutter rejection is achieved by modifying the high order correlation method to incorporate the target motion dynamics. The implementation of this 'modified high order correlation' using a high order neural network architecture is also developed. Simulation results indicate at least 97% clutter rejection rate for this method. To test the performance, experimental studies of this modified high order correlations are conducted under various scenarios which include: multiple target detection, continuous mode operation, various background clutter densities, and detection using variable number of scans and order of correlation. This algorithm performs very well even under many difficult operating environments. A new scoring process is developed to improve the discrimination ability of the modified high order correlation scheme by employing velocity and curvature information. This scoring process is then used to identify each individual track in the scene by using the properties of the modified high order correlation method. This modification not only significantly improves the clutter rejection under very dense clutter environment, but also increases the feasibility of using the modified high order correlation method for other areas such as data association target classification

  16. A novel fluorescence-activated cell sorter-based screen for yeast endocytosis mutants identifies a yeast homologue of mammalian eps15

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of endocytosis requires the discovery and characterization of the protein machinery that mediates this aspect of membrane trafficking. A novel genetic screen was used to identify yeast mutants defective in internalization of bulk lipid. The fluorescent lipophilic styryl dye FM4-64 was used in conjunction with FACS to enrich for yeast mutants that exhibit internalization defects. Detailed characterization of two of these mutants, dim1-1 and dim2-1, revealed defects in the endocytic pathway. Like other yeast endocytosis mutants, the temperature-sensitive dim mutant were unable to endocytose FM4-64 or radiolabeled alpha-factor as efficiently as wild-type cells. In addition, double mutants with either dim1-delta or dim2-1 and the endocytosis mutants end4-1 or act1-1 displayed synthetic growth defects, indicating that the DIM gene products function in a common or parallel endocytic pathway. Complementation cloning of the DIM genes revealed identity of DIM1 to SHE4 and DIM2 to PAN1. Pan1p shares homology with the mammalian clathrin adaptor-associated protein, eps15. Both proteins contain multiple EH (eps15 homology) domains, a motif proposed to mediate protein-protein interactions. Phalloidin labeling of filamentous actin revealed profound defects in the actin cytoskeleton in both dim mutants. EM analysis revealed that the dim mutants accumulate vesicles and tubulo-vesicular structures reminiscent of mammalian early endosomes. In addition, the accumulation of novel plasma membrane invaginations where endocytosis is likely to occur were visualized in the mutants by electron microscopy using cationized ferritin as a marker for the endocytic pathway. This new screening strategy demonstrates a role for She4p and Pan1p in endocytosis, and provides a new general method for the identification of additional endocytosis mutants. PMID:8978817

  17. Mechanisms and Observations of Coronal Dimming for the 2010 August 7 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Thompson, B. J.; Hock, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Coronal dimming of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission has the potential to be a useful forecaster of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As emitting material leaves the corona, a temporary void is left behind which can be observed in spectral images and irradiance measurements. The velocity and mass of the CMEs should impact the character of those observations. However, other physical processes can confuse the observations. We describe these processes and the expected observational signature, with special emphasis placed on the differences. We then apply this understanding to a coronal dimming event with an associated CME that occurred on 2010 August 7. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) are used for observations of the dimming, while the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory's COR1 and COR2 are used to obtain velocity and mass estimates for the associated CME. We develop a technique for mitigating temperature effects in coronal dimming from full-disk irradiance measurements taken by EVE. We find that for this event, nearly 100% of the dimming is due to mass loss in the corona.

  18. Mechanisms and Observations of Coronal Dimming for the 2010 August 7 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, James P.; Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Thompson, Barbara J.; Hock, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Coronal dimming of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission has the potential to be a useful forecaster of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As emitting material leaves the corona, a temporary void is left behind which can be observed in spectral images and irradiance measurements. The velocity and mass of the CMEs should impact the character of those observations. However, other physical processes can confuse the observations. We describe these processes and the expected observational signature, with special emphasis placed on the differences. We then apply this understanding to a coronal dimming event with an associated CME that occurred on 2010 August 7. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) are used for observations of the dimming, while the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's (SoHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory's (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 are used to obtain velocity and mass estimates for the associated CME. We develop a technique for mitigating temperature effects in coronal dimming from full-disk irradiance measurements taken by EVE. We find that for this event, nearly 100% of the dimming is due to mass loss in the corona.

  19. Spectral and luminous efficacy change of high-power LEDs under different dimming methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yimin; Narendran, Nadarajah; Dong, Tianming; Wu, Huiying

    2006-08-01

    Dimming is an important and necessary feature for light sources used in general lighting applications. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the spectral and luminous efficacy change of high-power colored and pc-white LEDs under continuous current reduction (CCR) and pulse-width modulation (PWM) dimming schemes. For InGaN-based blue, green, and pc-white LEDs, the peak wavelength shifts were in opposite directions for the two dimming schemes. The peak wavelength showed a blue shift with increased current, most likely due to band filling and QCSE dominated effects. InGaN LEDs exhibited red shifts with increased duty cycle, which is dominated by junction heat. AlInGaP red LEDs show mainly thermal-induced red shift with increased current or duty cycle. In addition, the luminous efficacy was always higher for the CCR dimming scheme at dimmed levels, irrespective of the LED type. Keywords: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs), white LEDs, mixed-color white LEDs, pulse-width modulation (PWM), continuous current reduction (CCR), peak wavelength shift, luminous efficacy

  20. The effect of surface brightness dimming in the selection of high-z galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Calvi, V.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L.; Pizzella, A.; Kim, S.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmological surface brightness (SB) dimming of the form (1 + z){sup –4} affects all sources. The strong dependence of SB dimming on redshift z suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-z galaxies, i.e., we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high SB. However, unresolved knots of emission are not affected by SB dimming, thus providing a way to test the clumpiness of high-z galaxies. Our strategy relies on the comparison of the total flux detected for the same source in surveys characterized by different depth. For all galaxies, deeper images permit the better investigation of low-SB features. Cosmological SB dimming makes these low-SB features hard to detect when going to higher and higher redshifts. We used the GOODS and HUDF Hubble Space Telescope legacy data sets to study the effect of SB dimming on low-SB features of high-z galaxies and compare it to the prediction for smooth sources. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 4 (i.e., B {sub 435}-band dropouts) detected in all of the data sets and found no significant trend when comparing the total magnitudes measured from images with different depth. Through Monte Carlo simulations we derived the expected trend for galaxies with different SB profiles. The comparison to the data hints at a compact distribution for most of the rest-frame ultraviolet light emitted from high-z galaxies.

  1. Subjective comparison of brightness preservation methods for local backlight dimming displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, J.; Mantel, C.; Forchhammer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Local backlight dimming is a popular technology in high quality Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs). In those displays, the backlight is composed of contributions from several individually adjustable backlight segments, set at different backlight luminance levels in different parts of the screen, according to the luma of the target image displayed on LCD. Typically, transmittance of the liquid crystal cells (pixels) located in the regions with dimmed backlight is increased in order to preserve their relative brightness with respect to the pixels located in the regions with bright backlight. There are different methods for brightness preservation for local backlight dimming displays, producing images with different visual characteristics. In this study, we have implemented, analyzed and evaluated several different approaches for brightness preservation, and conducted a subjective study based on rank ordering to compare the relevant methods on a real-life LCD with a local backlight dimming capability. In general, our results show that locally adapted brightness preservation methods produce more preferred visual outcome than global methods, but dependency on the content is also observed. Based on the results, guidelines for selecting the perceptually preferred brightness preservation method for local backlight dimming displays are outlined.

  2. Dust Impact Monitor DIM Onboard Philae: Measurements at Comet 67P/C-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Albin, Thomas; Apathy, Istvan; Arnold, Walter; Flandes, Alberto; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Hirn, Attila; Loose, Alexander; Peter, Attila; Seidensticker, Klaus J.; Sperl, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    The Rosetta lander Philae landed successfully on the nucleus surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014. Philae is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) which is part of the SESAME experiment package onboard. DIM employs piezoelectric PZT sensors to detect impacts by sub-millimetre and millimetre-sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma. DIM was operated during Philae's descent to its nominal landing site at 4 different altitudes above the comet surface, and at Philae's final landing site. During descent to the nominal landing site, DIM measured the impact of one rather big particle that probably had a size of a few millimeters. No impacts were detected at the final landing site which may be due to low cometary activity or due to shadowing from obstacles close to Philae, or both. We will present the results from our measurements at the comet and compare them with laboratory calibration experiments with ice/dust particles performed with a DIM flight spare sensor.

  3. Effects of dim or bright-light exposure during the daytime on human gastrointestinal activity.

    PubMed

    Sone, Yoshiaki; Hyun, Ki-Ja; Nishimura, Shinya; Lee, Young-Ah; Tokura, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of our previous findings that bright-light exposure during the daytime has profound influence on physiological parameters such as melatonin secretion and tympanic temperature in humans, we proposed the hypothesis that bright vs. dim light-exposure during the daytime has a different influence on the activity of the digestive system via the endocrine and/or autonomic nervous system. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a series of counterbalanced experiments in which subjects stayed the daytime (7:00 to 15:00h) under either a dim (80 lux) or bright (5,000 lux) light condition. We measured gastrointestinal activity using a breath hydrogen (indicative of carbohydrate malabsorption) and an electrogastrography (EGG, indicative of gastric myoelectric activity) test. The results showed the postprandial breath hydrogen excretion during the following nighttime period after daytime exposure to the dim-light condition was significantly higher than under the bright-light condition (p < 0.05). In addition, the spectrum total power of the EGG recorded after taking the evening meal was significantly lower for the dim than bright-light condition (p < 0.05). These results support our hypothesis and indicate that dim-light exposure during the daytime suppresses the digestion of the evening meal, resulting in malabsorption of dietary carbohydrates in it.

  4. Calibration of the Dust Impact Monitor DIM onboard Rosetta/Philae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Harald; Seidensticker, Klaus; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Hirn, Attila; Loose, Alexander; Peter, Attila; Ossowski, Thomas; Flandes, Alberto; Herwig, Alexander; Apathy, Istvan; Arnold, Walter; Sperl, Mathias

    2012-07-01

    The Rosetta lander spacecraft Philae will land on the nucleus surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in late 2014. It is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor instrument (DIM). DIM is part of the SESAME instrument package onboard Philae [Seidensticker et al., 2007] and consists of three piezoelectric PZT sensors. Each sensor is mounted on the outer side of a cube, facing in orthogonal directions, this way allowing for the detection of grains approaching normal to the nucleus surface and from two horizontal directions. DIM's total sensitive area is approximately 70 cm^2. It will measure impacts of sub-millimeter and millimeter sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma by the escaping gas flow. A grain-size dependent fraction of the emitted grains is expected to fall back to the nucleus surface due to gravity.

  5. Smart dimming circuit used in solid state lightings suitable for skygazer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Keiichi

    2012-03-01

    A skygazer is an astronomical visual observer who uses telescopes in a field. The lighting for them is important. Their requirements are solid-state, light weight, flicker-less, and dimming controls corresponding to photopic, mesopic and scotopic vision. Especially, the lighting never spoils a dark adaptation at moonless night. However, bright light is used to preparing the equipment at twilight. To satisfy their requirements, we clearly define the illuminance range and its wave length, and then we propose smart dimming. The main idea is the dimming method using PAM and the implementation to MCU sharing the DC-DC converter with LEDs. The next idea is efficient use of MCU built-in components.

  6. A sensor-less LED dimming system based on daylight harvesting with BIPV systems.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seunghwan; Kim, Jonghun; Jang, Cheol-Yong; Jeong, Hakgeun

    2014-01-13

    Artificial lighting in office buildings typically requires 30% of the total energy consumption of the building, providing a substantial opportunity for energy savings. To reduce the energy consumed by indoor lighting, we propose a sensor-less light-emitting diode (LED) dimming system using daylight harvesting. In this study, we used light simulation software to quantify and visualize daylight, and analyzed the correlation between photovoltaic (PV) power generation and indoor illumination in an office with an integrated PV system. In addition, we calculated the distribution of daylight illumination into the office and dimming ratios for the individual control of LED lights. Also, we were able directly to use the electric power generated by PV system. As a result, power consumption for electric lighting was reduced by 40 - 70% depending on the season and the weather conditions. Thus, the dimming system proposed in this study can be used to control electric lighting to reduce energy use cost-effectively and simply.

  7. Can aerosol loading explain the solar dimming over the Tibetan Plateau?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Ding, Baohong; Qin, Jun; Tang, Wenjun; Lu, Ning; Lin, Changgui

    2012-10-01

    Solar radiation over the Tibetan Plateau has declined over recent three decades, whereas total cloud cover has a decreasing trend. A likely explanation to this paradox is the increase in aerosols over this clean region. However, this study shows that the radiation extinction due to aerosol loading is of one order lower in magnitude than the observed dimming, and the solar dimming is also seen in a satellite product that was produced without considering temporal variations of aerosols. Instead, the inter-annual variability and decadal change in solar radiation is contrasting to that in water vapor amount and deep cloud cover (but not total cloud cover). Therefore, we suggest that the solar dimming over the Plateau is mainly due to the increase in water vapor amount and deep cloud cover, which in turn are related to the rapid warming and the increase in convective available potential energy.

  8. Selections from 2016: A Connection Between Solar Explosions and Dimming on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2016, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.The Nature of CME-Flare-Associated Coronal DimmingPublished June2016Main takeaway:The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed a large solar eruption at the end of December 2011. Scientists Jianxia Cheng (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Jiong Qiu (Montana State University) studied this coronal mass ejection and the associated flaring on the Suns surface. They found that this activity was accompanied by dimming in the Suns corona near the ends of the flare ribbons.Why its interesting:The process of coronal dimming isnt fully understood, but Cheng and Qius observations provide a clear link between coronal dimming and eruptions of plasma and energy from the Sun. The locations of the dimming the footpoints of the two flare ribbons and the timing relative to the eruption suggests that coronal dimming is caused by the ejection of hot plasma from the Suns surface.How this process was studied:There are a number of satellites dedicated to observing the Sun, and several of them were used to study this explosion. Data from SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (which images in extreme ultraviolet) and its Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (which measures magnetic fields) were used as well as observations from STEREO, the pair of satellites orbiting the Sun at 90 from SDO.CitationJ. X. Cheng and J. Qiu 2016 ApJ 825 37. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/825/1/37

  9. Dust Impact Monitor (SESAME-DIM) measurements at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Seidensticker, Klaus J.; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Albin, Thomas; Apathy, Istvan; Arnold, Walter; Flandes, Alberto; Hirn, Attila; Kobayashi, Masanori; Loose, Alexander; Péter, Attila; Podolak, Morris

    2015-11-01

    Context. The Rosetta lander Philae successfully landed on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014. Philae carries the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) on board, which is part of the Surface Electric Sounding and Acoustic Monitoring Experiment (SESAME). DIM employs piezoelectric PZT sensors to detect impacts by submillimeter- and millimeter-sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma. Aims: The DIM sensor measures dynamical data such as flux and the directionality of the impacting particles. Mass and speed of the particles can be constrained assuming density and elastic particle properties. Methods: DIM was operated during three mission phases of Philae at the comet: (1) before the separation of Philae from Rosetta at distances of about 9.6 km, 11.8 km, and 25.3 km from the nucleus barycenter. In this mission phase particles released from the nucleus on radial trajectories remained undetectable because of significant obscuration by the structures of Rosetta, and no dust particles were indeed detected; (2) during Philae's descent to its nominal landing site Agilkia, DIM detected one approximately millimeter-sized particle at a distance of 5.0 km from the nucleus' barycenter, corresponding to an altitude of 2.4 km from the surface. This is the closest ever dust detection at a cometary nucleus by a dedicated in situ dust detector; and (3) at Philae's final landing site, Abydos, DIM detected no dust impact which may be due to low cometary activity in the vicinity of Philae or due to shading by obstacles close to Philae, or both. Results: Laboratory calibration experiments showed that the material properties of the detected particle are compatible with a porous particle having a bulk density of approximately 250 kg m-3. The particle could have been lifted off the comet's surface by sublimating water ice.

  10. From Dimming to Brightening: Decadal Changes in Solar Radiation at Earth's Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Martin F.; Gilgen, Hans; Roesch, Andreas; Ohmura, Atsumu; Long, Charles N.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Forgan, B. W.; Kallis, A.; Russak, V.; Tsvetkov, Anatoly

    2005-05-06

    Variations in solar radiation incident at Earth's surface profoundly affect the human and terrestrial environment. A decline in solar radiation at land surfaces has become apparent in many observational records up to 1990, a phenomenon known as global dimming. Newly available surface observations from 1990 to the present, primarily from the Northern Hemisphere, show that the dimming did not persist into the 1990s. Instead, a widespread brightening has been observed since the late 1980s. This reversal is reconcilable with changes in cloudiness and atmospheric transmission and may substantially affect surface climate, the hydrological cycle, glaciers, and ecosystems.

  11. The Influence of Dimming in Road Lighting on the Visibility of Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacelar, Alexis

    Last years, people who are in charge of road lighting try to carry out energy savings but they do not really care about user considerations. This paper presents experimentation with observers, who were asked to assess the visibility of targets on the road surface under different levels of illumination (promoted by dimming). For our lighting installation, dimming does not influence the visibility of drivers very much and one can say that it affects less the visibility than the position of the target. Nevertheless, luminous flux reduction must be done with good and homogeneous lighting installation otherwise road users may have problems of visibility and comfort.

  12. From dimming to brightening: decadal changes in solar radiation at Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    Wild, Martin; Gilgen, Hans; Roesch, Andreas; Ohmura, Atsumu; Long, Charles N; Dutton, Ellsworth G; Forgan, Bruce; Kallis, Ain; Russak, Viivi; Tsvetkov, Anatoly

    2005-05-06

    Variations in solar radiation incident at Earth's surface profoundly affect the human and terrestrial environment. A decline in solar radiation at land surfaces has become apparent in many observational records up to 1990, a phenomenon known as global dimming. Newly available surface observations from 1990 to the present, primarily from the Northern Hemisphere, show that the dimming did not persist into the 1990s. Instead, a widespread brightening has been observed since the late 1980s. This reversal is reconcilable with changes in cloudiness and atmospheric transmission and may substantially affect surface climate, the hydrological cycle, glaciers, and ecosystems.

  13. X-ray to NIR emission from AA Tauri during the dim state. Occultation of the inner disk and gas-to-dust ratio of the absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. C.; France, K.; Günther, H. M.; Herczeg, G.; Robrade, J.; Bouvier, J.; McJunkin, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-12-01

    AA Tau is a well-studied, nearby classical T Tauri star, which is viewed almost edge-on. A warp in its inner disk periodically eclipses the central star, causing a clear modulation of its optical light curve. The system underwent a major dimming event beginning in 2011 caused by an extra absorber, which is most likely associated with additional disk material in the line of sight toward the central source. We present new XMM-Newton X-ray, Hubble Space Telescope FUV, and ground-based optical and near-infrared data of the system obtained in 2013 during the long-lasting dim phase. The line width decrease of the fluorescent H2 disk emission shows that the extra absorber is located at r > 1 au. Comparison of X-ray absorption (NH) with dust extinction (AV), as derived from measurements obtained one inner disk orbit (eight days) after the X-ray measurement, indicates that the gas-to-dust ratio as probed by the NH to AV ratio of the extra absorber is compatible with the ISM ratio. Combining both results suggests that the extra absorber, i.e., material at r > 1 au, has no significant gas excess in contrast to the elevated gas-to-dust ratio previously derived for material in the inner region (≲0.1 au). Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methyltransferase DIM5 Is Required for the Development and Virulence of Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Xinqiang; Zhao, Yanli; Cheng, Jiasen; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Histone methylation is widely present in animals, plants and fungi, and the methylation modification of histone H3 has important biological functions. Methylation of Lys9 of histone H3 (H3K9) has been proven to regulate chromatin structure, gene silencing, transcriptional activation, plant metabolism, and other processes. In this work, we investigated the functions of a H3K9 methyltransferase gene BcDIM5 in Botrytis cinerea, which contains a PreSET domain, a SET domain and a PostSET domain. Characterization of BcDIM5 knockout transformants showed that the hyphal growth rate and production of conidiophores and sclerotia were significantly reduced, while complementary transformation of BcDIM5 could restore the phenotypes to the levels of wild type. Pathogenicity assays revealed that BcDIM5 was essential for full virulence of B. cinerea. BcDIM5 knockout transformants exhibited decreased virulence, down-regulated expression of some pathogenic genes and drastically decreased H3K9 trimethylation level. However, knockout transformants of other two genes heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) BcHP1 and DNA methyltransferase (DIM2) BcDIM2 did not exhibit significant change in the growth phenotype and virulence compared with the wild type. Our results indicate that H3K9 methyltransferase BcDIM5 is required for H3K9 trimethylation to regulate the development and virulence of B. cinerea. PMID:27597848

  15. Experimental investigation of analog and digital dimming techniques on photometric performance of an indoor Visible Light Communication (VLC) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Fahad; Kalavally, Vineetha; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Parthiban, R.

    2015-09-01

    For making commercial implementation of light emitting diode (LED) based visible light communication (VLC) systems feasible, it is necessary to incorporate it with dimming schemes which will provide energy savings, moods and increase the aesthetic value of the places using this technology. There are two general methods which are used to dim LEDs commonly categorized as analog and digital dimming. Incorporating fast data transmission with these techniques is a key challenge in VLC. In this paper, digital and analog dimming for a 10 Mb/s non return to zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) based VLC system is experimentally investigated considering both photometric and communicative parameters. A spectrophotometer was used for photometric analysis and a line of sight (LOS) configuration in the presence of ambient light was used for analyzing communication parameters. Based on the experimental results, it was determined that digital dimming scheme is preferable for use in indoor VLC systems requiring high dimming precision and data transmission at lower brightness levels. On the other hand, analog dimming scheme is a cost effective solution for high speed systems where dimming precision is insignificant.

  16. Dim moving target tracking algorithm based on particle discriminative sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzhou; Li, Jianing; Ge, Fengzeng; Shao, Wanxing; Liu, Bing; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The small dim moving target usually submerged in strong noise, and its motion observability is debased by numerous false alarms for low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A target tracking algorithm based on particle filter and discriminative sparse representation is proposed in this paper to cope with the uncertainty of dim moving target tracking. The weight of every particle is the crucial factor to ensuring the accuracy of dim target tracking for particle filter (PF) that can achieve excellent performance even under the situation of non-linear and non-Gaussian motion. In discriminative over-complete dictionary constructed according to image sequence, the target dictionary describes target signal and the background dictionary embeds background clutter. The difference between target particle and background particle is enhanced to a great extent, and the weight of every particle is then measured by means of the residual after reconstruction using the prescribed number of target atoms and their corresponding coefficients. The movement state of dim moving target is then estimated and finally tracked by these weighted particles. Meanwhile, the subspace of over-complete dictionary is updated online by the stochastic estimation algorithm. Some experiments are induced and the experimental results show the proposed algorithm could improve the performance of moving target tracking by enhancing the consistency between the posteriori probability distribution and the moving target state.

  17. Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) onboard Rosetta/Philae: Tests with ice particles as comet analog materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto; Krüger, Harald; Loose, Alexander; Albin, Thomas; Arnold, Walter

    2014-09-01

    In 2014 the European Space Agency's spacecraft Rosetta will encounter the short-period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta carries the lander spacecraft Philae on board which will attempt to land on the comet's nucleus. Amongst Philae's instruments, the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) using piezoelectric sensors is aimed at measuring the physical properties (size and impact speed) of the millimetric and submillimetric dust and ice particles that move near the surface of comet 67P. Given that DIM has three orthogonal sensor sides (with about 70 cm2) total area), it will also be able to collect dynamical data, like an estimation of the particle flux in three dimension, that will help to derive daily and secular variations in the surface activity. We show the results of a series of calibration experiments with the goal to extend the performance tests of DIM. We tested DIM under particle impacts of densities similar to and larger than that of water ice (0.92-7.80 g/cm3) and at speeds from 0.3 to 1.9 m/s. Then, we performed experiments with spherical water ice particles between -40 °C and -20 °C. Finally, we measured the coefficient of restitution (COR) of the impacting particles. These data show that there is a loss mechanism in the impact which is caused by plastic deformation in the contact zones of both the impinging particle and the PZT sensor.

  18. Is global dimming and brightening in Japan limited to urban areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Ohmura, Atsumu; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Ohkawara, Nozomu

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide observations indicate secular trends of all-sky surface solar radiation on a decadal time scale, termed global dimming and brightening. Accordingly, the observed surface radiation in Japan generally shows a strong decline until the end of the 1980s and then a recovery until around 2000. Because a substantial number of measurement stations are located within or close to populated areas, one may speculate that the observed trends are strongly influenced by local air pollution and are thus not of large-scale significance. This hypothesis poses a serious question as to what regional extent the global dimming and brightening are significant: are the global dimming and brightening truly global phenomena, or regional, or even only local? Our study focused on 14 meteorological observatories that measured all-sky surface solar radiation, zenith transmittance, and maximum transmittance. On the basis of municipality population time series, historical land use maps, recent satellite images, and actual site visits, we concluded that eight stations have been significantly influenced by urbanization, with the remaining six stations being left pristine. Between the urban and rural areas, no marked differences were identified in the temporal trends of the aforementioned meteorological parameters. Our findings suggest that global dimming and brightening in Japan occurred on a large scale, independently of urbanization.

  19. Measurements at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Dust Impact Monitor (SESAME-DIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, A.; Albin, T.; Arnold, W.; Fischer, H. H.; Hirn, A.; Krüger, H.; Podolak, M.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Péter, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Rosetta lander Philae successfully landed on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014. Philae carries the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) on board, which is part of the Surface Electric Sounding and Acoustic Monitoring Experiment (SESAME). The DIM sensor -on top of Philae- with its associate electronics consists of a 7 cm wide cube with piezoelectric plates aimed to detect millimetric and submilimetric dust particles. Through DIM we can estimate dynamical data like flux and the directionality of the impacting particles. Mass and speed of the grains can be constrained for pre-defined density and elastic grain properties. DIM was operated during three mission phases of Philae at the comet: (1) Before Philae's separation from Rosetta at distances of about 9.6 km, 11.8 km, and 25.3 km from the nucleus barycenter. In this mission phase particles released from the nucleus on radial trajectories remained undetectable because of significant obscuration by the structures of Rosetta, and no dust particles were indeed detected. (2) During Philae's six hours descent to its nominal landing site Agilkia, DIM detected one approximately millimeter-sized particle at a distance of 4.97 km from the nucleus' barycenter, corresponding to an altitude of 2.4 km from the surface. This is the closest ever dust detection at a cometary nucleus by a dedicated in-situ dust detector. Laboratory calibration experiments showed that the material properties of the detected particle are compatible with a porous grain having a bulk density of approximately 250kg/m3 and a high porosity. Particles leaving the comet on radial trajectories were detectable with only a very small sensitive area of the DIM sensor while backfalling particles or particles in orbit about the nucleus had a more favorable detection geometry. (3) At Philae's final landing site, Abydos, DIM detected no dust impact which may be due to low cometary activity in the vicinity of Philae, or due to shading by

  20. Measurements of the Mass of Coronal Mass Ejections from the EUV Dimming Observed with STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The masses of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) have traditionally been determined from white-light coronagraphs (based on Thomson scattering of electrons), as well as from EUV dimming observed with one spacecraft. Here we report on an improved method of measuring CME masses based on EUV dimming observed with the dual STEREO/EUVI spacecraft in multiple temperature filters that includes 3D volume and density modeling in the dimming region and background corona. As a test we investigate 8 CME events with previous mass determinations from STEREO/COR2, of which 6 cases are reliably detected with EUVI using our automated multi-wavelength detection code. We find CME masses in the range of m_CME = (2-7) * 10^(15) g. The agreement between the two EUVI/A and B spacecraft is m_A/m_B =1.3+/-0.6$ and the consistency with white-light measurements by COR2 is m_EUVI/m_COR2 = 1.1+/-0.3. The consistency between EUVI and COR2 implies no significant mass backflows (or inflows) at r < 4 R_sun and adequate temperature coverage for the bulk of the CME mass in the range of T = 0.5-3.0 MK. The temporal evolution of the EUV dimming allows us also to model the evolution of the CME density n_e(t), volume V(t), height-time h(t), and propagation speed v(t) in terms of an adiabatically expanding self-similar geometry. We determine e-folding EUV dimming times of t_D=1.3+/-1.4 hrs. We test the adiabatic expansion model in terms of the predicted detection delay dt = 0.7 hr between EUVI and COR2 for the fastest CME event (2008-Mar-25) and find good agreement with the observed delay dt = 0.8 hr.

  1. Photon-axion conversion as a mechanism for supernova dimming: Limits from CMB spectral distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg G.; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2005-07-15

    Axion-photon conversion induced by intergalactic magnetic fields has been proposed as an explanation for the dimming of distant supernovae of type Ia (SNe Ia) without cosmic acceleration. The effect depends on the intergalactic electron density n{sub e} as well as the B-field strength and domain size. We show that for n{sub e} < or approx. 10{sup -9} cm{sup -3} the same mechanism would cause excessive spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This small-n{sub e} parameter region had been left open by the most restrictive previous constraints based on the dispersion of quasar (QSO) spectra. The combination of CMB and QSO limits suggests that the photon-axion conversion mechanism can only play a subleading role for SN Ia dimming. A combined analysis of all the observables affected by the photon-axion oscillations would be required to give a final verdict on the viability of this model.

  2. Alternative Line Coding Scheme with Fixed Dimming for Visible Light Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, M. T.; Imdad, F.; Kim, H. S.

    2017-01-01

    An alternative line coding scheme called fixed-dimming on/off keying (FD-OOK) is proposed for visible-light communication (VLC). FD-OOK reduces the flickering caused by a VLC transmitter and can maintain a 50% dimming level. Simple encoder and decoder are proposed which generates codes where the number of bits representing one is same as the number of bits representing zero. By keeping the number of ones and zeros equal the change in the brightness of lighting may be minimized and kept constant at 50%, thereby reducing the flickering in VLC. The performance of FD-OOK is analysed with two parameters: the spectral efficiency and power requirement.

  3. Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers: The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Naomi J.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    This report reviews how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps that the dimmers were historically designed to control, and how these differences can lead to complications when trying to dim LEDs. Compatibility between a specific LED source and a specific phase-cut dimmer is often unknown and difficult to assess, and ensuring compatibility adds complexity to the design, specification, bidding, and construction observation phases for new buildings and major remodel projects. To maximize project success, this report provides both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects, as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures.

  4. Dim Networks: The Utility of Social Network Analysis for Illuminating Partner Security Force Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    use of social network analysis (SNA) has allowed the military to map dark networks of terrorist organizations and selectively target key elements...data to improve SC. 14. SUBJECT TERMS social network analysis, dark networks, light networks, dim networks, security cooperation, Southeast Asia...task may already exist. Recently, the use of social network analysis (SNA) has allowed the military to map dark networks of terrorist organizations

  5. Aerosol emissions and dimming/brightening in Europe: Sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Wild, M.

    2011-11-01

    Observational data indicate a decrease of surface solar radiation (SSR) in Europe from about 1950 to the mid-1980s, followed by a renewed increase. Changing aerosol emissions have been suggested as a likely cause for this observed dimming and brightening. To quantify this hypothesis, we performed ensembles of transient sensitivity experiments with the global climate model ECHAM5-HAM, which includes interactive treatment of aerosols. The simulations cover the period 1950-2005 and use transient aerosol emissions (National Institute of Environmental Science, Japan) and prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Centre. The simulated clear-sky dimming and brightening can be attributed to changing aerosol emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Ensemble means of modeled SSR trends are in agreement with observed values. Dimming ceases too early in the model, around 1970. Potential causes are discussed. Brightening sets in at about the right time. Regional differences of modeled SSR are substantial, with clear-sky dimming trends ranging from -6.1 (eastern Europe) to -0.4 W m-2 decade-1 (British Isles) and brightening trends ranging from +1.3 to +6.3 W m-2 decade-1 (Scandinavia and eastern Europe). All-sky conditions show similar trends in the ensemble mean, but the spread among ensemble members is considerable, emphasizing the importance of clouds. Surface temperatures are found to depend mostly on the prescribed SSTs, with an additional aerosol component in some regions like eastern Europe. For precipitation, internal variability is too large to allow for any firm conclusions.

  6. Direct effect of aerosol optical properties on global dimming and brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Uchiyama, A.

    2011-12-01

    Surface solar radiation observed at numerous locations has decreased from the 1960s to the 1980s (Global dimming), thereafter increased (Global brightening). The dimming and brightening is considered to be due to the changes in both clouds and aerosols. Aerosols have a direct impact on the surface solar radiation by scattering and absorption. The impact is determined by three parameters: optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry factor, but the effect of asymmetry factor is rather smaller than the others. Therefore, the long-term changes in AOD and SSA are necessary to evaluate the aerosol impact on the global dimming and brightening. We have developed the method to estimate AOD and SSA from the hourly accumulated direct and diffuse irradiances measured by the ground-based broadband radiometers. In the estimation, the real part of the refractive index is fixed, and the size distribution is defined by the Junge distribution with a fixed shaping constant. Using the developed method, the measurements from 1975 to 2008 at 14 sites in Japan were analyzed. Consequently, a decrease of AOD by 0.02 and an increase of SSA by 0.2 during the period were seen. The surface solar radiation under the clear sky conditions, which was calculated from the estimated aerosol optical properties, was increased by 5% due to the changes in AOD and SSA; the influence of SSA was dominant. We also investigate the cloud impact on the surface solar radiation which was simply defined as the difference between the surface solar radiation under the cloudy sky conditions and under the clear sky conditions; the cloud impact had no statistically significant trends. The brightening in Japan may be due to the changes in aerosol optical properties, especially SSA. Our developed method can be applied to measurements at other sites around the world and would be helpful to understand the causes of the global dimming and brightening.

  7. Active region 11748: Recurring X-class flares, large scale dimmings and waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Alisdair R.; Malanushenko, Anna; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2014-06-01

    AR 11748 was a relatively compact active region that crossed the solar disk between 05/14/2013 and 05/26/2013. Despite its size it produced a number X-class flares, and global scale eruptive events that were captured by the SDO Feature Finding Team's (FFT) Dimming Region Detector. Using the results of this module and other FFT modules, we present an analysis of the this AR region and investigate why it was so globally impactful.

  8. Chemosensitization of Breast Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents by 3,3’diindolylmethane (DIM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    carbinol protects against covalent binding of benzo [ a ] pyrene and N -nitrosodimethylamine metabolites to mouse liver macromolecules. Chem Biol Interact...TκB has been reported to play a role in de novo resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents, which is a major cause for treatment failure in... cancer chemotherapy. Previous studies have shown that 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM), a major in vivo acid- catalyzed condensation product of Indole-3

  9. Chemosensitization of Breast Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents by 3,3’-Diindolylmethane (DIM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    protects against covalent binding of benzo [ a ] pyrene and N -nitrosodimethylamine metabolites to mouse liver macromolecules. Chem Biol Interact 1984;48...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Constitutive activation of Akt or NF-κB has been reported to play a role in de novo resistance of cancer cells to...chemotherapeutic agents, which is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy. Previous studies have shown that 3, 3’-diindolylmethane (DIM), a

  10. Dim light at night disrupts molecular circadian rhythms and increases body weight.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Meléndez-Fernández, O Hecmarie; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-08-01

    With the exception of high latitudes, life has evolved under bright days and dark nights. Most organisms have developed endogenously driven circadian rhythms that are synchronized to this daily light/dark cycle. In recent years, humans have shifted away from the naturally occurring solar light cycle in favor of artificial and sometimes irregular light schedules produced by electric lighting. Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the means by which environmental lighting alters metabolism are poorly understood. Thus, we exposed mice to dim light at night and investigated changes in the circadian system and metabolism. Here we report that exposure to ecologically relevant levels of dim (5 lux) light at night altered core circadian clock rhythms in the hypothalamus at both the gene and protein level. Circadian rhythms in clock expression persisted during light at night; however, the amplitude of Per1 and Per2 rhythms was attenuated in the hypothalamus. Circadian oscillations were also altered in peripheral tissues critical for metabolic regulation. Exposure to dimly illuminated, as compared to dark, nights decreased the rhythmic expression in all but one of the core circadian clock genes assessed in the liver. Additionally, mice exposed to dim light at night attenuated Rev-Erb expression in the liver and adipose tissue. Changes in the circadian clock were associated with temporal alterations in feeding behavior and increased weight gain. These results are significant because they provide evidence that mild changes in environmental lighting can alter circadian and metabolic function. Detailed analysis of temporal changes induced by nighttime light exposure may provide insight into the onset and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as other disorders involving sleep and circadian rhythm disruption.

