Science.gov

Sample records for encoding human liver

  1. Cloning and characterization of human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, J; Norman, D K; Beckmann, R J; Long, G L

    1987-01-01

    Human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor was isolated from two cDNA libraries by two different techniques. Based upon the frequency of positive clones, the abundance of mRNA for protein S is approximately 0.01%. Blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A)+ RNA revealed a major mRNA approximately 4 kilobases long and two minor forms of approximately 3.1 and approximately equal to 2.6 kilobases. One of the cDNA clones contains a segment encoding a 676 amino acid protein S precursor, as well as 108 and 1132 nucleotides of 5' and 3' noncoding sequence, respectively, plus a poly(A) region at the 3' end. The cDNAs are adenosine plus thymidine-rich (60%) except for the 5' noncoding region, where 78% of the nucleotides are guanosine or cytosine. The protein precursor consists of a 41 amino acid "leader" peptide followed by 635 amino acids corresponding to mature protein S. Comparison of the mature protein region with homologous vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins shows that it is composed of the following domains: an amino-terminal gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-rich region of 37 amino acids; a 36 amino acid linker region rich in hydroxy amino acids; four epidermal growth factor-like segments, each approximately 45 amino acids long; and a 387 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain of unrecognized structure and unknown function. Images PMID:3467362

  2. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  3. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  4. Human liver flukes.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David; Lamberton, Poppy H L; McGregor, Alastair

    2017-09-01

    Liver fluke infections occur in people worldwide. In some low-income regions, a combination of ecological, agricultural, and culinary factors leads to a very high prevalence of infection but, in higher-income regions, infections are uncommon. Infection is associated with substantial morbidity and several liver fluke species are recognised as biological carcinogens. Here, we review the epidemiology, clinical significance, and diagnostic and treatment strategies of human infection with these pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. LIVER BIOPSY IN HUMAN LEPTOSPIROSIS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LEPTOSPIRA, DISEASES), (*LIVER, BIOPSY), LEPTOSPIRA ICTEROHAEMORRHAGIAE, HUMANS, PATHOLOGY, CELL STRUCTURE, MITOCHONDRIA, NECROSIS, ENZYMES, TOXINS AND ANTITOXINS, KIDNEYS, PARASITES, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, BRAZIL

  6. Human herpesvirus 8-encoded cytokines.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, John

    2010-03-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV)-8, also called Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, was discovered in 1994 and was rapidly sequenced, revealing several unique and surprising features of its genetic makeup. Among these discoveries was the identification of the first viral homolog of IL-6 and three CC/beta-chemokine ligands (viral CCL-1, -2 and -3), not previously found in gamma-herpesviruses. Viral IL-6 was immediately recognized as a potential contributor to HHV-8 pathogenesis, specifically endothelial-derived Kaposi's sarcoma and the B-cell malignancy multicentric Castleman's disease with which IL-6, a proangiogenic and B-cell growth factor, had previously been implicated. The roles of the viral chemokines were speculated to involve immune evasion; however, like viral IL-6, the viral chemokines have the potential to contribute to pathogenesis through their shared angiogenic activities, known to be important for Kaposi's sarcoma and HHV-8-associated primary effusion lymphoma, and also via direct prosurvival activities. This article will discuss the molecular properties, activities and functions of viral IL-6 and the viral CCLs, proteins that could provide appropriate targets for antiviral and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  8. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Polina S.; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V.; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V.; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and ApcMin mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver. PMID:23792645

  9. Human liver caudate lobe and liver segment.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen; Hata, Fumitake

    2002-12-01

    Recently, the caudate lobe has seemed to be the final target for aggressive cancer surgery of the liver. This lobe has five surfaces: the dorsal, left and hilar-free surfaces and the right and ventral-border planes. Surgeons have divided the caudate lobe into three parts: Spiegel's lobe, which is called the 'caudate lobe and papillary process' by anatomists, the caudate process, viewed as almost the same entity by anatomists, and the paracaval portion corresponding to the dorsally located parenchyma in front of the inferior vena cava. All three parts are supplied by primary branches originating from the left and right portal veins, including the hilar bifurcation area. The hilar bifurcation branch often (50%) supplies the paracaval portion and it sometimes (29%) extends its territory to Spiegel's lobe. It was postulated by Couinaud that the paracaval portion or the S9 is not defined by its supplying portal vein branch but by its 'dorsal location' in the liver. Couinaud's caudate lobe or dorsal-liver concept cause, and still now causes, great logical confusion for surgeons. We attempt here to describe the margins of the lobe, border branches of the portal vein, the left/right territorial border of the portal vein or Cantile's line and other topics closely relating to the surgery within these contexts. Finally, the caudate lobe as a liver segment will be discussed.

  10. Encoding of human action in Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Patrik; Cantagallo, Anna; Craighero, Laila; D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Roy, Alice C; Pozzo, Thierry; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Fadiga, Luciano

    2009-07-01

    Broca's area has been considered, for over a century, as the brain centre responsible for speech production. Modern neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence have suggested a wider functional role is played by this area. In addition to the evidence that it is involved in syntactical analysis, mathematical calculation and music processing, it has recently been shown that Broca's area may play some role in language comprehension and, more generally, in understanding actions of other individuals. As shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging, Broca's area is one of the cortical areas activated by hand/mouth action observation and it has been proposed that it may form a crucial node of a human mirror-neuron system. If, on the one hand, neuroimaging studies use a correlational approach which cannot offer a final proof for such claims, available neuropsychological data fail to offer a conclusive demonstration for two main reasons: (i) they use tasks taxing both language and action systems; and (ii) they rarely consider the possibility that Broca's aphasics may also be affected by some form of apraxia. We administered a novel action comprehension test--with almost no linguistic requirements--on selected frontal aphasic patients lacking apraxic symptoms. Patients, as well as matched controls, were shown short movies of human actions or of physical events. Their task consisted of ordering, in a temporal sequence, four pictures taken from each movie and randomly presented on the computer screen. Patient's performance showed a specific dissociation in their ability to re-order pictures of human actions (impaired) with respect to physical events (spared). Our study provides a demonstration that frontal aphasics, not affected by apraxia, are specifically impaired in their capability to correctly encode observed human actions.

  11. Human liver chimeric mouse model based on diphtheria toxin-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiao-Nan; Ren, Rong-Rong; Yang, Hua; Qin, Bo-Yin; Peng, Xiu-Hua; Chen, Li-Xiang; Li, Shun; Yuan, Meng-Jiao; Wang, Chao; Zhou, Xiao-Hui

    2017-01-01

    AIM To establish an inducible liver injury mouse model and transplant human hepatocytes to obtain liver-humanized mice. METHODS We crossed three mouse strains, including albumin (Alb)-cre transgenic mice, inducible diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) transgenic mice and severe combined immune deficient (SCID)-beige mice, to create Alb-cre/DTR/SCID-beige (ADSB) mice, which coincidentally harbor Alb-cre and DTR transgenes and are immunodeficient. As the Cre expression is driven by the liver-specific promoter Alb (encoding ALB), the DTR stop signal flanked by two loxP sites can be deleted in the ADSB mice, resulting in DTR expression in the liver. ADSB mice aged 8-10 wk were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with diphtheria toxin (DT) and liver damage was assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level. Two days later, mouse livers were sampled for histological analysis, and human hepatocytes were transplanted into the livers on the same day. A human ALB enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed 7, 14, 21 and 28 d after transplantation. Human CD68 immunohistochemistry was performed 30 and 90 d after transplantation. RESULTS We crossed Alb-cre with DTR and SCID-beige mice to obtain ADSB mice. These mice were found to have liver damage 4 d after i.p. injection of 2.5 ng/g bodyweight DT. Bodyweight began to decrease on day 2, increased on day 7, and was lowest on day 4 (range, 10.5%-13.4%). Serum ALT activity began to increase on day 2 and reached a peak value of 289.7 ± 16.2 IU/mL on day 4, then returned to background values on day 7. After transplantation of human liver cells, peripheral blood human ALB level was 1580 ± 454.8 ng/mL (range, 750.2-3064.9 ng/mL) after 28 d and Kupffer cells were present in the liver at 30 d in ADSB mice. CONCLUSION Human hepatocytes were successfully repopulated in the livers of ADSB mice. The inducible mouse model of humanized liver in ADSB mice may have functional applications, such as hepatocyte transplantation, hepatic

  12. ENCODE Tiling Array Analysis Identifies Differentially Expressed Annotated and Novel 5′ Capped RNAs in Hepatitis C Infected Liver

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Christopher I.; Nelson, Cassie A.; Schwartz, Jason J.; Nix, David A.; Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2011-01-01

    Microarray studies of chronic hepatitis C infection have provided valuable information regarding the host response to viral infection. However, recent studies of the human transcriptome indicate pervasive transcription in previously unannotated regions of the genome and that many RNA transcripts have short or lack 3′ poly(A) ends. We hypothesized that using ENCODE tiling arrays (1% of the genome) in combination with affinity purifying Pol II RNAs by their unique 5′ m7GpppN cap would identify previously undescribed annotated and unannotated genes that are differentially expressed in liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Both 5′-capped and poly(A)+ populations of RNA were analyzed using ENCODE tiling arrays. Sixty-four annotated genes were significantly increased in HCV cirrhotic as compared to control liver; twenty-seven (42%) of these genes were identified only by analyzing 5′ capped RNA. Thirty-one annotated genes were significantly decreased; sixteen (50%) of these were identified only by analyzing 5′ capped RNA. Bioinformatic analysis showed that capped RNA produced more consistent results, provided a more extensive expression profile of intronic regions and identified upregulated Pol II transcriptionally active regions in unannotated areas of the genome in HCV cirrhotic liver. Two of these regions were verified by PCR and RACE analysis. qPCR analysis of liver biopsy specimens demonstrated that these unannotated transcripts, as well as IRF1, TRIM22 and MET, were also upregulated in hepatitis C with mild inflammation and no fibrosis. The analysis of 5′ capped RNA in combination with ENCODE tiling arrays provides additional gene expression information and identifies novel upregulated Pol II transcripts not previously described in HCV infected liver. This approach, particularly when combined with new RNA sequencing technologies, should also be useful in further defining Pol II transcripts differentially regulated in specific disease states and

  13. ENCODE tiling array analysis identifies differentially expressed annotated and novel 5' capped RNAs in hepatitis C infected liver.

    PubMed

    Folkers, Milan E; Delker, Don A; Maxwell, Christopher I; Nelson, Cassie A; Schwartz, Jason J; Nix, David A; Hagedorn, Curt H

    2011-02-16

    Microarray studies of chronic hepatitis C infection have provided valuable information regarding the host response to viral infection. However, recent studies of the human transcriptome indicate pervasive transcription in previously unannotated regions of the genome and that many RNA transcripts have short or lack 3' poly(A) ends. We hypothesized that using ENCODE tiling arrays (1% of the genome) in combination with affinity purifying Pol II RNAs by their unique 5' m⁷GpppN cap would identify previously undescribed annotated and unannotated genes that are differentially expressed in liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Both 5'-capped and poly(A)+ populations of RNA were analyzed using ENCODE tiling arrays. Sixty-four annotated genes were significantly increased in HCV cirrhotic as compared to control liver; twenty-seven (42%) of these genes were identified only by analyzing 5' capped RNA. Thirty-one annotated genes were significantly decreased; sixteen (50%) of these were identified only by analyzing 5' capped RNA. Bioinformatic analysis showed that capped RNA produced more consistent results, provided a more extensive expression profile of intronic regions and identified upregulated Pol II transcriptionally active regions in unannotated areas of the genome in HCV cirrhotic liver. Two of these regions were verified by PCR and RACE analysis. qPCR analysis of liver biopsy specimens demonstrated that these unannotated transcripts, as well as IRF1, TRIM22 and MET, were also upregulated in hepatitis C with mild inflammation and no fibrosis. The analysis of 5' capped RNA in combination with ENCODE tiling arrays provides additional gene expression information and identifies novel upregulated Pol II transcripts not previously described in HCV infected liver. This approach, particularly when combined with new RNA sequencing technologies, should also be useful in further defining Pol II transcripts differentially regulated in specific disease states and in

  14. Assessment of Liver Fibrosis Using Fast Strain-Encoded (FSENC) MRI Driven by Inherent Cardiac Motion

    PubMed Central

    Harouni, Ahmed A.; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Osman, Nael F.; Morse, Caryn; Heller, Theo; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An external driver-free MRI method for assessment of liver fibrosis offers a promising non-invasive tool for diagnosis and monitoring of liver disease. Lately, the heart’s intrinsic motion and MR tagging have been utilized for the quantification of liver strain. However, MR tagging requires multiple breath-hold acquisitions and substantial post-processing. This work proposes a fast strain-encoded (FSENC) MRI methodology to measure the peak strain (Sp) in the liver’s left lobe, which is in close proximity and caudal to the heart. Additionally, a new method is introduced to measure heart-induced shear wave velocity (SWV) inside the liver. Methods Phantom and in-vivo experiments (11 healthy subjects, and 11 patients with liver fibrosis) were conducted. Reproducibility experiments were performed in seven healthy subjects. Results Peak liver strain Sp significantly decreased in fibrotic liver compared healthy liver (6.46%±2.27% vs. 12.49%±1.76%, P<0.05). Heart-induced SWV significantly increased in patients compared to healthy subjects (0.15±0.04 m/s vs. 0.63±0.32 m/s, P<0.05). Reproducibility analysis yielded no significant difference in Sp (P=0.47) or SWV (P=0.56). Conclusion Accelerated external driver-free noninvasive assessment of left liver lobe strain and shear wave velocity is feasible using strain-encoded MRI. The two measures significantly separate healthy subjects from patients with fibrotic liver. PMID:25081734

  15. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and the liver.

    PubMed

    Crane, Megan; Iser, David; Lewin, Sharon R

    2012-03-27

    Liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals encompasses the spectrum from abnormal liver function tests, liver decompensation, with and without evidence of cirrhosis on biopsy, to non-alcoholic liver disease and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular cancer. HIV can infect multiple cells in the liver, leading to enhanced intrahepatic apoptosis, activation and fibrosis. HIV can also alter gastro-intestinal tract permeability, leading to increased levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide that may have an impact on liver function. This review focuses on recent changes in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of liver disease in HIV-infected patients, in the absence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, with a specific focus on issues relevant to low and middle income countries.

  17. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Prokopenko, P. G.; Malakheeva, L. I.

    2004-12-01

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Mössbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  18. Face Encoding and Recognition in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxby, James V.; Ungerleider, Leslie G.; Horwitz, Barry; Maisog, Jose Ma.; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Grady, Cheryl L.

    1996-01-01

    A dissociation between human neural systems that participate in the encoding and later recognition of new memories for faces was demonstrated by measuring memory task-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow with positron emission tomography. There was almost no overlap between the brain structures associated with these memory functions. A region in the right hippocampus and adjacent cortex was activated during memory encoding but not during recognition. The most striking finding in neocortex was the lateralization of prefrontal participation. Encoding activated left prefrontal cortex, whereas recognition activated right prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that the hippocampus and adjacent cortex participate in memory function primarily at the time of new memory encoding. Moreover, face recognition is not mediated simply by recapitulation of operations performed at the time of encoding but, rather, involves anatomically dissociable operations.

  19. HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION FACTORS IN THE HUMAN LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, G. H.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.

    1942-01-01

    Human liver tissue has been assayed to determine the amount of hemoglobin production factors in normal and abnormal states. Standardized dogs made anemic by blood removal have been used in this biological assay. Normal animal liver as control is rated as 100 per cent. Normal human liver tissue as compared with the normal animal control contains more of these hemoglobin production factors—a biological assay ratio of 120 to 160 per cent. Infections, acute and chronic, do not appear to modify these values, the concentration of hemoglobin-producing factors falling within the normal range. Pernicious anemia and aplastic anemia both show large liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors—a biological assay ratio of 200 to 240 per cent. Therapy in pernicious anemia reduces these liver stores as new red cells are formed. Secondary anemia presents a low normal or subnormal liver store of hemoglobin-producing factors—an assay of 60 to 130 per cent. Hemochromatosis, erythroblastic anemia, and hemolytic icterus in spite of large iron deposits in the liver usually show a biological assay which is normal or close to normal. Polycythemia shows low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Leukemias present a wide range of values discussed above. Hypoproteinemia almost always is associated with low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors in the liver—biological assays of 60 to 80 per cent. Hypoproteinemia means a depletion of body protein reserve stores including the labile protein liver reserves—a strong indication that the prehemoglobin material (or globin) is related to these liver stores. Pregnancy, eclampsia, and lactation all may present subnormal liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Exhaustion of protein stores lowers the barrier to infection and renders the liver very susceptible to many toxic substances. It should not be difficult to correct hypoproteinemia under these conditions and thus relieve the patient of a real hazard. PMID:19871236

  20. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  1. Enzymes of fructose metabolism in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Fritz; Lamprecht, Walther; Kirsch, Joachim

    1968-01-01

    The enzyme activities involved in fructose metabolism were measured in samples of human liver. On the basis of U/g of wet-weight the following results were found: ketohexokinase, 1.23; aldolase (substrate, fructose-1-phosphate), 2.08; aldolase (substrate, fructose-1,6-diphosphate), 3.46; triokinase, 2.07; aldehyde dehydrogenase (substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 1.04; D-glycerate kinase, 0.13; alcohol dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NAD]) substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 3.1; alcohol dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NADP]) (substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 3.6; and glycerol kinase, 0.62. Sorbitol dehydrogenases (25.0 U/g), hexosediphosphatase (4.06 U/g), hexokinase (0.23 U/g), and glucokinase (0.08 U/g) were also measured. Comparing these results with those of the rat liver it becomes clear that the activities of alcohol dehydrogenases (NAD and NADP) in rat liver are higher than those in human liver, and that the values of ketohexokinase, sorbitol dehydrogenases, and hexosediphosphatase in human liver are lower than those values found in rat liver. Human liver contains only traces of glycerate kinase. The rate of fructose uptake from the blood, as described by other investigators, can be based on the activity of ketohexokinase reported in the present paper. In human liver, ketohexokinase is present in a four-fold activity of glucokinase and hexokinase. This result may explain the well-known fact that fructose is metabolized faster than glucose. PMID:4385849

  2. Human Genomic Signatures of Brain Oscillations During Memory Encoding.

    PubMed

    Berto, Stefano; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Germi, James; Lega, Bradley C; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-04-05

    Memory encoding is an essential step for all learning. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human memory encoding remain poorly understood, and how this molecular framework permits the emergence of specific patterns of brain oscillations observed during mnemonic processing is unknown. Here, we directly compare intracranial electroencephalography recordings from the neocortex in individuals performing an episodic memory task with human gene expression from the same areas. We identify genes correlated with oscillatory memory effects across 6 frequency bands. These genes are enriched for autism-related genes and have preferential expression in neurons, in particular genes encoding synaptic proteins and ion channels, supporting the idea that the genes regulating voltage gradients are involved in the modulation of oscillatory patterns during successful memory encoding across brain areas. Memory-related genes are distinct from those correlated with other forms of cognitive processing and resting state fMRI. These data are the first to identify correlations between gene expression and active human brain states as well as provide a molecular window into memory encoding oscillations in the human brain.

  3. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Falkay, G.; Kovacs, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using {sup 3}H-prazosin and {sup 3}H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogeneous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycemia of newborns after treatment of premature labor with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  4. Digitalis metabolism and human liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, W A; Vallee, B L

    1980-01-01

    Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol: NAD" oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) catalyzes the oxidation of the 3 beta-OH group of digitoxigenin, digoxigenin, and gitoxigenin to their 3-keto derivatives, which have been characterized by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. These studies have identified human liver alcohol dehydrogenase as the unknown NAD(H)-dependent liver enzyme specific for the free hydroxyl group at C3 of the cardiac genins; this hydroxyl is the critical site of the genins' enzymatic oxidation and concomitant pharmacological inactivation in humans. Several kinetic approaches have demonstrated that ethanol and the pharmacologically active components of the digitalis glycosides are oxidized with closely similar kcat/Km values at the same site on human liver alcohol dehydrogenase, for which they compete. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase thereby becomes an important biochemical link in the metabolism, pharmacology, and toxicology of ethanol and these glycosides, structurally unrelated agents that are both used widely. Both the competition of ethanol with these cardiac sterols and the narrow margin of safety in the therapeutic use of digitalis derivatives would seem to place at increased risk those individuals who receive digitalis and simultaneously consume large amounts of ethanol or whose alcohol dehydrogenase function is impaired. PMID:6987673

  5. Phonetic Feature Encoding in Human Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarani, Nima; Cheung, Connie; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    During speech perception, linguistic elements such as consonants and vowels are extracted from a complex acoustic speech signal. The superior temporal gyrus (STG) participates in high-order auditory processing of speech, but how it encodes phonetic information is poorly understood. We used high-density direct cortical surface recordings in humans while they listened to natural, continuous speech to reveal the STG representation of the entire English phonetic inventory. At single electrodes, we found response selectivity to distinct phonetic features. Encoding of acoustic properties was mediated by a distributed population response. Phonetic features could be directly related to tuning for spectrotemporal acoustic cues, some of which were encoded in a nonlinear fashion or by integration of multiple cues. These findings demonstrate the acoustic-phonetic representation of speech in human STG. PMID:24482117

  6. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Steve; Erhart, Wiebke; Brosch, Mario; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Ahrens, Markus; Heits, Nils; Bell, Jordana T; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Deloukas, Panos; Siebert, Reiner; Sipos, Bence; Becker, Thomas; Röcken, Christoph; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-10-28

    Because of the dearth of biomarkers of aging, it has been difficult to test the hypothesis that obesity increases tissue age. Here we use a novel epigenetic biomarker of aging (referred to as an "epigenetic clock") to study the relationship between high body mass index (BMI) and the DNA methylation ages of human blood, liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. A significant correlation between BMI and epigenetic age acceleration could only be observed for liver (r = 0.42, P = 6.8 × 10(-4) in dataset 1 and r = 0.42, P = 1.2 × 10(-4) in dataset 2). On average, epigenetic age increased by 3.3 y for each 10 BMI units. The detected age acceleration in liver is not associated with the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score or any of its component traits after adjustment for BMI. The 279 genes that are underexpressed in older liver samples are highly enriched (1.2 × 10(-9)) with nuclear mitochondrial genes that play a role in oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport. The epigenetic age acceleration, which is not reversible in the short term after rapid weight loss induced by bariatric surgery, may play a role in liver-related comorbidities of obesity, such as insulin resistance and liver cancer.