  11. Mice exposed to dim light at night exaggerate inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian circadian system regulates many physiological functions including inflammatory responses. Appropriately timed light information is essential for maintaining circadian organization. Over the past ∼120 years, urbanization and the widespread adoption of electric lights have dramatically altered lighting environments. Exposure to light at night (LAN) is pervasive in modern society and disrupts core circadian clock mechanisms. Because microglia are the resident macrophages in the brain and macrophages contain intrinsic circadian clocks, we hypothesized that chronic exposure to LAN would alter microglia cytokine expression and sickness behavior following LPS administration. Exposure to 4 weeks of dim LAN elevated inflammatory responses in mice. Mice exposed to dimly lit, as compared to dark, nights exaggerated changes in body temperature and elevated microglia pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following LPS administration. Furthermore, dLAN mice had a prolonged sickness response following the LPS challenge. Mice exposed to dark or dimly lit nights had comparable sickness behavior directly following the LPS injection; however, dLAN mice showed greater reductions in locomotor activity, increased anorectic behavior, and increased weight loss than mice maintained in dark nights 24h post-LPS injection. Overall, these data suggest that chronic exposure to even very low levels of light pollution may alter inflammatory responses. These results may have important implications for humans and other urban dwelling species that commonly experience nighttime light exposure.

  12. Light-dependent magnetoreception: orientation behaviour of migratory birds under dim red light.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Stapput, Katrin; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds has been shown to be based on radical pair processes and to require light from the short wavelength part of the spectrum up to 565 nm Green. Under dim red light of 645 nm wavelength and 1 mW m(-2) intensity, Australian silvereyes and European robins showed a westerly tendency that did not change between spring and autumn, identifying it as a 'fixed direction' response. A thorough analysis revealed that this orientation did not involve the inclination compass, but was a response based on the polarity of the magnetic field. Furthermore, in contrast to the orientation under short-wavelength light, it could be disrupted by local anaesthesia of the upper beak where iron-containing receptors are located, indicating that it is controlled by these receptors. The similarity of the response under dim red light to the response in total darkness suggests that the two responses may be identical. These findings indicate that the observed 'fixed direction' response under dim red light is fundamentally different from the normal compass orientation, which is based on radical pair processes.

  13. Reverse polarity optical-OFDM (RPO-OFDM): dimming compatible OFDM for gigabit VLC links.

    PubMed

    Elgala, Hany; Little, Thomas D C

    2013-10-07

    Visible light communications (VLC) technology permits the exploitation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaries for simultaneous illumination and broadband wireless communication. Optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (O-OFDM) is a promising modulation technique for VLC systems, in which the real-valued O-OFDM baseband signal is used to modulate the instantaneous power of the optical carrier to achieve gigabit data rates. However, a major design challenge that limits the commercialization of VLC is how to incorporate the industry-preferred pulse-width modulation (PWM) light dimming technique while maintaining a broadband and reliable communication link. In this work, a novel signal format, reverse polarity O-OFDM (RPO-OFDM), is proposed to combine the fast O-OFDM communication signal with the relatively slow PWM dimming signal, where both signals contribute to the effective LED brightness. The advantages of using RPO-OFDM include, (1) the data rate is not limited by the frequency of the PWM signal, (2) the LED dynamic range is fully utilized to minimize the nonlinear distortion of the O-OFDM communication signal, and (3) the bit-error performance is sustained over a large fraction of the luminaire dimming range. In addition, RPO-OFDM offers a practical approach to utilize off-the-shelf LED drivers. We show results of numerical simulations to study the trade-offs between the PWM duty cycle, average electrical O-OFDM signal power, radiated optical flux as well as human perceived light.

  14. Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung-Chul; Choi, An-Seop; Jeong, Jae-Weon; Lee, Eleanor S.

    2010-07-08

    Daylight responsive dimming systems have been used in few buildings to date because they require improvements to improve reliability. The key underlying factor contributing to poor performance is the variability of the ratio of the photosensor signal to daylight workplane illuminance in accordance with sun position, sky condition, and fenestration condition. Therefore, this paper describes the integrated systems between automated roller shade systems and daylight responsive dimming systems with an improved closed-loop proportional control algorithm, and the relative performance of the integrated systems and single systems. The concept of the improved closed-loop proportional control algorithm for the integrated systems is to predict the varying correlation of photosensor signal to daylight workplane illuminance according to roller shade height and sky conditions for improvement of the system accuracy. In this study, the performance of the integrated systems with two improved closed-loop proportional control algorithms was compared with that of the current (modified) closed-loop proportional control algorithm. In the results, the average maintenance percentage and the average discrepancies of the target illuminance, as well as the average time under 90percent of target illuminance for the integrated systems significantly improved in comparison with the current closed-loop proportional control algorithm for daylight responsive dimming systems as a single system.

  15. A lightning-based search for nearby observationally dim terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTague, L. E.; Cummer, S. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Stanbro, M.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Current space-based observations of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) are capable of identifying only TGFs that exceed a lower brightness threshold. Observationally, dim TGFs that fall below this threshold are consequently difficult to find using photon-only search algorithms. Such TGFs are a potentially important part of the overall global TGF rate, and information on their occurrence rate would give important insight into TGF generation mechanisms. We describe and implement a lightning-based search for TGFs that uses the location and time of National Lightning Detection Network reported positive polarity, in-cloud (+IC) discharges of the type known to be directly associated with TGFs. These events identify a 200 μs search window when any associated TGF photons would have been detected. We show that this approach can detect TGFs without requiring a lower threshold on the detected photon brightness of the event, and thus is capable, in principle, of finding a population of weak TGFs. We find that TGFs occur at a rate between 1 in 40 and 1 in 500 of in-cloud lightning events that meet our study's criteria. The distribution of gamma ray counts in the search windows exhibits a statistically significant lack of nearby dim TGFs below the GBM search threshold. The data favor a brightness distribution in which nearby observationally dim TGFs are rare.

  16. The Mysterious Dimmings of the T Tauri Star V1334 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Zhou, George; Cargile, Phillip A.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Osborn, Hugh P.; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Reed, Phillip A.; Lund, Michael B.; Relles, Howard M.; Latham, David W.; Eastman, Jason; Stassun, Keivan G.; Bieryla, Allyson; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Gaidos, Eric; Ansdell, Megan; Siverd, Robert J.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Pepper, Joshua; Gaudi, B. Scott; West, Richard G.; Pollacco, Don; James, David; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Prieto, Jose L.; Johnson, Samson A.; Sergi, Anthony; McCrady, Nate; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    We present the discovery of two extended ∼0.12 mag dimming events of the weak-lined T Tauri star V1334. The start of the first event was missed but came to an end in late 2003, and the second began in 2009 February, and continues as of 2016 November. Since the egress of the current event has not yet been observed, it suggests a period of >13 years if this event is periodic. Spectroscopic observations suggest the presence of a small inner disk, although the spectral energy distribution shows no infrared excess. We explore the possibility that the dimming events are caused by an orbiting body (e.g., a disk warp or dust trap), enhanced disk winds, hydrodynamical fluctuations of the inner disk, or a significant increase in the magnetic field flux at the surface of the star. We also find a ∼0.32 day periodic photometric signal that persists throughout the 2009 dimming which appears to not be due to ellipsoidal variations from a close stellar companion. High-precision photometric observations of V1334 Tau during K2 campaign 13, combined with simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations from the ground, will provide crucial information about the photometric variability and its origin.

  17. TvDim1 of Trichoderma virens is involved in redox-processes and confers resistance to oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Morán-Diez, M Eugenia; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2010-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dim1 proteins belong to the TRX fold superfamily. An EST showing high identity values with genes coding for Dim1 proteins was selected from an EST library collection of Trichoderma virens T59. Here, we report the cloning, characterization, and functional analysis of a T. virens T59 TvDim1 gene. The TvDim1 gene, with a sequence size of 614 bp, was PCR-amplified and found to contain three introns. The TvDim1 gene was present as a single copy in the T. virens genome and was also present in another five Trichoderma strains investigated. Increased levels of expression and redox-activity were detected when the fungus was grown in the presence of H(2)O(2). The overexpression and silencing of TvDim1 in T. harzianum T34 gave rise to transformants, with higher and lower growth, redox-activity, and quantities of biomass, respectively, than the wild-type strain after culture under oxidative stress.

  18. Dust Impact Monitor DIM onboard Rosetta/Philae: Calibration experiments with ice particles as cometary analogue materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, H.; Albin, T.; Flandes, A.; Fischer, H.; Hirn, A.; Loose, A.; Seidensticker, K.; Arnold, W.

    2014-07-01

    The Rosetta lander spacecraft Philae will land on the nucleus surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. Philae is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM). DIM is part of the SESAME instrument package onboard Philae and employs piezoelectric PZT sensors to detect impacts by sub-millimetre and millimetre-sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma by the escaping gas flow. DIM will measure fluxes, impact directions, as well as the speed and size of the impacting particles. We studied the performance of DIM based on impact experiments and compared the measurements with the sensor's expected theoretical behaviour as derived from the Hertz theory of elastic impacts. We simulated impacts onto the DIM sensor with spherical ice particles with radii of approximately 0.7 mm and porous particles of other materials with radii up to 4 mm. Impact speeds range up to 2 m s^{-1}. Cometary grains on ballistic trajectories will have impact speeds below the escape speed from the nucleus surface (approximately 1.5 m s^{-1}), thus the impact speeds achievable by our experiments cover the range expected at the comet. Our results show that the signal strength and the contact durations measured with the DIM PZT sensors can be well approximated by the Hertz contact mechanics.

  19. Violent environment of the inner disk of RW Aurigae A probed by the 2010 and 2015 dimming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, S.; Manara, C. F.; Schneider, P. C.; Clarke, C. J.; Bouvier, J.; Rosotti, G.; Booth, R.; Haworth, T. J.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: The young binary system RW Aur shows strong signatures of a recent tidal encounter between the circumprimary disk and the secondary star. The primary star has recently undergone two major dimming events (Δmag ≈2 in V band) whose origin is still under debate. To shed light on the mechanism leading to the dimming events, we study the extinction properties, accretion variability, and gas kinematics using absorption lines from the material that is obscuring RW Aur A. Methods: We compared our moderate-resolution X-shooter spectra of the dim state of RW Aur A with other spectral observations. In particular, we analysed archival high-resolution UVES spectra obtained during the bright state of the system to track the evolution of the spectral properties across the second dimming event. Since the X-shooter spectrum is flux calibrated, we provide new synthetic photometry of RW Aur A during the dim state. Results: The spectrum obtained during the dim state shows narrow absorption lines in the Na and K optical doublets, where the former is saturated. With a velocity of - 60 km s-1, these lines indicate that during the dim state the disk wind is either enhanced or significantly displaced into the line of sight. The photometric evolution across the dimming event shows a grey extinction, and is correlated with a significant reduction of the EW of all photospheric lines. Emission lines that trace accretion do not vary significantly across the dimming. Conclusions: From comparing our observations with complementary results from the last years, we conclude that the dimming event is related to a major perturbation on the inner disk. We suggest that the inner disk is occulting (most of) the star and thus its photosphere, but does not occult the accretion regions within a few stellar radii. Since observations of the outer disk indicate that the disk is modestly inclined (45-60°), we propose that the inner disk might be warped by an as yet unseen (sub-) stellar companion

  20. Exposure to dim light at night during early development increases adult anxiety-like responses.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; McHenry, Zachary D; Abi Salloum, Bachir A; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-06-22

    Early experiences produce effects that may persist throughout life. Therefore, to understand adult phenotype, it is important to investigate the role of early environmental stimuli in adult behavior and health. Artificial light at night (LAN) is an increasingly common phenomenon throughout the world. However, animals, including humans, evolved under dark night conditions. Many studies have revealed affective, immune, and metabolic alterations provoked by aberrant light exposure and subsequent circadian disruption. Pups are receptive to entraining cues from the mother and then light early during development, raising the possibility that the early life light environment may influence subsequent behavior. Thus, to investigate potential influences of early life exposure to LAN on adult phenotype, we exposed mice to dim (~5 lux; full spectrum white light) or dark (~0 lux) nights pre- and/or postnatally. After weaning at 3 weeks of age, all mice were maintained in dark nights until adulthood (9 weeks of age) when behavior was assessed. Mice exposed to dim light in early life increased anxiety-like behavior and fearful responses on the elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. These mice also displayed reduced growth rates, which ultimately normalized during adolescence. mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin previously linked to early life environment and adult phenotype, was not altered in the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus by early life LAN exposure. Serum corticosterone concentrations were similar between groups at weaning, suggesting that early life LAN does not elicit a long-term physiologic stress response. Dim light exposure did not influence behavior on the open field, novel object, sucrose anhedonia, or forced swim tests. Our data highlight the potential deleterious consequences of low levels of light during early life to development and subsequent behavior. Whether these changes are due to altered maternal behavior

  1. Is there a transition of solar radiation from dimming to brightening over India?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, V. K.; Pandithurai, G.; Pai, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Recent observational studies show that solar radiation incident on ground has not been stable over the last several decades but underwent significant multi-decadal variations. From the 1950s, solar radiation has had a general decreasing trend, named dimming. Since the late 1980s, a trend reversal and partial recovery has been observed at many observations sites across the globe; it is the so-called brightening. The present study examined temporal and spatial trends in surface solar radiation (global and diffuse) and sunshine duration in India using a 40-year data set (1971-2010) of the twelve stations of solar radiation network of the India Meteorological Department. The research work examines the global solar radiation trends in all-sky and cloud-free sky conditions. The long-term variability in the diffuse components of solar radiation, bright sunshine duration, and cloud cover has also been studied over India. India is one of the few regions that showed a continuous and steady decline in global solar radiation from the 1970s to 2000. The declining trend of all-sky global irradiance over India as a whole was 0.6 Wm- 2 year- 1 during 1971-2000 and 0.2 Wm- 2 year - 1 during 2001-2010. A third-order polynomial fit to the data indicated a reversal in all-sky global irradiance around 2001 at some sites. Reversal or stabilization of global irradiance is also seen in seasonal mean values at some of the stations. The reversal in clear-sky global irradiance was clearly evident from 2001. Similar trend is also observed in bright sunshine duration. This confirms the well-known phenomenon of global dimming and global brightening over India. The analysis of global irradiance data highlights the fact that in general the dimming/brightening is station dependent because of regional sources and meteorology which contribute to the variation in solar irradiance.

  2. A simple model for understanding the DIM dust measurement at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, Morris; Flandes, Alberto; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Krüger, Harald

    2016-11-01

    We present a simple model for gas and dust flow from 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that can be used to understand the grain impact observed by the DIM instrument on Philae (Krüger et al., 2015). We show how model results when applied to the GIADA measurements (Rotundi et al., 2015; Della Corte et al., 2015) can be used, in conjunction with the results found by the MIRO (Schloerb et al., 2015) and VIRTIS (De Sanctis et al., 2015) instruments to infer surface properties such as surface temperature and surface ice fraction.

  3. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Data Information Management System (DIMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, James

    2004-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Integrated Science Study is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that combines the expertise of federal, state and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for the application of integrated research projects in other estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico. Efficient information and data distribution for the Tampa Bay Study has required the development of a Data Information Management System (DIMS). This information system is being used as an outreach management tool, providing information to scientists, decision makers and the public on the coastal resources of the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Home Circadian Phase Assessments with Measures of Compliance Yield Accurate Dim Light Melatonin Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Wyatt, James K.; Park, Margaret; Fogg, Louis F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is a need for the accurate assessment of circadian phase outside of the clinic/laboratory, particularly with the gold standard dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). We tested a novel kit designed to assist in saliva sampling at home for later determination of the DLMO. The home kit includes objective measures of compliance to the requirements for dim light and half-hourly saliva sampling. Design: Participants were randomized to one of two 10-day protocols. Each protocol consisted of two back-to-back home and laboratory phase assessments in counterbalanced order, separated by a 5-day break. Setting: Laboratory or participants' homes. Participants: Thirty-five healthy adults, age 21–62 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Most participants received at least one 30-sec epoch of light > 50 lux during the home phase assessments (average light intensity 4.5 lux), but on average for < 9 min of the required 8.5 h. Most participants collected every saliva sample within 5 min of the scheduled time. Ninety-two percent of home DLMOs were not affected by light > 50 lux or sampling errors. There was no significant difference between the home and laboratory DLMOs (P > 0.05); on average the home DLMOs occurred 9.6 min before the laboratory DLMOs. The home DLMOs were highly correlated with the laboratory DLMOs (r = 0.91, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Participants were reasonably compliant to the home phase assessment procedures. The good agreement between the home and laboratory dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) demonstrates that including objective measures of light exposure and sample timing during home saliva sampling can lead to accurate home DLMOs. Clinical Trial Registration: Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Citation: Burgess HJ, Wyatt JK, Park M, Fogg LF. Home circadian phase assessments with measures of compliance yield accurate dim light melatonin onsets. SLEEP 2015;38(6):889–897

  5. An analog retina model for detecting dim moving objects against a bright moving background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searfus, R. M.; Colvin, M. E.; Eeckman, F. H.; Teeters, J. L.; Axelrod, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    We are interested in applications that require the ability to track a dim target against a bright, moving background. Since the target signal will be less than or comparable to the variations in the background signal intensity, sophisticated techniques must be employed to detect the target. We present an analog retina model that adapts to the motion of the background in order to enhance targets that have a velocity difference with respect to the background. Computer simulation results and our preliminary concept of an analog 'Z' focal plane implementation are also presented.

  6. Cloning and characterization of a Dim1-like mitosis gene of Spodoptera frugiperda cells (Sf9) induced by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Hussain, Mazhar; Asgari, Sassan

    2013-06-01

    Dim1 proteins are evolutionarily highly conserved throughout the eukaryotes and are present in numerous species. These proteins are essential for mitosis and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Dim1-like gene from Spodoptera frugiperda cells (Sf9) was obtained. S. frugiperda Dim1 (SfDim1) cDNA is comprised of 975 bp including a 429 bp open reading frame (ORF), 225 bp 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), and 321 bp 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) with a poly A tail. The predicted polypeptide encoded by this gene is 142 aa with a molecular weight of 16.76 kDa and a PI of 5.53. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed high similarities with Dim1 of other species. The evolutionary conserved site of Dim1 proteins ((35)Asp-Pro-Thr-Cys(38)) is also present in SfDim1. Silencing of SfDim1 gene decreased cell proliferation at 72 h post-treatment in comparison to mock and control transfected cells. Using RT-PCR, we found relatively higher SfDim1 transcript levels following Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) infection compared to mock-infected cells from 4h post-infection (hpi) up until 24 hpi. The expression level diminished dramatically at 36 hpi up to 120 hpi with no expression detected at 144 hpi. Silencing of SfDim1 resulted in lower levels of virus DNA production in comparison to mock-infected cells, which suggested that SfDim1 might benefit the virus and facilitate viral replication. Overall, the results showed that SfDim1 protein is involved in cell proliferation as well as cell-virus interaction.

  7. Human natural killer cell maturation defect supports in vivo CD56(bright) to CD56(dim) lineage development.

    PubMed

    Domaica, Carolina Inés; Fuertes, Mercedes Beatriz; Uriarte, Ignacio; Girart, María Victoria; Sardañons, Jessica; Comas, Dorina Ileana; Di Giovanni, Daniela; Gaillard, María Isabel; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Zwirner, Norberto Walter

    2012-01-01

    Two populations of human natural killer (NK) cells can be identified in peripheral blood. The majority are CD3(-)CD56(dim) cells while the minority exhibits a CD3(-)CD56(bright) phenotype. In vitro evidence indicates that CD56(bright) cells are precursors of CD56(dim) cells, but in vivo evidence is lacking. Here, we studied NK cells from a patient that suffered from a melanoma and opportunistic fungal infection during childhood. The patient exhibited a stable phenotype characterized by a reduction in the frequency of peripheral blood CD3(-)CD56(dim) NK cells, accompanied by an overt increase in the frequency and absolute number of CD3(-)CD56(bright) cells. These NK cells exhibited similar expression of perforin, CD57 and CD158, the major activating receptors CD16, NKp46, NKG2D, DNAM-1, and 2B4, as well as the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A, on both CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells as healthy controls. Also, both NK cell subpopulations produced IFN-γ upon stimulation with cytokines, and CD3(-)CD56(dim) NK cells degranulated in response to cytokines or K562 cells. However, upon stimulation with cytokines, a substantial fraction of CD56(dim) cells failed to up-regulate CD57 and CD158, showed a reduction in the percentage of CD16(+) cells, and CD56(bright) cells did not down-regulate CD62L, suggesting that CD56(dim) cells could not acquire a terminally differentiated phenotype and that CD56(bright) cells exhibit a maturation defect that might result in a potential altered migration pattern. These observations, support the notion that NK cells of this patient display a maturation/activation defect that precludes the generation of mature NK cells at a normal rate accompanied by CD56(dim) NK cells that cannot completely acquire a terminally differentiated phenotype. Thus, our results provide evidence that support the concept that in vivo CD56(bright) NK cells differentiate into CD56(dim) NK cells, and contribute to further understand human NK cell ontogeny.

  8. Dim ultraviolet light as a means of deterring activity by the Hawaiian hoary bat Lasiurus cinereus semotus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorresen, P. Marcos; Cryan, Paul M.; Dalton, David C.; Wolf, Sandy; Johnson, Jessica A.; Todd, Christopher M.; Bonaccorso, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Widespread bat fatalities at industrial wind turbines are a conservation issue with the potential to inhibit efficient use of an abundant source of energy. Bat fatalities can be reduced by altering turbine operations, but such curtailment decreases turbine efficiency. If additional ways of reducing bat fatalities at wind turbines were available such tradeoffs might not be needed. Based on the facts that bats perceive distant objects primarily through vision and can see in very dim lighting conditions, and the possibility that bats might interact with turbines after approaching them as they would trees, we propose a novel method of reducing bat activity at wind turbines: illumination of the structure with dim light. As a first step toward assessing this approach, we illuminated trees with dim flickering ultraviolet (UV) light in areas frequented by Hawaiian hoary bats Lasiurus cinereus semotus, an endangered subspecies affected by wind turbines. We used a repeated-measures design to quantify bat activity near trees with acoustic detectors and thermal video cameras in the presence and absence of UV illumination, while concurrently monitoring insect numbers. Results indicate that dim UV reduces bat activity despite an increase in insect numbers. Experimental treatment did not completely inhibit bat activity near trees, nor did all measures of bat activity show statistically significant differences due to high variance in bat activity among sites. However, the observed decreases in bat activity with dim UV illumination justify further testing of this method as a means to reduce bat fatalities at wind turbines.

  9. DIM-1, a novel immunoglobulin superfamily protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, is necessary for maintaining bodywall muscle integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Teresa M; Gilbert, Mary M; Devenport, Danelle; Norman, Kenneth R; Moerman, Donald G

    2003-01-01

    The UNC-112 protein is required during initial muscle assembly in C. elegans to form dense bodies and M-lines. Loss of this protein results in arrest at the twofold stage of embryogenesis. In contrast, a missense mutation in unc-112 results in viable animals that have disorganized bodywall muscle and are paralyzed as adults. Loss or reduction of dim-1 gene function can suppress the severe muscle disruption and paralysis exhibited by these mutant hermaphrodites. The overall muscle structure in hermaphrodites lacking a functional dim-1 gene is slightly disorganized, and the myofilament lattice is not as strongly anchored to the muscle cell membrane as it is in wild-type muscle. The dim-1 gene encodes two polypeptides that contain three Ig-like repeats. The short DIM-1 protein isoform consists entirely of three Ig repeats and is sufficient for wild-type bodywall muscle structure and stability. DIM-1(S) localizes to the region of the muscle cell membrane around and between the dense bodies, which are the structures that anchor the actin filaments and may play a role in stabilizing the thin rather than the thick filament components of the sarcomere. PMID:12663531

  10. Adaptive local backlight dimming algorithm based on local histogram and image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Burini, Nino; Korhonen, Jari; Forchhammer, Søren; Mantel, Claire

    2013-02-01

    Liquid Crystal Display (LCDs) with Light Emitting Diode (LED) backlight is a very popular display technology, used for instance in television sets, monitors and mobile phones. This paper presents a new backlight dimming algorithm that exploits the characteristics of the target image, such as the local histograms and the average pixel intensity of each backlight segment, to reduce the power consumption of the backlight and enhance image quality. The local histogram of the pixels within each backlight segment is calculated and, based on this average, an adaptive quantile value is extracted. A classification into three classes based on the average luminance value is performed and, depending on the image luminance class, the extracted information on the local histogram determines the corresponding backlight value. The proposed method has been applied on two modeled screens: one with a high resolution direct-lit backlight, and the other screen with 16 edge-lit backlight segments placed in two columns and eight rows. We have compared the proposed algorithm against several known backlight dimming algorithms by simulations; and the results show that the proposed algorithm provides better trade-off between power consumption and image quality preservation than the other algorithms representing the state of the art among feature based backlight algorithms.

  11. Probing dim point sources in the inner Milky Way using PCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2017-01-01

    Poisson regression of the Fermi-LAT data in the inner Milky Way reveals an extended gamma-ray excess. An important question is whether the signal is coming from a collection of unresolved point sources, possibly old recycled pulsars, or constitutes a truly diffuse emission component. Previous analyses have relied on non-Poissonian template fits or wavelet decomposition of the Fermi-LAT data, which find evidence for a population of dim point sources just below the 3FGL flux limit. In order to be able to draw conclusions about the flux distribution of point sources at the dim end, we employ a Bayesian trans-dimensional MCMC framework by taking samples from the space of catalogs consistent with the observed gamma-ray emission in the inner Milky Way. The software implementation, PCAT (Probabilistic Cataloger), is designed to efficiently explore that catalog space in the crowded field limit such as in the galactic plane, where the model PSF, point source positions and fluxes are highly degenerate. We thus generate fair realizations of the underlying MSP population in the inner galaxy and constrain the population characteristics such as the radial and flux distribution of such sources.

  12. Single-state electronic ballast with dimming feature and unity power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.F.; Yu, T.H.; Chiang, M.C.

    1998-05-01

    Analysis, design, and practical consideration of a single-stage electronic ballast with dimming feature and unity power factor are presented in this paper. The proposed single-stage ballast is the combination of a boost converter and a half-bridge series-resonant parallel-loaded inverter. The boost semistage working in the discontinuous conduction mode functions as a power factor corrector and the inverter semistage operated above resonance are employed to ballast the lamp. Replacing the lamp with the plasma model, analysis of the ballast is fulfilled. The dimming feature is carried out by pulse-width modulation (PWM) and variable-frequency controls simultaneously. The proposed single-stage ballast is suitable for applications with moderate power level and low-line voltage while requiring a high-output voltage. It can save a controller, an active switch and its driver, reduce size, and possibly increase system reliability while requiring two additional diodes over a conventional two-stage system. A prototype was implemented to verify the theoretical discussion. The hardware measurements have shown that the desired performance can be achieved feasibly.

  13. Global dimming and urbanization: did stronger negative SSR trends collocate with regions of population growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamovic, Adel; Tanaka, Katsumasa; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Global dimming refers to the decrease in surface solar radiation (SSR) observed from the 1960s to the 1980s at different measurement sites all around the world. It is under debate whether anthropogenic aerosols emitted from urban areas close to the measurement sites are mainly responsible for the dimming. In order to assess this urbanization impact on SSR, we use spatially explicit population density data of 0.08° resolution to construct population indices (PI) at 157 high data quality sites. Our study extends previous population-based studies by incorporating distance-weighting as a simple aerosol diffusion model. We measured urbanization in the surrounding of a site as the PI change form 1960 to 1990 and found no negative correlation with the corresponding SSR trends from 1964 to 1989 for the 92 sites in Europe and Japan. For the 39 sites in China the correlation coefficients are significant at the 5 % level and reach around -0.35, while for the 26 remaining Asian, mostly Russian sites the correlation coefficients reach around -0.55 at the 1 % significance level. Results are similar, when the absolute levels of PIs are taken as an indicator for urbanization. Our findings call into question the existence of an urbanization effect for the sites in Europe and Japan, while such an effect cannot be ruled out for the sites in Asia, especially in Russia.

  14. Impact of global dimming on reference evapotranspiration in Hai River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zeng, X.; Sun, H.

    2015-05-01

    Global radiation can impact the surface energy balance and hydrological cycle. This study analysed changes in global radiation in Hai River basin, China during 1960 to 2012. Global radiation decreased significantly from 1960 to 1989 and increased from 1990 to 2012, which has been described as "from dimming to brightening". Sunshine duration was used as a proxy index where radiation records were unavailable. Results showed that sunshine duration (for 45 stations) show a significant decreasing trend from 1960 to 2012, which was a little different to global radiation (for 6 stations) during the brightening phase. Penman-Monteith model was used for estimating trends of reference evapotranspiration. The consistency of temporal and spatial variations in sunshine duration and reference evapotranspiration was examined during the periods 1960-1989 and 1990-2012. The results showed that the annual reference evapotranspiration trend was consistent with the sunshine duration trend (both were decreasing for 37 of the 45 stations) during 1960 to 1989, followed by an upward trend (for 26 of the 45 stations) from 1990, while the annual sunshine duration indicated a downward trend (for all 45 stations) during the whole period 1960-2012. Overall, global dimming could be the dominant factor for the decreased reference evapotranspiration from 1960 to 1989, while the increased reference evapotranspiration from 1990 to 2012 could be driven by other meteorological variables, especially global warming.

  15. Global dimming and urbanization: did stronger negative SSR trends collocate with regions of population growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamovic, Adel; Tanaka, Katsumasa; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Global dimming refers to the decrease in surface solar radiation (SSR) observed from the 1960s to the 1980s at different measurement sites all around the world. It is under debate whether anthropogenic aerosols emitted from urban areas close to the measurement sites are mainly responsible for the dimming. In order to assess this urbanization impact on SSR, we use spatially explicit population density data of 0.08° resolution to construct population indices (PI) at 157 high data quality sites. Our study extends previous population-based studies by incorporating distance-weighting as a simple aerosol diffusion model. We measured urbanization in the surrounding of a site as the PI change from 1960 to 1990 and found no negative correlation with the corresponding SSR trends from 1964 to 1989 for the 92 sites in Europe and Japan. For the 39 sites in China the correlation coefficients are significant at the 5 % level and reach around -0.35, while for the 26 remaining Asian, mostly Russian sites the correlation coefficients reach around -0.55 at the 1 % significance level. Results are similar, when the absolute levels of PIs are taken as an indicator for urbanization. Our findings call into question the existence of an urbanization effect for the sites in Europe and Japan, while such an effect cannot be ruled out for the sites in Asia, especially in Russia.

  16. Global dimming and urbanization: did stronger negative SSR trends collocate with regions of population growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamovic, A.; Tanaka, K.; Folini, D.; Wild, M.

    2015-11-01

    Global dimming refers to the decrease in surface solar radiation (SSR) observed from the 1960s to the 1980s at different measurement sites all around the world. It is under debate whether anthropogenic aerosols emitted from urban areas close to the measurement sites are mainly responsible for the dimming. In order to assess this urbanization impact on SSR, we use spatially explicit population density data of 0.08° resolution to construct population indices (PI) at 157 high data quality sites. Our study extends previous population-based studies by incorporating distance-weighting as a simple aerosol diffusion model. We measured urbanization in the surrounding of a site as the PI change form 1960 to 1990 and found no negative correlation with the corresponding SSR trends from 1964 to 1989 for the 92 sites in Europe and Japan. For the 39 sites in China the correlation coefficients are significant at the 5 % level and reach around -0.35, while for the 26 remaining Asian, mostly Russian sites the correlation coefficients reach around -0.55 at the 1 % significance level. Results are similar, when the absolute levels of PIs are taken as an indicator for urbanization. Our findings call into question the existence of an urbanization effect for the sites in Europe and Japan, while such an effect cannot be ruled out for the sites in Asia, especially in Russia.

  17. Inference of Dim Gamma-Ray Point Sources Using Probabilistic Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2016-07-01

    Poisson regression of the Fermi-LAT data in the inner Milky Way reveals an extended gamma-ray excess. The anomalous emission falls steeply away from the galactic center and has an energy spectrum that peaks at 1-2 GeV. An important question is whether the signal is coming from a collection of unresolved point sources, possibly recycled pulsars, or constitutes a truly diffuse emission component. Previous analyses have relied on non-Poissonian template fits or wavelet decomposition of the Fermi-LAT data, which find evidence for a population of dim point sources just below the 3FGL flux limit. In order to draw conclusions about a potentially dim population, we propose to sample from the catalog space of point sources, where the model dimensionality, i.e., the number of sources, is unknown. Although being a computationally expensive sampling problem, this approach allows us to infer the number, flux and radial distribution of the point sources consistent with the observed count data. Probabilistic cataloging is specifically useful in the crowded field limit, such as in the galactic disk, where the typical separation between point sources is comparable to the PSF. Using this approach, we recover the results of the deterministic Fermi-LAT 3FGL catalog, as well as sub-detection threshold information and fold the point source parameter degeneracies into the model-choice problem of whether an emission is coming from unresolved MSPs or dark matter annihilation.

  18. The eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae, Teleostei): novel ocular specializations for vision in dim light.

    PubMed

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Marshall, N Justin; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-05-01

    Lanternfishes are one of the most abundant groups of mesopelagic fishes in the world's oceans and play a critical role in biomass vertical turnover. Despite their importance, very little is known about their physiology or how they use their sensory systems to survive in the extreme conditions of the deep sea. In this study, we provide a comprehensive description of the general morphology of the myctophid eye, based on analysis of 53 different species, to understand better their visual capabilities. Results confirm that myctophids possess several visual adaptations for dim-light conditions, including enlarged eyes, an aphakic gap, a tapetum lucidum, and a pure rod retina with high densities of long photoreceptors. Two novel retinal specializations were also discovered. The first specialization is a fundal pigmentation in adult eyes, found within an isolated retinal region (typically central retina) composed of modified pigment epithelial cells, which we hypothesize to be the remnant of a more pronounced visual specialization important in larval stages. The second specialization is an aggregation of extracellular microtubular-like structures found within the sclerad region of the inner nuclear layer of the retina. We hypothesize that the marked interspecific differences in the hypertrophy of these microtubular-like structures may be related to inherent differences in visual function. A general interspecific variability in other parts of the eye is also revealed and examined in this study. The contribution of both ecology and phylogeny to the evolution of ocular specializations and vision in dim light are discussed.