  7. Liver glucose metabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Pérez-Felpete, Noemi; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Pazos-García, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Information about normal hepatic glucose metabolism may help to understand pathogenic mechanisms underlying obesity and diabetes mellitus. In addition, liver glucose metabolism is involved in glycosylation reactions and connected with fatty acid metabolism. The liver receives dietary carbohydrates directly from the intestine via the portal vein. Glucokinase phosphorylates glucose to glucose 6-phosphate inside the hepatocyte, ensuring that an adequate flow of glucose enters the cell to be metabolized. Glucose 6-phosphate may proceed to several metabolic pathways. During the post-prandial period, most glucose 6-phosphate is used to synthesize glycogen via the formation of glucose 1-phosphate and UDP–glucose. Minor amounts of UDP–glucose are used to form UDP–glucuronate and UDP–galactose, which are donors of monosaccharide units used in glycosylation. A second pathway of glucose 6-phosphate metabolism is the formation of fructose 6-phosphate, which may either start the hexosamine pathway to produce UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or follow the glycolytic pathway to generate pyruvate and then acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA may enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to be oxidized or may be exported to the cytosol to synthesize fatty acids, when excess glucose is present within the hepatocyte. Finally, glucose 6-phosphate may produce NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate through the pentose phosphate pathway. Glucose metabolism supplies intermediates for glycosylation, a post-translational modification of proteins and lipids that modulates their activity. Congenital deficiency of phosphoglucomutase (PGM)-1 and PGM-3 is associated with impaired glycosylation. In addition to metabolize carbohydrates, the liver produces glucose to be used by other tissues, from glycogen breakdown or from de novo synthesis using primarily lactate and alanine (gluconeogenesis). PMID:27707936

  8. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Alison E M; Ulyanov, Anatoly V; Fisher, Robyn L

    2017-03-07

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%-11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%-6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%-60%), APAP, CBZ (57%-56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%-43%), APAP and DCF (40%-38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%-35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  9. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Alison E. M.; Ulyanov, Anatoly V.; Fisher, Robyn L.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%), APAP, CBZ (57%–56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%–43%), APAP and DCF (40%–38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects. PMID:28272341

  10. Decellularized human liver as a natural 3D-scaffold for liver bioengineering and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Rombouts, Krista; Rennie Hall, Andrew; Urbani, Luca; Vinh Luong, Tu; Al-Akkad, Walid; Longato, Lisa; Brown, David; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Dhillon, Amar P.; Fuller, Barry; Davidson, Brian; Moore, Kevin; Dhar, Dipok; De Coppi, Paolo; Malago, Massimo; Pinzani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Liver synthetic and metabolic function can only be optimised by the growth of cells within a supportive liver matrix. This can be achieved by the utilisation of decellularised human liver tissue. Here we demonstrate complete decellularization of whole human liver and lobes to form an extracellular matrix scaffold with a preserved architecture. Decellularized human liver cubic scaffolds were repopulated for up to 21 days using human cell lines hepatic stellate cells (LX2), hepatocellular carcinoma (Sk-Hep-1) and hepatoblastoma (HepG2), with excellent viability, motility and proliferation and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Biocompatibility was demonstrated by either omental or subcutaneous xenotransplantation of liver scaffold cubes (5 × 5 × 5 mm) into immune competent mice resulting in absent foreign body responses. We demonstrate decellularization of human liver and repopulation with derived human liver cells. This is a key advance in bioartificial liver development. PMID:26248878

  11. Probabilistic Computation in Human Perception under Variability in Encoding Precision

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Shaiyan; van den Berg, Ronald; Ma, Wei Ji

    2012-01-01

    A key function of the brain is to interpret noisy sensory information. To do so optimally, observers must, in many tasks, take into account knowledge of the precision with which stimuli are encoded. In an orientation change detection task, we find that encoding precision does not only depend on an experimentally controlled reliability parameter (shape), but also exhibits additional variability. In spite of variability in precision, human subjects seem to take into account precision near-optimally on a trial-to-trial and item-to-item basis. Our results offer a new conceptualization of the encoding of sensory information and highlight the brain’s remarkable ability to incorporate knowledge of uncertainty during complex perceptual decision-making. PMID:22768258

  12. In vivo mechanical characterization of human liver.

    PubMed

    Nava, A; Mazza, E; Furrer, M; Villiger, P; Reinhart, W H

    2008-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of human liver has been characterized with aspiration experiments. Measurements have been performed in vivo under sterile conditions during open surgery. Twenty-three measurements on six healthy human livers were performed using the same loading history for each test, so to allow a direct comparison of the measured deformations. The measurement results are reported and the experimental uncertainties evaluated. One of the main objectives of the present paper is to share information on the in vivo mechanical response of human liver with the biomechanics research community: the present data can be used for mechanical model development and validation purposes. The parameters of a quasi-linear viscoelastic model have been determined from the experimental data by means of inverse finite element calculations. The corresponding linear elastic modulus is compared with values from the literature. In particular, a significant discrepancy has been found with respect to the values proposed by Carter et al. [Carter, F.J., Frank, T.G., Davies, P.J., McLean, D., Cuschieri, A., 2001. Measurement and modelling of the compliance of human and porcine organs. Medical Image Analysis 5, 231-236] and the reasons for this difference are discussed. The predictive capabilities of the quasi-linear viscoelastic model and the Rubin Bodner non-linear elastic-viscoplastic model are compared with respect to the tissue response in repeated aspiration cycles. Finally, for demonstration purposes, the constitutive model corresponding to the "average" liver response has been implemented into a finite element whole liver model and used for simulations related to liver surgery.

  13. Human liver catalase: cloning, expression and characterization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li Hua; Kim, Dae Won; Eum, Won Sik; Yoon, Chang Sik; Jang, Sang Ho; Choi, Hee Soon; Choi, Soo Hyun; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, So Young; Jung, Mi Ryoung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Kang, Jung Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kil Soo; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young

    2003-06-30

    We isolated a cDNA encoding liver catalase from a human liver cDNA library. The cDNA had a high degree of sequence similarity to the corresponding enzyme from other sources. It was expressed in E. coli using the pET15b vector. The protein produced was enzymatically active after purification, and its kinetic parameters closely resembled those of other mammalian catalases. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the purified catalase; six antibodies recognizing different epitopes were obtained, one of which inhibited the enzyme. The cross reactions of the antibodies with brain catalases from human and other mammalian tissues were investigated, and all the immunoreactive bands obtained on Western blots had molecular masses of about 58 kDa. Similarly fractionated extracts of several mammalian cell lines all gave a single band of molecular mass 58 kDa. These results indicate that mammalian livers and human cell lines contain only one major type of immunologically reactive catalase, even though some of catalases have been previously reported to differ in certain properties.

  14. Robust encoding of scene anticipation during human spatial navigation

    PubMed Central

    Shikauchi, Yumi; Ishii, Shin

    2016-01-01

    In a familiar city, people can recall scene views (e.g., a particular street corner scene) they could encounter again in the future. Complex objects with multiple features are represented by multiple neural units (channels) in the brain, but when anticipating a scene view, the kind of feature that is assigned to a specific channel is unknown. Here, we studied neural encoding of scene view anticipation during spatial navigation, using a novel data-driven analysis to evaluate encoding channels. Our encoding models, based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity, provided channel error correction via redundant channel assignments that reflected the navigation environment. We also found that our encoding models strongly reflected brain activity in the inferior parietal gyrus and precuneus, and that details of future scenes were locally represented in the superior prefrontal gyrus and temporal pole. Furthermore, a decoder associated with the encoding models accurately predicted future scene views in both passive and active navigation. These results suggest that the human brain uses scene anticipation, mediated especially by parietal and medial prefrontal cortical areas, as a robust and effective navigation processing. PMID:27874089

  15. Peculiar magnetic observations in pathological human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felner, I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    DC magnetic measurements confirm presence of (i) diamagnetic, (ii) ferri-magnetic (probably magnetite) and (iii) paramagnetic components in human liver tissues obtained from a normal person and two patients with hematological malignancies. The main observation is that patients' liver tissues show a pronounced magnetic peak at 54(1) K in their zero-field-cooled (ZFC) branches; its origin is not known. One sample shows unusual magnetic features: (i) this peak is irreversible and totally suppressed in the second ZFC sweep, (ii) around the peak position the field-cooled (FC) curve crosses the ZFC one (ZFC>FC). The two phenomena are related to each other.

  16. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  17. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding human trehalase.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, R; Taketani, S; Sasai-Takedatsu, M; Kino, M; Tokunaga, R; Kobayashi, Y

    1997-11-20

    A complete cDNA clone encoding human trehalase, a glycoprotein of brush-border membranes, has been isolated from a human kidney library. The cDNA encodes a protein of 583 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 66,595. Human enzyme contains a typical cleavable signal peptide at amino terminus, five potential glycosylation sites, and a hydrophobic region at carboxyl terminus where the protein is anchored to plasma membranes via glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human enzyme showed similarity to sequences of the enzyme from rabbit, silk worm, Tenebrio molitor, Escherichia coli and yeast. Northern blots revealed that human trehalase mRNA of approx. 2.0 kb was found mainly in the kidney, liver and small intestine. Expression of the recombinant trehalase in E. coli provided a high level of the enzyme activity. The isolation and expression of cDNA for human trehalase should facilitate studies of the structure of the gene, as well as a basis for a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism.

  18. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  19. Nucleotide sequence and the encoded amino acids of human apolipoprotein A-I mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Brewer, H B

    1984-01-01

    The cDNA clones encoding the precursor form of human liver apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), preproapoA-I, have been isolated from a cDNA library. A 17-base synthetic oligonucleotide based on residues 108-113 of apoA-I and a 26-base primer-extended, dideoxynucleotide-terminated cDNA were used as hybridization probes to select for recombinant plasmids bearing the apoA-I sequence. The complete nucleic acid sequence of human liver preproapoA-I has been determined by analysis of the cloned cDNA. The sequence is composed of 801 nucleotides encoding 267 amino acid residues. PreproapoA-I contains an 18-amino-acid prepeptide and a 6-amino-acid propeptide connected to the amino terminus of the 243-amino acid mature apoA-I. Southern blotting analysis of chromosomal DNA obtained from peripheral blood indicated the apoA-I gene is contained in a 2.1-kilobase-pair Pst I fragment and there is no gross difference in structural organization between the normal apoA-I gene and the Tangier disease apoA-I gene. Images PMID:6198645

  20. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    PubMed

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  1. Differential Encoding of Losses and Gains in the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Ben; Daw, Nathaniel; Dayan, Peter; Singer, Tania; Dolan, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Studies on human monetary prediction and decision making emphasize the role of the striatum in encoding prediction errors for financial reward. However, less is known about how the brain encodes financial loss. Using Pavlovian conditioning of visual cues to outcomes that simultaneously incorporate the chance of financial reward and loss, we show that striatal activation reflects positively signed prediction errors for both. Furthermore, we show functional segregation within the striatum, with more anterior regions showing relative selectivity for rewards and more posterior regions for losses. These findings mirror the anteroposterior valence-specific gradient reported in rodents and endorse the role of the striatum in aversive motivational learning about financial losses, illustrating functional and anatomical consistencies with primary aversive outcomes such as pain. PMID:17475790

  2. Characterization and mapping of human genes encoding zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P; Lichter, P; Thiesen, H J; Ward, D C; Dawid, I B

    1991-01-01

    The zinc finger motif, exemplified by a segment of the Drosophila gap gene Krüppel, is a nucleic acid-binding domain present in many transcription factors. To investigate the gene family encoding this motif in the human genome, a placental genomic library was screened at moderate stringency with a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide probe designed to hybridize to the His/Cys (H/C) link region between adjoining zinc fingers. Over 200 phage clones were obtained and are being sorted into groups by partial sequencing, cross-hybridization with oligodeoxynucleotide probes, and PCR amplification. Further, the genomic clones were cross-hybridized with a set of 30 zinc finger-encoding cDNAs (Kox1-Kox30) isolated from a human T-cell cDNA library. Four cDNAs (Kox4, Kox7, Kox12, and Kox15) were identified that match one or more genomic clones; these matches were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis. One or more clones from each locus were mapped onto human metaphase chromosomes by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with fluorescent probe detection. We mapped ZNF7/Kox4 to chromosome 8qter, ZNF19/Kox12 to 16q22, ZNF22/Kox15 to 10q11, and ZNF44/Kox7 to 16p11. The results of these analyses support the conclusion that the human genome contains many, probably several hundred, zinc finger genes with consensus H/C link regions. Images PMID:1946370

  3. Mutations in TJP2, encoding zona occludens 2, and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sambrotta, Melissa; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical description of a phenotype, which we now realize has several different genetic aetiologies. The identification of the underlying genetic defects has helped to elucidate important aspects of liver physiology. The latest addition to this family of diseases is tight junction protein 2 (TJP2) deficiency. This protein is also known as zona occludens 2 (ZO-2). The patients, so far presented, all have homozygous, protein-truncating mutations. A complete absence of this protein was demonstrated. These children presented with severe liver disease, some manifesting extrahepatic features. By contrast, embryonic-lethality was seen in ZO-2 knockout mice. This discovery highlights important differences, not just between species, but also between different epithelia in humans. This commentary discusses the recently presented findings, and some of the issues that arise. PMID:26451340

  4. Dynamic Encoding of Speech Sequence Probability in Human Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Matthew K.; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Tang, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning. PMID:25948269

  5. Dynamic encoding of speech sequence probability in human temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Matthew K; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Tang, Claire; Chang, Edward F

    2015-05-06

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning.