  19. Role of Black Carbon and Absorbing Organic Carbon Aerosols in Surface Dimming Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2010-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching at the Earth’s surface plays an essential role in driving both atmosphere hydrological and land/ocean biogeochemical processes. Measurements have shown significant decreases in surface solar radiation (dimming) in many regions since 1960s. At least half of the observed dimming could be linked to the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, especially absorbing aerosols like black carbon (BC) due to their strong atmospheric absorption. However, previous model-data comparisons indicate that absorption by aerosols is commonly and significantly underestimated in current GCM simulations by several factors over regions. Using a global chemical transport model coupled with a radiative transfer model, we include a treatment for absorbing organic carbons (OC) from bio-fuel and open biomass burnings in optical calculations and estimate aerosol radiative forcings for two anthropogenic aerosol emission scenarios representative of 1975 and 2000. Assumptions about aerosol mixing and the OC absorption spectrum are examined by comparing simulated atmospheric heating against aircraft optical and radiation measurements. The calculated aerosol single scattering albedo distribution (0.93+/-0.044) is generally comparable to the AERONET data (0.93+/-0.030) for year 2001, with best agreements in Europe and N. America, while overestimated in E. Asia and underestimated in the S. American biomass burning areas. On a global scale, inclusion of absorbing OC enhances the absorption in the atmosphere by 11% for July. The estimated aerosol direct radiative forcing at TOA (-0.24 W/m2) is similar to the average value of the AeroCom models based on the same 2000 emissions, but significantly enhanced negatively at surface by about 53% (-1.56 W/m2) and the atmosphere absorption is increased by +61% (+1.32 W/m2). About 87% of the estimated atmosphere absorption and 42% of the surface dimming is contributed by BC. Between 1975 and 2000, the calculated all-sky flux

  20. Effects of solar dimming and brightening on the terrestrial carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, L.; Bellouin, N.; Sitch, S.; Boucher, O.; Huntingford, C.; Wild, M.; Cox, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    Plant photosynthesis increases with solar radiation. Recent studies have shown that photosynthesis is more efficient under diffuse light conditions (Gu et al., 2003, Niyogi et al., 2004, Oliveira et al., 2007, Roderick et al., 2001). Changes in cloud cover and atmospheric aerosol loadings from either volcanic and anthropogenic sources, modify the total radiation reaching the surface and the fraction of this radiation which is diffuse, with uncertain overall effects on plant productivity and the global land carbon sink. A decrease in total solar radiation (Liepert, 2002, Stanhill and Cohen, 2001, Wild et al., 2005) has been observed at the Earth surface over the 1950-1990 period, called solar dimming. Such dimming gradually started to transform into brightening in some regions of the world since the late 1980s (Wild et al. 2005). The effect of these changes in total solar radiation and associated changes in diffuse radiation and diffuse fraction on the land biosphere has not yet been accounted for in global carbon cycle simulations because such models lack the mechanism that includes the diffuse irradiance effects on photosynthesis In this study we estimate the total impact of variations in clouds and atmospheric aerosols on the land carbon sink using a global land carbon cycle model modified to account for the effects of variations in both direct and diffuse radiation on canopy photosynthesis (Mercado et al., 2007) during the global dimming and brightening period. References Gu L.H., Baldocchi D.D., Wofsy S.C., Munger J.W., Michalsky J.J., Urbanski S.P. & Boden T.A. (2003) Response of a deciduous forest to the Mount Pinatubo eruption: Enhanced photosynthesis. Science, 299, 2035-2038. Liepert B.G. (2002) Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at sites in the United States and worldwide from 1961 to 1990. 29, 1421. Mercado L.M., Huntingford C., Gash J.H.C., Cox P.M. & Jogireddy V. (2007) Improving the representation of radiation interception and

  1. Outcomes from Enabling Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Oanh; Ball, Katrina

    The outcomes of enabling courses offered in Australia's vocational education and training (VET) sector were examined. "Enabling course" was defined as lower-level preparatory and prevocational courses covering a wide range of areas, including remedial education, bridging courses, precertificate courses, and general employment preparation…

  2. Technology Enabled Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on technology-enabled learning and human resource development. Among results found in "Current State of Technology-enabled Learning Programs in Select Federal Government Organizations: a Case Study of Ten Organizations" (Letitia A. Combs) are the following: the dominant delivery method is traditional…

  3. Fluorescence lifetime attachment LIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Oord, Cornelius J. R.; Stoop, Karel W. J.; van Geest, Lambertus K.

    2001-05-01

    We present the Lambert Instruments Fluorescence Lifetime Attachment LIFA. LIFA enables easy to use and affordable microscopy and macroscopic FLIM. The system implements the homodyne detection scheme for measuring the fluorescence lifetime in each pixel of the image. The microscopy system features an ultra bright LED illuminator, the LI-(mu) Cam intensified CCD camera a high frequency signal generator. The illuminator replaces the excitation light source of a standard fluorescence microscopy, while the LI-(mu) CAM intensified CCD camera is attached to the photo-port. Both the illuminator and the intensifier are modulated at a frequency up to 100 MHz at a series of phase differences. The lifetime image is calculated from the series of images on a personal computer.

  4. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Yoshida, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  5. Modified motion-based detection algorithm for dim targets in IR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Hari Babu; Saran, Ram; Kumar, Ashok

    2006-04-01

    An integrated algorithm for the detection of dim point/extended size, slow/fast-moving targets has been presented in this paper. In the proposed algorithm, essentially an innovation over an existing algorithm reported by Nengli Dong et al [7], morphological operations are carried out on the incoming IR data to improve signal to noise ratio (SNR). Methods of entropy thresholding and conjunction functions are integrated together. Conjunction function based algorithm has been significantly modified to take care of fast moving targets, a limitation of the method proposed by Nengli Dong et al. Our proposed algorithm is able to detect point as well extended size targets with low contrast and having frame to frame movements varying from sub-pixel to tens of pixels.

  6. Highlighting metabolic indicators of olive oil during storage by the AComDim method.

    PubMed

    Korifi, R; Plard, J; Le Dréau, Y; Rébufa, C; Rutledge, D N; Dupuy, N

    2016-07-15

    Lipid oxidation during olive oil storage induces changes in the metabolite content of the oil, which can be measured using so-called quality indices. High values indicate poor quality oils that should be labeled accordingly or removed from the market. Based on quality indices measured over two years for two olive oils, the AComDim method was used to highlight the influence of five factors (olive oil type, oxygen, light, temperature and storage time) on oxidative stability during storage. To identify the significant factors, two full factorial experimental designs were built, each containing four of the five factors examined. The results showed that all five factors, as well as some two-factor interactions, were significant. Phenols and hydroperoxides were identified as being the most sensitive to these factors, and potential markers for the ageing of olive oil.

  7. Another deep dimming of the classical T Tauri star RW Aurigae A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. P.; Gahm, G. F.; Djupvik, A. A.; Babina, E. V.; Artemenko, S. A.; Grankin, K. N.

    2015-05-01

    Context. RW Aur A is a classical T Tauri star (CTTS) with an unusually rich emission line spectrum. In 2014 the star faded by ~3 mag in the V band and went into a long-lasting minimum. In 2010 the star underwent a similar fading, although less pronounced. These events in RW Aur A are very unusual among the CTTS, and have been attributed to occultations by passing dust clouds. Aims: We want to find out if any spectral changes took place after the last fading of RW Aur A with the intention of gathering more information on the occulting body and the cause of the phenomenon. Methods: We collected spectra of the two components of RW Aur. The photometry was performed before and during the minimum. Results: The overall spectral signatures reflecting emission from accretion flows from disk to star did not change after the fading. However, blue-shifted absorption components related to the stellar wind increased in strength in certain resonance lines, and the profiles and strengths but not the fluxes of forbidden lines became drastically different. Conclusions: The extinction through the obscuring cloud is grey indicating the presence of large dust grains. At the same time, there are no traces of related absorbing gas. The cloud occults the star and the interior part of the stellar wind, but not the wind or jet further out. The dimming in 2014 was not accompanied by changes in the accretion flows at the stellar surface. There is evidence that the structure and velocity pattern of the stellar wind did change significantly. The dimmings could be related to passing condensations in a tidally disrupted disk, as proposed earlier, but we also speculate that large dust grains have been stirred up from the inclined disk into the line of sight through the interaction with an enhanced wind. Based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma, Spain; Fast-Track Service program 50-409.

  8. Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) onboard Rosetta/Philae: Comparison of experimental results and the theory behind the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto; Krüger, Harald; Loose, Alexander; Sperl, Matthias; Jürgen Seidensticker, Klaus; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Arnold, Walter

    2013-08-01

    The Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) experiment on board the Rosetta spacecraft's lander, Philae, is a cube with three sides covered with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors (total sensitive area: ≈70cm2), aimed at measuring the physical properties of millimetric and sub-millimetric dust particles that move near the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov - Gerasimenko. In this work we study the performance of the DIM Flight Spare (FS) unit based on impact experiments and compare the measurements with the sensor's expected theoretical behavior as derived from Hertz' theory of elastic impact. We present the results of impact experiments performed with spherical particles of different densities and elastic properties. We performed two types of experiments: (a) we analyze the performance of the different sensor sides under identical impacts, and (b) we investigate the performance of DIM under impacts of different materials and different impact speeds. We discuss the possible influence of the microstructure of the PZT sensor on the signal strength and its variation with position of the impacting particles. Our results show that the signal strength and the contact times measured with the DIM PZT sensors can be well approximated by Hertz' contact mechanics.

  9. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  10. ATTENUATION OF MULTI-TARGETED PROLIFERATION-LINKED SIGNALING BY 3,3′-DIINDOLYLMETHANE (DIM): FROM BENCH TO CLINIC

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Wang, Zhiwei; Bao, Bin; Hillman, Gilda G; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence provide credible support in favor of the potential role of bioactive products derived from ingesting cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage. Among many compounds, 3,3′-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is generated in the acidic environment of the stomach following dimerization of Indole-3-Carbinol (I3C) monomers present in these classes of vegetables. Both I3C and DIM have been investigated for their use in preventing, inhibiting, and reversing the progression of cancer- as a chemopreventive agent. In this review, we summarize an updated, wide-ranging pleiotropic anti-tumor and biological effects elicited by DIM against tumor cells. It is unfeasible to point one single target as basis of cellular target of action of DIM. We emphasize key cellular and molecular events that are effectively modulated in the direction of inducing apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation. Collectively, DIM orchestrates signaling through Ah receptor, NF-κB/Wnt/Akt/mTOR pathways impinging on cell cycle arrest, modulation of key cytochrome P450 enzymes, altering angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and epigenetic behaviors of cancer cells. The ability of DIM to selectively induce tumor cells to undergo apoptosis has been observed in preclinical models, and thus it has been speculated in improving the therapeutic efficacy of other anticancer agents that have diverse molecular targets. Consequently, DIM has moved through preclinical development into phase-I clinical trials, thereby suggesting that DIM could be a promising and novel agent either alone or as an adjunct to conventional therapeutics such as chemo-radio therapy, and targeted therapies. An important development has been the availability of DIM formulation with superior bioavailability for humans. Therefore, DIM appears to be a promising chemopreventive agent or chemo-radio-sensitizer for the prevention of tumor recurrence and/or for the treatment of human malignancies. PMID

  11. What can We Learn about Solar Coronal Mass Ejections, Coronal Dimmings, and Extreme-ultraviolet Jets through Spectroscopic Observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Xia, Lidong; He, Jiansen; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-01

    Solar eruptions, particularly coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets, have rarely been investigated with spectroscopic observations. We analyze several data sets obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode and find various types of flows during CMEs and jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit, while a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and an RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%), high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. These weak, high-speed outflows may provide a significant amount of mass to refill the corona after the eruption of CMEs, and part of them may experience further acceleration and eventually become solar wind streams that can serve as an additional momentum source of the associated CMEs. Density and temperature diagnostics of the dimming region suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other, and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analysis, we also find several temperature-dependent outflows (speed increases with temperature) immediately outside the (deepest) dimming region. These outflows may be evaporation flows that are caused by the enhanced thermal conduction or nonthermal electron beams along reconnecting field lines, or induced by the interaction between the opened field lines in the dimming region and the closed loops in the surrounding plage region. In an erupted CME loop and an EUV jet

  12. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  13. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  14. Bespoke contrast-matched diblock copolymer nanoparticles enable the rational design of highly transparent Pickering double emulsions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: GPC chromatograms, additional transmission electron micrographs, digital photographs, visible absorption spectra and laser diffraction data, further optical and fluorescence micrographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03856e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kate L.; Derry, Matthew J.; Warren, Nicholas J.; Ratcliffe, Liam P. D.; Williams, Clive N.; Brown, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the preparation of highly transparent oil-in-water Pickering emulsions using contrast-matched organic nanoparticles. This is achieved via addition of judicious amounts of either sucrose or glycerol to an aqueous dispersion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56–poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)500 [PGMA–PTFEMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles prior to high shear homogenization with an equal volume of n-dodecane. The resulting Pickering emulsions comprise polydisperse n-dodecane droplets of 20–100 μm diameter and exhibit up to 96% transmittance across the visible spectrum. In contrast, control experiments using non-contrast-matched poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56–poly(benzyl methacrylate)300 [PGMA56–PBzMA300] diblock copolymer nanoparticles as a Pickering emulsifier only produced conventional highly turbid emulsions. Thus contrast-matching of the two immiscible phases is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the preparation of highly transparent Pickering emulsions: it is essential to use isorefractive nanoparticles in order to minimize light scattering. Furthermore, highly transparent oil-in-water-in-oil Pickering double emulsions can be obtained by homogenizing the contrast-matched oil-in-water Pickering emulsion prepared using the PGMA56–PTFEMA500 nanoparticles with a contrast-matched dispersion of hydrophobic poly(lauryl methacrylate)39–poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)800 [PLMA39–PTFEMA800] diblock copolymer nanoparticles in n-dodecane. Finally, we show that an isorefractive oil-in-water Pickering emulsion enables fluorescence spectroscopy to be used to monitor the transport of water-insoluble small molecules (pyrene and benzophenone) between n-dodecane droplets. Such transport is significantly less efficient than that observed for the equivalent isorefractive surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Conventional turbid emulsions do not enable such a comparison to be made because the intense light scattering leads to

  15. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2016-07-12

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  16. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  17. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Zayas; Michael, Derby; Patrick, Gilman; Ananthan, Shreyas; Lantz, Eric; Cotrell, Jason; Beck, Fredic; Tusing, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  18. Exploring the World of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarnik, Stanley A.

    1991-01-01

    Provides a basic introduction to fluorescence enabling the amateur scientist to easily, and safely, demonstrate and photograph this phenomenon with the aid of an ultraviolet lamp. Includes a list of necessary equipment and materials, as well as catalog availability from several hardware suppliers. (JJK)

  19. Life of fluorescent lamps operated at high frequencies with solid-state ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verderber, R. R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F. M.

    1985-07-01

    Standard 40-watt, F-40, rapid-start, fluorescent lamps were operated with solid-state ballasts following the standard life-testing cycle of 3 hours on and 20 minutes off for more than 20,000 hours at high frequency. Lamp operating characteristics (starting voltage, filament voltage, arc current, and current-crest factor) were studied as factors affecting lamp life. Measurements show that fluorescent lamps can attain rated life at high frequency using solid-state ballasts. When lamps are operated in the dimmed mode, full filament power is required to sustain lamplife. The rate of lamp lumen depreciation is dependent on the lamp loading and not the operating frequency.

  20. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  1. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  2. Elucidation of phenotypic adaptations: Molecular analyses of dim-light vision proteins in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi; Zhang, Huan; Britt, Lyle

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate ancestors appeared in a uniform, shallow water environment, but modern species flourish in highly variable niches. A striking array of phenotypes exhibited by contemporary animals is assumed to have evolved by accumulating a series of selectively advantageous mutations. However, the experimental test of such adaptive events at the molecular level is remarkably difficult. One testable phenotype, dim-light vision, is mediated by rhodopsins. Here, we engineered 11 ancestral rhodopsins and show that those in early ancestors absorbed light maximally (λmax) at 500 nm, from which contemporary rhodopsins with variable λmaxs of 480–525 nm evolved on at least 18 separate occasions. These highly environment-specific adaptations seem to have occurred largely by amino acid replacements at 12 sites, and most of those at the remaining 191 (≈94%) sites have undergone neutral evolution. The comparison between these results and those inferred by commonly-used parsimony and Bayesian methods demonstrates that statistical tests of positive selection can be misleading without experimental support and that the molecular basis of spectral tuning in rhodopsins should be elucidated by mutagenesis analyses using ancestral pigments. PMID:18768804

  3. Monte Carlo Studies of Phase Separation in Compressible 2-dim Ising Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. J.; Landau, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    Using high resolution Monte Carlo simulations, we study time-dependent domain growth in compressible 2-dim ferromagnetic (s=1/2) Ising models with continuous spin positions and spin-exchange moves [1]. Spins interact with slightly modified Lennard-Jones potentials, and we consider a model with no lattice mismatch and one with 4% mismatch. For comparison, we repeat calculations for the rigid Ising model [2]. For all models, large systems (512^2) and long times (10^ 6 MCS) are examined over multiple runs, and the growth exponent is measured in the asymptotic scaling regime. For the rigid model and the compressible model with no lattice mismatch, the growth exponent is consistent with the theoretically expected value of 1/3 [1] for Model B type growth. However, we find that non-zero lattice mismatch has a significant and unexpected effect on the growth behavior.Supported by the NSF.[1] D.P. Landau and K. Binder, A Guide to Monte Carlo Simulations in Statistical Physics, second ed. (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2005).[2] J. Amar, F. Sullivan, and R.D. Mountain, Phys. Rev. B 37, 196 (1988).

  4. Dim light at night disturbs the daily sleep-wake cycle in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Jan Stenvers, Dirk; van Dorp, Rick; Foppen, Ewout; Mendoza, Jorge; Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H.; Meijer, Johanna H.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Deboer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to light at night (LAN) is associated with insomnia in humans. Light provides the main input to the master clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that coordinates the sleep-wake cycle. We aimed to develop a rodent model for the effects of LAN on sleep. Therefore, we exposed male Wistar rats to either a 12 h light (150–200lux):12 h dark (LD) schedule or a 12 h light (150–200 lux):12 h dim white light (5 lux) (LDim) schedule. LDim acutely decreased the amplitude of daily rhythms of REM and NREM sleep, with a further decrease over the following days. LDim diminished the rhythms of 1) the circadian 16–19 Hz frequency domain within the NREM sleep EEG, and 2) SCN clock gene expression. LDim also induced internal desynchronization in locomotor activity by introducing a free running rhythm with a period of ~25 h next to the entrained 24 h rhythm. LDim did not affect body weight or glucose tolerance. In conclusion, we introduce the first rodent model for disturbed circadian control of sleep due to LAN. We show that internal desynchronization is possible in a 24 h L:D cycle which suggests that a similar desynchronization may explain the association between LAN and human insomnia. PMID:27762290

  5. Spectral Changes in Metal Halide and High-Pressure Sodium Lamps Equipped with Electronic Dimming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Sargis, Raman; Wilson, David

    1995-01-01

    Electronic dimming of high-intensity discharge lamps offers control of Photosynthetic Photon Flux (PPF) but is often characterized as causing significant spectral changes. Growth chambers with 400-W Metal Halide (MH) and High-Pressure Sodium (HPS) lamps were equipped with a dimmer system using Silicon-Controlled Rectifiers (SCR) as high-speed switches. Phase control operation turned the line power off for some period of the alternating current cycle. At full power, the electrical input to HPS and MH lamps was 480 W (root mean squared) and could be decreased to 267 W and 428 W, respectively, before the arc was extinguished. Concomitant with this decrease in input power, PPF decreased by 60% in HPS and 50% in MH. The HPS lamp has characteristic spectral peaks at 589 and 595 nm. As power to the HPS lamps was decreased, the 589-nm peak remained constant while the 595-nm peak decreased, equaling the 589-nm peak at 345-W input, and 589-nm peak was almost absent at 270-W input. The MH lamp has a broader spectral output but also has a peak at 589 nm and another smaller peak at 545 nm. As input power approached 428 W, the 589-nm peak shifted to 570 nm. While the spectrum changed as input power was decreased in the MH and HPS lamps, the phytochrome equilibrium ratio (P(sub ft):P(sub tot)) remains unchanged for both lamp types.

  6. Physiology and morphology of sustaining and dimming neurons of the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus (Brachyura: Grapsidae).

    PubMed

    Berón de Astrada, Martín; Tuthill, John C; Tomsic, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    In crustaceans, sustaining (SN) and dimming (DN) neurons are readily identified by their distinct responses to a light pulse. However, morphological identification and electrophysiological characterization of these neurons has been achieved only in the crayfish. This study provides a description of SNs and DNs in a second crustacean species, the crab Chasmagnathus. SNs and DNs of the crab arborize extensively in the medulla and the axons project to the midbrain. Upon a light pulse, SNs depolarize and increase the firing rate while DNs hyperpolarize and reduce firing. These responses are highly consistent and their magnitudes depend on the intensity of the light pulse. When stimulated with a wide-field motion grating, SNs respond with a modulation of the membrane potential and spike frequency. We also characterized the responses of these neurons to a rotating e-vector of polarized light. SNs show the maximum depolarization when the e-vector approaches vertical. In contrast, DNs show maximal depolarization to near horizontal e-vector orientations. The semi-terrestrial crab and the crayfish inhabit unique light environments and exhibit disparate visual behaviors. Yet, we found that the location, morphology and physiology of SNs and DNs of the crab are nearly identical to those described in the crayfish.

  7. Immunohistochemical distribution of phosphatidylglucoside using anti-phosphatidylglucoside monoclonal antibody (DIM21)

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Yukisato Okazaki, Toshiro; Nagatsuka, Yasuko; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kato, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2007-10-19

    The immunohistochemical distribution of phosphatidylglucoside (PhGlc) in organs obtained from human autopsy cases was investigated using the DIM21 antibody. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on formaline-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections using the simple stain peroxidase method. The sections were then subjected to antigen retrieval by microwave irradiation in citrate buffer. PhGlc expression was observed in not only the epithelial but also the non-epithelial components of several visceral organs. Squamous and glandular epithelial cells were positive for PhGlc in several organs. The surface areas of the epithelium, particularly the squamous epithelium, were positive. Mesothelial cells were also positive in some organs. Endothelial cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells are positive in several organs. Macrophage is positive in many organs. Epithelial cells of the gallbladder were positive, however, the intrahepatic bile ducts were not positive. In the brain tissue, astroglial cells, the chorioide plexus, the pituitary gland, and ependymal cells were positive. Further investigation is indispensable in order to establish a relationship between cell differentiation and PhGlc expression.

  8. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets.

  9. The application of IR detector with windowing technique in the small and dim target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaofeng; Chen, Fansheng; Dong, Yucui; Cui, Kun; Huang, Sijie

    2015-04-01

    The performance of small and dim IR target detection is mostly affected by the signal to noise ratio(SNR) and signal to clutter ratio(SCR), for the MWIR especially LWIR array detector, because of the background radiation and the optical system radiation, the SCR cannot be unlimited increased by using a longer integral time, so the frame rate of the detector was mainly limited by the data readout time especially in a large-scale infrared detector, in this paper a new MWIR array detector with windowing technique was used to do the experiment, which can get a faster frame rate around the target by using the windowing mode, so the redundant information could be ignore, and the background subtraction was used to remove the fixed pattern noise and adjust the dynamic range of the target, then a local NUC(non uniformity correction) technique was proposed to improve the SCR of the target, the advantage between local NUC and global NUC was analyzed in detail, finally the multi local window frame accumulation was adopted to enhance the target further, and the SNR of the target was improved. The experiment showed the SCR of the target can improved from 1.3 to 36 at 30 frames accumulation, which make the target detection and tracking become very easily by using the new method.

  10. Surface dimming by the 2013 Rim Fire simulated by a sectional aerosol model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Bardeen, Charles G; Bucholtz, Anthony; Rosenlof, Karen H; Saide, Pablo E; Da Silva, Arlindo; Ziemba, Luke D; Thornhill, Kenneth L; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Schwarz, Joshua P; Perring, Anne E; Froyd, Karl D; Wagner, N L; Mills, Michael J; Reid, Jeffrey S

    2016-06-27

    The Rim Fire of 2013, the third largest area burned by fire recorded in California history, is simulated by a climate model coupled with a size-resolved aerosol model. Modeled aerosol mass, number, and particle size distribution are within variability of data obtained from multiple-airborne in situ measurements. Simulations suggest that Rim Fire smoke may block 4-6% of sunlight energy reaching the surface, with a dimming efficiency around 120-150 W m(-2) per unit aerosol optical depth in the midvisible at 13:00-15:00 local time. Underestimation of simulated smoke single scattering albedo at midvisible by 0.04 suggests that the model overestimates either the particle size or the absorption due to black carbon. This study shows that exceptional events like the 2013 Rim Fire can be simulated by a climate model with 1° resolution with overall good skill, although that resolution is still not sufficient to resolve the smoke peak near the source region.

  11. Parental Exposure to Dim Light at Night Prior to Mating Alters Offspring Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Yasmine M.; Russart, Kathryn L.G.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to dim light at night (dLAN) disrupts natural light/dark cycles and impairs endogenous circadian rhythms necessary to maintain optimal biological function, including the endocrine and immune systems. We have previously demonstrated that white dLAN compromises innate and cell mediated immune responses in adult Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). We hypothesized that dLAN has transgenerational influences on immune function. Adult male and female Siberian hamsters were exposed to either dark nights (DARK) or dLAN (~5 lux) for 9 weeks, then paired in full factorial design, mated, and thereafter housed under dark nights. Offspring were gestated and reared in dark nights, then tested as adults for cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Maternal exposure to dLAN dampened delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in male offspring. Maternal and paternal exposure to dLAN reduced DTH responses in female offspring. IgG antibodies to a novel antigen were elevated in offspring of dams exposed to dLAN. Paternal exposure to dLAN decreased splenic endocrine receptor expression and global methylation in a parental sex-specific manner. Together, these data suggest that exposure to dLAN has transgenerational effects on endocrine-immune function that may be mediated by global alterations in the epigenetic landscape of immune tissues. PMID:28361901

  12. Annual parallax and a dimming event of a Mira variable star, FV Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the trigonometric parallax of water masers associated with a Mira star, FV Bootis (FV Boo) using VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on our multi-epoch VERA observations, we derived the parallax to be 0.97 ± 0.06 mas, which corresponds to a distance of 1.03^{+0.07}_{-0.06} kpc. The water masers around FV Boo were spatially distributed over an area of 41 au × 41 au, and their internal motions indicate the presence of an outflow. Using the Kagoshima University 1 m optical/infrared telescope, we determined the period to be 305.6 d and the mean apparent magnitude to be +2.91 mag in the K'-band. On the period-luminosity plane, the obtained period and K'-band magnitude puts FV Boo slightly below the sequence of Miras, possibly due to circumstellar reddening. Combining our photometric data with COBE and 2MASS datasets spanning over 20 years, we found in the near infrared that FV Boo was significantly fainter in 2005 compared with preceding and later phases. Its color, however, did not show a large variation through this change. We infer that the dimming could be caused by an eclipse due to a cloud in a binary system.

  13. Body size limits dim-light foraging activity in stingless bees (Apidae: Meliponini).

    PubMed

    Streinzer, Martin; Huber, Werner; Spaethe, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    Stingless bees constitute a species-rich tribe of tropical and subtropical eusocial Apidae that act as important pollinators for flowering plants. Many foraging tasks rely on vision, e.g. spatial orientation and detection of food sources and nest entrances. Meliponini workers are usually small, which sets limits on eye morphology and thus quality of vision. Limitations are expected both on acuity, and thus on the ability to detect objects from a distance, as well as on sensitivity, and thus on the foraging time window at dusk and dawn. In this study, we determined light intensity thresholds for flight under dim light conditions in eight stingless bee species in relation to body size in a Neotropical lowland rainforest. Species varied in body size (0.8-1.7 mm thorax-width), and we found a strong negative correlation with light intensity thresholds (0.1-79 lx). Further, we measured eye size, ocelli diameter, ommatidia number, and facet diameter. All parameters significantly correlated with body size. A disproportionately low light intensity threshold in the minute Trigonisca pipioli, together with a large eye parameter P eye suggests specific adaptations to circumvent the optical constraints imposed by the small body size. We discuss the implications of body size in bees on foraging behavior.

  14. Reduced cannibalistic behavior of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, larvae under dark and dim conditions.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yukinori; Sanudin, Noorsyarinah; Firdaus, Rian Freddie; Saad, Shahbudin

    2013-06-01

    In general, African catfish shows higher survival rates in the dark conditions than in the light conditions. In this study, larval behavior of African catfish was observed under 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 lx using a CCD camera to investigate the reason why African catfish larvae show higher survival rates in dark conditions. The larvae showed significantly higher swimming activity under 0, 0.01, and 0.1 lx than that under 10 and 100 lx. The larvae also showed significantly increased aggressive behavior under 10 and 100 lx; the swimming larvae attacked resting individuals more frequently under 10 and 100 lx than under 0, 0.01, and 0.1 lx. The aggressive behavior and sharp teeth of the attacking larvae appeared to induce skin surface lesions on injured larvae. Chemical substances were then generated from the injured skin surface, and these chemical stimuli triggered cannibalistic behavior in other fish near the injured fish. The results of this study demonstrate that the higher survival rates of African catfish larvae under dark conditions are a result of inactivity and subsequent increase in chemical releasing stimuli concentrations around inactive individuals that triggers feeding behavior in nearby active catfish. Therefore, we recommend larval rearing of African catfish in dark or dim conditions, as it improves catfish survival rates.

  15. Surface dimming by the 2013 Rim Fire simulated by a sectional aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Saide, Pablo E.; Da Silva, Arlindo; Ziemba, Luke D.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Perring, Anne E.; Froyd, Karl D.; Wagner, N. L.; Mills, Michael J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-01

    The Rim Fire of 2013, the third largest area burned by fire recorded in California history, is simulated by a climate model coupled with a size-resolved aerosol model. Modeled aerosol mass, number, and particle size distribution are within variability of data obtained from multiple-airborne in situ measurements. Simulations suggest that Rim Fire smoke may block 4-6% of sunlight energy reaching the surface, with a dimming efficiency around 120-150 W m-2 per unit aerosol optical depth in the midvisible at 13:00-15:00 local time. Underestimation of simulated smoke single scattering albedo at midvisible by 0.04 suggests that the model overestimates either the particle size or the absorption due to black carbon. This study shows that exceptional events like the 2013 Rim Fire can be simulated by a climate model with 1° resolution with overall good skill, although that resolution is still not sufficient to resolve the smoke peak near the source region.

  16. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression.

  17. Fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  18. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-01-12

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  19. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    PubMed

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use.

  20. Multi-block data analysis using ComDim for the evaluation of complex samples: Characterization of edible oils.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Larissa Naida; de Figueiredo, Luana Caroline; Bonafé, Elton Guntendorfer; Coqueiro, Aline; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Março, Paulo Henrique; Rutledge, Douglas N; Valderrama, Patrícia

    2017-04-08

    The ComDim chemometrics method for multi-block analysis was employed to evaluate thirty-two vegetable oil samples analyzed by near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, and by Gas Chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for their fatty acids composition. This unsupervised pattern recognition method was able to extract information from the tables of results that could be presented in informative graphs showing the relationship between the samples through the scores, the predominance of information in particular tables through the saliences and the contribution of the variables in each table which were responsible for the similarities observed in the samples, through the loadings plots. It was possible to infer similarities and differences among the samples studied according to the specific absorption in the UV-Vis and NIR region, as well as their fatty acids composition. The proposed methodology demonstrates the applicability of ComDim for the characterization of samples when different variables (different techniques) describe the same samples. In this particular study, the ComDim chemometrics method was able to discriminate samples by their characteristics and compositions.

  1. Living in the dark does not mean a blind life: bird and mammal visual communication in dim light.

    PubMed

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, María Del Mar

    2017-04-05

    For many years, it was believed that bird and mammal communication 'in the dark of the night' relied exclusively on vocal and chemical signalling. However, in recent decades, several case studies have conveyed the idea that the nocturnal world is rich in visual information. Clearly, a visual signal needs a source of light to work, but diurnal light (twilight included, i.e. any light directly dependent on the sun) is not the only source of luminosity on this planet. Actually, moonlight represents a powerful source of illumination that cannot be neglected from the perspective of visual communication. White patches of feathers and fur on a dark background have the potential to be used to communicate with conspecifics and heterospecifics in dim light across different contexts and for a variety of reasons. Here: (i) we review current knowledge on visual signalling in crepuscular and nocturnal birds and mammals; and (ii) we also present some possible cases of birds and mammals that, due to the characteristics of their feather and fur coloration pattern, might use visual signals in dim light. Visual signalling in nocturnal animals is still an emerging field and, to date, it has received less attention than many other means of communication, including visual communication under daylight. For this reason, many questions remain unanswered and, sometimes, even unasked.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  2. Loss of CD44dim Expression from Early Progenitor Cells Marks T-Cell Lineage Commitment in the Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Mendes, Rui D.; Li, Yunlei; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Wabeke, Tamara; Langerak, Anton W.; Pieters, Rob; Staal, Frank J. T.; Meijerink, Jules P. P.

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell development is less well studied than its murine counterpart due to the lack of genetic tools and the difficulty of obtaining cells and tissues. Here, we report the transcriptional landscape of 11 immature, consecutive human T-cell developmental stages. The changes in gene expression of cultured stem cells on OP9-DL1 match those of ex vivo isolated murine and human thymocytes. These analyses led us to define evolutionary conserved gene signatures that represent pre- and post-αβ T-cell commitment stages. We found that loss of dim expression of CD44 marks human T-cell commitment in early CD7+CD5+CD45dim cells, before the acquisition of CD1a surface expression. The CD44−CD1a− post-committed thymocytes have initiated in frame T-cell receptor rearrangements that are accompanied by loss of capacity to differentiate toward myeloid, B- and NK-lineages, unlike uncommitted CD44dimCD1a− thymocytes. Therefore, loss of CD44 represents a previously unrecognized human thymocyte stage that defines the earliest committed T-cell population in the thymus. PMID:28163708

  3. Fluorescent Reporters for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Cheryl L.; Boles, Blaise R.; Lauderdale, Katherine J.; Thoendel, Matthew; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus as a prominent pathogen in community and healthcare settings, there is a growing need for effective reporter tools to facilitate physiology and pathogenesis studies. Fluorescent proteins are ideal as reporters for their convenience in monitoring gene expression, performing host interaction studies, and monitoring biofilm growth. We have developed a suite of fluorescent reporter plasmids for labeling S. aureus cells. These plasmids encode either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or higher wavelength reporter variants for yellow (YFP) and red (mCherry) labeling. The reporters were placed under control of characterized promoters to enable constitutive or inducible expression. Additionally, plasmids were assembled with fluorescent reporters under control of the agr quorum-sensing and Sigma factor B promoters, and the fluorescent response with wildtype and relevant mutant strains was characterized. Interestingly, reporter expression displayed a strong dependence on ribosome binding site (RBS) sequence, with the superoxide dismutase RBS displaying the strongest expression kinetics of the sequences examined. To test the robustness of the reporter plasmids, cell imaging was performed with fluorescence microscopy and cell populations were separated using florescence activated cell sorting (FACS), demonstrating the possibilities of simultaneous monitoring of multiple S. aureus properties. Finally, a constitutive YFP reporter displayed stable, robust labeling of biofilm growth in a flow cell apparatus. This toolbox of fluorescent reporter plasmids will facilitate cell labeling for a variety of different experimental applications. PMID:19264102

  4. CD34+CD38dim cells in the human thymus can differentiate into T, natural killer, and dendritic cells but are distinct from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Res, P; Martínez-Cáceres, E; Cristina Jaleco, A; Staal, F; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1996-06-15

    Recently we reported that the human thymus contains a minute population of CD34+CD38dim cells that do not express the T-cell lineage markers CD2 and CD5. The phenotype of this population resembled that of CD34+CD38dim cells present in fetal liver, umbilical cord blood, and bone marrow known to be highly enriched for pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this report we tested the hypothesis that the CD34+CD38dim thymocytes constitute the most primitive hematopoietic cells in the thymus using a combination of phenotypic and functional analyses. It was found that in contrast to CD34+CD38dim cells from fetal liver and bone marrow, CD34+CD38dim cells from the thymus express high levels of CD45RA and are negative for Thy-1. These data indicate that the CD34+CD38dim thymocytes are distinct from pluripotent stem cells. CD34+CD38dim thymocytes differentiate into T cells when cocultured with mouse fetal thymic organs. In addition, individual cells in this population can differentiate either to natural killer cells in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-7 (IL-7), and IL-2 or to dendritic cells in the presence of SCF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNFalpha), indicating that CD34+CD38dim thymocytes contain multi-potential hematopoietic progenitors. To establish which CD34+ fetal liver subpopulation contains the cells that migrate to the thymus, we investigated the T-cell-developing potential of CD34+CD38dim and CD34+CD38+ fetal liver cells and found that the capacity of CD34+ fetal liver cells to differentiate into T cells is restricted to those cells that are CD38dim. Collectively, these findings indicate that cells from the CD34+CD38dim fetal liver cell population migrate to the thymus before upregulating CD38 and committing to the T-cell lineage.

  5. Linking genomic responses of gonads with reproductive impairment in marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) exposed chronically to the chemopreventive and antifouling agent, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM).

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianguo; Au, Doris W T; Hu, Chenyan; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhou, Bingsheng; Cai, Lin; Giesy, John P; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) has been promoted as an effective chemopreventive and antifouling additive. However, the concurrent risks or side effects of DIM are not fully understood, especially on tissues responsive to estrogen. Therefore, this study employed marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) as a test model to evaluate relative safety and explore mechanisms of toxic action of DIM on development and function of gonad after chronic (28days) aqueous exposure to relatively low doses (0μg/L or 8.5μg/L). Integration of comprehensive toxicogenomic analysis at the transcriptome and proteome levels with apical endpoints, such as production of eggs and swimming performance of larvae, elucidated the molecular linkage in gonad from bottom up along the reproductive adverse outcome pathway. A series of sequential changes at the transcript and protein levels were linked to lesser fecundity and viability of larvae exposed to DIM. Anomalous production of vitellogenin (VTG) and eggshell proteins in testis confirmed the estrogenic potency of DIM. In the ovary, although storage of VTG was greater, lesser expressions of cathepsin enzymes blocked cleavage and incorporation of VTG into oocytes as yolk, which acted together with lower eggshell proteins to inhibit maturation of primary oocyte and thus contributed to impairment of fecundity. Overall, this study demonstrated that exposure to DIM impaired reproductive fitness. Diverse molecular initiating changes in gonads were linked to apical endpoints that could be used in assessment of risks posed by DIM on gametogenesis. In combination with chemical stability and potent endocrine disruption, the results of this study can inform decisions about the use of DIM either as chemopreventive or antifouling agent.

  6. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  7. Nuclear Ribosome Biogenesis Mediated by the DIM1A rRNA Dimethylase Is Required for Organized Root Growth and Epidermal Patterning in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wieckowski, Yana; Schiefelbein, John

    2012-01-01

    Position-dependent patterning of hair and non-hair cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is a powerful system to study the molecular basis of cell fate specification. Here, we report an epidermal patterning mutant affecting the ADENOSINE DIMETHYL TRANSFERASE 1A (DIM1A) rRNA dimethylase gene, predicted to participate in rRNA posttranscriptional processing and base modification. Consistent with a role in ribosome biogenesis, DIM1A is preferentially expressed in regions of rapid growth, and its product is nuclear localized with nucleolus enrichment. Furthermore, DIM1A preferentially accumulates in the developing hair cells, and the dim1A point mutant alters the cell-specific expression of the transcriptional regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE, and WEREWOLF. Together, these findings suggest that establishment of cell-specific gene expression during root epidermis development is dependent upon proper ribosome biogenesis, possibly due to the sensitivity of the cell fate decision to relatively small differences in gene regulatory activities. Consistent with its effect on the predicted S-adenosyl-l-Met binding site, dim1A plants lack the two 18S rRNA base modifications but exhibit normal pre-rRNA processing. In addition to root epidermal defects, the dim1A mutant exhibits abnormal root meristem division, leaf development, and trichome branching. Together, these findings provide new insights into the importance of rRNA base modifications and translation regulation for plant growth and development. PMID:22829145

  8. Nuclear ribosome biogenesis mediated by the DIM1A rRNA dimethylase is required for organized root growth and epidermal patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wieckowski, Yana; Schiefelbein, John

    2012-07-01

    Position-dependent patterning of hair and non-hair cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is a powerful system to study the molecular basis of cell fate specification. Here, we report an epidermal patterning mutant affecting the ADENOSINE DIMETHYL TRANSFERASE 1A (DIM1A) rRNA dimethylase gene, predicted to participate in rRNA posttranscriptional processing and base modification. Consistent with a role in ribosome biogenesis, DIM1A is preferentially expressed in regions of rapid growth, and its product is nuclear localized with nucleolus enrichment. Furthermore, DIM1A preferentially accumulates in the developing hair cells, and the dim1A point mutant alters the cell-specific expression of the transcriptional regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE, and WEREWOLF. Together, these findings suggest that establishment of cell-specific gene expression during root epidermis development is dependent upon proper ribosome biogenesis, possibly due to the sensitivity of the cell fate decision to relatively small differences in gene regulatory activities. Consistent with its effect on the predicted S-adenosyl-l-Met binding site, dim1A plants lack the two 18S rRNA base modifications but exhibit normal pre-rRNA processing. In addition to root epidermal defects, the dim1A mutant exhibits abnormal root meristem division, leaf development, and trichome branching. Together, these findings provide new insights into the importance of rRNA base modifications and translation regulation for plant growth and development.

  9. The solar dimming/brightening effect over the Mediterranean Basin in the period 1979-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambezidis, H. D.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kalliampakos, G. K.; Rashki, A.; Wild, M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface is subjected to multi-decadal variations with significant spatial and temporal heterogeneities in both magnitude and sign. Although several studies have examined the solar radiation trends over Europe, North America and Asia, the Mediterranean Basin has not been studied extensively. This work investigates the evolution and trends in the surface net short-wave radiation (NSWR, surface solar radiation - reflected) over the Mediterranean Basin during the period 1979-2012 using monthly re-analysis datasets from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and aims to shed light on the specific role of clouds on the NSWR trends. The solar dimming/brightening phenomenon is temporally and spatially analyzed over the Mediterranean Basin. The spatially-averaged NSWR over the whole Mediterranean Basin was found to increase in MERRA by +0.36 Wm-2 per decade, with higher rates over the western Mediterranean (+0.82 Wm-2 per decade), and especially during spring (March-April-May; +1.3 Wm-2 per decade). However, statistically significant trends in NSWR either for all-sky or clean-sky conditions are observed only in May. The increasing trends in NSWR are mostly associated with decreasing ones in cloud optical depth (COD), especially for the low (<700 hPa) clouds. The decreasing COD trends (less opaque clouds and/or decrease in absolute cloudiness) are more pronounced during spring, thus controlling the increasing tendency in NSWR. The NSWR trends for cloudless (clear) skies are influenced by changes in the water-vapor content or even variations in surface albedo to a lesser degree, whereas aerosols are temporally constant in MERRA. The slight negative trend (not statistically significant) in NSWR under clear skies for nearly all months and seasons implies a slight increasing trend in water vapor under a warming and more humid climatic scenario over the Mediterranean.

  10. Chronic dim light at night provokes reversible depression-like phenotype: possible role for TNF.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, T A; Weil, Z M; Nelson, R J

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades and women are twice as likely as men to develop the disorder. Recent environmental changes almost certainly have a role in this phenomenon, but a complete set of contributors remains unspecified. Exposure to artificial light at night (LAN) has surged in prevalence during the past 50 years, coinciding with rising rates of depression. Chronic exposure to LAN is linked to increased risk of breast cancer, obesity and mood disorders, although the relationship to mood is not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic exposure to 5 lux LAN on depression-like behaviors in female hamsters. Using this model, we also characterized hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and hippocampal dendritic morphology, and investigated the reversibility of these changes 1, 2 or 4 weeks following elimination of LAN. Furthermore, we explored the mechanism of action, focusing on hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines given their dual role in synaptic plasticity and the pathogenesis of depression. Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we identified a reversible increase in hippocampal tumor necrosis factor (TNF), but not interleukin-1β, mRNA expression in hamsters exposed to LAN. Direct intracerebroventricular infusion of a dominant-negative inhibitor of soluble TNF, XPro1595, prevented the development of depression-like behavior under LAN, but had no effect on dendritic spine density in the hippocampus. These results indicate a partial role for TNF in the reversible depression-like phenotype observed under chronic dim LAN. Recent environmental changes, such as LAN exposure, may warrant more attention as possible contributors to rising rates of mood disorders.

  11. Spectral Changes in Metal Halide and High-pressure Sodium Lamps Equipped with Electronic Dimming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Sargis, Raman; Wilson, David

    1995-01-01

    Electronic dimming of high-intensity discharge lamps offers control of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) but is often characterized as causing significant spectral changes. Growth chambers with 400-W metal halide (MH) and high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps were equipped with a dimmer system using silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCR) as high-speed switches. Phase control operation turned the line power off for some period of the alternating current cycle. At full power, the electrical input to HPS and MH lamps was 480 W (root mean squared) and could be decreased to 267 W and 428 W, respectively, before the arc was extinguished. Concomitant with this decrease in input power, PPF decreased by 60% in HPS and 50% in MH. The HPS lamp has characteristic spectral peaks at 589 and 595 nm. As power to the HPS lamps was decreased, the 589-nm peak remained constant while the 595-nm peak decreased, equaling the 589-nm peak at 345-W input, and the 589-nm peak was almost absent at 270-W input. The MH lamp has a broader spectral output but also has a peak at 589 nm and another smaller peak at 545 nm. As input power to the MH lamps decreased, the peak at 589 diminished to equal the 545-nm peak. As input power approached 428 W, the 589-nm peak shifted to 570 nm. While the spectrum changed as input power was decreased in the MH and HPS lamps, the phytochrome equilibrium ratio (P(sub fr):P(sub tot)) remains unchanged for both lamp types.

  12. Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Marina C; Hessels, Martijn; van de Werken, Maan; de Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G M; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2010-07-01

    The timing of work and social requirements has a negative impact on performance and well-being of a significant proportion of the population in our modern society due to a phenomenon known as social jetlag. During workdays, in the early morning, late chronotypes, in particular, suffer from a combination of a nonoptimal circadian phase and sleep deprivation. Sleep inertia, a transient period of lowered arousal after awakening, therefore, becomes more severe. In the present home study, the authors tested whether the use of an alarm clock with artificial dawn could reduce complaints of sleep inertia in people having difficulties in waking up early. The authors also examined whether these improvements were accompanied by a shift in the melatonin rhythm. Two studies were performed: Study 1: three conditions (0, 50, and 250 lux) and Study 2: two conditions (0 lux and self-selected dawn-light intensity). Each condition lasted 2 weeks. In both studies, the use of the artificial dawn resulted in a significant reduction of sleep inertia complaints. However, no significant shift in the onset of melatonin was observed after 2 weeks of using the artificial dawn of 250 lux or 50 lux compared to the control condition. A multilevel analysis revealed that only the presence of the artificial dawn, rather than shift in the dim light melatonin onset or timing of sleep offset, is related to the observed reduction of sleep inertia complaints. Mechanisms other than shift of circadian rhythms are needed to explain the positive results on sleep inertia of waking up with a dawn signal.

  13. Dimming over the oceans: mixed layer ocean experiments from 1870 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SSTs) changes are known to affect precipitation patterns. However, it is still subject to debate, whether anthropogenic aerosols are capable of affecting SSTs, which could feed back on precipitation patterns. To influence SSTs, anthropogenic aerosols need to reduce incoming surface solar radiation (SSR) through direct or indirect effects for a sufficiently long time span over a sufficiently large area. To quantify the maximum potential SST response to anthropogenic aerosol dimming over the past decades, we performed equilibrium experiments with the general circulation model, ECHAM and explicit aerosol representation (ECHAM6-HAM2.2) and a mixed-layer ocean (MLO). Every ten years, we let the system equilibrate to the conditions (aerosol and greenhouse gas burdens, GHG) of that specific year. Each experiment is conducted over 50 years, of which the first 10 years are discarded. We generated three sets of decadal equilibria covering the entire 20th century and part of the 19th century (from 1870) : One, where both GHG and anthropogenic aerosols are set to the respective decade, one where GHG levels are held constant at 1850s levels, and one where anthropogenic aerosols are held constant at 1850s levels. Deep ocean heat fluxes are prescribed based on the surface energy flux climatology derived from an atmosphere-only integration with pre-industrial (year 1850) conditions for aerosols and GHG and climatological SSTs (average of Hadley Center SSTs, observation based, over the years 1871-1900). Results of these findings will be discussed, especially the SST and precipitation responses seen in the different equilibria. Moreover, results will be put in context with transient experiments with prescribed SSTs. The presented results are part of a project aiming at quantifying the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on SSTs. The results will serve as a basis for future experiments using a dynamic ocean model to quantify the transient response of the ocean

  14. Dim light at night disrupts the short-day response in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-02-01

    Photoperiodic regulation of physiology, morphology, and behavior is crucial for many animals to survive seasonally variable conditions unfavorable for reproduction and survival. The photoperiodic response in mammals is mediated by nocturnal secretion of melatonin under the control of a circadian clock. However, artificial light at night caused by recent urbanization may disrupt the circadian clock, as well as the photoperiodic response by blunting melatonin secretion. Here we examined the effect of dim light at night (dLAN) (5lux of light during the dark phase) on locomotor activity rhythms and short-day regulation of reproduction, body mass, pelage properties, and immune responses of male Siberian hamsters. Short-day animals reduced gonadal and body mass, decreased spermatid nuclei and sperm numbers, molted to a whiter pelage, and increased pelage density compared to long-day animals. However, animals that experienced short days with dLAN did not show these short-day responses. Moreover, short-day specific immune responses were altered in dLAN conditions. The nocturnal activity pattern was blunted in dLAN hamsters, consistent with the observation that dLAN changed expression of the circadian clock gene, Period1. In addition, we demonstrated that expression levels of genes implicated in the photoperiodic response, Mel-1a melatonin receptor, Eyes absent 3, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone, were higher in dLAN animals than those in short-day animals. These results suggest that dLAN disturbs the circadian clock function and affects the molecular mechanisms of the photoperiodic response.

  15. Fluorescent probes and fluorescence (microscopy) techniques--illuminating biological and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Drummen, Gregor P C

    2012-11-28

    Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  16. Enabling immersive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Josh; Mateas, Michael; Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  17. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  18. Nano-enabled SERS reporting photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Arash; Roxin, Áron; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To impart effective cellular damage via photodynamic therapy (PDT), it is vital to deliver the appropriate light dose and photosensitizer concentration, and to monitor the PDT dose delivered at the site of interest. In vivo monitoring of photosensitizers has in large part relied on their fluorescence emission. Palladium-containing photosensitizers have shown promising clinical results by demonstrating near full conversion of light to PDT activity at the cost of having undetectable fluorescence. We demonstrate that, through the coupling of plasmonic nanoparticles with palladium-photosensitizers, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provides both reporting and monitoring capability to otherwise quiescent molecules. Nano-enabled SERS reporting of photosensitizers allows for the decoupling of the therapeutic and imaging mechanisms so that both phenomena can be optimized independently. Most importantly, the design enables the use of the same laser wavelength to stimulate both the PDT and imaging features, opening the potential for real-time dosimetry of photosensitizer concentration and PDT dose delivery by SERS monitoring.

  19. Enabling responsible public genomics.

    PubMed

    Conley, John M; Doerr, Adam K; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    As scientific understandings of genetics advance, researchers require increasingly rich datasets that combine genomic data from large numbers of individuals with medical and other personal information. Linking individuals' genetic data and personal information precludes anonymity and produces medically significant information--a result not contemplated by the established legal and ethical conventions governing human genomic research. To pursue the next generation of human genomic research and commerce in a responsible fashion, scientists, lawyers, and regulators must address substantial new issues, including researchers' duties with respect to clinically significant data, the challenges to privacy presented by genomic data, the boundary between genomic research and commerce, and the practice of medicine. This Article presents a new model for understanding and addressing these new challenges--a "public genomics" premised on the idea that ethically, legally, and socially responsible genomics research requires openness, not privacy, as its organizing principle. Responsible public genomics combines the data contributed by informed and fully consenting information altruists and the research potential of rich datasets in a genomic commons that is freely and globally available. This Article examines the risks and benefits of this public genomics model in the context of an ambitious genetic research project currently under way--the Personal Genome Project. This Article also (i) demonstrates that large-scale genomic projects are desirable, (ii) evaluates the risks and challenges presented by public genomics research, and (iii) determines that the current legal and regulatory regimes restrict beneficial and responsible scientific inquiry while failing to adequately protect participants. The Article concludes by proposing a modified normative and legal framework that embraces and enables a future of responsible public genomics.

  20. Enabling interstellar probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; International Interstellar Probe Team

    2011-04-01

    The scientific community has advocated a scientific probe to the interstellar medium for over 30 years. While the Voyager spacecraft have passed through the termination shock of the solar wind, they have limited lifetimes as their radioisotope power supplies decay. It remains unclear whether they can reach the heliopause, the boundary between shocked solar wind and interstellar plasmas, and, in any case, they will not reach the undisturbed interstellar medium. As with most exploratory space missions, their ongoing observations continue to raise even more questions about the nature of the interaction of our heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Scientific questions including: What is the nature of the nearby interstellar medium? How do the Sun and galaxy affect the dynamics of the heliosphere? What is the structure of the heliosphere? How did matter in the solar system and interstellar medium originate and evolve? can only be answered by an "interstellar precursor" probe. Such a mission is required to make in situ measurements in the interaction region and interstellar medium itself at distances far from the Sun, but in a finite mission lifetime. By launching a probe toward the incoming "interstellar wind," whose direction is known, the distance to be traveled can be minimized but is still large. The current consensus is that a scientifically compelling mission must function to at least a distance of 200 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun and return a reasonable stream of data during the voyage. The central problem is that of providing a means of propulsion to accelerate a probe from the Solar System. Even with a low-mass payload and spacecraft, achieving the high speeds needed, even with gravity assists, have remained problematic. Voyager 1, the fastest object ever to leave the system is now traveling ˜3.6 AU/yr, and a credible probe must reach at least 2-3 times this speed. The use of an Ares V is an approach for enabling a fast interstellar precursor

  1. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6

  2. Wet, Dry, Dim, or Bright? The Future of Water Resources in North Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brikowski, T. H.

    2009-12-01

    Future water resource availability in North Texas (Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex) is likely to be limited by the combined impact of decadal-scale and longer term climate changes. Two decadal precipitation anomalies are statistically distinguishable in the historical record (dry/wet, Table 1). These correspond temporally with the onset of global dimming/brightening events (hydrologic cycle retardation/acceleration) respectively (Table 1). Surface water hydrologic parameters are variably correlated with these events, depending on the degree of time-integration of each process. Precipitation correlates most strongly with the decadal anomalies. Runoff changes during these periods were magnified relative to precipitation changes, presumably an effect of soil moisture changes, and over the basin as a whole correlate best with the global events. Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) attempts to capture such effects, and also correlates most strongly with the global events. The most important time-integrators of the system, reservoirs, show mixed correlation in terms of total storage with the decadal and longer term climate periods. Reservoir flood releases (excess storage) correlate with decadal precipitation anomalies, in part reflecting short-term consumption influences. Major reservoirs in the area post-date the dry period, precluding direct evaluation of sustainability from historical records. Historical correlations versus PDSI can be combined with climate-model based PDSI projections to evaluate future sustainability. Climate projections based on a mean of 19 IPCC intermediate scenario (SRESa1b) models indicate an approximately 10% reduction in mean annual precipitation, and warming of 2oC by 2050 in this region. Steady lowering of mean annual PDSI results, with a 50% probability that annual PDSI will average -0.5 by 2050. Average climate will move from humid (Aridity Index=35) to semi-humid (AI=27), and runoff can be expected to decline accordingly. Probability of a

  3. HINODE/XRT AND STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF A DIFFUSE CORONAL 'WAVE'-CORONAL MASS EJECTION-DIMMING EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Engell, Alexander J.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J.; Grigis, Paolo; Testa, Paola

    2009-10-20

    We report on observations of the first diffuse coronal wave detected by Hinode/XRT. The event occurred near the west solar limb on 2007 May 23, originating from active region (AR) 10956 and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal dimmings. The bright emission forming the coronal wave expanded predominantly to the east and south of the AR. We use X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and STEREO Behind (B) data combined with a potential magnetic field extrapolation to derive an understanding of the global magnetic field connectivity. We attribute the brightening to the east of the AR to compression and channeling of the plasma along large-scale loops. The brightening to the south of the AR expands across the quiet Sun, making the southern component a likely candidate for identification as a diffuse coronal wave. We analyze the bright front in STEREO/EUVI (B) 171, 195, and 284 A images, as well as in XRT data, finding the strongest components to be largely cospatial in all bandpasses. We also exploit the near-limb location of this event by combining STEREO/COR1 and Extreme Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (EUVI) data. Using all the data, we derive a full picture of the low-coronal development of the eruption. The COR1 data show that the southernmost outer edge of the CME is progressively displaced southward during the expansion. EUVI data below the COR1 occulting disk show that the CME is significantly distorted in the low corona as a result of the associated filament eruption. The core coronal dimmings map to the core of the CME; the secondary coronal dimmings map to the CME cavity; and the diffuse coronal wave maps to the outermost edge of the expanding CME shell. The analysis of this near-limb event has important implications for understanding earlier eruptions originating from the same AR on 2007 May 16, 19, and 20.

  4. Beryllium increases the CD14(dim)CD16+ subset in the lung of chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Gillespie, May; Elliott, Jill; Wang, Jieru; Gottschall, Eva Brigitte; Mroz, Peggy M; Maier, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    CD14dimCD16+ and CD14brightCD16+ cells, which compose a minor population of monocytes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), have been implicated in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this phenotype was present as a subset of lung infiltrative alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the granulomatous lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The monocytes subsets was determined from PBMC cells and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from CBD, beryllium sensitized Non-smoker (BeS-NS) and healthy subjects (HS) using flow cytometry. The impact of smoking on the AMs cell phenotype was determined by using BAL cells from BeS smokers (BeS-S). In comparison with the other monocyte subpopulations, CD14dimCD16+ cells were at decreased frequency in PBMCs of both BeS-NS and CBD and showed higher HLA-DR expression, compared to HS. The AMs from CBD and BeS-NS demonstrated a CD14dimCD16+phenotype, while CD14brightCD16+ cells were found at increased frequency in AMs of BeS, compared to HS. Fresh AMs from BeS-NS and CBD demonstrated significantly greater CD16, CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR than HS and BeS-S. The expression of CD16 on AMs from both CBD and BeS-NS was downregulated significantly after 10μM BeSO4 stimulation. The phagocytic activity of AMs decreased after 10μM BeSO4 treatment in both BeS-NS and CBD, although was altered or reduced in HS and BeS-S. These results suggest that Be increases the CD14dimCD16+ subsets in the lung of CBD subjects. We speculate that Be-stimulates the compartmentalization of a more mature CD16+ macrophage phenotype and that in turn these macrophages are a source of Th1 cytokines and chemokines that perpetuate the Be immune response in CBD. The protective effect of cigarette smoking in BeS-S may be due to the low expression of co-stimulatory markers on AMs from smokers as well as the decreased phagocytic function.

  5. Editorial: 3DIM-DS 2015: Optical image processing in the context of 3D imaging, metrology, and data security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfalou, Ayman

    2017-02-01

    Following the first International Symposium on 3D Imaging, Metrology, and Data Security (3DIM-DS) held in Shenzhen during september 2015, this special issue gathers a series of articles dealing with the main topics discussed during this symposium. These topics highlighted the importance of studying complex data treatment systems and intensive calculations designed for high dimensional imaging and metrology for which high image quality and high transmission speed become critical issues in a number of technological applications. A second purpose was to celebrate the International Year of Light by emphasizing the important role of optics in actual information processing systems.

  6. Research on infrared dim-point target detection and tracking under sea-sky-line complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu-xing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Hai-bo

    2011-08-01

    Target detection and tracking technology in infrared image is an important part of modern military defense system. Infrared dim-point targets detection and recognition under complex background is a difficulty and important strategic value and challenging research topic. The main objects that carrier-borne infrared vigilance system detected are sea-skimming aircrafts and missiles. Due to the characteristics of wide field of view of vigilance system, the target is usually under the sea clutter. Detection and recognition of the target will be taken great difficulties .There are some traditional point target detection algorithms, such as adaptive background prediction detecting method. When background has dispersion-decreasing structure, the traditional target detection algorithms would be more useful. But when the background has large gray gradient, such as sea-sky-line, sea waves etc .The bigger false-alarm rate will be taken in these local area .It could not obtain satisfactory results. Because dim-point target itself does not have obvious geometry or texture feature ,in our opinion , from the perspective of mathematics, the detection of dim-point targets in image is about singular function analysis .And from the perspective image processing analysis , the judgment of isolated singularity in the image is key problem. The foregoing points for dim-point targets detection, its essence is a separation of target and background of different singularity characteristics .The image from infrared sensor usually accompanied by different kinds of noise. These external noises could be caused by the complicated background or from the sensor itself. The noise might affect target detection and tracking. Therefore, the purpose of the image preprocessing is to reduce the effects from noise, also to raise the SNR of image, and to increase the contrast of target and background. According to the low sea-skimming infrared flying small target characteristics , the median filter is used to

  7. Gr-1dimCD11b+ immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells but not neutrophils are markers of lethal tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsiganov, Evgeny N; Verbina, Elena M; Radaeva, Tatiana V; Sosunov, Vasily V; Kosmiadi, George A; Nikitina, Irina Yu; Lyadova, Irina V

    2014-05-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) disease may progress at different rates and have different outcomes. Neutrophils have been implicated in TB progression; however, data on their role during TB are controversial. In this study, we show that in mice, TB progression is associated with the accumulation of cells that express neutrophilic markers Gr-1 and Ly-6G but do not belong to conventional neutrophils. The cells exhibit unsegmented nuclei, have Gr-1(dim)Ly-6G(dim)CD11b(+) phenotype, and express F4/80, CD49d, Ly-6C, CD117, and CD135 markers characteristic not of neutrophils but of immature myeloid cells. The cells accumulate in the lungs, bone marrow, spleen, and blood at the advanced (prelethal) stage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and represent a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells at different stages of their differentiation. The accumulation of Gr-1(dim)CD11b(+) cells is accompanied by the disappearance of conventional neutrophils (Gr-1(hi)Ly-6G(hi)-expressing cells). The Gr-1(dim)CD11b(+) cells suppress T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production in vitro via NO-dependent mechanisms, that is, they exhibit characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These results document the generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells during TB, suggesting their role in TB pathogenesis, and arguing that neutrophils do not contribute to TB pathology at the advanced disease stage.

  8. Comparative system identification of flower tracking performance in three hawkmoth species reveals adaptations for dim light vision.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Anna L; Kihlström, Klara; Chandler, Steven; Sponberg, Simon

    2017-04-05

    Flight control in insects is heavily dependent on vision. Thus, in dim light, the decreased reliability of visual signal detection also prompts consequences for insect flight. We have an emerging understanding of the neural mechanisms that different species employ to adapt the visual system to low light. However, much less explored are comparative analyses of how low light affects the flight behaviour of insect species, and the corresponding links between physiological adaptations and behaviour. We investigated whether the flower tracking behaviour of three hawkmoth species with different diel activity patterns revealed luminance-dependent adaptations, using a system identification approach. We found clear luminance-dependent differences in flower tracking in all three species, which were explained by a simple luminance-dependent delay model, which generalized across species. We discuss physiological and anatomical explanations for the variance in tracking responses, which could not be explained by such simple models. Differences between species could not be explained by the simple delay model. However, in several cases, they could be explained through the addition on a second model parameter, a simple scaling term, that captures the responsiveness of each species to flower movements. Thus, we demonstrate here that much of the variance in the luminance-dependent flower tracking responses of hawkmoths with different diel activity patterns can be captured by simple models of neural processing.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  9. A real-time tracking system of infrared dim and small target based on FPGA and DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Sheng-hui; Zhou, Hui-xin; Qin, Han-lin; Wang, Bing-jian; Qian, Kun

    2014-11-01

    A core technology in the infrared warning system is the detection tracking of dim and small targets with complicated background. Consequently, running the detection algorithm on the hardware platform has highly practical value in the military field. In this paper, a real-time detection tracking system of infrared dim and small target which is used FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) and DSP (Digital Signal Processor) as the core was designed and the corresponding detection tracking algorithm and the signal flow is elaborated. At the first stage, the FPGA obtain the infrared image sequence from the sensor, then it suppresses background clutter by mathematical morphology method and enhances the target intensity by Laplacian of Gaussian operator. At the second stage, the DSP obtain both the original image and the filtered image form the FPGA via the video port. Then it segments the target from the filtered image by an adaptive threshold segmentation method and gets rid of false target by pipeline filter. Experimental results show that our system can achieve higher detection rate and lower false alarm rate.

  10. CALiPER Report 20.2: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-31

    This report focuses on the flicker and power quality performance of the Series 20 lamps at full output and various dimmed levels. All of the Series 20 PAR38 lamps that manufacturers claimed to be dimmable (including all halogen lamps) were evaluated individually (one lamp at a time) both on a switch and under the control of a phase-cut dimmer designed for use with "all classes of bulbs." Measurements of luminous flux, flicker, and power quality were taken at 10 target dimmed settings and compared with operation on a switch. Because only a single unit of each product was evaluated on a single dimmer that may or may not have been recommended by its manufacturer, this report focuses on the performance of the products relative to each other, rather than the best-case performance of each lamp or variation in performance delivered from each lamp. Despite these limitations, the results suggest that LED performance is improving, and performance trends are beginning to emerge, perhaps due in part to the identification of preferred LED driver strategies for lamp products.

  11. Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Maurya, Santosh K; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) (∼ 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to "internal desynchrony" between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.

  12. A Global Model Simulation of Aerosol Effects of Surface Radiation Budget- Toward Understanding of the "Dimming to Brightening" Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Yu, Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study on the role aerosols play in the change of solar radiation at Earth's surface that transitioned from a decreasing (dimming) trend to an increasing (brightening) trend. Our primary objective is to understand the relationship between the long-term trends of aerosol emission, atmospheric burden, and surface solar radiation. More specifically, we use the recently compiled comprehensive global emission datasets of aerosols and precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions and other sources from 1980 to 2006 to simulate long-term variations of aerosol distributions and optical properties, and then calculate the multi-decadal changes of short-wave radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere by coupling the GOCART model simulated aerosols with the Goddard radiative transfer model. The model results are compared with long-term observational records from ground-based networks and satellite data. We will address the following critical questions: To what extent can the observed surface solar radiation trends, known as the transition from dimming to brightening, be explained by the changes of anthropogenic and natural aerosol loading on global and regional scales? What are the relative contributions of local emission and long-range transport to the surface radiation budget and how do these contributions change with time?

  13. Direct aerosol effects during periods of solar dimming and brightening hidden in the regression residuals: Evidence from Potsdam measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tobias; Wechsung, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A recent empirical study of Stanhill et al. (2014), which was based on the Angstrom-Prescott relationship between global radiation and sunshine duration, was evaluated. The parameters of this relationship seemed to be rather stable across the dimming and brightening periods. Thus, the authors concluded that the variation in global radiation is more influenced by changes in cloud cover and sunshine duration than by the direct aerosol effects. In our study, done for the Potsdam station (one of six globally distributed stations, the source of one of the longest observational records and closely located to former hot spots of aerosol emission), we tested and rejected the hypothesis that the dimming of global radiation directly caused by aerosols is negligible. The residuals of the Angstrom-Prescott regression reveal a statistically significant positive temporal trend and a temporal level segmentation. The latter was consistent with the temporal emission patterns around Potsdam. The trend in the residuals only disappeared when the model intercept varied according to the temporal level segmentation. The magnitude of the direct aerosol effect on the level changes in global radiation derived from the modified Angstrom-Prescott relationship was in the range indicated in previous studies. Thus, from here, a specific request cannot be made for a revision of current climate models state-of-the-art representation of both the cooling effect directly caused by aerosols and the temperature sensitivity to the increase of greenhouse gases.

  14. Bright versus dim ambient light affects subjective well-being but not serotonin-related biological factors.

    PubMed

    Stemer, Bettina; Melmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Dietmar; Ebenbichler, Christoph; Kemmler, Georg; Deisenhammer, Eberhard A

    2015-10-30

    Light falling on the retina is converted into an electrical signal which stimulates serotonin synthesis. Previous studies described an increase of plasma and CNS serotonin levels after bright light exposure. Ghrelin and leptin are peptide hormones which are involved in the regulation of hunger/satiety and are related to serotonin. Neopterin and kynurenine are immunological markers which are also linked to serotonin biosynthesis. In this study, 29 healthy male volunteers were exposed to bright (5000lx) and dim (50lx) light conditions for 120min in a cross-over manner. Subjective well-being and hunger as well as various serotonin associated plasma factors were assessed before and after light exposure. Subjective well-being showed a small increase under bright light and a small decrease under dim light, resulting in a significant interaction between light condition and time. Ghrelin concentrations increased significantly under both light conditions, but there was no interaction between light and time. Correspondingly, leptin decreased significantly under both light conditions. Hunger increased significantly with no light-time interaction. We also found a significant decrease of neopterin, tryptophan and tyrosine levels, but no interaction between light and time. In conclusion, ambient light was affecting subjective well-being rather than serotonin associated biological factors.

  15. Boolean map saliency combined with motion feature used for dim and small target detection in infrared video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Zhenming; Zhang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Infrared dim and small target detection plays an important role in infrared search and tracking systems. In this paper, a novel infrared dim and small target detection method based on Boolean map saliency and motion feature is proposed. Infrared targets are the most salient parts in images, with high gray level and continuous moving trajectory. Utilizing this property, we build a feature space containing gray level feature and motion feature. The gray level feature is the intensity of input images, while the motion feature is obtained by motion charge in consecutive frames. In the second step, the Boolean map saliency approach is implemented on the gray level feature and motion feature to obtain the gray saliency map and motion saliency map. In the third step, two saliency maps are combined together to get the final result. Numerical experiments have verified the effectiveness of the proposed method. The final detection result can not only get an accurate detection result, but also with fewer false alarms, which is suitable for practical use.