  6. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  7. A neural circuit encoding sexual preference in humans

    PubMed Central

    Poeppl, Timm B.; Langguth, Berthold; Rupprecht, Rainer; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual preference determines mate choice for reproduction and hence guarantees conservation of species in mammals. Despite this fundamental role in human behavior, current knowledge on its target-specific neurofunctional substrate is based on lesion studies and therefore limited. We used meta-analytic remodeling of neuroimaging data from 364 human subjects with diverse sexual interests during sexual stimulation to quantify neural regions associated with sexual preference manipulations. We found that sexual preference is encoded by four phylogenetically old, subcortical brain structures. More specifically, sexual preference is controlled by the anterior and preoptic area of the hypothalamus, the anterior and mediodorsal thalamus, the septal area, and the perirhinal parahippocampus including the dentate gyrus. In contrast, sexual non-preference is regulated by the substantia innominata. We anticipate the identification of a core neural circuit for sexual preferences to be a starting point for further sophisticated investigations into the neural principles of sexual behavior and particularly of its aberrations. PMID:27339689

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling Controls Liver Size in Mice With Humanized Livers

    PubMed Central

    Naugler, Willscott E.; Tarlow, Branden D.; Fedorov, Lev M.; Taylor, Matthew; Pelz, Carl; Li, Bin; Darnell, Jennifer; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The ratio of liver size to body weight (hepatostat) is tightly controlled, but little is known about how the physiologic functions of the liver help determine its size. Livers of mice repopulated with human hepatocytes (humanized livers) grow to larger than normal; the human hepatocytes do not recognize fibroblast growth factor-15 (FGF15) produced by mouse intestine. This results in upregulation of bile acid synthesis in the human hepatocytes and enlargement of the bile acid pool. We investigated whether abnormal bile acid signaling affects the hepatostat in mice. Methods We crossed Fah−/−, Rag2−/−, Il2r−/− mice with NOD mice to create FRGN mice, whose livers can be fully repopulated with human hepatocytes. We inserted the gene for human FGF19 (ortholog to mouse Fgf15), including regulatory sequences, into the FRGN mice to create FRGN19+ mice. Livers of FRGN19+ mice and their FRGN littermates were fully repopulated with human hepatocytes. Liver tissues were collected and bile acid pool sizes and RNA sequences were analyzed and compared with those of mice without humanized livers (controls). Results Livers were larger in FRGN mice with humanized livers (13% of body weight), compared to control FRGN mice; they also had much larger bile acid pools and aberrant bile acid signaling. Livers from FRGN19+ normalized to 7.8% of body weight, and their bile acid pool and signaling more closely resembled that of control FRGN19+ mice. RNA sequence analysis showed activation of the Hippo pathway, and immunohistochemical and transcription analyses revealed increased hepatocyte proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the enlarged humanized livers of FRGN mice. Cell sorting experiments showed that although healthy human liver does not produce FGF19, non-parenchymal cells from cholestatic livers produce FGF19. Conclusions In mice with humanized livers, expression of an FGF19 transgene corrects bile acid signaling defects, resulting in normalization of bile

  9. Humanization of excretory pathway in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hirotoshi; Katoh, Miki; Sawada, Toshiro; Nakajima, Miki; Soeno, Yoshinori; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-06-01

    The liver of a chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)(+/+)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse line recently established in Japan could be replaced by more than 80% with human hepatocytes. We previously reported that the chimeric mice with humanized liver could be useful as a human model in studies on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the humanization of an excretory pathway was investigated in the chimeric mice. Cefmetazole (CMZ) was used as a probe drug. The CMZ excretions in urine and feces were 81.0 and 5.9% of the dose, respectively, in chimeric mice and were 23.7 and 59.4% of the dose, respectively, in control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. Because CMZ is mainly excreted in urine in humans, the excretory profile of chimeric mice was demonstrated to be similar to that of humans. In the chimeric mice, the hepatic mRNA expression of human drug transporters could be quantified. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA expression of mouse drug transporters in the chimeric mice was significantly lower than in the control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. In conclusion, chimeric mice exhibited a humanized profile of drug excretion, suggesting that this chimeric mouse line would be a useful animal model in excretory studies.

  10. Ipsilateral directional encoding of joystick movements in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohit; Gaona, Charles; Roland, Jarod; Anderson, Nick; Freudenberg, Zachary; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2009-01-01

    The majority of Brain Computer Interfaces have relied on signals related to primary motor cortex and the operation of the contralateral limb. Recently, the physiology associated with same-sided (ipsilateral) motor movements has been found to have a unique cortical physiology. This study sets out to assess whether more complex motor movements can be discerned utilizing ipsilateral cortical signals. In this study, three invasively monitored human subjects were recorded while performing a center out joystick task with the hand ipsilateral to the hemispheric subdural grid array. It was found that directional tuning was present in ipsilateral cortex. This information was encoded in both distinct anatomic populations and spectral distributions. These findings support the notion that ipsilateral signals may provide added information for BCI operation in the future.

  11. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  12. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints

    PubMed Central

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Alex P.; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E.; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K.; Maurano, Matthew T.; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R. Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J.; Akey, Joshua M.; Bender, Michael; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNaseI, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNaseI footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNaseI cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50 base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation, and pluripotency. PMID:22955618

  13. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints.

    PubMed

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B; Reynolds, Alex P; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K; Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J; Akey, Joshua M; Bender, M A; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNase I, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNase I footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million transcription factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNase I cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50-base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation and pluripotency.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  15. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  16. First insight into the human liver proteome from PROTEOME(SKY)-LIVER(Hu) 1.0, a publicly available database.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we report proteome and transcriptome profiles of the human adult liver and present an initial analysis. Overall, the human liver proteome (HLP) data set comprises 6788 identified proteins with at least two peptides matches at 95% confidence, including 3721 proteins newly identified in liver. The human liver transcriptome (HLT) data set consists of 11 205 expressed genes. The HLP is the largest proteome data set for a human organ and is the first direct association between a proteome and its transcriptome derived from the same sample. Although it is hard to approach complete coverage of the HLP currently, several conclusions based on this data set are clearly reached: (1) The 5816 protein-encoding genes (PEGs) represented by the HLP and the 11 104 PEGs represented in the HLT have been identified from 20 070 PEGs in IPI Human v3.07 and 19 478 PEGs in the integrated human transcriptome database, respectively. (2) The patterns of chromosomal distribution of the genes corresponding to the HLP are highly consistent with those of the HLT. Some chromosomal regions, such as 16p13.3, 19q13.31, 19q13.42, and Xq28, exhibit particularly high densities of liver-specific genes, which perform the important functions related to normal physiology or/and pathology in this organ. (3) The HLP spans 6 orders of magnitude in relative protein abundance and 78% of the proteins fall in the middle of this range. Of newly identified liver proteins, 82.5% are of low abundance. (4) Proteins involving in metabolism, transport, and coagulation and those containing active domains for metabolism, transport, and biosynthesis are significantly enriched in liver. (5) All 94 metabolic pathways in KEGG are touched to different extent. Of which, for 48 pathways, particularly those involved in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, more than 80% of the component proteins have been detected. The liver-specific pathways, such as those participating in metabolism of bile acid and bilirubin and

  17. Plasmodium vivax liver stage development and hypnozoite persistence in human liver-chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Vaughan, Ashley M; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Yimamnuaychok, Narathatai; Rezakhani, Nastaran; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Singh, Naresh; Kaushansky, Alexis; Camargo, Nelly; Baldwin, Michael; Lindner, Scott E; Adams, John H; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Prachumsri, Jetsumon; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2015-04-08

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is characterized by periodic relapses of symptomatic blood stage parasite infections likely initiated by activation of dormant liver stage parasites-hypnozoites. The lack of tractable P. vivax animal models constitutes an obstacle in examining P. vivax liver stage infection and drug efficacy. To overcome this obstacle, we have used human liver-chimeric (huHep) FRG KO mice as a model for P. vivax infection. FRG KO huHep mice support P. vivax sporozoite infection, liver stage development, and hypnozoite formation. We show complete P. vivax liver stage development, including maturation into infectious exo-erythrocytic merozoites as well as the formation and persistence of hypnozoites. Prophylaxis or treatment with the antimalarial primaquine can prevent and eliminate liver stage infection, respectively. Thus, P. vivax-infected FRG KO huHep mice are a model to investigate liver stage development and dormancy and may facilitate the discovery of drugs targeting relapsing malaria.

  18. Plasmodium vivax liver stage development and hypnozoite persistence in human liver-chimeric mice

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Yimamnuaychok, Narathatai; Rezakhani, Nastaran; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Singh, Naresh; Kaushansky, Alexis; Camargo, Nelly; Baldwin, Michael; Lindner, Scott E.; Adams, John H.; Prachumsri, Jetsumon; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is characterized by periodic relapses of symptomatic blood stage parasite infections likely initiated by activation of dormant liver stage parasites -hypnozoites. The lack of tractable animal models for P. vivax constitutes a severe obstacle to investigate this unique aspect of its biology and to test drug efficacy against liver stages. We show that the FRG KO huHep liver-humanized mice support P. vivax sporozoite infection, development of liver stages, and the formation of small non-replicating hypnozoites. Cellular characterization of P. vivax liver stage development in vivo demonstrates complete maturation into infectious exo-erythrocytic merozoites and continuing persistence of hypnozoites. Primaquine prophylaxis or treatment prevents and eliminates liver stage infection. Thus, the P. vivax/FRG KO huHep mouse infection model constitutes an important new tool to investigate the biology of liver stage development and dormancy and might aid in the discovery of new drugs for the prevention of relapsing malaria. PMID:25800544

  19. Encoding of marginal utility across time in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Alex; Seymour, Ben; Roiser, Jonathan P; Bossaerts, Peter; Friston, Karl J.; Curran, H. Valerie; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Marginal utility theory prescribes the relationship between the objective property of the magnitude of rewards and their subjective value. Despite its pervasive influence, however, there is remarkably little direct empirical evidence for such a theory of value, let alone of its neurobiological basis. We show that human preferences in an inter-temporal choice task are best described by a model that integrates marginally diminishing utility with temporal discounting. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that activity in the dorsal striatum encodes both the marginal utility of rewards, over and above that which can be described by their magnitude alone, and the discounting associated with increasing time. In addition, our data show that dorsal striatum may be involved in integrating subjective valuation systems inherent to time and magnitude, thereby providing an overall metric of value used to guide choice behaviour. Furthermore, during choice we show that anterior cingulate activity correlates with the degree of difficulty associated with dissonance between value and time. Our data support an integrative architecture for decision-making, revealing the neural representation of distinct subcomponents of value that may contribute to impulsivity and decisiveness. PMID:19641120

  20. Characterization of the human LPIN1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2010-05-07

    The human LPIN1 gene encodes the protein lipin 1, which possesses phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase (3-sn-phosphatidate phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.4) activity (Han, G.-S., Wu, W.-I., and Carman, G. M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 9210-9218). In this work, we characterized human lipin 1 alpha, beta, and gamma isoforms that were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. PA phosphatase activities of the alpha, beta, and gamma isoforms were dependent on Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions at pH 7.5 at 37 degrees C. The activities were inhibited by concentrations of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) above their optimums and by Ca(2+), Zn(2+), N-ethylmaleimide, propranolol, and the sphingoid bases sphingosine and sphinganine. The activities were thermally labile at temperatures above 40 degrees C. The alpha, beta, and gamma activities followed saturation kinetics with respect to the molar concentration of PA (K(m) values of 0.35, 0.24, and 0.11 mm, respectively) but followed positive cooperative (Hill number approximately 2) kinetics with respect to the surface concentration of PA (K(m) values of 4.2, 4.5, and 4.3 mol %, respectively) in Triton X-100/PA-mixed micelles. The turnover numbers (k(cat)) for the alpha, beta, and gamma isoforms were 68.8 + or - 3.5, 42.8 + or - 2.5, and 5.7 + or - 0.2 s(-1), respectively, whereas their energy of activation values were 14.2, 15.5, and 18.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The isoform activities were dependent on PA as a substrate and required at least one unsaturated fatty acyl moiety for maximum activity.

  1. Characterization of the Human LPIN1-encoded Phosphatidate Phosphatase Isoforms*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2010-01-01

    The human LPIN1 gene encodes the protein lipin 1, which possesses phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase (3-sn-phosphatidate phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.4) activity (Han, G.-S., Wu, W.-I., and Carman, G. M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 9210–9218). In this work, we characterized human lipin 1 α, β, and γ isoforms that were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. PA phosphatase activities of the α, β, and γ isoforms were dependent on Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions at pH 7.5 at 37 °C. The activities were inhibited by concentrations of Mg2+ and Mn2+ above their optimums and by Ca2+, Zn2+, N-ethylmaleimide, propranolol, and the sphingoid bases sphingosine and sphinganine. The activities were thermally labile at temperatures above 40 °C. The α, β, and γ activities followed saturation kinetics with respect to the molar concentration of PA (Km values of 0.35, 0.24, and 0.11 mm, respectively) but followed positive cooperative (Hill number ∼2) kinetics with respect to the surface concentration of PA (Km values of 4.2, 4.5, and 4.3 mol %, respectively) in Triton X-100/PA-mixed micelles. The turnover numbers (kcat) for the α, β, and γ isoforms were 68.8 ± 3.5, 42.8 ± 2.5, and 5.7 ± 0.2 s−1, respectively, whereas their energy of activation values were 14.2, 15.5, and 18.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The isoform activities were dependent on PA as a substrate and required at least one unsaturated fatty acyl moiety for maximum activity. PMID:20231281

  2. Long Term Fate of Human Fetal Liver Progenitor Cells Transplanted in Injured Mouse Livers.

    PubMed

    Irudayaswamy, Antony; Muthiah, Mark; Zhou, Lei; Hung, Hau; Jumat, Nur Halisah Bte; Haque, Jamil; Teoh, Narcissus; Farrell, Geoffrey; Riehle, Kimberly J; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Su, Lin Lin; Chan, Jerry Ky; Choolani, Mahesh; Wong, P C; Wee, Aileen; Lim, Seng Gee; Campbell, Jean; Fausto, Nelson; Dan, Yock Young

    2017-09-28

    Liver progenitor cells have the potential to repair and regenerate a diseased liver. The success of any translational efforts, however, hinges on thorough understanding of the fate of these cells after transplant, especially in terms of long-term safety and efficacy. Here we report transplantation of a liver progenitor population isolated from human fetal livers into immune-permissive mice with follow-up up to 36 weeks after transplant. We found that human progenitor cells engraft and differentiate into functional human hepatocytes in the mouse, producing albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and glycogen. They create tight junctions with mouse hepatocytes, with no evidence of cell fusion. Interestingly, they also differentiate into functional endothelial cell and bile duct cells. Transplantation of progenitor cells abrogated carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis in recipient mice, with down-regulation of procollagen and anti-smooth muscle actin. Paradoxically, the degree of engraftment of human hepatocytes correlated negatively with the anti-fibrotic effect. Progenitor cell expansion was most prominent in cirrhotic animals, and correlated with transcript levels of pro-fibrotic genes. Animals that had resolution of fibrosis had quiescent native progenitor cells in their livers. No evidence of neoplasia was observed, even up to 9 months after transplantation. Human fetal liver progenitor cells successfully attenuate liver fibrosis in mice. They are activated in the setting of liver injury, but become quiescent when injury resolves, mimicking the behavior of de novo progenitor cells. Our data suggest that liver progenitor cells transplanted into injured livers maintain a functional role in the repair and regeneration of the liver. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  4. Chimeric mice with a humanized liver as an animal model of troglitazone-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kakuni, Masakazu; Morita, Mayu; Matsuo, Kentaro; Katoh, Yumiko; Nakajima, Miki; Tateno, Chise; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-10-02

    Troglitazone (Tro) is a thiazolidinedione antidiabetic drug that was withdrawn from the market due to its association with idiosyncratic severe liver injury. Tro has never induced liver injury in experimental animals in vivo. It was assumed that the species differences between human and experimental animals in the pharmaco- or toxicokinetics of Tro might be associated with these observations. In this study, we investigated whether a chimeric mouse with a humanized liver that we previously established, whose replacement index with human hepatocytes is up to 92% can reproduce Tro-induced liver injury. When the chimeric mice were orally administered Tro for 14 or 23 days (1000mg/kg/day), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was significantly increased by 2.1- and 3.6-fold, respectively. Co-administration of l-buthionine sulfoximine (10mM in drinking water), an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis, unexpectedly prevented the Tro-dependent increase of ALT, which suggests that the GSH scavenging pathway will not be involved in Tro-induced liver injury. To elucidate the mechanism of the onset of liver injury, hepatic GSH content, the level of oxidative stress markers and phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes were determined. However, these factors were not associated with Tro-induced liver injury. An immune-mediated reaction may be associated with Tro-induced liver toxicity in vivo, because the chimeric mouse is derived from an immunodeficient SCID mouse. In conclusion, we successfully reproduced Tro-induced liver injury using chimeric mice with a humanized liver, which provides a new animal model for studying idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  6. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunami, Michio; Chengsheng Chen; Yoshida, Akira )

    1991-09-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. The authors isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5{prime} region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role.

  7. Regeneration of Human Liver After Hepatic Lobectomy Studied by Repeated Liver Scanning and Repeated Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Yu; Lee, Chue-Shue; Chen, Chiou-Chiang; Liau, Kuong-Yi; Lin, Wen-Shih-Jen

    1979-01-01

    Regeneration of the residual lobe of the liver after hepatic lobectomy in humans was studied by repeated liver scanning in seven noncirrhotic and three cirrhotic patients. Each patient was studied for several months during the study which lasted from 1-12 years. Regeneration was apparent in noncirrhotic liver remnants following hepatic lobectomy. In the case of a long standing, space occupying lesions such as benign giant cysts, the liver remnant would complete its regeneration process rather early, usually within a few months of hepatic lobectomy. In hepatoma cases, however, regeneration of the residual lobe after hepatic resection usually took five or six months for completion. On the contrary, no definite increase in the size of the liver remnant was seen on repeated liver scanning in cirrhotic patients. Histologic study of the residual lobe was repeated on needle biopsy specimens in two noncirrhotic and four cirrhotic patients. Regenerative hyperplasia of liver cells with large hyperchromatic, or double nuclei never seen in the preresection liver appeared in the liver remnant five, 11, and 27 days after hepatic lobectomy in noncirrhotic patients. In cirrhotics, however, there were no histologic changes between the preresection liver and the postresection remnant studied three, five, 15, 40 days or even two years and 8 months after hepatic lobectomy. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:464678

  8. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  9. Encoding of configural regularity in the human visual system.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas; Wagemans, Johan; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2014-08-13

    The visual system is very efficient in encoding stimulus properties by utilizing available regularities in the inputs. To explore the underlying encoding strategies during visual information processing, we presented participants with two-line configurations that varied in the amount of configural regularity (or degrees of freedom in the relative positioning of the two lines) in a fMRI experiment. Configural regularity ranged from a generic configuration to stimuli resembling an "L" (i.e., a right-angle L-junction), a "T" (i.e., a right-angle midpoint T-junction), or a "+",-the latter being the most regular stimulus. We found that the response strength in the shape-selective lateral occipital area was consistently lower for a higher degree of regularity in the stimuli. In the second experiment, using multivoxel pattern analysis, we further show that regularity is encoded in terms of the fMRI signal strength but not in the distributed pattern of responses. Finally, we found that the results of these experiments could not be accounted for by low-level stimulus properties and are distinct from norm-based encoding. Our results suggest that regularity plays an important role in stimulus encoding in the ventral visual processing stream.

  10. Collagen polymorphism in normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1977-01-01

    Collagens in normal human liver and in alcoholic cirrhotic liver were investigated. Collagens were solubilized by limited proteolysis with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification, were fractionated into types I and III by selective precipitation with NaCl. After carboxymethyl cellulose and agarose chromatography, the resulting alpha-chains from each of the collagen types were analyzed with respect to their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions. A comparison of the results obtained from normal liver with those from the diseases organ revealed no significant differences. The isolated human liver alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) chains were digested with CNBr and the generated peptides were separated and purified by a combination of ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. The molecular weight and the amino acid and the carbohydrate compositions of each of the peptides were identical to those of the corresponding human skin peptides except for the slightly higher content of hydroxylysine in some of the peptides. The relative content of type III in relation to type I collagen in both normal anc cirrhotic liver was determined by digesting washed liver homogenates directly with CNBr and quantitating the resultant alpha1(I) and alpha 1(III) peptides after chromatographic separation. The relative quantities of these peptides indicated that normal human liver contained an average of 47% type III, with the remainder being type I. Cirrhotic liver, on the other hand, contained a significantly smaller proportion of type III, ranging from 18 to 34% in different samples, with a corresponding increase in type I. These findings indicate that although the amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of collagens deposited in cirrhotic liver are normal, the fibrotic process of alcoholic liver disease in humans is accompanied by an alteration in tissue collagen polymorphism, and suggest that the observed alterations may have pathogenetic implications. PMID:833273

  11. Multilineage communication regulates human liver bud development from pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Sekine, Keisuke; Gerber, Tobias; Loeffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans; Gac, Malgorzata; Kanton, Sabina; Kageyama, Jorge; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Belicova, Lenka; Bickle, Marc; Barsacchi, Rico; Okuda, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Emi; Kimura, Masaki; Ayabe, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Hideki; Takebe, Takanori; Treutlein, Barbara

    2017-06-22

    Conventional two-dimensional differentiation from pluripotency fails to recapitulate cell interactions occurring during organogenesis. Three-dimensional organoids generate complex organ-like tissues; however, it is unclear how heterotypic interactions affect lineage identity. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing to reconstruct hepatocyte-like lineage progression from pluripotency in two-dimensional culture. We then derive three-dimensional liver bud organoids by reconstituting hepatic, stromal, and endothelial interactions, and deconstruct heterogeneity during liver bud development. We find that liver bud hepatoblasts diverge from the two-dimensional lineage, and express epithelial migration signatures characteristic of organ budding. We benchmark three-dimensional liver buds against fetal and adult human liver single-cell RNA sequencing data, and find a striking correspondence between the three-dimensional liver bud and fetal liver cells. We use a receptor-ligand pairing analysis and a high-throughput inhibitor assay to interrogate signalling in liver buds, and show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) crosstalk potentiates endothelial network formation and hepatoblast differentiation. Our molecular dissection reveals interlineage communication regulating organoid development, and illuminates previously inaccessible aspects of human liver development.

  12. The phenotypic characteristic of liver-derived stem cells from adult human deceased donor liver.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Park, H-J; Kim, Y-A; Lee, D-H; Noh, J-K; Kwon, C H D; Jung, S-M; Lee, S-K

    2012-05-01

    Liver transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage liver disease. Because of the limited donor availability, attention has been focused on the possibility to restore liver mass and function through cell transplantation. Stem cells are a promising source for liver repopulation after cell transplantation, but whether or not the adult liver contains hepatic stem cells is highly controversial. Several studies have suggested the presence of stem cells in the adult normal human liver. However, a population with stem cell properties has not yet been isolated. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize progenitor cells in normal adult human liver. We isolated and expanded human liver stem cells (HLSCs) from a donated liver not suitable for liver transplantation or characterizing them by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence assay. HLSCs expressed the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166 but not the hematopoietic stem cell markers CD34, CD45, and CD117. HLSCs were also positive for vimentin and nestin, a stem cell marker. The absence of staining for cytokeratin-19, CD117, and CD34 indicated that HLSCs were not oval stem cells. In addition, HLSCs expressed CD26, and in a small percentage of cells, cytokeratin-8 and cytokeratin-18, indicating a partial commitment to hepatic cells. We concluded that HLSCs expressed several mesenchymal but not hematopoietic stem cell markers as well as CD26 and CK18, indicating a partial commitment to hepatic cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  14. Human Germline Antibody Gene Segments Encode Polyspecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Briney, Bryan S.; DeLuca, Samuel L.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding. PMID:23637590

  15. Expression and function of thyroid hormone receptor variants in normal and chronically diseased human liver.

    PubMed

    Chamba, A; Neuberger, J; Strain, A; Hopkins, J; Sheppard, M C; Franklyn, J A

    1996-01-01

    As the liver represents a major target organ for thyroid hormone action, we compared the expression of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha and beta variants in normal human liver and liver affected by primary biliary cirrhosis, sclerosing cholangitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 6 in each group). Western blot analysis using specific polyclonal antibodies to alpha 1 or beta 1 TRs or to the related non-T3-binding c-erbA alpha 2 variant revealed abundant expression of TRs in normal and diseased liver, with no difference in size or abundance of TR proteins. Immunocytochemistry likewise revealed abundant nuclear expression of TR proteins in normal and diseased liver, with similar patterns and intensity of staining. Despite abundant TR protein expression, Northern blot hybridization of polyadenylated ribonucleic acid (RNA; 10 micrograms) to TR complementary DNAs revealed only a weak signal for c-erbA alpha 2 messenger RNA (mRNA). Comparison of the level of expression of the thyroid hormone-regulated mRNAs encoding T4-binding globulin, sex hormone-binding globulin, cortisol-binding globulin, and transthyretin in normal and diseased tissue revealed no significant difference, suggesting that hepatocellular expression of these mRNAs is maintained in chronic liver disease despite a marked reduction in circulating T3 concentrations.