  16. Standardizing intensive care device data to enable secondary usages.

    PubMed

    Ingenerf, Josef; Kock, Ann-Kristin; Poelker, Marcel; Seidl, Konrad; Zeplin, Georg; Mersmann, Stefan; Handels, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    To represent medical device observations in a format that is consumable by clinical software, standards like HL7v3 and ISO/IEEE 11073 should be used jointly. This is demonstrated in a project with Dräger Medical GmbH focusing on their Patient Data Management System (PDMS) in intensive care, called Integrated Care Manager (ICM). Patient and device data of interest should be mapped to suitable formats to enable data exchange and decision support. Instead of mapping device data to target formats bilaterally we use a generic HL7v3 Refined Message Information Model (RMIM) with device specific parts adapted to ISO/IEEE 11073 DIM. The generality of the underlying model (based on Yuksel et al. [1]) allows the flexible inclusion of IEEE 11073 conformant device models of interest on the one hand and the generation of needed artifacts for secondary usages on the other hand, e.g. HL7 V2 messages, HL7 CDA documents like the Personal Health Monitoring Report (PHMR) or web services. Hence, once the medical device data are obtained in the RMIM format, it can quite easily be transformed into HL7-based standard interfaces through XSL transformations because these interfaces all have their building blocks from the same RIM. From there data can be accessed uniformly, e.g. as needed by Dräger´s decision support system SmartCare [2] for automated control and optimization of weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  17. Night vision by cuttlefish enables changeable camouflage.

    PubMed

    Allen, Justine J; Mäthger, Lydia M; Buresch, Kendra C; Fetchko, Thomas; Gardner, Meg; Hanlon, Roger T

    2010-12-01

    Because visual predation occurs day and night, many predators must have good night vision. Prey therefore exhibit antipredator behaviours in very dim light. In the field, the giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) assumes camouflaged body patterns at night, each tailored to its immediate environment. However, the question of whether cuttlefish have the perceptual capability to change their camouflage at night (as they do in day) has not been addressed. In this study, we: (1) monitored the camouflage patterns of Sepia officinalis during the transition from daytime to night-time using a natural daylight cycle and (2) tested whether cuttlefish on a particular artificial substrate change their camouflage body patterns when the substrate is changed under dim light (down to starlight, 0.003 lux) in a controlled light field in a dark room setting. We found that cuttlefish camouflage patterns are indeed adaptable at night: animals responded to a change in their visual environment with the appropriate body pattern change. Whether to deceive their prey or predators, cuttlefish use their excellent night vision to perform adaptive camouflage in dim light.

  18. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    van der Tol, C; Berry, J A; Campbell, P K E; Rascher, U

    2014-01-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions. Key Points Light saturation of photosynthesis determines quenching of leaf fluorescence We incorporated steady state leaf fluorescence in a photosynthesis model PMID:27398266

  20. New detection algorithm for dim point moving target in IR-image sequence based on an image frames transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M. A.; Li, Hongzuo

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we follow the concept of the track before detect (TBD) category in order to perform a simple, fast and adaptive detection and tracking processes of dim pixel size moving targets in IR images sequence. We present two new algorithms based on an image frames transformation, the first algorithm is a recursive algorithm to measure the image background Baseline which help in assigning an adaptive threshold, while the second is an adaptive recursive statistical spatio-temporal algorithm for detecting and tracking the target. The results of applying the proposed algorithms on a set of frames having a simple single pixel target performing a linear motion shows a high efficiency and validity in the detecting of the motion, and the measurement of the background baseline.

  1. Self-Consistent Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of a Coronal Mass Ejection, Coronal Dimming, and a Giant Cusp-shaped Arcade Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Chen, P. F.; Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Sakajiri, Takuma; Shibata, Kazunari

    2005-11-01

    We performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated giant arcade formations, and the results suggest new interpretations of observations of CMEs. We performed two cases of the simulation: with and without heat conduction. Comparing between the results of the two cases, we found that the reconnection rate in the conductive case is a little higher than that in the adiabatic case and that the temperature of the loop top is consistent with the theoretical value predicted by the Yokoyama-Shibata scaling law. The dynamical properties such as velocity and magnetic field are similar in the two cases, whereas thermal properties such as temperature and density are very different. In both cases, slow shocks associated with magnetic reconnection propagate from the reconnection region along the magnetic field lines around the flux rope, and the shock fronts form spiral patterns. Just outside the slow shocks, the plasma density decreases greatly. The soft X-ray images synthesized from the numerical results are compared with the soft X-ray images of a giant arcade observed with the Soft X-Ray Telescope aboard Yohkoh; it is confirmed that the effect of heat conduction is significant for the detailed comparison between simulation and observation. The comparison between synthesized and observed soft X-ray images provides new interpretations of various features associated with CMEs and giant arcades. (1) It is likely that the Y-shaped ejecting structure, observed in the giant arcade on 1992 January 24, corresponds to slow and fast shocks associated with magnetic reconnection. (2) Soft X-ray twin dimming corresponds to the rarefaction induced by reconnection. (3) The inner boundary of the dimming region corresponds to the slow shocks. (4) The ``three-part structure'' of a CME can be explained by our numerical results. (5) The numerical results also suggest that a backbone feature of a flare/giant arcade may correspond to the fast shock formed

  2. Prediction of melatonin efficacy by pretreatment dim light melatonin onset in children with idiopathic chronic sleep onset insomnia.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Smits, Marcel G; van Someren, Eus J W; Boudewijn Gunning, W

    2005-06-01

    Research has shown efficacy of melatonin treatment to advance sleep-wake rhythms in insomnia. In healthy adults, direction and magnitude of the phase shift depends on the timing of administration relative to the phase position of the circadian system. Therefore, in the present study we investigated whether in children with chronic sleep onset insomnia (SOI) efficacy of melatonin treatment in the early evening could be predicted from dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), a phase marker of the circadian system. We combined data of two previously published double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in 110 participants, aged 6-12 years. Sleep was actigraphically estimated, and saliva collected, at baseline and in the third week of a 4-week treatment period with 5 mg melatonin or placebo at 18:00 or 19:00 hours. Primary outcome measures were pre- to post-treatment changes in dim light melatonin onset (DeltaDLMO), sleep onset (DeltaSO), sleep latency (DeltaSL), and total sleep duration (DeltaTSD). Melatonin advanced DLMO with +1:12 h (P < 0.001), SO with +0:42 h (P = 0.004), SL decreased with 25 min (P = 0.019), and TSD did not change significantly, as compared with placebo. In the melatonin-treated group, but not in the placebo-treated group, pretreatment DLMO was significantly related to DeltaDLMO [F(1, 29) = 7.28, P = 0.012] and DeltaSO [F(1, 25) = 7.72, P = 0.010]. The time interval between treatment administration and pretreatment DLMO (INT) was only significantly related to DeltaSO [F(1,26) = 5.40, P = 0.028]. The results suggest that in children with SOI, the efficacy of early evening melatonin to advance sleep onset and endogenous melatonin onset increases the later the pretreatment DLMO is.

  3. Transient anhedonia phenotype and altered circadian timing of behaviour during night-time dim light exposure in Per3−/− mice, but not wildtype mice

    PubMed Central

    Martynhak, Bruno Jacson; Hogben, Alexandra L.; Zanos, Panos; Georgiou, Polymnia; Andreatini, Roberto; Kitchen, Ian; Archer, Simon N.; von Schantz, Malcolm; Bailey, Alexis; van der Veen, Daan R.

    2017-01-01

    Industrialisation greatly increased human night-time exposure to artificial light, which in animal models is a known cause of depressive phenotypes. Whilst many of these phenotypes are ‘direct’ effects of light on affect, an ‘indirect’ pathway via altered sleep-wake timing has been suggested. We have previously shown that the Period3 gene, which forms part of the biological clock, is associated with altered sleep-wake patterns in response to light. Here, we show that both wild-type and Per3−/− mice showed elevated levels of circulating corticosterone and increased hippocampal Bdnf expression after 3 weeks of exposure to dim light at night, but only mice deficient for the PERIOD3 protein (Per3−/−) exhibited a transient anhedonia-like phenotype, observed as reduced sucrose preference, in weeks 2–3 of dim light at night, whereas WT mice did not. Per3−/− mice also exhibited a significantly smaller delay in behavioural timing than WT mice during weeks 1, 2 and 4 of dim light at night exposure. When treated with imipramine, neither Per3−/− nor WT mice exhibited an anhedonia-like phenotype, and neither genotypes exhibited a delay in behavioural timing in responses to dLAN. While the association between both Per3−/− phenotypes remains unclear, both are alleviated by imipramine treatment during dim night-time light. PMID:28071711

  4. Revisiting human natural killer cell subset function revealed cytolytic CD56dimCD16+ NK cells as rapid producers of abundant IFN-γ on activation

    PubMed Central

    De Maria, Andrea; Bozzano, Federica; Cantoni, Claudia; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    The two major functions of human natural killer (NK) cells are conventionally associated with distinct cell subsets. Thus, cytolytic activity is mostly confined to the CD56dimCD16+ subset, whereas cytokine production is generally assigned to CD56brightCD16+/− cells. In this study, we reevaluated the functional capabilities of these NK subsets with regard to the production of IFN-γ at different time points after cell triggering via NKp46 and NKp30 activating receptors. Different from previous studies, cytokine production was also assessed at early intervals. We show that CD56dim NK cells produce IFN-γ already at 2 to 4 h, whereas no cytokine production is detected beyond 16 h. In contrast, CD56bright cells release IFN-γ only at late time intervals (>16 h after stimulation). The rapid IFN-γ production by CD56dim NK cells is in line with the presence of IFN-γ mRNA in freshly isolated cells. Rapid IFN-γ production was also induced by combinations of IL-2, IL-12, and IL-15. Our data indicate that not only cytolytic activity but also early IFN-γ production is a functional property of CD56dim NK cells. Thus, this subset can assure a rapid and comprehensive NK cell intervention during the early phases of innate responses. PMID:21187373

  5. Identification of blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58, blaDIM-1 and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in hospital enterobacteriaceae isolates from Sierra Leone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the results of a molecular epidemiological survey of 15 carbapenemase-encoding genes from a recent collection of clinical isolates. The most salient findings revealed that (i) 60% of the isolates harbored multiple carbapenemase genes, (ii) the blaDIM-1 gene that has only been reported in...

  6. Objective measures of sleep and dim light melatonin onset in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Saxvig, Ingvild W; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Pallesen, Ståle; Vedaa, Oystein; Nordhus, Inger H; Sørensen, Eli; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2013-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder is characterized by a delay in the timing of the major sleep period relative to conventional norms. The sleep period itself has traditionally been described as normal. Nevertheless, it is possible that sleep regulatory mechanism disturbances associated with the disorder may affect sleep duration and/or architecture. Polysomnographic data that may shed light on the issue are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine polysomnographic measures of sleep in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder, and to compare findings to that of healthy controls. A second aim was to estimate dim light melatonin onset as a marker of circadian rhythm and to investigate the phase angle relationship (time interval) between dim light melatonin onset and the sleep period. Data from 54 adolescents and young adults were analysed, 35 diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder and 19 healthy controls. Results show delayed timing of sleep in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but once sleep was initiated no group differences in sleep parameters were observed. Dim light melatonin onset was delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but no difference in phase angle was observed between the groups. In conclusion, both sleep and dim light melatonin onset were delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder. The sleep period appeared to occur at the same circadian phase in both groups, and once sleep was initiated no differences in sleep parameters were observed.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HVAC SYSTEMS: TRI-DIM FILTER CORP. PREDATOR II MODEL 8VADTP123C23

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Predator II, Model 8VADTP123C23CC000 air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Tri-Dim Filter Corporation. The pressure drop across the filter was 138 Pa clean and...

  8. Enabling Space Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, William J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation on enabling space science and exploration covers the following topics: 1) Today s Deep Space Network; 2) Next Generation Deep Space Network; 3) Needed technologies; 4) Mission IT and networking; and 5) Multi-mission operations.

  9. Empowering versus Enabling in Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Karen; Shanta, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Enabling behaviors that encourage dependence should be avoided by nursing faculty. An empowerment model that includes collegiality, communication, accountability, and autonomy is more suited to the professional preparation of nurses. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  10. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  11. Modulated Chlorophyll "a" Fluorescence: A Tool for Teaching Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques da Silva, Jorge; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela; Padua, Mario

    2007-01-01

    "In vivo" chlorophyll "a" fluorescence is a key technique in photosynthesis research. The recent release of a low cost, commercial, modulated fluorometer enables this powerful technology to be used in education. Modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence measurement "in vivo" is here proposed as a tool to demonstrate basic…

  12. Reactive Fluorescent Dyes For Urethane Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Molecules of fluorescent dyes chemically bound in urethane conformal-coating materials to enable nondestructive detection of flaws in coats through inspection under ultraviolet light, according to proposal. Dye-bonding technique prevents outgassing of dyes, making coating materials suitable for use where flaw-free coats must be assured in instrumentation or other applications in which contamination by outgassing must be minimized.

  13. Wavefront shaping for single fiber fluorescence endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M.; Piestun, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in wavefront control, spatial light modulators, and computational power enable the use of a single multimode fiber as a fluorescence scanning microscope. We explore multimode fibers with different characteristics (diameter, index profile, etc.) and compare their performance regarding robustness against external perturbations and quality of the scanning focus.

  14. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Thomas A.; Bunel, Florestan; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT)] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples. PMID:24709799

  15. The molecular origin and evolution of dim-light vision in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bickelmann, Constanze; Morrow, James M; Du, Jing; Schott, Ryan K; van Hazel, Ilke; Lim, Steve; Müller, Johannes; Chang, Belinda S W

    2015-11-01

    The nocturnal origin of mammals is a longstanding hypothesis that is considered instrumental for the evolution of endothermy, a potential key innovation in this successful clade. This hypothesis is primarily based on indirect anatomical inference from fossils. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of rhodopsin--the vertebrate visual pigment mediating the first step in phototransduction at low-light levels--via codon-based model tests for selection, combined with gene resurrection methods that allow for the study of ancient proteins. Rhodopsin coding sequences were reconstructed for three key nodes: Amniota, Mammalia, and Theria. When expressed in vitro, all sequences generated stable visual pigments with λMAX values similar to the well-studied bovine rhodopsin. Retinal release rates of mammalian and therian ancestral rhodopsins, measured via fluorescence spectroscopy, were significantly slower than those of the amniote ancestor, indicating altered molecular function possibly related to nocturnality. Positive selection along the therian branch suggests adaptive evolution in rhodopsin concurrent with therian ecological diversification events during the Mesozoic that allowed for an exploration of the environment at varying light levels.

  16. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  17. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    PubMed

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.

  18. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particle, and the extent of quenching varied with the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of FP as well as with the configuration of surface attachment. Since this study demonstrates that biological fluorophores can be selectively incorporated into and optically coupled with nanoparticle-based devices, applications in DNA-based nanofabrication can be foreseen.

  19. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  20. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  1. Secure Enclaves-Enabled Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-25

    solution. Recommendations There is the potential to exploit extremely lucrative opportunities utilizing our first- mover advantage in this...emerging market segment. However, there is still significant work to be completed. The SE Enabled browser extension application is still in the early

  2. Dust Impact Monitor (SESAME-DIM) on board Rosetta/Philae: Millimetric particle flux at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Attila; Albin, Thomas; Apáthy, István; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Flandes, Alberto; Loose, Alexander; Péter, Attila; Seidensticker, Klaus J.; Krüger, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Context. The Philae lander of the Rosetta mission, aimed at the in situ investigation of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, was deployed to the surface of the comet nucleus on 12 November 2014 at 2.99 AU heliocentric distance. The Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) as part of the Surface Electric Sounding and Acoustic Monitoring Experiment (SESAME) on the lander employed piezoelectric detectors to detect the submillimetre- and millimetre-sized dust and ice particles emitted from the nucleus. Aims: We determine the upper limit of the ambient flux of particles in the measurement range of DIM based on the measurements performed with the instrument during Philae's descent to its nominal landing site Agilkia at distances of about 22 km, 18 km, and 5 km from the nucleus barycentre and at the final landing site Abydos. Methods: The geometric factor of the DIM sensor was calculated assuming an isotropic ambient flux of the submillimetre- and millimetre-sized particles. For the measurement intervals when no particles were detected the maximum true impact rate was calculated by assuming Poisson distribution of the impacts, and it was given as the detection limit at a 95% confidence level. The shading by the comet environment at Abydos was estimated by simulating the pattern of illumination on Philae and consequently the topography around the lander. Results: Based on measurements performed with DIM, the upper limit of the flux of particles in the measurement range of the instrument was of the order of 10-8-10-7 m-2 s-1 sr-1 during descent. The upper limit of the ambient flux of the submillimetre- and millimetre-sized dust and ice particles at Abydos was estimated to be 1.6 × 10-9 m-2 s-1 sr-1 on 13 and 14 November 2014. A correction factor of roughly 1/3 for the field of view of the sensors was calculated based on an analysis of the pattern of illumination on Philae. Conclusions: Considering particle speeds below escape velocity, the upper limit for the volume density of particles in

  3. Social and emotional loneliness and self-reported difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) in a sample of Norwegian university students.

    PubMed

    Hayley, Amie C; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Sivertsen, Børge; Knapstad, Marit; Øverland, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Social and emotional loneliness negatively impact several areas of health, including sleep. However, few comprehensive population-based studies have evaluated this relationship. Over 12,000 students aged 21-35 years who participated in the student survey for higher education in Norway (the SHoT study) were assessed. Loneliness was assessed using the Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale. Difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) was assessed by a single-item subjective response on the depression scale of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25). Social loneliness was associated with more serious DIMS (unadjusted proportional odds-ratio [OR] = 2.69, 95% CI = 2.46-2.95). This association was attenuated following adjustment for anxiety (adjusted OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.75-2.10) and depression (adjusted OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.34-1.63), however was not substantially altered when all demographics and psychological distress were accounted for (fully adjusted OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.30-1.63). Emotional loneliness was also associated with more serious DIMS (unadjusted proportional OR = 2.33, 95% CI = 2.12-2.57). Adjustment for anxiety (adjusted OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.78-2.15) and depression (adjusted OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48-1.80) attenuated, but did not extinguish this relationship in the fully adjusted model (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.09-1.31). Mediation analyses revealed that the social loneliness-DIMS association was fully attributed to psychological distress, while the emotional loneliness-DIMS association was only partially mediated, and a direct association was still observed. Associations between social and emotional loneliness and subjective DIMS were embedded in a larger pattern of psychological distress. Mitigating underlying feelings of loneliness may reduce potentially deleterious effects on sleep health and psychological wellbeing in young adults.

  4. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  6. New surface solar radiation and evaporation datasets in Spain: in search of a better understating of the dimming/brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; Calbó, J.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    Previous research on the dimming/brightening phenomena in Spain has been limited to the analysis of the long-term series of sunshine duration (Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2007) and cloud cover observations (Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2009). This work describes the development of a new dataset of surface radiation in Spain based on the 16 longest daily series provided by the Spanish Meteorology Agency, with the first series starting in the early 1970s, and providing global, diffuse and direct radiation. For the Madrid station an additional effort has been made to digitalize monthly records of global radiation since 1958, which provide the longest series available in Spain up to the present. The results of a temporal analysis of this dataset show an overall agreement with the trends observed using sunshine duration series, confirming the suitability of this latter variable to estimate surface radiation on decadal time scales. The important role of surface solar radiation to drive evaporation is well known, and consequently an agreement between the dimming/brightening phases and the trends in potential evaporation has been observed worldwide (Wild, 2009). Therefore, a dataset consisting of monthly series of potential evaporation has been generated by using records from tanks and Piche atmometers. The pan evaporation data consist of 13 series with records since 1981, meanwhile for Piche measurements there are around 100 series with more than 60 years of data, some of them starting in the beginning of the 20th century. The results show a decrease in pan evaporation (1981-2010 period) that cannot be explained by the observed increase in solar radiation, but may be linked to a decrease in the wind speed. On the other hand, evaporation trends estimated by the Piche evaporimeter provide a better agreement with solar radiation and sunshine time trends. This relationship needs special attention, as Piche evaporimeter is exposed inside a meteorological screen, especially regarding

  7. Pulsed-light imaging for fluorescence guided surgery under normal room lighting.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Kristian; Davis, Scott C; McClatchy, David; Valdes, Pablo A; Kanick, Stephen C; Paulsen, Keith D; Roberts, David W; Pogue, Brian W

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescence guided surgery (FGS) is an emerging technology that has demonstrated improved surgical outcomes. However, dim lighting conditions required by current FGS systems are disruptive to standard surgical workflow. We present a novel FGS system capable of imaging fluorescence under normal room light by using pulsed excitation and gated acquisition. Images from tissue-simulating phantoms confirm visual detection down to 0.25 μM of protoporphyrin IX under 125 μW/cm2 of ambient light, more than an order of magnitude lower than that measured with the Zeiss Pentero in the dark. Resection of orthotopic brain tumors in mice also suggests that the pulsed-light system provides superior sensitivity in vivo.

  8. Two-step phase-shifting fluorescence incoherent holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Yao, Hai; Qu, Xinghua; Gao, Bruce Z

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence holographic microscope (FINCHSCOPE) is a motionless fluorescence holographic imaging technique based on Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) that shows promise in reconstructing three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens with three holograms. We report a developing two-step phase-shifting method that reduces the required number of holograms from three to two. Using this method, we resolved microscopic fluorescent beads that were three-dimensionally distributed at different depths with two interferograms captured by a CCD camera. The method enables the FINCHSCOPE to work in conjunction with the frame-straddling technique and significantly enhance imaging speed.

  9. Screening fluorescent voltage indicators with spontaneously spiking HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeehae; Werley, Christopher A; Venkatachalam, Veena; Kralj, Joel M; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Development of improved fluorescent voltage indicators is a key challenge in neuroscience, but progress has been hampered by the low throughput of patch-clamp characterization. We introduce a line of non-fluorescent HEK cells that stably express NaV 1.3 and KIR 2.1 and generate spontaneous electrical action potentials. These cells enable rapid, electrode-free screening of speed and sensitivity of voltage sensitive dyes or fluorescent proteins on a standard fluorescence microscope. We screened a small library of mutants of archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) in spiking HEK cells and identified two mutants with greater voltage-sensitivity than found in previously published Arch voltage indicators.

  10. Two-step phase-shifting fluorescence incoherent holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Yao, Hai; Qu, Xinghua; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence holographic microscope (FINCHSCOPE) is a motionless fluorescence holographic imaging technique based on Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) that shows promise in reconstructing three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens with three holograms. We report a developing two-step phase-shifting method that reduces the required number of holograms from three to two. Using this method, we resolved microscopic fluorescent beads that were three-dimensionally distributed at different depths with two interferograms captured by a CCD camera. The method enables the FINCHSCOPE to work in conjunction with the frame-straddling technique and significantly enhance imaging speed. PMID:24972355

  11. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  12. Exogenous Attention Enables Perceptual Learning.

    PubMed

    Szpiro, Sarit F A; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-12-01

    Practice can improve visual perception, and these improvements are considered to be a form of brain plasticity. Training-induced learning is time-consuming and requires hundreds of trials across multiple days. The process of learning acquisition is understudied. Can learning acquisition be potentiated by manipulating visual attentional cues? We developed a protocol in which we used task-irrelevant cues for between-groups manipulation of attention during training. We found that training with exogenous attention can enable the acquisition of learning. Remarkably, this learning was maintained even when observers were subsequently tested under neutral conditions, which indicates that a change in perception was involved. Our study is the first to isolate the effects of exogenous attention and to demonstrate its efficacy to enable learning. We propose that exogenous attention boosts perceptual learning by enhancing stimulus encoding.

  13. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  14. Technologies for Networked Enabled Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B.; Levine, J.

    2005-01-01

    Current point-to-point data links will not scale to support future integration of surveillance, security, and globally-distributed air traffic data, and already hinders efficiency and capacity. While the FAA and industry focus on a transition to initial system-wide information management (SWIM) capabilities, this paper describes a set of initial studies of NAS network-enabled operations technology gaps targeted for maturity in later SWIM spirals (201 5-2020 timeframe).

  15. Nanofluidics: enabling processes for biotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmanella, Umberto; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2001-10-01

    The advance of micro and nanodevice manufacturing technology enables us to carry out biological and chemical processes in a more efficient manner. In fact, fluidic processes connect the macro and the micro/nano worlds. For devices approaching the size of the fluid molecules, many physical phenomena occur that are not observed in macro flows. In this brief review, we discuss a few selected topics which of are interest for basic research and are important for applications in biotechnology.

  16. Divergence of dim-light vision among bats (order: Chiroptera) as estimated by molecular and electrophysiological methods

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He-Qun; Wei, Jing-Kuan; Li, Bo; Wang, Ming-Shan; Wu, Rui-Qi; Rizak, Joshua D.; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Xu, Fu-Qiang; Shen, Yong-Yi; Hu, Xin-Tian; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Dim-light vision is present in all bats, but is divergent among species. Old-World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) have fully developed eyes; the eyes of insectivorous bats are generally degraded, and these bats rely on well-developed echolocation. An exception is the Emballonuridae, which are capable of laryngeal echolocation but prefer to use vision for navigation and have normal eyes. In this study, integrated methods, comprising manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), f-VEP and RNA-seq, were utilized to verify the divergence. The results of MEMRI showed that Pteropodidae bats have a much larger superior colliculus (SC)/ inferior colliculus (IC) volume ratio (3:1) than insectivorous bats (1:7). Furthermore, the absolute visual thresholds (log cd/m2•s) of Pteropodidae (−6.30 and −6.37) and Emballonuridae (−3.71) bats were lower than those of other insectivorous bats (−1.90). Finally, genes related to the visual pathway showed signs of positive selection, convergent evolution, upregulation and similar gene expression patterns in Pteropodidae and Emballonuridae bats. Different results imply that Pteropodidae and Emballonuridae bats have more developed vision than the insectivorous bats and suggest that further research on bat behavior is warranted. PMID:26100095

  17. Bilinear weighting and threshold scheme for low-power two-dimensional local dimming liquid crystal displays without block artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Song, Seok-Jeong; Nam, Hyoungsik

    2014-06-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) weighted roll-off local dimming algorithm that eliminates any visible block artifacts caused by the spatial mismatch between a discontinuous panel image and a continuous backlight is described. The proposed scheme enhances the high gray details by means of a roll-off scheme and removes the block artifacts with bilinear weighting of a pixel-compensated panel image. In addition, the threshold scheme is used to resolve overcompensation problems that lead to visible artifacts around the boundaries of dark local blocks. The image quality and the power consumption are evaluated for 40 test images through both simulation and measurement. Compared to 15.56 and 1.45 of a 2-D roll-off method, the maximum and average color difference values of a proposed scheme are reduced to 7.76 and 0.72 in the simulation. For a prototype 40-in. light emitting diode TV, the average power saving over 40 test images is measured as 60.96%.

  18. The Drosophila Prosecretory Transcription Factor dimmed Is Dynamically Regulated in Adult Enteroendocrine Cells and Protects Against Gram-Negative Infection.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Katherine; Park, Dongkook; Taghert, Paul H; Micchelli, Craig A

    2015-05-20

    The endocrine system employs peptide hormone signals to translate environmental changes into physiological responses. The diffuse endocrine system embedded in the gastrointestinal barrier epithelium is one of the largest and most diverse endocrine tissues. Furthermore, it is the only endocrine tissue in direct physical contact with the microbial environment of the gut lumen. However, it remains unclear how this sensory epithelium responds to specific pathogenic challenges in a dynamic and regulated manner. We demonstrate that the enteroendocrine cells of the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut display a transient, sensitive, and systemic induction of the prosecretory factor dimmed (dimm) in response to the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila (Pe). In enteroendocrine cells, dimm controls the levels of the targets Phm, dcat-4, and the peptide hormone, Allatostatin A. Finally, we identify dimm as a host factor that protects against Pe infection and controls the expression of antimicrobial peptides. We propose that dimm provides "gain" in enteroendocrine output during the adaptive response to episodic pathogen exposure.

  19. Why the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) should be measured before treatment of patients with circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Keijzer, Henry; Smits, Marcel G; Duffy, Jeanne F; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) may include light therapy, chronotherapy and melatonin. Exogenous melatonin is increasingly being used in patients with insomnia or CRSD. Although pharmacopoeias and the European food safety authority (EFSA) recommend administering melatonin 1-2 h before desired bedtime, several studies have shown that melatonin is not always effective if administered according to that recommendation. Crucial for optimal treatment of CRSD, melatonin and other treatments should be administered at a time related to individual circadian timing (typically assessed using the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO)). If not administered according to the individual patient's circadian timing, melatonin and other treatments may not only be ineffective, they may even result in contrary effects. Endogenous melatonin levels can be measured reliably in saliva collected at the patient's home. A clinically reliably DLMO can be calculated using a fixed threshold. Diary and polysomnographic sleep-onset time do not reliably predict DLMO or circadian timing in patients with CRSD. Knowing the patient's individual circadian timing by assessing DLMO can improve diagnosis and treatment of CRSD with melatonin as well as other therapies such as light or chronotherapy, and optimizing treatment timing will shorten the time required to achieve results.

  20. Divergence of dim-light vision among bats (order: Chiroptera) as estimated by molecular and electrophysiological methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, He-Qun; Wei, Jing-Kuan; Li, Bo; Wang, Ming-Shan; Wu, Rui-Qi; Rizak, Joshua D; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Xu, Fu-Qiang; Shen, Yong-Yi; Hu, Xin-Tian; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-06-23

    Dim-light vision is present in all bats, but is divergent among species. Old-World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) have fully developed eyes; the eyes of insectivorous bats are generally degraded, and these bats rely on well-developed echolocation. An exception is the Emballonuridae, which are capable of laryngeal echolocation but prefer to use vision for navigation and have normal eyes. In this study, integrated methods, comprising manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), f-VEP and RNA-seq, were utilized to verify the divergence. The results of MEMRI showed that Pteropodidae bats have a much larger superior colliculus (SC)/ inferior colliculus (IC) volume ratio (3:1) than insectivorous bats (1:7). Furthermore, the absolute visual thresholds (log cd/m(2)•s) of Pteropodidae (-6.30 and -6.37) and Emballonuridae (-3.71) bats were lower than those of other insectivorous bats (-1.90). Finally, genes related to the visual pathway showed signs of positive selection, convergent evolution, upregulation and similar gene expression patterns in Pteropodidae and Emballonuridae bats. Different results imply that Pteropodidae and Emballonuridae bats have more developed vision than the insectivorous bats and suggest that further research on bat behavior is warranted.

  1. The cause of solar dimming and brightening at the Earth's surface during the last half century: Evidence from measurements of sunshine duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanhill, Gerald; Achiman, Ori; Rosa, Rafael; Cohen, Shabtai

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of the Angstrom-Prescott relationship between normalized values of global radiation and sunshine duration measured during the last 50 years made at five sites with a wide range of climate and aerosol emissions showed few significant differences in atmospheric transmissivity under clear or cloud-covered skies between years when global dimming occurred and years when global brightening was measured, nor in most cases were there any significant changes in the parameters or in their relationships to annual rates of fossil fuel combustion in the surrounding 1° cells. It is concluded that at the sites studied changes in cloud cover rather than anthropogenic aerosols emissions played the major role in determining solar dimming and brightening during the last half century and that there are reasons to suppose that these findings may have wider relevance.

  2. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Echterhoff, Johannes; Jirka, Simon; Simonis, Ingo; Everding, Thomas; Stasch, Christoph; Liang, Steve; Lemmens, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement. PMID:22163760

  3. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-07-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread.

  5. Detection of dimming/brightening in Italy from homogenized all-sky and clear-sky surface solar radiation records and underlying causes (1959-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, Veronica; Brunetti, Michele; Celozzi, Angela; Maugeri, Maurizio; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2016-09-01

    A dataset of 54 daily Italian downward surface solar radiation (SSR) records has been set up collecting data for the 1959-2013 period. Special emphasis is given to the quality control and the homogenization of the records in order to ensure the reliability of the resulting trends. This step has been shown as necessary due to the large differences obtained between the raw and homogenized dataset, especially during the first decades of the study period. In addition, SSR series under clear-sky conditions were obtained considering only the cloudless days from corresponding ground-based cloudiness observations. Subsequently, records were interpolated onto a regular grid and clustered into two regions, northern and southern Italy, which were averaged in order to get all-sky and clear-sky regional SSR records. Their temporal evolution is presented, and possible reasons for differences between all-sky and clear-sky conditions and between the two regions are discussed in order to determine to what extent SSR variability depends on aerosols or clouds. Specifically, the all-sky SSR records show a decrease until the mid-1980s (dimming period), and a following increase until the end of the series (brightening period) even though strength and persistence of tendencies are not the same in all seasons. Clear-sky records present stronger tendencies than all-sky records during the dimming period in all seasons and during the brightening period in winter and autumn. This suggests that, under all-sky conditions, the variations caused by the increase/decrease in the aerosol content have been partially masked by cloud cover variations, especially during the dimming period. Under clear sky the observed dimming is stronger in the south than in the north. This peculiarity could be a consequence of a significant contribution of mineral dust variations to the SSR variability.

  6. VISUALIZATION OF MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BY FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K.

    2008-01-01

    The visualization of protein complexes in living cells enables validation of protein interactions in their normal environment and determination of their subcellular localization. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay has been used to visualize interactions among multiple proteins in many cell types and organisms. This assay is based on the association between two fluorescent-protein fragments when they are brought together by an interaction between proteins fused to the fragments. Modified forms of this assay have been used to visualize the competition between alternative interaction partners and the covalent modification of proteins by ubiquitin family peptides. PMID:16625152

  7. Enablement as a Positive Force in Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg

    1996-01-01

    Explores the concept of enablement and provides a framework for the counselor and counselor educator to use in facilitating client- or student-directed goals. Examines use of enablement, enablement versus co-dependency, the use of the enablement framework in the counseling role, and clinical examples of the enablement framework. (RJM)

  8. An 80 kyr-long continuous speleothem record from Dim Cave, SW Turkey with paleoclimatic implications for the Eastern Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Shulmeister, James; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Tonguç Uysal, I.; Feng, Yue-Xing; Duc Nguyen, Ai; Yüce, Galip

    2015-01-01

    Speleothem-based stable isotope records are valuable in sub-humid and semi-arid settings where many other terrestrial climate proxies are fragmentary. The Eastern Mediterranean is one such region. Here we present an 80-kyr-long precisely-dated (by U-series) and high-resolution oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) records from Dim Cave (~36°N) in SW Turkey. The glacial-interglacial δ18O variations in the Dim Cave speleothem are best explained in terms of changes in the trajectories of winter westerly air masses. These are along a northerly (European) track (isotopically less depleted) during the early last glaciation but are gradually depressed southward closer to the modern westerly track along the North African coast (more depleted) after c.50 kyr and remain in the southern track through the Last Glacial Maximum. The southward displacement of the westerly track reflects growth of the Fennoscandian ice sheet and its impact on westerly wind fields. Changes in δ13C are interpreted as reflecting soil organic matter composition and/or thickness. δ13C values are significantly more negative in interglacials reflecting active carbonic acid production in the soil and less negative in glacial times reflecting carbonate rock values. Several Heinrich events are recorded in the Dim record indicating intensification of westerly flow across this part of the EM. PMID:26337921

  9. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy at endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianan Y.; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1994-07-01

    A spectrofluorometry system has been developed for the collection of laser induced fluorescense spectra of tissue during endoscopy. In this system, a catheter with seven optical fibers was used to deliver the excitation light and collect the emitted fluorescence. The system enables one to switch from regular endoscopy into fluorescence measurement in 50 ms using a computerized shutter system. The fluorescence spectra can be recorded in 100 ms. This spectrofluorometry system has been used to obtain spectra from bronchial, larynx and nasopharyngeal tissues when employed with the appropriate endoscopes. The results demonstrate that laser induced fluorescence can be used to differentiate abnormal tissue from normal tissue. The illumination and fluorescence collection patterns of this system have been modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation data shows that the spectra recorded by our collection pattern is very close to the intrinsic spectra of tissue. The experimental results and the Monte Carlo simulation suggest that changes in fluorescence intensity are more robust for the detection of early cancers than the differences in spectral characteristics.