  16. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  17. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring human ventilation for apnoea detection using an optical encoder.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, G M; Webster, J G

    1998-08-01

    We have designed, built and tested a proof-of-concept system based on optical encoder technology for measuring adult or infant ventilation. It uses change in chest circumference to provide an indirect measure of ventilation. The Hewlett-Packard HEDS-9720 optical encoder senses displacement of its matching codestrip. It yields a resolution of 0.17 mm and is accurate to 0.008 mm over a 10 mm test distance. The encoder is mounted on a nylon web belt wrapped around the torso and responds to changes in circumference. Motion of the code strip during respiration is converted to direction of movement (inhalation or exhalation) as well as magnitude of circumference change. Use of two sensor bands, one on the chest and one on the abdomen, may allow detection of obstructive apnoea in which there is no air flow out of or into the subject despite respiratory movement. Applications of this technology include infant apnoea monitoring as well as long-term adult monitoring.

  19. A comparative study of aldolase from human muscle and liver

    PubMed Central

    Eagles, Peter A. M.; Iqbal, Muzaffar

    1973-01-01

    Aldolase was purified from human skeletal muscle and human liver by techniques capable of processing large quantities (10–20kg) of tissue. The methods used also proved convenient for isolating aldolase on a large scale from other mammalian and avian sources. Aldolase from both human liver and muscle was crystallized; each gave two crystalline forms, depending on the conditions of crystallization. X-ray studies on the muscle aldolase crystals suggest a close structural similarity between human and rabbit muscle aldolase. Aldolases from human muscle and liver have similar pH optima and pH stability but their stability to heat treatment differs. The effect of heat on the enzymes may therefore provide an easy means of distinguishing them. The kinetic constants Km and kcat. for these aldolases are similar to other mammalian aldolases. Amino acid analyses and tryptic peptide `mapping' show that the primary structures of the two aldolases differ greatly. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:4733235

  20. Human liver proteome project: plan, progress, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    He, Fuchu

    2005-12-01

    The Human Liver Proteome Project is the first initiative of the human proteome project for human organs/tissues and aims at writing a modern Prometheus myth. Its global scientific objectives are to reveal the "solar system" of the human liver proteome, expression profiles, modification profiles, a protein linkage (protein-protein interaction) map, and a proteome localization map, and to define an ORFeome, physiome, and pathome. Since it was first proposed in April 2002, the Human Liver Proteome Project has attracted more than 100 laboratories from all over the world. In the ensuing 3 years, we set up a management infrastructure, identified reference laboratories, confirmed standard operating procedures, initiated international research collaborations, and finally achieved the first set of expression profile data.

  1. Human platelets inhibit liver fibrosis in severe combined immunodeficiency mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Murata, Soichiro; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of human platelets in liver fibrosis. METHODS: Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were administered CCl4 and either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS group) or human platelet transfusions (hPLT group). Concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), matrix metallopeptidases (MMP)-9, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the liver tissue were compared between the PBS and the hPLT groups by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The effects of a human platelet transfusion on liver fibrosis included the fibrotic area, hydroxyproline content, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, which were evaluated by picrosirius red staining, ELISA, and immunohistochemical staining using an anti-mouse α-SMA antibody, respectively. Phosphorylations of mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (Met) and SMAD3, downstream signals of HGF and TGF-β, were compared between the two groups by Western blotting and were quantified using densitometry. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Furthermore, the accumulation of human platelets in the liver 2 h after platelet transfusion was compared between normal and fibrotic livers by immunohistochemical staining using an anti-human CD41 antibody. RESULTS: The fibrotic area and hydroxyproline content in the liver were both significantly lower in the hPLT group when compared to the PBS group (fibrotic area, 1.7% ± 0.6% vs 2.5% ± 0.6%, P = 0.03; hydroxyproline content, 121 ± 26 ng/g liver vs 156 ± 47 ng/g liver, P = 0.04). There was less α-smooth muscle actin staining in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (0.5% ± 0.1% vs 0.8% ± 0.3%, P = 0.02). Hepatic expression levels of mouse HGF and MMP-9 were significantly higher in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (HGF, 109 ± 13 ng/g liver vs 88 ± 22 ng/g liver, P = 0.03; MMP-9, 113% ± 7%/GAPDH vs 92% ± 11%/GAPDH, P = 0.04). In contrast, the

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2010: Conference Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease continues to represent a critical mediator of morbidity and mortality in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The frequent presence and overlap of concomitant injurious processes, including hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infections, hepatoxicity associated with antiretroviral therapeutic agents, alcohol, and other toxins, in the setting of immunosuppression lead to rapid fibrotic progression and early development of end-stage liver disease. This conference summary describes the proceedings of a state-of-the-art gathering of international experts designed to highlight the status of current research in epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of HIV and liver disease. PMID:21898501

  3. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells improve liver function and ascites in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Hu; Shi, Ming; Xu, Ruonan; Fu, Junliang; Lv, Jiyun; Chen, Liming; Lv, Sa; Li, Yuanyuan; Yu, Shuangjie; Geng, Hua; Jin, Lei; Lau, George K K; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC), a life-threatening complication of chronic liver disease, is one of the major indications for liver transplantation. Recently, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transfusion has been shown to lead to the regression of liver fibrosis in mice and humans. This study examined the safety and efficacy of umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) in patients with decompensated LC. A total of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients with decompensated LC, including 30 patients receiving UC-MSC transfusion, and 15 patients receiving saline as the control, were recruited; clinical parameters were detected during a 1-year follow-up period. No significant side-effects and complications were observed in either group. There was a significant reduction in the volume of ascites in patients treated with UC-MSC transfusion compared with controls (P < 0.05). UC-MSC therapy also significantly improved liver function, as indicated by the increase of serum albumin levels, decrease in total serum bilirubin levels, and decrease in the sodium model for end-stage liver disease scores. UC-MSC transfusion is clinically safe and could improve liver function and reduce ascites in patients with decompensated LC. UC-MSC transfusion, therefore, might present a novel therapeutic approach for patients with decompensated LC.

  4. Human liver territories: Think beyond the 8-segments scheme.

    PubMed

    Fasel, Jean H D

    2017-10-01

    Worldwide, compartmentalization of the human liver into portal venous territories today follows the eight-segments scheme credited to Couinaud. However, there are increasing reports of anatomical, radiological and surgical observations that contradict this concept. This paper presents a viewpoint that enhances understanding of these inconsistencies and can serve as a basis for customized liver interventions. Clin. Anat. 30:974-977, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Liver-derived human mesenchymal stem cells: a novel therapeutic source for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yini; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanuan

    2016-05-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell type for research and therapy due to their ability to proliferate, differentiate, modulate immune reactions, and secrete trophic factors. MSCs exist in a multitude of tissues, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissues. Moreover, MSCs have recently been isolated from the liver. Compared with other MSC types, liver-derived human MSCs (LHMSCs) possess general morphologies, immune functions, and differentiation capacities. Interestingly, LHMCSs produce higher levels of pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic cytokines than those of bone marrow-derived MSCs. Thus, these cells may be a promising therapeutic source for liver diseases. This paper summarizes the biological characteristics of LHMSCs and their potential benefits and risks for the treatment of liver diseases.

  6. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. ); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. )

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  7. Opisthorchis viverrini: The carcinogenic human liver fluke

    PubMed Central

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Pengsaa, Prasit; Sripa, Banchob

    2008-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia, including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia. The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatomegaly, cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. Multi-factorial etiology of cholangiocarcinoma, mechanical damage, parasite secretions, and immunopathology may enhance cholangiocarcinogenesis. Moreover, both experimental and epidemiological evidences strongly implicate liver fluke infection as the major risk factor in cholangiocarcinoma, cancer of the bile ducts. The liver fluke infection is induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region, particularly in rural areas, of Thailand. The health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in the high-risk areas. PMID:18205254

  8. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  9. Variations in human liver fucosyltransferase activities in hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Jezequel-Cuer, M; Dalix, A M; Flejou, J F; Durand, G

    1992-06-01

    The hyperfucosylation of a number of glycoconjugates observed in liver diseases involves the action of several specific fucosyltransferases (F.T.) notably responsible for synthesizing histo-blood group antigens. We determined the activities of alpha 3, alpha 2 and alpha 3/4 F.T. in 35 liver biopsy samples from patients with fatty liver, alcoholic or post-hepatic liver cirrhosis, primary or secondary biliary cirrhosis, acute hepatitis or a normal liver. F.T. activities were measured by transfer of GDP [14C] fucose to asialotransferrin for alpha 3 F.T., to phenyl beta-D-galactoside for alpha 2 F.T. and to 2' fucosyllactose for alpha 3/4 F.T. The diseased liver extracts showed an early increase in non-Le gene-associated alpha 3 F.T. activity (p = 0.001), which was related to the number of steatosic hepatocytes and the degree of intralobular inflammatory infiltration. Overexpression of this alpha 3 F.T. provides an explanation for the strong expression of 3-fucosyl lactosamine structures described in several hepatobiliary diseases. alpha 2 F.T. levels were significantly elevated in the two groups of liver cirrhosis and acute hepatitis (p = 0.05), but not enough to consider alpha 2 F.T. as a sensitive feature of mesenchymal cell injury. All Lewis-positive biopsies displaying biliary alterations showed increased Le gene-encoded alpha 3/4 F.T. activity (p = 0.001), which was related to the intensity of neoductular proliferation. Elevated levels of alpha 3/4 F.T. may be a very early sign of biliary regeneration.

  10. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  11. Sustained Expression of Naked Plasmid DNA Encoding Hepatocyte Growth Factor in Mice Promotes Liver and Overall Body Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junwei; Chen, Shiping; Huang, Leaf; Michalopoulos, George K.; Liu, Youhua

    2007-01-01

    To understand the physiological functions of exogenous hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on normal adult animals, we delivered human HGF gene into mice by a hydrodynamics-based in vivo gene transfection approach using a naked plasmid vector. Systemic administration of naked plasmid containing HGF cDNA driven under cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV-HGF) by rapid injection via the tail vein produced a remarkable level of human HGF protein in the circulation, beginning to appear at 4 hours and peaking at 12 hours following injection. Tissue distribution studies identified the liver as the organ with the highest level of transgene expression. Through weekly repeated injections of plasmid vector, we achieved sustained, long-term, high levels of exogenous HGF expression in mice for 8 weeks. Increases of more than 31% and 16% in liver and body weights were found, respectively, in the mice that received pCMV-HGF plasmid compared with that given the control vector for 8 weeks. Expression of exogenous HGF in vivo activated mitogen-activated protein kinases and induced proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in normal adult liver and kidneys. These data suggest that systemic administration of naked plasmid vector is a convenient, safe, and highly efficient approach to introduce and maintain exogenous HGF gene expression in vivo in a controllable fashion. Our results also indicate that long-term expression of human HGF in mice markedly activates growth-related signal transduction events, promotes cell proliferation, and leads to liver and overall body growth in whole adult animals. PMID:11283849

  12. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  13. Human germline hedgehog pathway mutations predispose to fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Guillen-Sacoto, Maria J; Martinez, Ariel F; Abe, Yu; Kruszka, Paul; Weiss, Karin; Everson, Joshua L; Bataller, Ramon; Kleiner, David E; Ward, Jerrold M; Sulik, Kathleen K; Lipinski, Robert J; Solomon, Benjamin D; Muenke, Maximilian