  11. Non-classical Phase-dependent Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Samir

    2000-06-01

    A simple two-level atom, radiating in free space, is a canonical system in quantum optics. Historically, resonance fluorescence provided the first experimental evidence for photon antibunching, sub-Poisson statistics, and quantum jumps. However, it is well known that observation of phase-dependent nonclassical effects in resonance fluorescence presents severe experimental challenges. In particular, the phenomenon of squeezing in resonance fluorescence, first predicted in 1981footnote D. F. Walls and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 709 (1981), long eluded observation despite receiving considerable attention. In this talk I will describe how we recently overcame these challenges to make the first measurements of single-atom squeezing spectra in the phase-dependent fluorescence of a beam of driven two-level atoms in free space(Z. H. Lu, S. Bali, and J. E. Thomas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3635 (1998). The experimental scheme permits a valid comparison of these measurements with our predictions, thus yielding a new and simple physical picture of phase-dependent resonance fluorescence. Results of a direct measurement of the two-time field correlation function will also be presented. Our measurements enable important insights into the basic atomic processes underlying squeezing, and help elucidate the role of quantum jumps in phase-dependent resonance fluorescence.

  12. Noise-enabled optical ratchets

    PubMed Central

    León-Montiel, Roberto de J.; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the implementation of a novel noise-enabled optical ratchet system. We demonstrate that, unlike commonly-used ratchet schemes—where complex asymmetric optical potentials are needed—efficient transport of microparticles across a one-dimensional optical lattice can be produced by introducing controllable noise in the system. This work might open interesting routes towards the development of new technologies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of transport occurring at the micro- and nanoscale, from novel particle-sorting tools to efficient molecular motors. PMID:28287152

  13. Optimized microsystems-enabled photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Young, Ralph W.; Resnick, Paul J.; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-22

    Technologies pertaining to designing microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells are described herein. A first restriction for a first parameter of an MEPV cell is received. Subsequently, a selection of a second parameter of the MEPV cell is received. Values for a plurality of parameters of the MEPV cell are computed such that the MEPV cell is optimized with respect to the second parameter, wherein the values for the plurality of parameters are computed based at least in part upon the restriction for the first parameter.

  14. Noise-enabled optical ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León-Montiel, Roberto De J.; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2017-03-01

    In this contribution, we report on the implementation of a novel noise-enabled optical ratchet system. We demonstrate that, unlike commonly-used ratchet schemes—where complex asymmetric optical potentials are needed—efficient transport of microparticles across a one-dimensional optical lattice can be produced by introducing controllable noise in the system. This work might open interesting routes towards the development of new technologies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of transport occurring at the micro- and nanoscale, from novel particle-sorting tools to efficient molecular motors.

  15. Tunable solid-state fluorescent materials for supramolecular encryption

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xisen; Ke, Chenfeng; Bruns, Carson J.; McGonigal, Paul R.; Pettman, Roger B.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-01-01

    Tunable solid-state fluorescent materials are ideal for applications in security printing technologies. A document possesses a high level of security if its encrypted information can be authenticated without being decoded, while also being resistant to counterfeiting. Herein, we describe a heterorotaxane with tunable solid-state fluorescent emissions enabled through reversible manipulation of its aggregation by supramolecular encapsulation. The dynamic nature of this fluorescent material is based on a complex set of equilibria, whose fluorescence output depends non-linearly on the chemical inputs and the composition of the paper. By applying this system in fluorescent security inks, the information encoded in polychromic images can be protected in such a way that it is close to impossible to reverse engineer, as well as being easy to verify. This system constitutes a unique application of responsive complex equilibria in the form of a cryptographic algorithm that protects valuable information printed using tunable solid-state fluorescent materials. PMID:25901677

  16. FIRST MEASUREMENTS OF THE MASS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM THE EUV DIMMING OBSERVED WITH STEREO EUVI A+B SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Lemen, James R.; Sandman, Anne; Vourlidas, Angelos; Colaninno, Robin C. E-mail: vourlidas@nrl.navy.mi

    2009-11-20

    The masses of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have traditionally been determined from white-light coronagraphs (based on Thomson scattering of electrons), as well as from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) dimming observed with one spacecraft. Here we develop an improved method of measuring CME masses based on EUV dimming observed with the dual STEREO/EUVI spacecraft in multiple temperature filters that includes three-dimensional volume and density modeling in the dimming region and background corona. As a test, we investigate eight CME events with previous mass determinations from STEREO/COR2, of which six cases are reliably detected with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) using our automated multi-wavelength detection code. We find CME masses in the range of m {sub CME} = (2-7) x 10{sup 15} g. The agreement between the two EUVI/A and B spacecraft is m{sub A} /m{sub B} = 1.3 +- 0.6 and the consistency with white-light measurements by COR2 is m{sub EUVI}/m{sub COR2} = 1.1 +- 0.3. The consistency between EUVI and COR2 implies no significant mass backflows (or inflows) at r < 4 R{sub sun} and adequate temperature coverage for the bulk of the CME mass in the range of T approx 0.5-3.0 MK. The temporal evolution of the EUV dimming allows us to also model the evolution of the CME density n{sub e} (t), volume V(t), height-time h(t), and propagation speed v(t) in terms of an adiabatically expanding self-similar geometry. We determine e-folding EUV dimming times of t{sub D} = 1.3 +- 1.4 hr. We test the adiabatic expansion model in terms of the predicted detection delay (DELTAt approx 0.7 hr) between EUVI and COR2 for the fastest CME event (2008 March 25) and find good agreement with the observed delay (DELTAt approx 0.8 hr).

  17. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions.

  18. Autonomy enables new science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Richard J.; Gor, Victoria; Man, Guy K.; Stolorz, Paul E.; Chapman, Clark; Merline, William J.; Stern, Alan

    1997-01-01

    The challenge of space flight in NASA's future is to enable smaller, more frequent and intensive space exploration at much lower total cost without substantially decreasing mission reliability, capability, or the scientific return on investment. The most effective way to achieve this goal is to build intelligent capabilities into the spacecraft themselves. Our technological vision for meeting the challenge of returning quality science through limited communication bandwidth will actually put scientists in a more direct link with the spacecraft than they have enjoyed to date. Technologies such as pattern recognition and machine learning can place a part of the scientist's awareness onboard the spacecraft to prioritize downlink or to autonomously trigger time-critical follow-up observations-particularly important in flyby missions-without ground interaction. Onboard knowledge discovery methods can be used to include candidate discoveries in each downlink for scientists' scrutiny. Such capabilities will allow scientists to quickly reprioritize missions in a much more intimate and efficient manner than is possible today. Ultimately, new classes of exploration missions will be enabled.

  19. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  20. Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will likely require international cooperation in order to leverage limited resources. International standards can help enable cooperative missions by providing well understood, predefined interfaces allowing compatibility between unique spacecraft and systems. The International Space Station (ISS) partnership has developed a publicly available International Docking System Standard (IDSS) that provides a solution to one of these key interfaces by defining a common docking interface. The docking interface provides a way for even dissimilar spacecraft to dock for exchange of crew and cargo, as well as enabling the assembly of large space systems. This paper provides an overview of the key attributes of the IDSS, an overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS), and the plans for updating the ISS with IDSS compatible interfaces. The NDS provides a state of the art, low impact docking system that will initially be made available to commercial crew and cargo providers. The ISS will be used to demonstrate the operational utility of the IDSS interface as a foundational technology for cooperative exploration.

  1. Directory Enabled Policy Based Networking

    SciTech Connect

    KELIIAA, CURTIS M.

    2001-10-01

    This report presents a discussion of directory-enabled policy-based networking with an emphasis on its role as the foundation for securely scalable enterprise networks. A directory service provides the object-oriented logical environment for interactive cyber-policy implementation. Cyber-policy implementation includes security, network management, operational process and quality of service policies. The leading network-technology vendors have invested in these technologies for secure universal connectivity that transverses Internet, extranet and intranet boundaries. Industry standards are established that provide the fundamental guidelines for directory deployment scalable to global networks. The integration of policy-based networking with directory-service technologies provides for intelligent management of the enterprise network environment as an end-to-end system of related clients, services and resources. This architecture allows logical policies to protect data, manage security and provision critical network services permitting a proactive defense-in-depth cyber-security posture. Enterprise networking imposes the consideration of supporting multiple computing platforms, sites and business-operation models. An industry-standards based approach combined with principled systems engineering in the deployment of these technologies allows these issues to be successfully addressed. This discussion is focused on a directory-based policy architecture for the heterogeneous enterprise network-computing environment and does not propose specific vendor solutions. This document is written to present practical design methodology and provide an understanding of the risks, complexities and most important, the benefits of directory-enabled policy-based networking.

  2. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  3. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  4. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  5. Holograms with fluorescent benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pérez, A.; Toxqui-López, S.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Dorantes-Garcia, V.

    2011-02-01

    Behavior study of the diffraction efficiency parameter from holographic gratings, with fluorescents inks such as benzyls. We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence to blue laser to make transmissions holograms using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensibilizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence propertied of inks, mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we show the results of painting hologram method with fluorescents inks and describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with gratings with a He-Cd laser at 442nm and we later were painting with fluorescent ink, interesting fluorescence characteristic to the hologram.

  6. Increased sensitivity of bacterial detection in cerebrospinal fluid by fluorescent staining on low-fluorescence membrane filters.

    PubMed

    Durtschi, Jacob D; Erali, Maria; Bromley, L Kathryn; Herrmann, Mark G; Petti, Cathy A; Smith, Roger E; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2005-09-01

    A membrane-filter-based, fluorescent Gram stain method for bacterial detection in cerebrospinal fluid samples was developed and evaluated as a rapid, sensitive alternative to standard Gram stain protocols. A recently developed, modified version of the aluminium oxide membrane Anopore with low-fluorescence optical properties showed superior performance in this application. Other aspects of the fluorescent Gram stain system that were evaluated include membrane filter selection, strategies to reduce fluorescence fading and the effect of patient blood cells on bacterial detection in the fluorescently stained cerebrospinal fluid samples. The combination of the membrane filter's bacteria-concentrating ability and absolute retention along with high-contrast, fluorescent Gram discriminating dyes enabled rapid bacterial detection and Gram discrimination, with a 1-1.5 order of magnitude increase in the bacterial concentration limit of detection.

  7. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  8. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  9. Oligomeric state of purified transient receptor potential melastatin-1 (TRPM1), a protein essential for dim light vision.

    PubMed

    Agosto, Melina A; Zhang, Zhixian; He, Feng; Anastassov, Ivan A; Wright, Sara J; McGehee, Jennifer; Wensel, Theodore G

    2014-09-26

    Transient receptor potential melastatin-1 (TRPM1) is essential for the light-induced depolarization of retinal ON bipolar cells. TRPM1 likely forms a multimeric channel complex, although almost nothing is known about the structure or subunit composition of channels formed by TRPM1 or any of its close relatives. Recombinant TRPM1 was robustly expressed in insect cells, but only a small fraction was localized to the plasma membrane. Similar intracellular localization was observed when TRPM1 was heterologously expressed in mammalian cells. TRPM1 was affinity-purified from Sf9 cells and complexed with amphipol, followed by detergent removal. In blue native gels and size exclusion chromatography, TRPM1 migrated with a mobility consistent with detergent- or amphipol-bound dimers. Cross-linking experiments were also consistent with a dimeric subunit stoichiometry, and cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis without symmetry imposition yielded a model with approximate 2-fold symmetrical features. Finally, electron microscopy of TRPM1-antibody complexes revealed a large particle that can accommodate TRPM1 and two antibody molecules. Taken together, these data indicate that purified TRPM1 is mostly dimeric. The three-dimensional structure of TRPM1 dimers is characterized by a small putative transmembrane domain and a larger domain with a hollow cavity. Blue native gels of solubilized mouse retina indicate that TRPM1 is present in two distinct complexes: one similar in size to the recombinant protein and one much larger. Because dimers are likely not functional ion channels, these results suggest that additional partner subunits participate in forming the transduction channel required for dim light vision and the ON pathway.

  10. Oligomeric State of Purified Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-1 (TRPM1), a Protein Essential for Dim Light Vision*

    PubMed Central

    Agosto, Melina A.; Zhang, Zhixian; He, Feng; Anastassov, Ivan A.; Wright, Sara J.; McGehee, Jennifer; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin-1 (TRPM1) is essential for the light-induced depolarization of retinal ON bipolar cells. TRPM1 likely forms a multimeric channel complex, although almost nothing is known about the structure or subunit composition of channels formed by TRPM1 or any of its close relatives. Recombinant TRPM1 was robustly expressed in insect cells, but only a small fraction was localized to the plasma membrane. Similar intracellular localization was observed when TRPM1 was heterologously expressed in mammalian cells. TRPM1 was affinity-purified from Sf9 cells and complexed with amphipol, followed by detergent removal. In blue native gels and size exclusion chromatography, TRPM1 migrated with a mobility consistent with detergent- or amphipol-bound dimers. Cross-linking experiments were also consistent with a dimeric subunit stoichiometry, and cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis without symmetry imposition yielded a model with approximate 2-fold symmetrical features. Finally, electron microscopy of TRPM1-antibody complexes revealed a large particle that can accommodate TRPM1 and two antibody molecules. Taken together, these data indicate that purified TRPM1 is mostly dimeric. The three-dimensional structure of TRPM1 dimers is characterized by a small putative transmembrane domain and a larger domain with a hollow cavity. Blue native gels of solubilized mouse retina indicate that TRPM1 is present in two distinct complexes: one similar in size to the recombinant protein and one much larger. Because dimers are likely not functional ion channels, these results suggest that additional partner subunits participate in forming the transduction channel required for dim light vision and the ON pathway. PMID:25112866

  11. Parallel and convergent evolution of the dim-light vision gene RH1 in bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Liu, Jie; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2010-01-21

    Rhodopsin, encoded by the gene Rhodopsin (RH1), is extremely sensitive to light, and is responsible for dim-light vision. Bats are nocturnal mammals that inhabit poor light environments. Megabats (Old-World fruit bats) generally have well-developed eyes, while microbats (insectivorous bats) have developed echolocation and in general their eyes were degraded, however, dramatic differences in the eyes, and their reliance on vision, exist in this group. In this study, we examined the rod opsin gene (RH1), and compared its evolution to that of two cone opsin genes (SWS1 and M/LWS). While phylogenetic reconstruction with the cone opsin genes SWS1 and M/LWS generated a species tree in accord with expectations, the RH1 gene tree united Pteropodidae (Old-World fruit bats) and Yangochiroptera, with very high bootstrap values, suggesting the possibility of convergent evolution. The hypothesis of convergent evolution was further supported when nonsynonymous sites or amino acid sequences were used to construct phylogenies. Reconstructed RH1 sequences at internal nodes of the bat species phylogeny showed that: (1) Old-World fruit bats share an amino acid change (S270G) with the tomb bat; (2) Miniopterus share two amino acid changes (V104I, M183L) with Rhinolophoidea; (3) the amino acid replacement I123V occurred independently on four branches, and the replacements L99M, L266V and I286V occurred each on two branches. The multiple parallel amino acid replacements that occurred in the evolution of bat RH1 suggest the possibility of multiple convergences of their ecological specialization (i.e., various photic environments) during adaptation for the nocturnal lifestyle, and suggest that further attention is needed on the study of the ecology and behavior of bats.

  12. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  13. Fluorescence depolarization measurements under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Banishev, Alexandr; Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the time-dependent fluorescence depolarization of emissive probe molecules enable real-time observations of molecular rotations in shocked materials. In shocked solids, molecular rotations occur as a result of shear deformations. An apparatus is described to measure time-dependent fluorescence depolarization of shocked materials using laser-driven flyer plates and either a picosecond or a nanosecond probe laser. The emission was separated into parallel and perpendicular channels and imaged onto a streak camera. Time-dependent fluorescence depolarization of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye dissolved in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) was measured with a 16 ns duration impact at 1 km s-1. A partial depolarization of the dye emission was observed to occur during a 150 ns period after the shock.

  14. Spatially Enabling the Health Sector

    PubMed Central

    Weeramanthri, Tarun Stephen; Woodgate, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Spatial information describes the physical location of either people or objects, and the measured relationships between them. In this article, we offer the view that greater utilization of spatial information and its related technology, as part of a broader redesign of the architecture of health information at local and national levels, could assist and speed up the process of health reform, which is taking place across the globe in richer and poorer countries alike. In making this point, we describe the impetus for health sector reform, recent developments in spatial information and analytics, and current Australasian spatial health research. We highlight examples of uptake of spatial information by the health sector, as well as missed opportunities. Our recommendations to spatially enable the health sector are applicable to high- and low-resource settings. PMID:27867933

  15. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

    2007-09-01

    It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed.

  16. Context-Enabled Business Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-04-01

    To truly understand context and apply it in business intelligence, it is vital to understand what context is and how it can be applied in addressing organizational needs. Context describes the facets of the environment that impact the way that end users interact with the system. Context includes aspects of location, chronology, access method, demographics, social influence/ relationships, end-user attitude/ emotional state, behavior/ past behavior, and presence. To be successful in making Business Intelligence content enabled, it is important to be able to capture the context of use user. With advances in technology, there are a number of ways in which this user based information can be gathered and exposed to enhance the overall end user experience.

  17. Enabling the Kepler Exoplanet Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler mission, with its unrivaled photometric precision and nearly continuous monitoring, provides an unprecedented opportunity for an exoplanet census. However, while it has identified thousands of transiting planet candidates, only relatively few have yet been dynamically confirmed as bona fide planets, with only a handful more even conceivably amenable to future dynamical confirmation. As a result, the ability to draw detailed conclusions about the diversity of exoplanet systems from Kepler detections relies critically on assigning false positive probabilities to thousands of unconfirmed candidates. I have developed a procedure to calculate these probabilities using only the Kepler photometry, optionally including available follow-up observations. Using this, I can often statistically validate a candidate signal using two single-epoch observations: a stellar spectrum and a high-resolution image. Accordingly, I have applied this procedure to the publicly released Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) using results from several large follow-up campaigns: spectroscopic surveys of >100 KOIs with TripleSpec at the Palomar 200-in and >700 KOIs with Keck/HIRES, and imaging surveys of >60 KOIs with Keck/NIRC2 and nearly 1000 KOIs with the Palomar Robo-AO system. This has enabled me to identify hundreds of Kepler candidates as newly secure planets, identify some as likely false positives, and prescribe the most useful follow-up observations for the rest of the KOIs. These results will enable Kepler to fulfill its promise as a mission to study the statistics of exoplanet systems. In addition, this new approach to transit survey follow-up---detailed probabilistic assessment of large numbers of candidates in order to inform the application of relatively scarce follow-up resources---will remain fruitful as transit surveys continue to produce many more candidates than can be followed up with traditional strategies.

  18. Reflectance and fluorescence hyperspectral elastic image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Baker, Ross; Hakansson, Johan; Gustafsson, Ulf P.

    2004-05-01

    Science and Technology International (STI) presents a novel multi-modal elastic image registration approach for a new hyperspectral medical imaging modality. STI's HyperSpectral Diagnostic Imaging (HSDI) cervical instrument is used for the early detection of uterine cervical cancer. A Computer-Aided-Diagnostic (CAD) system is being developed to aid the physician with the diagnosis of pre-cancerous and cancerous tissue regions. The CAD system uses the fusion of multiple data sources to optimize its performance. The key enabling technology for the data fusion is image registration. The difficulty lies in the image registration of fluorescence and reflectance hyperspectral data due to the occurrence of soft tissue movement and the limited resemblance of these types of imagery. The presented approach is based on embedding a reflectance image in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Having a reflectance image in both data sets resolves the resemblance problem and thereby enables the use of elastic image registration algorithms required to compensate for soft tissue movements. Several methods of embedding the reflectance image in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery are described. Initial experiments with human subject data are presented where a reflectance image is embedded in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery.

  19. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  20. Dental fluorescence: potential forensic use.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ricarda Duarte; da Silva, Marcos André Duarte; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista; Melo, Ana Cláudia Moreira; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira

    2013-09-10

    In cases of identification of bones, skeletal segments or isolated bones, searching for biotypologic diagnostic data to estimate an individual's age enables comparing these data with those of missing individuals. Enamel, dentin and pulp undergo remarkable changes during an individual's life. The enamel becomes more mineralized, smoother and thinner, and deteriorates because of physiological and pathological factors. Dental pulp decreases in volume due to the deposition of secondary dentin; thus, the dentin becomes thicker with time. In natural teeth, the fluorescence phenomenon occurs in dentin and enamel and changes in those tissues may alter the expression of the natural tooth color. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between age and teeth fluorescence for individuals from different age groups. The sample consisted of 66 randomly selected Brazilians of both genders aged 7-63 years old. They were divided into 6 groups: Group 1 - aged 7-12 years, Group 2 - aged 13-20 years, Group 3 - aged 21-30 years, Group 4 - aged 31-40 years, Group 5 - aged 41-50 years and Group 6 - aged between 51 and 63 years. Upper right or left central incisors were used for the study. Restored and aesthetic rehabilitated teeth were excluded from the sample. The measurement of tooth fluorescence was carried out via computer analysis of digital images using the software ScanWhite DMC/Darwin Systems - Brazil. It was observed that dental fluorescence decreases when comparing the age groups 21-30, 31-40, 41-50 and 51-63 years. The results also showed that there is a statistically significant difference between the groups 41-50 years and 21-30 years (p=0.005) and also among the group 51-63 years and all other groups (p<0.005). It can be concluded that dental fluorescence is correlated with age and has a similar and stable behavior from 7 to 20 years of age. It reaches its maximum expected value at the age of 26.5 years and thereafter decreases.

  1. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  2. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  3. Enabling Participation In Exoplanet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the distribution of exoplanets has required the contributions of a community of astronomers, who all require the support of colleagues to finish their projects in a manner to enable them to enter new collaborations to continue to contribute to understanding exoplanet science.The contributions of each member of the astronomy community are to be encouraged and must never be intentionally obstructed.We present a member’s long pursuit to be a contributing part of the exoplanet community through doing transit photometry as a means of commissioning the telescopes for a new observatory, followed by pursuit of interpreting the distributions in exoplanet parameter data.We present how the photometry projects have been presented as successful by the others who have claimed to have completed them, but how by requiring its employees to present results while omitting one member has been obstructive against members working together and has prevented the results from being published in what can genuinely be called a peer-reviewed fashion.We present how by tolerating one group to obstruct one member from finishing participation and then falsely denying credit is counterproductive to doing science.We show how expecting one member to attempt to go around an ostracizing group by starting something different is destructive to the entire profession. We repeat previously published appeals to help ostracized members to “go around the observatory” by calling for discussion on how the community must act to reverse cases of shunning, bullying, and other abuses. Without better recourse and support from the community, actions that do not meet standard good collegial behavior end up forcing good members from the community. The most important actions are to enable an ostracized member to have recourse to participating in group papers by either working through other authors or through the journal. All journals and authors must expect that no co-author is keeping out a major

  4. Enabling technology for human collaboration.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Tim Andrew; Jones, Wendell Bruce; Warner, David Jay; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Merkle, Peter Benedict

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-month LDRD late start project which explored the potential of enabling technology to improve the performance of small groups. The purpose was to investigate and develop new methods to assist groups working in high consequence, high stress, ambiguous and time critical situations, especially those for which it is impractical to adequately train or prepare. A testbed was constructed for exploratory analysis of a small group engaged in tasks with high cognitive and communication performance requirements. The system consisted of five computer stations, four with special devices equipped to collect physiologic, somatic, audio and video data. Test subjects were recruited and engaged in a cooperative video game. Each team member was provided with a sensor array for physiologic and somatic data collection while playing the video game. We explored the potential for real-time signal analysis to provide information that enables emergent and desirable group behavior and improved task performance. The data collected in this study included audio, video, game scores, physiological, somatic, keystroke, and mouse movement data. The use of self-organizing maps (SOMs) was explored to search for emergent trends in the physiological data as it correlated with the video, audio and game scores. This exploration resulted in the development of two approaches for analysis, to be used concurrently, an individual SOM and a group SOM. The individual SOM was trained using the unique data of each person, and was used to monitor the effectiveness and stress level of each member of the group. The group SOM was trained using the data of the entire group, and was used to monitor the group effectiveness and dynamics. Results suggested that both types of SOMs were required to adequately track evolutions and shifts in group effectiveness. Four subjects were used in the data collection and development of these tools. This report documents a proof of concept

  5. Fluorescence properties of melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Mosca, L; De Marco, C; Fontana, M; Rosei, M A

    1999-11-01

    Recently our group synthesized a new class of melanins obtained by the tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation of opioid peptides (opiomelanins). Owing to the presence of the peptide moiety such pigments exhibit high solubility in hydrophilic solvents, which allows spectroscopic investigations. In particular, the absence of solid-state quenching effects enables the study of melanin fluorescence properties, till now poorly investigated due to the complete insolubility of melanins produced from tyrosine or Dopa. Opiomelanins dissolved in aqueous medium show a characteristic emission peaked at 440 and 520 nm when excited around 330 nm, where a maximum is observed in the absorption spectrum. Kinetic measurements performed on the tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation of opioid peptides show that the 440-nm fluorescence band arises in the early stages of peptide oxidation, whereas the 520-nm band appears in later stages of oxidation, i.e., during the polymerization of indole-quinone units. Moreover, molecular sieve fractionation shows that in the opiomelanin fraction with a molecular weight lower than 10 kDa the 440-nm band is dominant in the fluorescence spectrum. The breakdown of the polymer induced by hydrogen peroxide and light (i.e., the photobleaching of melanin pigments) produces a marked enhancement of the 440-nm fluorescence band while the 520-nm band disappears. Hence, our findings suggest that the observed fluorescence contains contributions from both oligomeric units (440-nm band) and high-molecular-weight polymers (520-nm band).

  6. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  7. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  8. Dimming every light cheaply

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Pettler, Peter; Jennings, Judith

    2002-03-27

    This paper discusses the successful development and testing of the first ballast/IBECS network interface that will allow commercially-available controllable ballasts to be operated from the Internet via IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System). The interface, which is expected to cost original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) only about $1-2/unit, has been hardened so that it is impervious to electronic noise generated by most 0-10 VDC controllable ballasts.

  9. The Drosophila Transcription Factor Dimmed Affects Neuronal Growth and Differentiation in Multiple Ways Depending on Neuron Type and Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan; Nässel, Dick R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of postmitotic neurons occurs during different stages of development, including metamorphosis, and may also be part of neuronal plasticity and regeneration. Recently we showed that growth of post-mitotic neuroendocrine cells expressing the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Dimmed (Dimm) in Drosophila could be regulated by insulin/IGF signaling and the insulin receptor (dInR). Dimm is also known to confer a secretory phenotype to neuroendocrine cells and can be part of a combinatorial code specifying terminal differentiation in peptidergic neurons. To further understand the mechanisms of Dimm function we ectopically expressed Dimm or Dimm together with dInR in a wide range of Dimm positive and Dimm negative peptidergic neurons, sensory neurons, interneurons, motor neurons, and gut endocrine cells. We provide further evidence that dInR mediated cell growth occurs in a Dimm dependent manner and that one source of insulin-like peptide (DILP) for dInR mediated cell growth in the CNS is DILP6 from glial cells. Expressing both Dimm and dInR in Dimm negative neurons induced growth of cell bodies, whereas dInR alone did not. We also found that Dimm alone can regulate cell growth depending on specific cell type. This may be explained by the finding that the dInR is a direct target of Dimm. Conditional gene targeting experiments showed that Dimm alone could affect cell growth in certain neuron types during metamorphosis or in the adult stage. Another important finding was that ectopic Dimm inhibits apoptosis of several types of neurons normally destined for programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together our results suggest that Dimm plays multiple transcriptional roles at different developmental stages in a cell type-specific manner. In some cell types ectopic Dimm may act together with resident combinatorial code transcription factors and affect terminal differentiation, as well as act in transcriptional networks that participate in long term maintenance

  10. The Coronal-Dimming Footprint of a Streamer-Puff Coronal Mass Ejection: Confirmation of the Magnetic-Arch-Blowout Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2007-01-01

    A streamer puff is a recently identified variety of coronal mass ejection (CME) of narrow to moderate width. It (1) travels our along a streamer, transiently inflating the streamer but leaving it largely intact, and (2) occurs in step with a compact ejective flare in an outer flank of the base of the streamer. These aspects suggest the following magnetic-arch-blowout scenario for the production of these CMEs: the magnetic explosion that produces the flare also produces a plasmoid that explodes up the leg of an outer loop of the arcade base of the streamer, blows out the top of this loop, and becomes the core of the CME. In this paper, we present a streamer-puff CME that produced a coronal-dimming footprint. The coronal dimming, its magnetic setting, and the timing and magnetic setting of a strong compact ejective flare within the dimming footprint nicely confirm the magnetic-arch-blowout scenario. From these observations, together with several published cases of a trans-equatorial CME produced in tandem with an ejective flare or filament eruption that was far offset from directly under the CME, we propose the following. Streamer-puff CMEs are a subclass (one variety) of a broader class of "over-and-out" CMEs that are often much larger than streamer puffs but are similar to them in that they are produced by the blowout of a large quasi-potential magnetic arch by a magnetic explosion that erupts from one foot of the large arch, where it is marked by a filament eruption and/or an ejective flare.

  11. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Jeremy T.

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  12. Solar Glitter -- Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Gregory N.

    2012-02-01

    Many products have significantly benefitted from, or been enabled by, the ability to manufacture structures at an ever decreasing length scale. Obvious examples of this include integrated circuits, flat panel displays, micro-scale sensors, and LED lighting. These industries have benefited from length scale effects in terms of improved performance, reduced cost, or new functionality (or a combination of these). In a similar manner, we are working to take advantage of length scale effects that exist within solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. While this is a significant step away from traditional approaches to solar power systems, the benefits in terms of new functionality, improved performance, and reduced cost for solar power are compelling. We are exploring scale effects that result from the size of the solar cells within the system. We have developed unique cells of both crystalline silicon and III-V materials that are very thin (5-20 microns thick) and have very small lateral dimensions (on the order of hundreds of microns across). These cells minimize the amount of expensive semiconductor material required for the system, allow improved cell performance, and provide an expanded design space for both module and system concepts allowing optimized power output and reduced module and balance of system costs. Furthermore, the small size of the cells allows for unique high-efficiency, high-flexibility PV panels and new building-integrated PV options that are currently unavailable. These benefits provide a pathway for PV power to become cost competitive with grid power and allow unique power solutions independent of grid power.

  13. Enabling individualized therapy through nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Jason H.; van de Ven, Anne L.; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Serda, Rita E.; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ziemys, Arturas; Bouamrani, Ali; Hu, Tony; Ranganathan, Shivakumar I.; De Rosa, Enrica; Martinez, Jonathan O.; Smid, Christine A.; Buchanan, Rachel M.; Lee, Sei-Young; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Landry, Matthew; Meyn, Anne; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Individualized medicine is the healthcare strategy that rebukes the idiomatic dogma of ‘losing sight of the forest for the trees’. We are entering a new era of healthcare where it is no longer acceptable to develop and market a drug that is effective for only 80% of the patient population. The emergence of “-omic” technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and advances in systems biology are magnifying the deficiencies of standardized therapy, which often provide little treatment latitude for accommodating patient physiologic idiosyncrasies. A personalized approach to medicine is not a novel concept. Ever since the scientific community began unraveling the mysteries of the genome, the promise of discarding generic treatment regimens in favor of patient-specific therapies became more feasible and realistic. One of the major scientific impediments of this movement towards personalized medicine has been the need for technological enablement. Nanotechnology is projected to play a critical role in patient-specific therapy; however, this transition will depend heavily upon the evolutionary development of a systems biology approach to clinical medicine based upon “-omic” technology analysis and integration. This manuscript provides a forward looking assessment of the promise of nanomedicine as it pertains to individualized medicine and establishes a technology “snapshot” of the current state of nano-based products over a vast array of clinical indications and range of patient specificity. Other issues such as market driven hurdles and regulatory compliance reform are anticipated to “self-correct” in accordance to scientific advancement and healthcare demand. These peripheral, non-scientific concerns are not addressed at length in this manuscript; however they do exist, and their impact to the paradigm shifting healthcare transformation towards individualized medicine will be critical for its success. PMID:20045055

  14. Optical modulation and selective recovery of Cy5 fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chaoyang; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Dickson, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence modulation offers the opportunity to detect low concentration fluorophore signals within high background. Applicable from the single molecule to bulk levels, we demonstrate long-wavelength optical depopulation of dark states that otherwise limit Cy5 fluorescence intensity. By modulated excitation of a long wavelength Cy5 transient absorption, we dynamically modulate Cy5 emission. The frequency dependence enables specificaton of the dark state timescales enabling optical demodulation-based signal recovery from high background. These dual laser illumination schemes for high sensitivity fluorescence signal recovery easily improve signal to noise ratios by well over an order of magnitude, largely by discrimination against background. Previously limited to very specialized dyes, our utilization of long-lived dark states in Cy5 enables selective detection of this very common single molecule and bulk fluorophore. Although, in principle, the “dark state” can arise from any photoinduced process, we demonstrate that cis-trans photoisomerization, with its unique transient absorption and lifetime enables this sensitivity boosting, long-wavelength modulation to occur in Cy5. Such studies underscore the need for transient absorption studies on common fluorophores to extend the impact of fluorescence modulation for high sensitivity fluorescence imaging in a much wider array of applications. PMID:22086764

  15. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  16. Forensic applications: Fluorescence properties of tooth-coloured restorative materials using a fluorescence DSLR camera.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Ramya; Walsh, Laurence J; Forrest, Alexander; Tennant, Marc; Chapman, James

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the fluorescence properties of dry and wet samples of contemporary tooth-coloured restorative materials using a fluorescence based DSLR camera and a variety of LEDs emitting different wavelengths of visible light as excitation sources. The materials examined included resin composites; ceramics and hybrid restorative materials such as ormocers, Vita Enamic™ and resin reinforced glass-ionomer cements. The levels of fluorescence for each sample under different combinations of incident light wavelengths and filters was analysed by using histogram data for colour channels from Adobe Photoshop software. Fluorescence patterns were influenced by water sorption of the materials. UV-A/Violet light (405±nm) produced the greatest range of luminosity values (10-204) amongst the tooth-coloured restorative materials, and showed the greatest differences between restorations and tooth structure. The best filter combinations with violet light were orange or yellow filters. Under ultraviolet excitation, Fuji VIII A2 exhibited a unique bright pink fluorescence emission, while VitaEnamic™, ormocer and glass-ionomer cements emitted bluish-pink fluorescence emissions. In conclusion, restorative materials exhibited varied emission pattern under UV-A (405nm) light, which enables their detection and differentiation from natural tooth structure.

  17. pH-Responsive fluorescent graphene quantum dots for fluorescence-guided cancer surgery and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zetan; Zhou, Shixin; Garcia, Cesar; Fan, Louzhen; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2017-04-03

    Cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Improved cancer treatment requires enhancement of cancer diagnosis and detection. To achieve this goal, here we report a novel imaging probe, pH-responsive fluorescent graphene quantum dots (pRF-GQDs). pRF-GQDs were prepared by electrolysis of graphite rods in sodium p-toluenesulfonate acetonitrile solution. The resulting pRF-GQDs, which have minimal toxicity, display a sharp fluorescence transition between green and blue at pH 6.8, a pH matching the acidic extracellular microenvironment in solid tumors. We found that this unique fluorescence switch property allows tumors to be distinguished from normal tissues. In addition to fluorescence, pRF-GQDs also exhibit upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL). We demonstrate that the combination of UCPL and fluorescence switch enables detection of solid tumors of different origin at an early developmental stage. Therefore, pRF-GQDs have great potential to be used as a universal probe for fluorescence-guided cancer surgery and cancer diagnosis.

  18. Fluorescent monolayer protected gold nanoparticles - Preparation and structure elucidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, P.; Kuchukova, N.; Dobrikov, G. M.; Timtcheva, I.; Kostova, K.; Petkova, I.; Vauthey, E.

    2011-05-01

    A novel N-substituted 4-methoxy-1,8-naphthalimide (NAFTA 8) especially designed for fluorescent labeling of gold nanoparticles has been synthesized. NAFTA 8 bears a long methylene chain at the imide N atom and has a terminal SH group, which enables its chemical binding to gold nanostructures. The longest wavelength absorption maximum of NAFTA 8 in chloroform is at 370 nm, the fluorescent maximum is at 430 nm and the fluorescent quantum yield is 0.95. The newly synthesized fluorophore is applied for functionalization of gold nanoparticles with diameter 1.5 ± 0.5 nm prepared through chemical reduction. The obtained Monolayer Protected Clusters are characterized by elemental analysis, TEM, XPS, FT-IR, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The performed investigations provide evidence for the formation of chemical bond between the thiol ligand and the gold surface. They also show that the obtained metal/dielectric 3D structures are highly fluorescent.

  19. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  20. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  1. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  2. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Rostad, Christina A.; Currier, Michael C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  3. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Walker, Joshua; Weyant, Kevin B; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.). In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV) emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable

  4. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  5. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  6. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  7. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  8. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  9. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  10. Laser fluorescence diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. K.; Krasilnikov, D. M.; Turkin, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper descsribes the development of an apparatus, method, and practical recommendation on using fluorescence diagnostics in alimentary-intestinal tract surgery and analyses of blood serum and plasma for investigating influence of various drug preparations on a human organism. The report of the firm Israel Aircraft Industries on the high efficiency of using fluorescent analysis in early diagnostics of rectum, lung, and breast cancer has stimulated our publication.

  11. Phase-Conjugated Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number)FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP PHASE-CONJUGATED FLUORESCENCE EMITTED POWER FOUR -WAVE MIXING THREE CONTRIBUTIONS...atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave mixing is studied from first principles. The MaxwellLeisenberg equations are solved for the...Fronczak Hall State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14260 Fluorescent emission by an atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave

  12. Fluorescence imaging of dendritic spines of Golgi-Cox-stained neurons using brightening background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Min; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Tao; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Muqing; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel fluorescence imaging approach to imaging nonfluorescence-labeled biological tissue samples. The method was demonstrated by imaging neurons in Golgi-Cox-stained and epoxy-resin-embedded samples through the excitation of the background fluorescence of the specimens. The dark neurons stood out clearly against background fluorescence in the images, enabling the tracing of a single dendritic spine using both confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that the reported fluorescence imaging method would provide an effective alternative solution to image nonfluorescence-labeled samples, and it allows tracing the dendritic spine structure of neurons.

  13. Current crowding impact at spatially and temporarily resolved thermal characters of large-area AlGaInP light emitting diodes operating in dimming/flashing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.; Podoltsev, A. D.; Malyutenko, O. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    By exploring spatially (μm-scale) and temporarily (ms-scale) resolved light and 8-12 μm thermal imaging analyses, we demonstrate how current crowding alternates the thermal parameters of light emitting diodes (LEDs) operating in dimming/flashing mode. For example, in AlGaInP/GaAs high-current (I ≥ 1 A) large-area (≥1 mm2) LEDs, we measured the thermal time constant (2.5 ms), heat diffusion length (110 μm), current crowding length (≤75 μm), thermal diffusivity (0.08 cm2/s) of GaAs substrate, and current-dependent thermal patterns taken from the front and sidewall facet of chips. We discovered that even at I = 100 mA emitting ships are already divided by two regions with different temperatures, small area high-temperature central regions (effective volumes) with high current density and larger area lower-temperature peripheral regions with much lower current density. The experiments evidence that the simplified computer simulations of dimming mode based on mean chip temperature, mean thermal resistance, and average current density, as well as temperature-independent ABC-modeling must be regarded with skepticism.

  14. Bioluminescence of a firefly pupa: involvement of a luciferase isotype in the dim glow of pupae and eggs in the Japanese firefly, Luciola lateralis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Furuhashi, Mana; Bessho, Manabu; Sagawa, Shingo; Ikeya, Haruyoshi; Inouye, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    We isolated cDNA for a luciferase isotype, LlLuc2, from the ovary of the Japanese firefly, Luciola lateralis. The gene product LlLuc2 showed 59% amino acid identity with LlLuc1, which had been isolated from the adult L. lateralis lantern. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicated that LlLuc2 is an orthologue of LcLuc2 from Luciola cruciata. The spectral maxima of the luminescence by recombinant LlLuc1 and LlLuc2 were 550 and 539 nm, respectively. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that LlLuc1 was expressed predominantly in larvae and adults, and LlLuc2 was expressed in eggs and pupae, which glow dimly, and we found that the in vivo luminescence spectra of the egg and pupa in L. lateralis were in good agreement with the in vitro luminescence spectrum by LlLuc2. These results suggest that, in L. lateralis, LlLuc1 is responsible for the yellowish luminescence of larval and adult lanterns, and LlLuc2 is responsible for the dim, greenish glow of eggs and whole pupae. Similar results were obtained in L. cruciata.

  15. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  16. Phytoplankton-Fluorescence-Lifetime Vertical Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.; St. Louis, Ernest

    2004-01-01

    A battery-operated optoelectronic instrument is designed to be lowered into the ocean to measure the intensity and lifetime of fluorescence of chlorophyll A in marine phytoplankton as a function of depth from 0 to 300 m. Fluorescence lifetimes are especially useful as robust measures of photosynthetic productivity of phytoplankton and of physical and chemical mechanisms that affect photosynthesis. The knowledge of photosynthesis in phytoplankton gained by use of this and related instruments is expected to contribute to understanding of global processes that control the time-varying fluxes of carbon and associated biogenic elements in the ocean. The concentration of chlorophyll in the ocean presents a major detection challenge because in order to obtain accurate values of photosynthetic parameters, the intensity of light used to excite fluorescence must be kept very low so as not to disturb the photosynthetic system. Several innovations in fluorometric instrumentation were made in order to make it possible to reach the required low detection limit. These innovations include a highly efficient optical assembly with an integrated flow-through sample interface, and a high-gain, low-noise electronic detection subsystem. The instrument also incorporates means for self-calibration during operation, and electronic hardware and software for control, acquisition and analysis of data, and communications. The electronic circuitry is highly miniaturized and designed to minimize power demand. The instrument is housed in a package that can withstand the water pressure at the maximum depth of 300 m. A light-emitting diode excites fluorescence in the sample flow cell, which is placed at one focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector. A photomultiplier tube is placed at the other focal point. This optical arrangement enables highly efficient collection of fluorescence emitted over all polar directions. Fluorescence lifetime is measured indirectly, by use of a technique based on the

  17. Mosaic-Detector-Based Fluorescence Spectral Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    A battery-powered, pen-sized, portable instrument for measuring molecular fluorescence spectra of chemical and biological samples in the field has been proposed. Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is among the techniques used most frequently in laboratories to analyze compositions of chemical and biological samples. Heretofore, it has been possible to measure fluorescence spectra of molecular species at relative concentrations as low as parts per billion (ppb), with a few nm spectral resolution. The proposed instrument would include a planar array (mosaic) of detectors, onto which a fluorescence spectrum would be spatially mapped. Unlike in the larger laboratory-type molecular fluorescence spectrometers, mapping of wavelengths to spatial positions would be accomplished without use of relatively bulky optical parts. The proposed instrument is expected to be sensitive enough to enable measurement of spectra of chemical species at relative concentrations <1 ppb, with spectral resolution that could be tailored by design to be comparable to a laboratory molecular fluorescence spectrometer. The proposed instrument (see figure) would include a button-cell battery and a laser diode, which would generate the monochromatic ultraviolet light needed to excite fluorescence in a sample. The sample would be held in a cell bounded by far-ultraviolet-transparent quartz or optical glass. The detector array would be, more specifically, a complementary metal oxide/ semiconductor or charge-coupled- device imaging photodetector array, the photodetectors of which would be tailored to respond to light in the wavelength range of the fluorescence spectrum to be measured. The light-input face of the photodetector array would be covered with a matching checkerboard array of multilayer thin film interference filters, such that each pixel in the array would be sensitive only to light in a spectral band narrow enough so as not to overlap significantly with the band of an adjacent pixel. The

  18. Fluorescence of Melanin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, James Martin

    1981-06-01

    Optical fluorescence in aqueous suspensions of synthetic dopa melanin has been detected and investigated. A fluorescence lifetime of 8.3 ns was measured in pulsed laser experiments. Fluorescence was observed for excitation between 290 and 420 nm. The emission as a function of wavelength displayed a single broad maximum falling between 440 and 480 nm, depending on excitation wavelength. The dependence of the quantum efficiency for fluorescence on parameters such as solution temperature, viscosity, pH, and concentration of metal ion, such as copper, has been investigated. The emission intensity decreased at both high and low values of pH, with increasing temperatures, and with increasing metal ion concentration, and decreasing viscosity. The pH dependence of the fluorescence can be related to changes in the ionization state of the various ionizable groups attached to the fluorophores. A self consistent model was developed in which proton transfer from these groups was fast compared with fluorescence rates for one type of fluorophore and slow compared with those for another type. The fluorescence dependence on copper ion concentration is explained in terms of a model invoking a reaction between melanin fluorophores and copper ions leading to the formation of a melanin-copper complex which is itself fluorescent. A model incorporating diffusion controlled chemical reactions between fluorescents groups and quencher groups on the melanin polymer is developed and used to explain the observed dependence of melanin fluorescence on solvent viscosity. Over the temperature range 20(DEGREES)C-70(DEGREES)C, an Arrhenius type behavior was found with an activation enthalpy of 1.3 Kcal/mole. Using the temperature dependence of the viscous quenching model as well as the temperature dependence of the fluorophore-radical equilibrium concentration leads to a temperature dependence which is in reasonable agreement with the observed behavior. Many aspects of the experimental results

  19. Time encoded multicolor fluorescence detection in a microfluidic flow cytometer.

    PubMed

    Martini, Joerg; Recht, Michael I; Huck, Malte; Bern, Marshall W; Johnson, Noble M; Kiesel, Peter

    2012-12-07

    We describe an optical detection technique that delivers high signal-to-noise discrimination to enable a multi-parameter flow cytometer that combines high performance, robustness, compactness and low cost. The enabling technique is termed "spatially modulated detection" and generates a time-dependent signal as a continuously fluorescing (bio-) particle traverses an optical transmission pattern along the fluidic channel. Correlating the detected signal with the expected transmission pattern achieves high discrimination of the particle signal from background noise. Additionally, the particle speed and its fluorescence emission characteristics are deduced from the correlation analysis. Our method uses a large excitation/emission volume along the fluidic channel in order to increase the total flux of fluorescence light that originates from a particle while requiring minimal optical alignment. Despite the large excitation/detection volume, the mask pattern enables a high spatial resolution in the micron range. This allows for detection and characterization of particles with a separation (in flow direction) comparable to the dimension of individual particles. In addition, the concept is intrinsically tolerant of non-encoded background fluorescence originating from fluorescent components in solution, fluorescing components of the chamber and contaminants on its surface. The optical detection technique is illustrated with experimental results of multicolor detection with a single large area detector by filtering fluorescence emission of different particles through a patterned color mask. Thereby the particles' fluorescence emission spectrum is encoded in a time dependent intensity signal and color information can be extracted from the correlation analysis. The multicolor detection technique is demonstrated by differentiation of micro-beads loaded with PE (Phycoerythrin) and PE-Cy5 that are excited at 532 nm.

  20. Multifunctional Magnetic-fluorescent Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Serena A.; Rakovich, Yury P.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2008-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a fast-growing area, involving the fabrication and use of nano-sized materials and devices. Various nanocomposite materials play a number of important roles in modern science and technology. Magnetic and fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications. It is expected that the combination of magnetic and fluorescent properties in one nanocomposite would enable the engineering of unique multifunctional nanoscale devices, which could be manipulated using external magnetic fields. The aim of this review is to present an overview of bimodal “two-in-one” magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposite materials which combine both magnetic and fluorescent properties in one entity, in particular those with potential applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. There is a great necessity for the development of these multifunctional nanocomposites, but there are some difficulties and challenges to overcome in their fabrication such as quenching of the fluorescent entity by the magnetic core. Fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites include a variety of materials including silica-based, dye-functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots-magnetic nanoparticle composites. The classification and main synthesis strategies, along with approaches for the fabrication of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites, are considered. The current and potential biomedical uses, including biological imaging, cell tracking, magnetic bioseparation, nanomedicine and bio- and chemo-sensoring, of magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites are also discussed.

  1. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Arne; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-28

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime contrast in small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Sun, LuZhe; Herman, Brian A.

    2007-02-01

    Early detection of primary tumors is the key for effective therapeutic intervention and successful patient survival. Small animal models emulating human diseases are powerful tools for our comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of tumor formation and metastasis to distant sites. Our long-term goal is to develop a non-invasive, multiphoton-fluorescence lifetime imaging (MP-FLIM) modality that can precisely quantify these steps in animal tumor models at a very early stage. The specific hypothesis is that fluorescence lifetime can be employed as reliable contrast parameter for providing higher detection sensitivity as compared with conventional intensity-based tumor imaging approaches and therefore it is possible to detect smaller tumor volumes (early detection) than those achieved by other prevailing methods. We base this hypothesis on our recent observations that (1) fluorescence lifetime is "intrinsic" to the fluorophore and its measurement is not affected by concentration and/or spectral artifacts as in intensity-based methods, (2) multiphoton excitation can enable increased tissue penetrability and reduced phototoxicity and (3) MP-FLIM approach can discriminate background autofluorescence from the fluorescent proteins in thick tissues thereby achieving a ten-fold increase in signal-to-background ratio over the intensity-based approaches. We present our preliminary data to support this hypothesis in primary tumor detection in nu/nu athymic mouse models.

  3. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  4. Dendrimer Probes for Enhanced Photostability and Localization in Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sung Hoon; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled high-resolution imaging and tracking of single proteins and biomolecules in cells. To achieve high spatial resolutions in the nanometer range, bright and photostable fluorescent probes are critically required. From this view, there is a strong need for development of advanced fluorescent probes with molecular-scale dimensions for fluorescence imaging. Polymer-based dendrimer nanoconjugates hold strong potential to serve as versatile fluorescent probes due to an intrinsic capacity for tailored spectral properties such as brightness and emission wavelength. In this work, we report a new, to our knowledge, class of molecular probes based on dye-conjugated dendrimers for fluorescence imaging and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We engineered fluorescent dendritic nanoprobes (FDNs) to contain multiple organic dyes and reactive groups for target-specific biomolecule labeling. The photophysical properties of dye-conjugated FDNs (Cy5-FDNs and Cy3-FDNs) were characterized using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which revealed greatly enhanced photostability, increased probe brightness, and improved localization precision in high-resolution fluorescence imaging compared to single organic dyes. As proof-of-principle demonstration, Cy5-FDNs were used to assay single-molecule nucleic acid hybridization and for immunofluorescence imaging of microtubules in cytoskeletal networks. In addition, Cy5-FDNs were used as reporter probes in a single-molecule protein pull-down assay to characterize antibody binding and target protein capture. In all cases, the photophysical properties of FDNs resulted in enhanced fluorescence imaging via improved brightness and/or photostability. PMID:23561533

  5. Fluorescent Aptamer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui William; Kim, Youngmi; Meng, Ling; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Martin, Jennifer; Tang, Zhiwen; Shangguan, Dihua; O'Donoghue, Meghan; Tan, Weihong

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acid probes that can be evolved to have high specificity and affinity for different targets. These targets include biomar-ker proteins, small molecules, and even whole live cells that express a variety of surface proteins of interest. Aptamers offer several advantages over protein-based molecular probes such as low immunogenic activity, flexible modification, and in vitro synthesis. In addition, aptamers used as molecular probes can be made with easy signaling for binding with their corresponding targets. There are a few different fluorescence-based signal transduction mechanisms, such as direct fluorophore labeling, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence quenching, fluorescence anisotropy, and light-switching excimers. These signaling processes in combination with various labeling strategies of nucleic acid aptamers contribute to simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective biological assays. In this chapter, we discuss the optical signaling of aptamers for single proteins such as α-thrombin and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We also present detailed discussion about fluorescent aptamers developed from cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) for the recognition of different target tumor cells.

  6. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  7. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  8. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  9. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to < 10 ns. A temporal resolution of half the excitation period is possible which in this instance is 15 ns. This stroboscopic technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  10. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  11. An Internet enabled impact limiter material database

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an interest enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The technique used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience.

  12. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU. PMID:26901051

  13. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  14. Boosting nanodiamond fluorescence: towards development of brighter probes.

    PubMed

    Havlik, Jan; Petrakova, Vladimira; Rehor, Ivan; Petrak, Vaclav; Gulka, Michal; Stursa, Jan; Kucka, Jan; Ralis, Jan; Rendler, Torsten; Lee, San-Yung; Reuter, Rolf; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Ledvina, Miroslav; Nesladek, Milos; Cigler, Petr

    2013-04-21

    A novel approach for preparation of ultra-bright fluorescent nanodiamonds (fNDs) was developed and the thermal and kinetic optimum of NV center formation was identified. Combined with a new oxidation method, this approach enabled preparation of particles that were roughly one order of magnitude brighter than particles prepared with commonly used procedures.

  15. Charge-sensitive fluorescent nanosensors created from nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Petrakova, V; Rehor, I; Stursa, J; Ledvina, M; Nesladek, M; Cigler, P

    2015-08-07

    We show that fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are among the few types of nanosensors that enable direct optical reading of noncovalent molecular events. The unique sensing mechanism is based on switching between the negatively charged and neutral states of NV centers which is induced by the interaction of the FND surface with charged molecules.

  16. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  17. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  18. Low-cost, High Performance Avalanche Photodiodes for Enabling High Sensitivity Bio-fluorescence Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Johnson , M.A.L.; Yu, Shonghai; Kolbas, R. M.; Cook , Jr. J. W.; Schetzina, J. F. Absorption Coefficient and...absorption region to achieve high QE 0 200 400 600 800 1000 GaN E F ie ld (M V /c m ) E n e rg y Distance (nm) E c E v SiC 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 1 2 575 580...585 E n e rg y E le c tr ic F ie ld ( M V /c m ) Distance (nm) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 Mg Doped ICCL GaN E F ie ld (M V /c m ) E n e rg y

  19. Guidelines for application of fluorescent lamps in high-performance avionic backlight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syroid, Daniel D.

    1997-07-01

    Fluorescent lamps have proven to be well suited for use in high performance avionic backlight systems as demonstrated by numerous production applications for both commercial and military cockpit displays. Cockpit display applications include: Boeing 777, new 737s, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-22, C- 130, Navy P3, NASA Space Shuttle and many others. Fluorescent lamp based backlights provide high luminance, high lumen efficiency, precision chromaticity and long life for avionic active matrix liquid crystal display applications. Lamps have been produced in many sizes and shapes. Lamp diameters range from 2.6 mm to over 20 mm and lengths for the larger diameter lamps range to over one meter. Highly convoluted serpentine lamp configurations are common as are both hot and cold cathode electrode designs. This paper will review fluorescent lamp operating principles, discuss typical requirements for avionic grade lamps, compare avionic and laptop backlight designs and provide guidelines for the proper application of lamps and performance choices that must be made to attain optimum system performance considering high luminance output, system efficiency, dimming range and cost.

  20. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  1. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians. PMID:27311567

  2. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    PubMed

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system.

  3. Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    So, P T; Dong, C Y; Masters, B R; Berland, K M

    2000-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. This technology enables noninvasive study of biological specimens in three dimensions with submicrometer resolution. Two-photon excitation of fluorophores results from the simultaneous absorption of two photons. This excitation process has a number of unique advantages, such as reduced specimen photodamage and enhanced penetration depth. It also produces higher-contrast images and is a novel method to trigger localized photochemical reactions. Two-photon microscopy continues to find an increasing number of applications in biology and medicine.

  4. Temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent polymeric thermometer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), labeled by polarity and hydrogen bonding sensitive 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan.

    PubMed

    Gota, Chie; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2008-03-13

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers showing temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes enable thermal mapping of small spaces such as a microchannel and a living cell. We report the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA), which is a random copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and an environment-sensitive fluorescent monomer (DBD-AA) containing a 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan structure. The average fluorescence lifetime of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) in aqueous solution increased from 4.22 to 14.1 ns with increasing temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C. This drastic change in fluorescence lifetime (27% increase per 1 degrees C) is the sharpest ever reported. Concentration independency, one of the advantages of fluorescence lifetime measurements, was seen in average fluorescence lifetime (13.7 +/- 0.18 ns) of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) at 33 degrees C over a wide concentration range (0.005-1 w/v%). With increasing temperature, polyNIPAM units in poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) change their structure from an extended form to a globular form, providing apolar and aprotic environments to the fluorescent DBD-AA units. Consequently, the environment-sensitive DBD-AA units translate the local environmental changes into the extension of the fluorescence lifetime. This role of the DBD-AA units was revealed by a study of solvent effects on fluorescence lifetime of a model environment-sensitive fluorophore.

  5. Hyperspectral Fluorescence and Reflectance Imaging Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; O'Neal, S. Duane; Lanoue, Mark; Russell, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    wavelength light-emitting-diode (LED) sources and white-light LED sources designed to produce consistently spatially stable light. White LEDs provide illumination for the measurement of reflectance spectra, while narrowband blue and UV LEDs are used to excite fluorescence. Each spectral type of LED can be turned on or off depending on the specific remote-sensing process being performed. Uniformity of illumination is achieved by using an array of LEDs and/or an integrating sphere or other diffusing surface. The image plane scanner uses a fore optic with a field of view large enough to provide an entire scan line on the image plane. It builds up a two-dimensional image in pushbroom fashion as the target is scanned across the image plane either by moving the object or moving the fore optic. For fluorescence detection, spectral filtering of a narrowband light illumination source is sometimes necessary to minimize the interference of the source spectrum wings with the fluorescence signal. Spectral filtering is achieved with optical interference filters and absorption glasses. This dual spectral imaging capability will enable the optimization of reflective, fluorescence, and fused datasets as well as a cost-effective design for multispectral imaging solutions. This system has been used in plant stress detection studies and in currency analysis.

  6. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years.

  7. Commentary: Academic Enablers and School Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.

    2002-01-01

    This commentary presents academic enablers within the broader, overlapping context of school learning theory, including the theories of Carroll, Harnishfeger and Wiley, Walberg, and others. Multivariate models are needed to understand the influences of academic enabler and school learning variables on learning, as well as the influences of these…

  8. Graphene as a Reversible and Spectrally Selective Fluorescence Quencher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Kakenov, Nurbek; Balci, Osman; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-09-01

    We report reversible and spectrally selective fluorescence quenching of quantum dots (QDs) placed in close proximity to graphene. Controlling interband electronic transitions of graphene via electrostatic gating greatly modifies the fluorescence lifetime and intensity of nearby QDs via blocking of the nonradiative energy transfer between QDs and graphene. Using ionic liquid (IL) based electrolyte gating, we are able to control Fermi energy of graphene in the order of 1 eV, which yields electrically controllable fluorescence quenching of QDs in the visible spectrum. Indeed, our technique enables us to perform voltage controllable spectral selectivity among quantum dots at different emission wavelengths. We anticipate that our technique will provide tunable light-matter interaction and energy transfer that could yield hybrid QDs-graphene based optoelectronic devices with novel functionalities, and additionally, may be useful as a spectroscopic ruler, for example, in bioimaging and biomolecular sensing. We propose that graphene can be used as an electrically tunable and wavelength selective fluorescence quencher.

  9. Fluorescent nanowire heterostructures as a versatile tool for biology applications.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Karl; Persson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Oredsson, Stina; Samuelson, Lars; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Borgström, Magnus T; Prinz, Christelle N

    2013-10-09

    Nanowires are increasingly used in biology, as sensors, as injection devices, and as model systems for toxicity studies. Currently, in situ visualization of nanowires in biological media is done using organic dyes, which are prone to photobleaching, or using microscopy methods which either yield poor resolution or require a sophisticated setup. Here we show that inherently fluorescent nanowire axial heterostructures can be used to localize and identify nanowires in cells and tissue. By synthesizing GaP-GaInP nanowire heterostructures, with nonfluorescent GaP segments and fluorescent GaInP segments, we created a barcode labeling system enabling the distinction of the nanowire morphological and chemical properties using fluorescence microscopy. The GaInP photoluminescence stability, combined with the fact that the nanowires can be coated with different materials while retaining their fluorescence, make these nanowires promising tools for biological and nanotoxicological studies.

  10. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  11. Strategies for In Vivo Imaging Using Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-26

    Fluorescent proteins have enabled the color-coding of cells growing in vivo. Noninvasive imaging of cells expressing fluorescent proteins has allowed the real-time determination of the behavior on cancer cells, the progression of infection, the differentiation of stem cells, and interaction of stromal and cancer cells. Cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm can visualize in vivo nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics in vivo including: mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle phase, and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm that occurs during cancer-cell deformation. Linking spectrally-distinct fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins results in color-coding the phases of the cell cycle. With the use of fluorescent proteins, literally any cellular or molecular function can be imaged in vivo. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  13. Microencapsulated Fluorescent Dye Penetrant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Microencapsulated fluorescent dye pentrant materials were evaluated for feasibility as a technique to detect cracks on metal surfaces when applied as...a free flowing dry powder. Various flourescent dye solutions in addition to a commercial penetrant (Zyglo ZL-30) were microencapsulated and tested on

  14. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  15. Fluorescence Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Ryan K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the modern surgical era is highlighted by multiple technological advances and innovations, one area that has remained constant is the dependence of the surgeon's vision on white-light reflectance. This renders different body tissues in a limited palette of various shades of pink and red, thereby limiting the visual contrast available to the operating surgeon. Healthy tissue, anatomic variations, and diseased states are seen as slight discolorations relative to each other and differences are inherently limited in dynamic range. In the upcoming years, surgery will undergo a paradigm shift with the use of targeted fluorescence imaging probes aimed at augmenting the surgical armamentarium by expanding the “visible” spectrum available to surgeons. Such fluorescent “smart probes” will provide real-time, intraoperative, pseudo-color, high-contrast delineation of both normal and pathologic tissues. Fluorescent surgical molecular guidance promises another major leap forward to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes, and to reduce overall healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of current and future surgical applications of fluorescence imaging in diseased and nondiseased tissues and focus on the innovative fields of image processing and instrumentation. PMID:23335674

  16. Estimating the dim light melatonin onset of adolescents within a 6-h sampling window: the impact of sampling rate and threshold method

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Stephanie J.; Suh, Christina; Molina, Thomas A.; Fogg, Louis F.; Sharkey, Katherine M.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective/Background Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders often manifest during the adolescent years. Measurement of circadian phase such as the Dim Light Melatonin Onset (DLMO) improves diagnosis and treatment of these disorders, but financial and time costs limit the use of DLMO phase assessments in clinic. The current analysis aims to inform a cost-effective and efficient protocol to measure the DLMO in older adolescents by reducing the number of samples and total sampling duration. Patients/Methods A total of 66 healthy adolescents (26 males) aged 14.8 to 17.8 years participated in a study in which sleep was fixed for one week before they came to the laboratory for saliva collection in dim light (<20 lux). Two partial 6-h salivary melatonin profiles were derived for each participant. Both profiles began 5 h before bedtime and ended 1 h after bedtime, but one profile was derived from samples taken every 30 mins (13 samples) and the other from samples taken every 60 mins (7 samples). Three standard thresholds (first 3 melatonin values mean + 2 SDs, 3 pg/mL, and 4 pg/mL) were used to compute the DLMO. Agreement between DLMOs derived from 30-min and 60-min sampling rates was determined using a Bland-Altman analysis; agreement between sampling rate DLMOs was defined as ± 1 h. Results and Conclusions Within a 6-h sampling window, 60-min sampling provided DLMO estimates that were within ± 1 h of DLMO from 30-min sampling, but only when an absolute threshold (3 pg/mL or 4 pg/mL) was used to compute the DLMO. Future analyses should be extended to include adolescents with circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. PMID:27318227

  17. Interoperability of medical device information and the clinical applications: an HL7 RMIM based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 DIM.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2011-07-01

    Medical devices are essential to the practice of modern healthcare services. Their benefits will increase if clinical software applications can seamlessly acquire the medical device data. The need to represent medical device observations in a format that can be consumable by clinical applications has already been recognized by the industry. Yet, the solutions proposed involve bilateral mappings from the ISO/IEEE 11073 Domain Information Model (DIM) to specific message or document standards. Considering that there are many different types of clinical applications such as the electronic health record and the personal health record systems, the clinical workflows, and the clinical decision support systems each conforming to different standard interfaces, detailing a mapping mechanism for every one of them introduces significant work and, thus, limits the potential health benefits of medical devices. In this paper, to facilitate the interoperability of clinical applications and the medical device data, we use the ISO/IEEE 11073 DIM to derive an HL7 v3 Refined Message Information Model (RMIM) of the medical device domain from the HL7 v3 Reference Information Mode (RIM). This makes it possible to trace the medical device data back to a standard common denominator, that is, HL7 v3 RIM from which all the other medical domains under HL7 v3 are derived. Hence, once the medical device data are obtained in the RMIM format, it can easily be transformed into HL7-based standard interfaces through XML transformations because these interfaces all have their building blocks from the same RIM. To demonstrate this, we provide the mappings from the developed RMIM to some of the widely used HL7 v3-based standard interfaces.

  18. Possible role of the dimming/brightening in observed temperatures across Europe since the second half of the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Besselaar, E. J. M.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; Wild, M.; Klein Tank, A. M. G.

    2012-04-01

    The surface solar radiation (SSR) is the fundamental source of energy in the climate system, and consequently the source of life on our planet, due to its central role in the surface energy balance. Therefore, a significant impact on temperatures is expected due to the widespread dimming/brightening phenomenon observed since the second half of the 20th century (Wild, 2009). Previous studies pointed out the effects of SSR trends in temperatures series over Europe (Makowski et al., 2009; Philipona et al., 2009), although the lack of long-term SSR series limits these results. This work describes an updated sunshine duration (SS) dataset compiled by the European Climate Assessment and Dataset (ECA&D) project based on around 300 daily time series over Europe covering the 1961-2010 period. The relationship between the SS and temperature series is analysed based on four temperature variables: maximum (TX), minimum (TN) and mean temperature (TG), as well as the diurnal temperature range (DTR). Regional and pan-European mean series of SS and temperatures are constructed. The analyses are performed on annual and seasonal scale, and focusing on the interannual and decadal agreement between the variables. The results show strong positive correlations on interannual scales between SS and temperatures over Europe, especially for the DTR and TX during the summer period and regions in Central Europe. Interestingly, the SS and temperatures series show a tendency towards higher correlations in the smoothed series, both for different regions and temperature variables. These results confirm the relationship between temperature and SS trends over Europe since the second half of the 20th century, which has been speculated to partially decrease (increase) temperatures during the dimming (brightening) period (Makowski et al., 2009; Wild, 2009). Further research is needed to confirm this cause-effect relationship currently found only using correlation analysis.

  19. Elevated levels of peripheral blood CD14(bright) CD16+ and CD14(dim) CD16+ monocytes may contribute to the development of retinopathy in patients with juvenile onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ryba-Stanisławowska, Monika; Myśliwska, Jolanta; Juhas, Ulana; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to analyze the CD14(bright) CD16(+) and CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocyte subsets in juvenile-onset complication-free diabetes mellitus type 1 in the context of their association with microvascular complications. 61 children with type 1 diabetes and 30 healthy individuals were enrolled in a study. CD14(bright) CD16(+) and CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocytes were quantified in peripheral blood by means of flow cytometry. At the time of sampling blood glucose concentration was taken along with biochemical measurement of renal function, CRP and glycosylated hemoglobin. The Spearman's correlations were used to compare the relationship between CD16(+) monocyte subsets and the clinical parameters that can predict the development of microangiopathies. The flow cytometric analysis of monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of analyzed subjects revealed that the numbers of CD14(bright) CD16(+) and CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocytes were significantly higher in patients with type 1 diabetes than in the healthy individuals. As to the relationship between CD16(+) monocyte subsets and the clinical parameters that can predict development of microangiopathies, it was shown that both CD16(+) subsets were associated with increased risk of retinopathy development, defined as retinopathy development value. Elevated levels of intermediate CD14(bright) CD16(+) and non-classical CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocytes predict development of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  20. pH-switchable bacteria detection using zwitterionic fluorescent polymer.

    PubMed

    Khoerunnisa; Mazrad, Zihnil A I; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2017-04-15

    A zwitterionic fluorescent polymer with high sensitivity to pH changes was constructed for the detection and imaging of both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. A detection probe using the zwitterionic fluorescent polymer was synthesized with single boron dipyrromethane (BODIPY) as a hydrophobic dye and bromoethane as a cationic group for bacteria binding with conjugated poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (BOD/BE-PSM). The zwitterionic fluorescent polymer bound to bacteria through ionic complexes between anionic groups on the bacterial surface and cationic BOD/BE-PSM groups after 1h incubation. This finding demonstrated that the fluorescence on/off system operated via changes in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of the zwitterionic fluorescent polymer, depending on the pH (6.0, 7.4, or 9.0), at a fixed 1mg/mL polymer concentration. The system showed good stability with a limit of detection of 1mg/mL. Quenching caused by interactions with the hydrophobic BODIPY dye was also observed, enabling bacteria detection, as shown by fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy images. Our results indicated that the zwitterionic fluorescent polymer could be used to detect bacteria over a wide range of pH values.

  1. Simultaneous neuron- and astrocyte-specific fluorescent marking

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Wiebke; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Kamo, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Kasai, Atsushi; Seiriki, Kaoru; Shintani, Norihito; Ago, Yukio; Farfan, Camille; and others

    2015-03-27

    Systematic and simultaneous analysis of multiple cell types in the brain is becoming important, but such tools have not yet been adequately developed. Here, we aimed to generate a method for the specific fluorescent labeling of neurons and astrocytes, two major cell types in the brain, and we have developed lentiviral vectors to express the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in neurons and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in astrocytes. Importantly, both fluorescent proteins are fused to histone 2B protein (H2B) to confer nuclear localization to distinguish between single cells. We also constructed several expression constructs, including a tandem alignment of the neuron- and astrocyte-expression cassettes for simultaneous labeling. Introducing these vectors and constructs in vitro and in vivo resulted in cell type-specific and nuclear-localized fluorescence signals enabling easy detection and distinguishability of neurons and astrocytes. This tool is expected to be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of changes in neurons and astrocytes in healthy and diseased brains. - Highlights: • We develop a method for the specific fluorescent labeling of neurons and astrocytes. • Neuron-specific labeling is achieved using Scg10 and synapsin promoters. • Astrocyte-specific labeling is generated using the minimal GFAP promoter. • Nuclear localization of fluorescent proteins is achieved with histone 2B protein.

  2. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Michael G; Husvogt, Lennart; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E; Hornegger, Joachim; Connolly, James L; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-01-01

    We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems.