    2017-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of liver disease. Activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been implicated in the progression of NAFLD and proposed as a therapeutic target; however, the effects of Hh signaling inhibition have not been studied in humans with germline mutations that affect this pathway. Patients with holoprosencephaly (HPE), a disorder associated with germline mutations disrupting Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, were clinically evaluated for NAFLD. A combined mouse model of Hh signaling attenuation (Gli2 heterozygous null: Gli2(+/-)) and diet-induced NAFLD was used to examine aspects of NAFLD and hepatic gene expression profiles, including molecular markers of hepatic fibrosis and inflammation. Patients with HPE had a higher prevalence of liver steatosis compared to the general population, independent of obesity. Exposure of Gli2(+/-) mice to fatty liver-inducing diets resulted in increased liver steatosis compared to wild-type mice. Similar to humans, this effect was independent of obesity in the mutant mice and was associated with decreased expression of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory genes, and increased expression of PPARγ, a potent anti-fibrogenic and anti-inflammatory regulator. Interestingly, tumor suppressors p53 and p16INK4 were found to be downregulated in the Gli2(+/-) mice exposed to a high-fat diet. Our results indicate that germline mutations disrupting Hh signaling promotes liver steatosis, independent of obesity, with reduced fibrosis. While Hh signaling inhibition has been associated with a better NAFLD prognosis, further studies are required to evaluate the long-term effects of mutations affecting this pathway. Lay summary: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excess fat deposition in the liver predominantly due to high calorie intake and a sedentary lifestyle. NAFLD progression is usually accompanied by activation of the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway leading to fibrous

  14. Gene Expression Patterns in Human Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Cheung, Siu Tim; So, Samuel; Fan, Sheung Tat; Barry, Christopher; Higgins, John; Lai, Kin-Man; Ji, Jiafu; Dudoit, Sandrine; Ng, Irene O.L.; van de Rijn, Matt; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Using cDNA microarrays to characterize patterns of gene expression in HCC, we found consistent differences between the expression patterns in HCC compared with those seen in nontumor liver tissues. The expression patterns in HCC were also readily distinguished from those associated with tumors metastatic to liver. The global gene expression patterns intrinsic to each tumor were sufficiently distinctive that multiple tumor nodules from the same patient could usually be recognized and distinguished from all the others in the large sample set on the basis of their gene expression patterns alone. The distinctive gene expression patterns are characteristic of the tumors and not the patient; the expression programs seen in clonally independent tumor nodules in the same patient were no more similar than those in tumors from different patients. Moreover, clonally related tumor masses that showed distinct expression profiles were also distinguished by genotypic differences. Some features of the gene expression patterns were associated with specific phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the tumors, including growth rate, vascular invasion, and p53 overexpression. PMID:12058060

  15. Real-time confocal laser endomicroscopic evaluation of primary liver cancer based on human liver autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Maki, Harufumi; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Arita, Junichi; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Kaneko, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Harihara, Yasushi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2017-02-01

    Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is available for real-time microscopic examination. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of intraoperative CLE examination as a modality to evaluate surgical margins in surgery for primary liver cancer. A probe-based CLE system (Cellvizio 100, Mauna Kea Technologies, Paris, France) was used. The subjects comprised seven specimens obtained from six patients with primary liver cancer in November 2015. The probe was manually attached to the surfaces of specimens, and images were collected without external fluorophores. CLE images were compared with hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides. Fluorescence intensity (FI) values of the CLE images were assessed using luminance-analyzing software. CLE examination visualized non-cancerous regions in the background liver as regular structures with high fluorescence because of human liver autofluorescence. Conversely, hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma were depicted as irregular structures with low fluorescence. The median FI values of the non-cancerous regions and the cancerous regions were 104 (79.8-156) and 74.9 (60.6-106), respectively, and were significantly different (P = 0.031). The probe-based CLE enables real-time differentiation of cancerous regions from non-cancerous tissues in surgical specimens because of human liver autofluorescence. CLE can be used to confirm negative surgical margins in the operating room. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:151-157. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Liver Stem Cells: Experimental Findings and Implications for Human Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulos, George K; Khan, Zahida

    2015-10-01

    Evidence from human histopathology and experimental studies with rodents and zebrafish has shown that hepatocytes and cholangiocytes may function as facultative stem cells for each other in conditions of impaired regeneration. The interpretation of the findings derived from these studies has generated considerable discussion and some controversies. This review examines the evidence obtained from the different experimental models and considers implications that these studies may have for human liver disease.

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of peroxisomal enzymes in human liver biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, J. A.; Völkl, A.; Müller-Höcker, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Fahimi, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    The immunocytochemical localization of catalase and three enzymes of the peroxisomal lipid beta-oxidation system--acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional protein enoyl-CoA hydratase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase--in human liver biopsies was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. The antisera raised against all four enzymes from rat liver cross-reacted with the corresponding proteins in homogenates of human liver as revealed by immunoblotting. For light-microscopic localization in glutaraldehyde-fixed Epon-embedded material, the removal of resin and controlled digestion with trypsin was necessary. At the ultrastructural level specific labeling for all four antigens was found by the protein A-gold technique in peroxisomes of liver parenchymal cells fixed with formaldehyde-low glutaraldehyde concentrations and embedded in Lowicryl K4M. In biopsies fixed with glutaraldehyde and embedded in Epon, treatment with metaperiodate or etching with sodium ethoxide improved the immunolabeling. After such treatment catalase showed the most intense labeling and acyl-CoA oxidase the weakest, the two other proteins exhibiting an intermediate immunoreaction. In material postfixed with osmium only catalase could be visualized in peroxisomes. The immunocytochemical investigation of peroxisomal proteins in human liver biopsies provides a simple and highly promising approach for further elucidation of the pathophysiology of peroxisomal disorders. Images Figures 2 and 3 Figure 4-7 Figures 9-12 Figure 1 Figure 8 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:2886050

  18. Effector-Invariant Movement Encoding in the Human Motor System.

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Dinstein, Ilan; Shelef, Ilan; Donchin, Opher

    2017-09-13

    Ipsilateral motor areas of cerebral cortex are active during arm movements and even reliably predict movement direction. Is coding similar during ipsilateral and contralateral movements? If so, is it in extrinsic (world-centered) or intrinsic (joint-configuration) coordinates? We addressed these questions by examining the similarity of multivoxel fMRI patterns in visuomotor cortical regions during unilateral reaching movements with both arms. The results of three complementary analyses revealed that fMRI response patterns were similar across right and left arm movements to identical targets (extrinsic coordinates) in visual cortices, and across movements with equivalent joint-angles (intrinsic coordinates) in motor cortices. We interpret this as evidence for the existence of distributed neural populations in multiple motor system areas that encode ipsilateral and contralateral movements in a similar manner: according to their intrinsic/joint coordinates.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cortical motor control exhibits clear lateralization: each hemisphere controls the motor output of the contralateral body. Nevertheless, neural populations in ipsilateral areas across the visuomotor hierarchy are active during unilateral movements. We show that fMRI response patterns in the motor cortices are similar for both arms if the movement direction is mirror-reversed across the midline. This suggests that in both ipsilateral and contralateral motor cortices, neural populations have effector-invariant coding of movements in intrinsic coordinates. This not only affects our understanding of motor control, it may serve in the development of brain machine interfaces that also use ipsilateral neural activity. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/379054-10$15.00/0.

  19. [Molecular and metabolic changes in human clear cell liver foci].

    PubMed

    Ribback, S; Calvisi, D F; Cigliano, A; Rausch, J; Heidecke, C-D; Birth, M; Dombrowski, F

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the AKT/mTOR and Ras/MAPK pathways and the lipogenic phenotype are evident both in human hepatocellular carcinoma and in the rat model of insulin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in the earliest preneoplastic lesions, i.e. clear cell foci (CCF) of altered hepatocytes. These CCFs have also been described in the human liver but characterization of molecular and metabolic changes are still pending. In this study, human sporadic CCFs were investigated in a collection of human non-cirrhotic liver specimens using histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and molecular pathological analysis. Human CCFs occurred in approximately 33 % of non-cirrhotic livers and stored masses of glycogen in the cytoplasm, largely due to reduced activity of glucose-6-phosphatase. Hepatocytes revealed an upregulation of the AKT/mTOR and the Ras/MAPK pathways, the insulin receptor, glucose transporters and enzymes of glycolysis and de novo lipogenesis. Proliferative activity was 2-fold higher than in extrafocal tissue. The CCFs of altered hepatocytes are metabolically and proliferatively active lesions even in humans. They resemble the well-known preneoplastic lesions from experimental models in terms of morphology, glycogen storage, overexpression of protooncogenic signaling pathways and activation of the lipogenic phenotype, which are also known in human hepatocellular carcinoma. This suggests that hepatic CCFs also represent very early lesions of hepatocarcinogenesis in humans.

  20. Role of human liver microsomes in in vitro metabolism of drugs-a review.

    PubMed

    Asha, Sepuri; Vidyavathi, Maravajhala

    2010-03-01

    Drug metabolism studies are essential and necessary during the evaluation of drugs. This review discusses the in vitro human liver models to estimate the drug metabolic fates in vivo. Different approaches are provided and emphasis is placed on the potential of human liver microsomes for drug metabolism and inhibition studies. The methodology for these studies using human liver microsomes, applications of human liver microsomes, and the drugs studied by human liver microsomes are listed. Human liver microsomes represent a critical experimental model for the evaluation of drug metabolites with a high probability of clinical success.

  1. Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jung-Mo; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Yong-In; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Sun Hee; Paik, Young-Ki; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) was recently initiated as an international collaborative effort. Our team adopted chromosome 9 (Chr 9) and performed a bioinformatics and proteogenomic analysis to catalog Chr 9-encoded proteins from normal tissues, lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. Approximately 74.7% of the Chr 9 genes of the human genome were identified, which included approximately 28% of missing proteins (46 of 162) on Chr 9 compared with the list of missing proteins from the neXtProt master table (2013-09). In addition, we performed a comparative proteomics analysis between normal lung and lung cancer tissues. Based on the data analysis, 15 proteins from Chr 9 were detected only in lung cancer tissues. Finally, we conducted a proteogenomic analysis to discover Chr 9-residing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and mutations described in the COSMIC cancer mutation database. We identified 21 SNPs and 4 mutations containing peptides on Chr 9 from normal human cells/tissues and lung cancer cell lines, respectively. In summary, this study provides valuable information of the human proteome for the scientific community as part of C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD. PMID:24274035

  2. Cultivation of human liver cell lines with microcarriers acting as biological materials of bioartificial liver

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Hu, Huan-Zhang; Yang, Ji-Zhen

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To improve the cultivation efficiency and yield of human liver cell line Cl-1. METHODS: High-density cultivation of Cl-1 on microcarriers was carried out with periodic observation of their growth and proliferation. The specific functions of human liver cell were also determined. RESULTS: Cells of Cl-1 cell line grew well on microcarrier Cytodex-3 and on the 7th day the peak was reached. The amount of Cl-1 cells was 2.13 × 108 and the total amount of albumin synthesis reached 71.23 μg, urea synthesis 23.32 mg and diazepam transformation 619.7 μg respectively. The yield of Cl-1 on microcarriers was 49.3 times that of conventional cultivation. The amounts of albumin synthesis, urea synthesis and diazepam transformation were 39.8 times, 41.6 times and 33.3 times those of conventional cultivation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The human liver cell line Cl-1 can be cultivated to a high density with Cytodex-3 and has better biological functions. High-density cultivation of Cl-1 on microcarriers can act as the biological material of bioartificial liver. PMID:11819434

  3. Purification and properties of arginase from human liver and erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Berüter, J; Colombo, J P; Bachmann, C

    1978-01-01

    Arginase was isolated from human liver and erythrocytes. The purification procedure used acetone precipitation, heat-treatment, (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Both enzymes migrated to the anode at pH8.3 on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. After incubation at pH8.0 and 37 degrees C the purified anionic liver arginase migrated to the cathode on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. It is assumed that the multiple forms of the enzyme reported in the literature are partly artifacts of the purification procedure. The liver arginase showed a mol.wt. of 107000 determined by gel filtration and a sedimentation coefficient of 5.9S. Treatment of the liver enzyme with 0.25% sodium dodecyl sulphate at pH10 demonstrated an oligomeric structure of the enzyme with a mol.wt. of the subunit of 35000. The kinetic properties determined for the purified liver arginase showed an optimum pH of 9.3 and an optimal MnCl2 concentration of 2mM. The Km for L-arginine was 10.5 mM and for L-canavanine 50mM, and L-lysine exhibited a competitive type of inhibition with a Ki of 4.4mM. L-Homoarginine was not a substrate for liver arginase. PMID:743206