  3. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Husvogt, Lennart; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E.; Hornegger, Joachim; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems. PMID:27500636

  4. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  5. Preclinical evaluation of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled cetuximab as a potential tool for fluorescence-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Saccomano, Mara; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    The high rate of recurrence in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) could be reduced by supporting the surgeons in discriminating healthy from diseased tissues with intraoperative fluorescence-guidance. Here, we studied the suitability of Cetuximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled as a new tool for fluorescence-guided surgery. Distribution and binding of systemically injected Cetuximab Alexa Fluor 647 conjugate (Cetux-Alexa-647) and the co-injected control human IgG Alexa Fluor 750 conjugate (hIgG-Alexa-750) was studied over 48 h by NIR fluorescence imaging in mice bearing human orthotopic AsPC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 PDAC tumors. Cetux-Alexa-647, but not the control hIgG-Alexa-750 fluorescence, was specifically detected in vivo in both primary pancreatic tumors with maximum fluorescence intensities at 24 h, and in metastases of AsPC-1 tumors as small as 1 mm. Lifetime analysis and NIR fluorescence microscopy of tumor sections confirmed the binding specificity of Cetux-Alexa-647 to PDAC cells. Comparable results were obtained with Cetuximab conjugated to Alexa Fluor 750 dye (Cetux-Alexa-750). Fluorescence-guided dissection, performed 24 h after injection of Cetuximab conjugated to IRDye 800CW (Cetux-800CW), enabled a real-time delineation of AsPC-1 tumor margins, and small metastases. Odyssey scans revealed that only the vital part of the tumor, but not the necrotic part was stained with Cetux-800CW. NIR fluorescently labeled Cetuximab may be a promising tool that can be applied for fluorescence-guided surgery to visualize tumor margins and metastatic sites in order to allow a precise surgical resection.

  6. Natural Indoles, Indole-3-Carbinol (I3C) and 3,3’-Diindolylmethane (DIM), Attenuate Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Mediated Liver Injury by Downregulating miR-31 Expression and Promoting Caspase-2-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent superantigen capable of inducing inflammation characterized by robust immune cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine release. Exposure to SEB can result in food poisoning as well as fatal conditions such as toxic shock syndrome. In the current study, we investigated the effect of natural indoles including indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM) on SEB-mediated liver injury. Injection of SEB into D-galactosamine-sensitized female C57BL/6 mice resulted in liver injury as indicated by an increase in enzyme aspartate transaminase (AST) levels, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and massive infiltration of immune cells into the liver. Administration of I3C and DIM (40mg/kg), by intraperitonal injection, attenuated SEB-induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by decrease in AST levels, inflammatory cytokines and cellular infiltration in the liver. I3C and DIM triggered apoptosis in SEB-activated T cells primarily through activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In addition, inhibitor studies involving caspases revealed that I3C and DIM-mediated apoptosis in these activated cells was dependent on caspase-2 but independent of caspase-8, 9 and 3. In addition, I3C and DIM caused a decrease in Bcl-2 expression. Both compounds also down-regulated miR-31, which directly targets caspase-2 and influences apoptosis in SEB-activated cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that indoles can effectively suppress acute hepatic inflammation caused by SEB and that this may be mediated by decreased expression of miR-31 and consequent caspase-2-dependent apoptosis in T cells. PMID:25706292

  7. Holograms of fluorescent albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2011-09-01

    We report the characterization and analysis of photochromic films gallus gallus albumin as a matrix modified for holographic recording. Photo-oxidation of homogeneous mixtures prepared with albumin-propylene glycol, to combine chemically with aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate at certain concentrations. We analyzed the diffraction gratings, through the diffraction efficiency of the proposed material. Also, eosin was used as a fluorescent agent, so it is found that produces an inhibitory effect, thus decreasing the diffraction efficiency of the matrices prepared in near-identical circumstances. The work was to achieve stability of albumin films, were prepared with propylene glycol. Finally, experimental studies were performed with films when subjected to aqueous solution of eosin (fluorescent agent) to verify the ability to increase or decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  8. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Karen; Vasquez, Deb

    2017-01-01

    The Federal Energy Management Program's 'Utility Energy Service Contracts: Enabling Documents' provide legislative information and materials that clarify the authority for federal agencies to enter into utility energy service contracts, or UESCs.

  9. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents provides materials that clarify the authority for Federal agencies to enter into utility energy services contracts (UESCs), as well as sample documents and resources to ease utility partnership contracting.

  10. A reversibly photoswitchable GFP-like protein with fluorescence excitation decoupled from switching.

    PubMed

    Brakemann, Tanja; Stiel, Andre C; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Testa, Ilaria; Grotjohann, Tim; Leutenegger, Marcel; Plessmann, Uwe; Urlaub, Henning; Eggeling, Christian; Wahl, Markus C; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2011-09-11

    Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins have enabled new approaches for imaging cells, but their utility has been limited either because they cannot be switched repeatedly or because the wavelengths for switching and fluorescence imaging are strictly coupled. We report a bright, monomeric, reversibly photoswitchable variant of GFP, Dreiklang, whose fluorescence excitation spectrum is decoupled from that for optical switching. Reversible on-and-off switching in living cells is accomplished at illumination wavelengths of ∼365 nm and ∼405 nm, respectively, whereas fluorescence is elicited at ∼515 nm. Mass spectrometry and high-resolution crystallographic analysis of the same protein crystal in the photoswitched on- and off-states demonstrate that switching is based on a reversible hydration/dehydration reaction that modifies the chromophore. The switching properties of Dreiklang enable far-field fluorescence nanoscopy in living mammalian cells using both a coordinate-targeted and a stochastic single molecule switching approach.

  11. A synthesis of fluorescent starch based on carbon nanoparticles for fingerprints detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongren; Guo, Xingjia; Liu, Jun; Li, Feng

    2016-10-01

    A pyrolysis method for synthesizing carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were developed by using malic acid and ammonium oxalate as raw materials. The incorporation of a minor amount of carbon nanoparticles into starch powder imparts remarkable color-tunability. Based on this phenomenon, an environment friendly fluorescent starch powder for detecting latent fingerprints in non-porous surfaces was prepared. The fingerprints on different non-porous surfaces developed with this powder showed very good fluorescent images under ultraviolet excitation. The method using fluorescent starch powder as fluorescent marks is simple, rapid and green. Experimental results illustrated the effectiveness of proposed methods, enabling its practical applications in forensic sciences.

  12. Fluorescent probe based on heteroatom containing styrylcyanine: pH-sensitive properties and bioimaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Gao, Ya; Huang, Zhibing; Chen, Xiaohui; Ke, Zhiyong; Zhao, Peiliang; Yan, Yichen; Liu, Ruiyuan; Qu, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    A novel fluorescent probe based on heteroatom containing styrylcyanine is synthesized. The fluorescence of probe is bright green in basic and neutral media but dark orange in strong acidic environments, which could be reversibly switched. Such behavior enables it to work as a fluorescent pH sensor in the solution state and a chemosensor for detecting acidic and basic volatile organic compounds. Analyses by NMR spectroscopy confirm that the protonation or deprotonation of pyridinyl moiety is responsible for the sensing process. In addition, the fluorescent microscopic images of probe in live cells and zebrafish are achieved successfully, suggesting that the probe has good cell membrane permeability and low cytotoxicity.

  13. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  14. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  15. Chelators Exhibiting Triple Fluorescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-31

    Collins et al. I excited state (LE). Grabowski et al proposed the twisted intramolecular charge transfer ( TICT ) state 2 to successfully account for the...red-shifted fluorescence. Grabowski et al. Pure Appl. Chem.. 1983. 3 55. 245. TICT refers to the state wherein an intramolecular char,,e transfer takes...phenyl acceptor ring from the dimethyl amino donor group. The TICT 6 state has been observed in other molecular systems bearing donor and acceptor

  16. ISS - Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA and the ISS partnership are jointly developing a key standard to enable future collaborative exploration. The IDSS is based on flight proven design while incorporating new low impact technology. Low impact technology accommodates a wide range of vehicle contact and capture conditions. This standard will get early demonstration on the ISS. Experience gained here will enable operational experience and the opportunity to refine the standard.

  17. GIS Enabled Modeling and Simulation (GEMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    polygons, visual databases include texture information to provide a visualization of ground and material types. These databases include 3D models ...US Army TEC GIS-Enabled Modeling and Simulation project, and was the lead developer on the building interior semantic information portion of the...GIS Enabled Modeling and Simulation (GEMS) Thomas Stanzione Kevin Johnson MAK Technologies 68 Moulton Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (617) 876

  18. Fluorescent imaging of cancerous tissues for targeted surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lihong; Shen, Baozhong; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    To maximize tumor excision and minimize collateral damage is the primary goal of cancer surgery. Emerging molecular imaging techniques have to “image-guided surgery” developing into “molecular imaging-guided surgery”, which is termed “targeted surgery” in this review. Consequently, the precision of surgery can be advanced from tissue-scale to molecule-scale, enabling “targeted surgery” to be a component of “targeted therapy”. Evidence from numerous experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated significant benefits of fluorescent imaging in targeted surgery with preoperative molecular diagnostic screening. Fluorescent imaging can help to improve intraoperative staging and enable more radical cytoreduction, detect obscure tumor lesions in special organs, highlight tumor margins, better map lymph node metastases, and identify important normal structures intraoperatively. Though limited tissue penetration of fluorescent imaging and tumor heterogeneity are two major hurdles for current targeted surgery, multimodality imaging and multiplex imaging may provide potential solutions to overcome these issues, respectively. Moreover, though many fluorescent imaging techniques and probes have been investigated, targeted surgery remains at a proof-of-principle stage. The impact of fluorescent imaging on cancer surgery will likely be realized through persistent interdisciplinary amalgamation of research in diverse fields. PMID:25064553

  19. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered. PMID:21714025

  1. Green fluorescent protein: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Remington, S James

    2011-09-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994-2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered.

  2. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  3. Surface plasmon enhanced-field fluorescence biosensor for point-of-care testing using fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Toshihito; Ohtsuka, Hisashi; Kasagi, Noriyuki; Oohara, Tomoya; Matsuno, Tadahiro; Hakamata, Masashi; Komatsu, Akihiro; Sendai, Tomonari

    2012-03-01

    An optical biosensor system using surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence has been developed, which allows high sensitivity and fast measurement available. Intensity of fluorophores in SPFS is highly dependent upon the distance from metal surface. The resonant evanescent electric field excites fluorophores within the penetration area. On the other hand, fluorescence quenching in close proximity to a metal surface interfere with the excitation. We have developed a new technology for fluorescent nanoparticles that could receive the energy from metal surface effectively. This enables technology of detecting strong and stable SPFS signals, as well as homogeneous assay method that allows us to eliminate binding/free separation process for unreacted fluorescent particles. A rate assay method has also been employed, which resolves affect from diffusion-limited access, in order to realize a fast surface immunoreaction in a microchannel. Taking advantage of these two developments, as eliminating an enzyme response process such as CLEIA, our system reaches much faster reaction time of 2 minutes to detect thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of canine serum sample at 0.1ng/mL. We believe our system with these new technologies is a powerful tool for in-vitro diagnosis which meets various clinical requirements.

  4. Optically Modulated Fluorescence Bioimaging: Visualizing Obscured Fluorophores in High Background

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Fluorescence microscopy and detection have become indispensible for understanding organization and dynamics in biological systems. Novel fluorophores with improved brightness, photostability, and biocompatibility continue to fuel further advances but often rely on having minimal background. The visualization of interactions in very high biological background, especially for proteins or bound complexes at very low copy numbers, remains a primary challenge. Instead of focusing on molecular brightness of fluorophores, we have adapted the principles of high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy to improve the sensitivity and signal discrimination in fluorescence bioimaging. Utilizing very long wavelength transient absorptions of kinetically trapped dark states, we employ molecular modulation schemes that do not simultaneously modulate the background fluorescence. This improves the sensitivity and ease of implementation over high-energy photoswitch-based recovery schemes, as no internal dye reference or nanoparticle-based fluorophores are needed to separate the desired signals from background. In this Account, we describe the selection process for and identification of fluorophores that enable optically modulated fluorescence to decrease obscuring background. Differing from thermally stable photoswitches using higher-energy secondary lasers, coillumination at very low energies depopulates transient dark states, dynamically altering the fluorescence and giving characteristic modulation time scales for each modulatable emitter. This process is termed synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe) microscopy. By understanding and optically controlling the dye photophysics, we selectively modulate desired fluorophore signals independent of all autofluorescent background. This shifts the fluorescence of interest to unique detection frequencies with nearly shot-noise-limited detection, as no background signals are collected. Although the fluorescence

  5. Photodynamic tumor therapy and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy after ALA administration using 633-nm light as therapeutic and fluorescence excitation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Kienle, Alwin; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Rueck, Angelika C.; Meier, Thomas H.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy were carried out on human tumors after 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration using 633-nm light of a dye laser as therapeutic radiation and as fluorescence excitation radiation. This has the advantages of (1) enabling use of one laser for PDT and fluorescence diagnosis only, (2) enabling the possibility of on-line fluorescence measurements, and (3) exciting protoporphyrin molecules in deep tissue layers. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine excitation and fluorescence phonon distribution in case of red and violet excitation radiation. The results show the possibility of depth-resolved measurements on the fluorophore distribution by variation of excitation wavelength. The high penetration depth of 633-nm radiation results in a higher ratio of the 700-nm protoporphyrin fluorescence of the xenotransplanted tumor It to Is compared with 407-nm excitation. No values greater than 1 for the ratio I/Is were found, however, in case of intravenous ALA injection even for red excitation. Therefore, a large amount of ALA will be metabolized in the skin and can cause photosensitivity of the patient when applied systematically. In contrast, protoporphyrin fluorescence limited to the pretreated skin area was detected in case of topically applied ALA to patients with mycosis funcoides and erythroplasy of Queyrat. The influence of remitted excitation light and of the spontaneous radiation from the laser as well as the possible excitation of foodbased degradation products of chlorophyll has to be considered in high-sensitivity fluorescence measurements.

  6. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  7. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present a dual modality fiber optic probe combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and Raman spectroscopy for in vivo endoscopic applications. The presented multi-spectroscopy probe enables efficient excitation and collection of fluorescence lifetime signals for FLIm in the UV/visible wavelength region, as well as of Raman spectra in the near-IR for simultaneous Raman/FLIm imaging. The probe was characterized in terms of its lateral resolution and distance dependency of the Raman and FLIm signals. In addition, the feasibility of the probe for in vivo FLIm and Raman spectral characterization of tissue was demonstrated. PMID:26093843

  8. VCSEL-based flexible opto-fluidic fluorescence sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Yoon, Jongseung

    2016-03-01

    Flexible opto-fluidic fluorescence sensors based on microscale vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (micro-VCSELs) and silicon photodiodes (Si-PDs) are demonstrated, where arrays of 850 nm micro-VCSELs and thin film Si-PDs are heterogeneously integrated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by transfer printing, in conjunction with elastomeric fluidic channel. Enabled with optical isolation trenches together with wavelength- and angle-selective spectral filters implemented to suppress the absorption of excitation light, the integrated flexible fluorescence sensors exhibited significantly enhanced signal-to-background ratio, resulting in a maximum sensitivity of 5 × 10-5 wt% of infrared-absorbing organic dyes.

  9. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S. B.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization. PMID:26580231

  10. Image navigation as a means to expand the boundaries of fluorescence-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Oscar R.; Buckle, Tessa; Bunschoten, Anton; Kuil, Joeri; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Wendler, Thomas; Valdés-Olmos, Renato A.; van der Poel, Henk G.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2012-05-01

    Hybrid tracers that are both radioactive and fluorescent help extend the use of fluorescence-guided surgery to deeper structures. Such hybrid tracers facilitate preoperative surgical planning using (3D) scintigraphic images and enable synchronous intraoperative radio- and fluorescence guidance. Nevertheless, we previously found that improved orientation during laparoscopic surgery remains desirable. Here we illustrate how intraoperative navigation based on optical tracking of a fluorescence endoscope may help further improve the accuracy of hybrid surgical guidance. After feeding SPECT/CT images with an optical fiducial as a reference target to the navigation system, optical tracking could be used to position the tip of the fluorescence endoscope relative to the preoperative 3D imaging data. This hybrid navigation approach allowed us to accurately identify marker seeds in a phantom setup. The multispectral nature of the fluorescence endoscope enabled stepwise visualization of the two clinically approved fluorescent dyes, fluorescein and indocyanine green. In addition, the approach was used to navigate toward the prostate in a patient undergoing robot-assisted prostatectomy. Navigation of the tracked fluorescence endoscope toward the target identified on SPECT/CT resulted in real-time gradual visualization of the fluorescent signal in the prostate, thus providing an intraoperative confirmation of the navigation accuracy.

  11. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  12. In ovo sexing of chicken eggs by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galli, Roberta; Preusse, Grit; Uckermann, Ortrud; Bartels, Thomas; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    Culling of day-old male chicks in production of laying hen strains involves several millions of animals every year worldwide and is ethically controversial. In an attempt to provide an alternative, optical spectroscopy was investigated to determine nondestructively in ovo the sex of early embryos of the domestic chicken. The extraembryonic blood circulation system was accessed by producing a window in the egg shell and the flowing blood was illuminated with a near-infrared laser. The strong fluorescence and the weak Raman signals were acquired and spectroscopically analyzed between 800 and 1000 nm. The increase of fluorescence intensity between 3.5 and 11.5 days of incubation was found to be in agreement with the erythropoietic stages, thus enabling to identify hemoglobin as fluorescence source. Sex-related differences in the fluorescence spectrum were found at day 3.5, and principal component (PC) analysis showed that the blood of males was characterized by a specific fluorescence band located at ∼910 nm. Supervised classification of the PC scores enabled the determination of the sex of 380 eggs at day 3.5 of incubation with a correct rate up to 93% by combining the information derived from both fluorescence and Raman scattering. Graphical abstract The fluorescence of blood obtained in ovo by illumination of embryonic vessels with a IR laser displays spectral differences that can be employed for sexing of eggs in early stage of incubation, before onset of embryo sensitivity and without hindering its development into a healthy chick.

  13. Piezoelectric optical MEMS scanning fluorescence biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Joe; Kim, Eun S.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy plays a key role in a broad area of biological and medical applications. Development of fluorescence spectroscopy micro-devices will enable construction of fully integrated platforms for clinical diagnostics. We report the design, microfabrication and testing of a piezoelectric MEMS micro-grating as a part of the development of a combined spectral/time-resolved fluorescence biosensor for tissue characterization. For the design of the device, we simulated its theoretical performance using a piezoelectric multi-morph model with appropriate diffraction geometry. The microfabrication process was based on a SiN diaphragm (formed via KOH bulk-micromachining) on which the supporting layer of the micro-cantilevers was patterned. Piezoelectric ZnO was then magnetron sputtered and patterned on the cantilever as the physical source for linear actuation with low voltage (>32V). E-beam evaporation of aluminum formed the final reflective diffraction pattern as well as the electrode connections to the device units. The device actuation and displacement were characterized using LDDM (Laser Doppler Displacement Meter). Current cantilevers designed with 500 μm wide gratings (20 μm spacing) produced a maximum 38 μm bi-polar deflection at 3.5 kHz, with scanning from 350-650 nm at 26 nm resolution (10 nm with new 10 μm period prototype). The MEMS device was designed to be integrated with a fast response photomultiplier, and thus can be used with time-resolved fluorescence detection. Because in the case of time-resolved measurements, spectral resolution is not a crucial element, this configuration allows for the compensation of the geometric limitations (linear dispersion) of a micro-scale device that require wavelength differentiation and selection.

  14. New Labour and the enabling state.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ian

    2000-11-01

    The notion of the 'enabling state' gained currency in the UK during the 1990s as an alternative to the 'providing' or the welfare state. It reflected the process of contracting out in the NHS and compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) in local government during the 1980s, but was also associated with developments during the 1990s in health, social care and education in particular. The creation of an internal market in the NHS and the associated purchaser-provider split appeared to transfer 'ownership' of services increasingly to the providers - hospitals, General Practitioners (GPs) and schools. The mixed economy of care that was stimulated by the 1990 NHS and Community Care Act appeared to offer local authorities the opportunity to enable non state providers to offer care services in the community. The new service charters were part of the enablement process because they offered users more opportunity to influence provision. This article examines how far service providers were enabled and assesses the extent to which new Labour's policies enhance or reject the 'enabling state' in favour of more direct provision.

  15. Antigen-responsive molecular sensor enables real-time tumor-specific imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Seok-Ki; Lee, Byung Il; Choi, Yongdoo

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-fluorophore conjugates have high potential for the specific fluorescence detection of target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the antibody-fluorophore conjugates described to date are inappropriate for real-time imaging of target cells because removal of unbound antibody is required to reduce background fluorescence before quantifiable analysis by microscopy. In addition, clinical applications of the conjugates have been limited by persistent background retention due to their long systemic circulation and nonspecific uptake. Here we report fast and real-time near-infrared fluorescence imaging of target cancer cells using an antigen-responsive molecular “on-off” sensor: the fluorescence of trastuzumab-ATTO680 conjugate is dark (i.e., turned off) in the extracellular region, while it becomes highly fluorescent (i.e., turned on) upon binding to the target antigen HER2 on cancer cell surface. This molecular switch enables fast and real-time imaging of target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

  17. Fluorescence suppression using micro-scale spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Conti, Claudia; Botteon, Alessandra; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-09-21

    We present a new concept of fluorescence suppression in Raman microscopy based on micro-spatially offset Raman spectroscopy which is applicable to thin stratified turbid (diffusely scattering) matrices permitting the retrieval of the Raman signals of sublayers below intensely fluorescing turbid over-layers. The method is demonstrated to yield good quality Raman spectra with dramatically suppressed fluorescence backgrounds enabling the retrieval of Raman sublayer signals even in situations where conventional Raman microscopy spectra are fully overwhelmed by intense fluorescence. The concept performance was studied theoretically using Monte Carlo simulations indicating the potential of up to an order or two of magnitude suppression of overlayer fluorescence backgrounds relative to the Raman sublayer signals. The technique applicability was conceptually demonstrated on layered samples involving paints, polymers and stones yielding fluorescence suppression factors between 12 to above 430. The technique has potential applications in a number of analytical areas including cultural heritage, archaeology, polymers, food, pharmaceutical, biological, biomedical, forensics and catalytic sciences and quality control in manufacture.

  18. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-13

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  19. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  20. In Mice, Tuberculosis Progression Is Associated with Intensive Inflammatory Response and the Accumulation of Gr-1dim Cells in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Lyadova, Irina V.; Tsiganov, Evgeny N.; Kapina, Marina A.; Shepelkova, Galena S.; Sosunov, Vasily V.; Radaeva, Tatiana V.; Majorov, Konstantin B.; Shmitova, Natalya S.; van den Ham, Henk-Jan; Ganusov, Vitaly V.; De Boer, Rob J.; Racine, Rachael; Winslow, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) results in different clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic containment to rapidly progressing tuberculosis (TB). The mechanisms controlling TB progression in immunologically-competent hosts remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings To address these mechanisms, we analyzed TB progression in a panel of genetically heterogeneous (A/SnxI/St) F2 mice, originating from TB-highly-susceptible I/St and more resistant A/Sn mice. In F2 mice the rates of TB progression differed. In mice that did not reach terminal stage of infection, TB progression did not correlate with lung Mtb loads. Nor was TB progression correlated with lung expression of factors involved in antibacterial immunity, such as iNOS, IFN-γ, or IL-12p40. The major characteristics of progressing TB was high lung expression of the inflammation-related factors IL-1β, IL-6, IL-11 (p<0.0003); CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2 (p<0.002); MMP-8 (p<0.0001). The major predictors of TB progression were high expressions of IL-1β and IL-11. TNF-α had both protective and harmful effects. Factors associated with TB progression were expressed mainly by macrophages (F4-80+ cells) and granulocytes (Gr-1hi/Ly-6Ghi cells). Macrophages and granulocytes from I/St and A/Sn parental strains exhibited intrinsic differences in the expression of inflammatory factors, suggesting that genetically determined peculiarities of phagocytes transcriptional response could account for the peculiarities of gene expression in the infected lungs. Another characteristic feature of progressing TB was the accumulation in the infected lungs of Gr-1dim cells that could contribute to TB progression. Conclusions/Significance In a population of immunocompetent hosts, the outcome of TB depends on quantitatively- and genetically-controlled differences in the intensity of inflammatory responses, rather than being a direct consequence of mycobacterial colonization. Local accumulation of Gr-1dim cells is

  1. Enabling the Discovery of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational radiation was announced with the publication of the results of a physics experiment involving over a thousand participants. This was preceded by a century of theoretical work, involving a similarly large group of physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists. This huge effort was enabled by a substantial commitment of resources, both public and private, to develop the different strands of this complex research enterprise, and to build a community of scientists to carry it out. In the excitement following the discovery, the role of key enablers of this success has not always been adequately recognized in popular accounts. In this talk, I will try to call attention to a few of the key ingredients that proved crucial to enabling the successful discovery of gravitational waves, and the opening of a new field of science.

  2. Fluorescence in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Henrik

    Following the initial detection by Bowen in 1934 of the strong O III lines being due to accidental resonance with strong He II radiation, many strong spectral emission lines are explained as produced by fluorescence. Many of these are Fe II lines pumped by H Lyα, as a consequence of strong radiation from hydrogen and a favorable energy level structure for Fe II. The lines are observed in many types of objects with low density plasma components. The Weigelt condensations in the vicinity of the massive star Eta Carinae is one location where these lines are observed and can be studied in detail, as well as been used for diagnostics.

  3. Fluorescence Detection In Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarner, Susan

    1988-04-01

    Fluorescence detection is in common usage in forensic science laboratories for the visualization of three enzyme markers. The fluorogenic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate, 4-methylutbel-liveryl acetate, and fluorecein diacetate, are acted upon by the enzymes Erythrocyte Acid Phospha, tase, Esterase-D, and Carbonic Anhydrase-III, respectively, to produce compounds visible to the analyst when viewed with transmitted UV light at 365 nm. Additionally, the choice of fluorogenic corn, pounds may help detect a specific enzyme from a related enzyme. One of the responsibilities of a forensic science laboratory may be the analysis of blood for genetically controlled polymorphic enzymes and protein markers. The genetic markers are said to be polymorphic because each exhibits types which can be differentiated and allows for the inclusion or exclusion of possible-donors of the blood. Each genetic marker can be separated into these recognizable types by electrophoresis, a technique which separates compounds based on electrical charges. Electrophoresis is conducted by placing a portion or extract of each bloodstain into a support medium which will conduct electricity. This is known as a plate or membrane. By controlling the pH of the buffer and the potential that is applied to the plate, the analyst can achieve separation of the types within an enzyme marker. The types appear as differing patterns of bands. Once the bloodstain has been subjected to electrophoresis, the enzymes must be visualized. This is generally best accomplished by using the specific activity of the enzyme. For the enzymes described in the present work, the visualization is performed by over-layering the plate with a piece of filter paper that 'has been saturated with the appropriate non-fluorescent substrate and buffer. The bands of enzyme, which is now in discrete patterns, will act upon the non-fluorescent substrate to create a fluorescent compound. The plate is then viewed with transmitted UV

  4. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  5. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  6. The Application Of Picosecond-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy In The Study Of Flavins And Flavoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Antonie J.; van Hoek, Arie

    1988-06-01

    Picosecond relaxation processes of flavins and flavoproteins were investigated with mode-locked and synchronously pumped lasers as source of excitation and time-correlated single photon counting in detection. Free flavin rotational correlation times of 80-150 ps (values depending on the flavin derivative used) could be precisely determined. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence of the flavin bound in the electron-carrier protein flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris yields a fluorescence lifetime component of 30 ps in the fluorescence decay. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in flavodoxin exhibits a short lifetime component, which is attributed in part to energy transfer from tryptophan to flavin. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy decay analysis of the two tryptophan residues in flavodoxin provide new evidence for specific flavin-tryptophan interaction. Finally, picosecond-resolved spectroscopy enables the direct measurement of energy transfer between two different chromophores in a protein, from which topographical details can be inferred.

  7. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Conor J.; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  8. Spatially selective photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence and application to background reduction for biomolecule detection assays.

    PubMed

    Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Polans, James; Cunningham, Brian T

    2011-11-07

    By combining photonic crystal label-free biosensor imaging with photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence, it is possible to selectively enhance the fluorescence emission from regions of the PC surface based upon the density of immobilized capture molecules. A label-free image of the capture molecules enables determination of optimal coupling conditions of the laser used for fluorescence imaging of the photonic crystal surface on a pixel-by-pixel basis, allowing maximization of fluorescence enhancement factor from regions incorporating a biomolecule capture spot and minimization of background autofluorescence from areas between capture spots. This capability significantly improves the contrast of enhanced fluorescent images, and when applied to an antibody protein microarray, provides a substantial advantage over conventional fluorescence microscopy. Using the new approach, we demonstrate detection limits as low as 0.97 pg/ml for a representative protein biomarker in buffer.

  9. Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fluorescence after polyelectrolyte caging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Krol, Silke; Campanini, Barbara; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    Discovery of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) constituted an important improvement for living cell studies on submicron resolution allowing in vivo fluorescence labeling. We studied the photo-physical properties of single GFP molecules incorporated in a charged polyelectrolyte environment by means of single molecule spectroscopy. The fluorescence characteristics change dramatically in terms of photo-stability,lifetime and blinking behavior so that the proteins scale up to quantum dots. The reported results highlight interesting applications in the design of fluorescent markers and in the development of optical data storage architectures.

  10. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing; Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong; Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing; Yu, Hongyu

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  11. Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE Program

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-01

    The Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE program, a new project funding approach, allows small Federal facilities to realize energy and water savings in six months or less. ESPC ENABLE provides a standardized and streamlined process to install targeted energy conservation measures (ECMs) such as lighting, water, and controls with measurement and verification (M&V) appropriate for the size and scope of the project. This allows Federal facilities smaller than 200,000 square feet to make progress towards important energy efficiency and water conservation requirements.

  12. Enabling human HUMS with data modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Jaenisch, Kristina K.; Hicklen, Michael L.

    2006-05-01

    We simulate a notional Navy SEAL rebreather diver on an extended mission using Model Predictive Control (MPC) theory. A mathematical framework for enabling physiological HUMS (Health Usage Management Systems) is shown. A rebreather simulation is used to derive MPC baseline Data Models of diver status by converting the simulation first into differential equations and then into lookup tables (LUT). When abnormal readings are indicated, sensor data from the diver is published to the ad hoc network, enabling intermittent upload. Mission success confidence is updated and determined during the mission. A novel method of converting MPC Data Models into lookup tables worn by the diver is given.

  13. Upgraded NERVA systems: Enabler nuclear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, Gerry

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA/Rover Enabler technology enables to go on a low risk, short-term program to meet the requirements of the Mars mission and maybe some lunar missions. The following subject areas are covered: NERVA technology - the foundation for tomorrow's space missions; NERVA/Rover reactor system test sequence; NERVA engine development program; nuclear thermal reactor capability based on many related Westinghouse technology programs; investment in Rover/Nerva technology; synergistic applications of NERVA technology; flow schematic of the NDR engine; the NERVA nuclear subsystem; and technology evolution.

  14. Networking Technologies Enable Advances in Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory; Freeman, Kenneth; Gilstrap, Raymond; Beck, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment to prototype a new way of conducting science by applying networking and distributed computing technologies to an Earth Science application. A combination of satellite, wireless, and terrestrial networking provided geologists at a remote field site with interactive access to supercomputer facilities at two NASA centers, thus enabling them to validate and calibrate remotely sensed geological data in near-real time. This represents a fundamental shift in the way that Earth scientists analyze remotely sensed data. In this paper we describe the experiment and the network infrastructure that enabled it, analyze the data flow during the experiment, and discuss the scientific impact of the results.

  15. Synthesis of Fluorescent Gelators and Direct Observation of Gelation with a Fluorescence Microscope.

    PubMed

    Hanabusa, Kenji; Ueda, Takuya; Takata, Shingo; Suzuki, Masahiro

    2016-11-14

    Fluorescein-, benzothiazole-, quinoline-, stilbene-, and carbazole-containing fluorescent gelators have been synthesized by connecting gelation-driving segments, including l-isoleucine, l-valine, l-phenylalanine, l-leucine residue, cyclo(l-asparaginyl-l-phenylalanyl), and trans-(1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane. The emission behaviors of the gelators were investigated, and their gelation abilities studied against 15 solvents. The minimum gel concentration, variable-temperature spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy (FM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to characterize gelation. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-H and C=O of amide, van der Waals interactions and π-π stacking play important roles in gelation. The colors of emission are related to the fluorescence structures of gelators. Fibrous aggregates characterized by the color of their emission were observed by FM. 3D images are produced by the superposition of images captured by CLSM every 0.1 μm to a settled depth. The 3D images show that the large micrometer-sized aggregates spread out three dimensionally. FM observations of mixed gelators are studied. In the case of gelation, two structurally related gelators with the same gelation-driving segment lead to the gelators build up of the same aggregates through similar hydrogen-bonding patterns. When two gelators with structurally different gelation-driving segments induce gelation, the gelators build up each aggregate through individual hydrogen-bonding patterns. A fluorescent reagent that was incorporated into the aggregates of gels through van der Waals interactions was developed. The addition of this fluorescent reagent enables the successful observation of nonfluorescent gelators' aggregates by FM.

  16. Fluorescence-Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Guillermo

    The natural luminescent phenomena (from the Latin words "lumen" and "essentia", i.e., "made of light") such as northern lights (aurora borealis), marine brightness, glow-worms, shining putrid fish scales, "bluish"- appearing water when contained in certain wooden cups (quinine fluorescence), some stones heated at high temperatures with reducing agents (BaS phosphorescence), or light emitted while crushing sugar (triboluminescence) already fascinated our ancestors. Nowadays we understand that ultraviolet and visible emission of light originates from a competitive deactivation pathway of the lowest electronic excited state of atoms and molecules that produces the so called luminescence (the sub-terms fluorescence and phosphorescence just designate whether the return of the excited to the ground state is an "allowed" or "forbidden" process, namely it is fast or slow, the loosely-defined border between them being a 1-μs-1 rate constant). Actually, luminescence is the only method to generate light in the known Universe regardless it is powered by the nuclear reactions in the stars, the ohmical heating in bulbs, an electric discharge, the absorption of light or a (bio)chemical reaction (chemiluminescence).

  17. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  18. Understanding microbial/DOM interactions using fluorescence and flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Bethany; Rushworth, Cathy; Attridge, John; Anesio, Alexandre; Cox, Tim; Reynolds, Darren

    2015-04-01

    processing and subsequent production of DOM, will inform the development of a new generation of in situ fluorescence sensors. Ultimately, our aim is develop a novel technology that enables the monitoring of ecosystem health in freshwater aquatic systems.

  19. Network Enabled Operations: A Canadian Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-13

    Decisive: US Naval Institute Proceedings. ** VERDON , J. (2004) Transformation in the CF - People Implications of Effects-Based and Network-Enabled...Operations: A Canadian Perspective (U) 4. AUTHORS (First name, middle initial and last name. If military, show rank, e.g. Maj. John E. Doe.) Michael H

  20. Nanotechnologv Enabled Biological and Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an enabling technology that will impact almost all economic sectors: one of the most important and with great potential is the health/medical sector. - Nanomaterials for drug delivery - Early warning sensors - Implantable devices - Artificial parts with improved characteristics Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers show promise for use in sensor development, electrodes and other biomedical applications.