  4. Relationship between phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Doecke, C J; Veronese, M E; Pond, S M; Miners, J O; Birkett, D J; Sansom, L N; McManus, M E

    1991-01-01

    1. The metabolic interaction of phenytoin and tolbutamide in human liver microsomes was investigated. 2. Phenytoin 4-hydroxylation (mean Km 29.6 microM, n = 3) was competitively inhibited by tolbutamide (mean Ki 106.2 microM, n = 3) and tolbutamide methylhydroxylation (mean Km 85.6 microM, n = 3) was competitively inhibited by phenytoin (mean Ki 22.6 microM, n = 3). 3. A significant correlation was obtained between phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations in microsomes from 18 human livers (rs = 0.82, P less than 0.001). 4. Sulphaphenazole was a potent inhibitor of both phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations with IC50 values of 0.4 microM and 0.6 microM, respectively. 5. Mephenytoin was a poor inhibitor of both phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations with IC50 values greater than 400 microM for both reactions. 6. Anti-rabbit P450IIC3 IgG inhibited both phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations in human liver microsomes by 62 and 68%, respectively. 7. These in vitro studies are consistent with phenytoin 4-hydroxylation and tolbutamide methylhydroxylation being catalysed by the same cytochrome P450 isozyme(s) in human liver microsomes. PMID:2049228

  5. Gene encoding human Ro-associated autoantigen Y5 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Maraia, R; Sakulich, A L; Brinkmann, E; Green, E D

    1996-01-01

    Ro ribonucleoproteins are composed of Y RNAs and the Ro 60 kDa protein. While the Ro 60 kDa protein is implicated in an RNA discard pathway that recognizes 3'-extended 5S rRNAs, the function of Y RNAs remains unknown [O'Brien,C.A. and Wolin,S.L. (1995) Genes Dev. 8,2891-2903]. Y5 RNA occupies a large fraction of Ro 60 kDa protein in human Ro RNPs, contains an atypical 3'-extension not found on other Y RNAs, and constitutes an RNA antigen in certain autoimmune patients [Boulanger et al. (1995) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 99, 29-36]. An overabundance of Y RNA retroposed pseudogenes has previously complicated the isolation of mammalian Y RNA genes. The source gene for Y5 RNA was isolated from human DNA as well as from Galago senegalis DNA. Authenticity of the hY5 RNA gene was demonstrated in vivo and its activity was compared with the hY4 RNA gene that also uses a type 3 promoter for RNA polymerase III. The hY5 RNA gene was subsequently found to reside within a few hundred thousand base pairs of other Y RNA genes and the linear order of the four human Y RNA genes on chromosome 7q36 was determined. Phylogenetic comparative analyses of promoter and RNA structure indicate that the Y5 RNA gene has been subjected to positive selection during primate evolution. Consistent with the proposal of O'Brien and Harley [O'Brian,C.A. and Wolin,S.L. (1992) Gene 116, 285-289], analysis of flanking sequences suggest that the hY5 RNA gene may have originated as a retroposon. PMID:8836182

  6. A novel splice variant of human gene NPL, mainly expressed in human liver, kidney and peripheral blood leukocyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoqing; Gu, Shaohua; Xu, Jian; Zou, Xianqiong; Zheng, Huarui; Jin, Zhe; Xie, Yi; Ji, Chaoneng; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    From the human fetal brain cDNA library constructed by our lab, a novel variant cDNA of a human gene was successfully cloned and identified. Because the gene has been named N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (NPL), accordingly we term our splice variant NPL_v2. The cDNA of NPL_v2 has a full-length open reading frame (ORF) from the nucleotide position 320 to 1225 that encodes a protein comprising 301 amino acids. SMART analysis showed that our hypothetical protein has one dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) domain. Phosphorylation analysis of the deduced protein show that there are five phosphorylation sites including three "serine" and two "threonine" at the region that are not found in other splice variant. RT-PCR experiment revealed that our splice variant of the gene is mainly expressed in human placenta, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, thymus, ovary, small intestine and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  7. Isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the amino-terminal region of human apolipoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Protter, A.A.; Hardman, D.A.; Schilling, J.W.; Miller, J.; Appleby, V.; Chen, G.C.; Kirsher, S.W.; McEnroe, G.; Kane, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    A partial cDNA clone for the B-26 region of apolipoprotein B was isolated from an adult human liver DNA library by screening with an oligonucleotide probe derived from amino-terminal protein sequence obtained from purified B-26 peptide. Antisera against a synthetic 17-residue peptide whose amino acid sequence was encoded by the clone cross-reacts with apolipoproteins B-26, B-100, and B-48, but not with B-74. The nucleotide sequence immediately upstream from the amino terminus of B-26 codes for an apparent signal sequence, implying that the B-26 moiety is in an amino-terminal locus in the B-100 protein. That this sequence represents a 5' end region is further supported by primer extension analysis using a fragment of the cDNA clone and by S1 nuclease protection experiments using the corresponding region in a genomic clone.

  8. Expression cloning of a human cDNA encoding folylpoly(gamma-glutamate) synthetase and determination of its primary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Garrow, T A; Admon, A; Shane, B

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA for folypoly(gamma-glutamate) synthetase [FPGS; tetrahydrofolate:L-glutamate gamma-ligase (ADP forming), EC 6.3.2.17] has been cloned by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli folC mutant. The cDNA encodes a 545-residue protein of M(r) 60,128. The deduced sequence has regions that are highly homologous to peptide sequences obtained from purified pig liver FPGS and shows limited homology to the E. coli and Lactobacillus casei FPGSs. Expression of the cDNA in E. coli results in elevated expression of an enzyme with characteristics of mammalian FPGS. Expression of the cDNA in AUXB1, a mammalian cell lacking FPGS activity, overcomes the cell's requirement for thymidine and purines but does not overcome the cell's glycine auxotrophy, consistent with expression of the protein in the cytosol but not the mitochondria. PMID:1409616

  9. Architecture of the human regulatory network derived from ENCODE data.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Mark B; Kundaje, Anshul; Hariharan, Manoj; Landt, Stephen G; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Cheng, Chao; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Khurana, Ekta; Rozowsky, Joel; Alexander, Roger; Min, Renqiang; Alves, Pedro; Abyzov, Alexej; Addleman, Nick; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Boyle, Alan P; Cayting, Philip; Charos, Alexandra; Chen, David Z; Cheng, Yong; Clarke, Declan; Eastman, Catharine; Euskirchen, Ghia; Frietze, Seth; Fu, Yao; Gertz, Jason; Grubert, Fabian; Harmanci, Arif; Jain, Preti; Kasowski, Maya; Lacroute, Phil; Leng, Jing Jane; Lian, Jin; Monahan, Hannah; O'Geen, Henriette; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Partridge, E Christopher; Patacsil, Dorrelyn; Pauli, Florencia; Raha, Debasish; Ramirez, Lucia; Reddy, Timothy E; Reed, Brian; Shi, Minyi; Slifer, Teri; Wang, Jing; Wu, Linfeng; Yang, Xinqiong; Yip, Kevin Y; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend; Farnham, Peggy J; Myers, Richard M; Weissman, Sherman M; Snyder, Michael

    2012-09-06

    Transcription factors bind in a combinatorial fashion to specify the on-and-off states of genes; the ensemble of these binding events forms a regulatory network, constituting the wiring diagram for a cell. To examine the principles of the human transcriptional regulatory network, we determined the genomic binding information of 119 transcription-related factors in over 450 distinct experiments. We found the combinatorial, co-association of transcription factors to be highly context specific: distinct combinations of factors bind at specific genomic locations. In particular, there are significant differences in the binding proximal and distal to genes. We organized all the transcription factor binding into a hierarchy and integrated it with other genomic information (for example, microRNA regulation), forming a dense meta-network. Factors at different levels have different properties; for instance, top-level transcription factors more strongly influence expression and middle-level ones co-regulate targets to mitigate information-flow bottlenecks. Moreover, these co-regulations give rise to many enriched network motifs (for example, noise-buffering feed-forward loops). Finally, more connected network components are under stronger selection and exhibit a greater degree of allele-specific activity (that is, differential binding to the two parental alleles). The regulatory information obtained in this study will be crucial for interpreting personal genome sequences and understanding basic principles of human biology and disease.

  10. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells.

  11. Subregions of human parietal cortex selectively encoding object orientation.

    PubMed

    Aso, Toshihiko; Hanakawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Kayako; Toma, Keiichiro; Shibasaki, Hiroshi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2007-03-30

    Computation of object orientation could be an independent process from those of other object features, but currently neither the location of human brain areas selectively coding orientation information nor an optimum experimental paradigm have yet been established. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate brain activation in the parietal cortices related to object orientation. Using an Arabic digit whose spatial attributes were carefully manipulated, we found parietal areas exclusively sensitive to object orientation, but not to general spatial attention. It seems that, by excluding confounds such as mental manipulation or working memory as well as inherent spatial information within the stimuli, functional segregation within the parietal lobe can be effectively probed.

  12. Dynamic Encoding of Face Information in the Human Fusiform Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel Singh; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Li, Yuanning; Konecky, Roma O.; Pyles, John A.; Walls, Shawn A.; Destefino, Vincent; Wang, Wei; Richardson, R. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Humans’ ability to rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and classify faces under variable conditions derives from a network of brain regions highly tuned to face information. The fusiform face area (FFA) is thought to be a computational hub for face processing, however temporal dynamics of face information processing in FFA remains unclear. Here we use multivariate pattern classification to decode the temporal dynamics of expression-invariant face information processing using electrodes placed directly upon FFA in humans. Early FFA activity (50-75 ms) contained information regarding whether participants were viewing a face. Activity between 200-500 ms contained expression-invariant information about which of 70 faces participants were viewing along with the individual differences in facial features and their configurations. Long-lasting (500+ ms) broadband gamma frequency activity predicted task performance. These results elucidate the dynamic computational role FFA plays in multiple face processing stages and indicate what information is used in performing these visual analyses. PMID:25482825

  13. Neural encoding of saltatory pneumotactile velocity in human glabrous hand

    PubMed Central

    Custead, Rebecca; Wang, Yingying; Barlow, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Neurons in the somatosensory cortex are exquisitely sensitive to mechanical stimulation of the skin surface. The location, velocity, direction, and adaptation of tactile stimuli on the skin’s surface are discriminable features of somatosensory processing, however the representation and processing of dynamic tactile arrays in the human somatosensory cortex are poorly understood. The principal aim of this study was to map the relation between dynamic saltatory pneumatic stimuli at discrete traverse velocities on the glabrous hand and the resultant pattern of evoked BOLD response in the human brain. Moreover, we hypothesized that the hand representation in contralateral Brodmann Area (BA) 3b would show a significant dependence on stimulus velocity. Saltatory pneumatic pulses (60 ms duration, 9.5 ms rise/fall) were repetitively sequenced through a 7-channel TAC-Cell array at traverse velocities of 5, 25, and 65 cm/s on the glabrous hand initiated at the tips of D2 (index finger) and D3 (middle finger) and sequenced towards the D1 (thumb). The resulting hemodynamic response was sampled during 3 functional MRI scans (BOLD) in 20 neurotypical right-handed adults at 3T. Results from each subject were inserted to the one-way ANOVA within-subjects and one sample t-test to evaluate the group main effect of all three velocities stimuli and each of three different velocities, respectively. The stimulus evoked BOLD response revealed a dynamic representation of saltatory pneumotactile stimulus velocity in a network consisting of the contralateral primary hand somatosensory cortex (BA3b), associated primary motor cortex (BA4), posterior insula, and ipsilateral deep cerebellum. The spatial extent of this network was greatest at the 5 and 25 cm/s pneumotactile stimulus velocities. PMID:28841675

  14. Value of freedom to choose encoded by the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Juri; Usui, Nobuo; Park, Soyoung Q.; Williams, Tony; Iijima, Toshio; Taira, Masato; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Humans and animals value the opportunity to choose by preferring alternatives that offer more rather than fewer choices. This preference for choice may arise not only from an increased probability of obtaining preferred outcomes but also from the freedom it provides. We used human neuroimaging to investigate the neural basis of the preference for choice as well as for the items that could be chosen. In each trial, participants chose between two options, a monetary amount option and a “choice option.” The latter consisted of a number that corresponded to the number of everyday items participants would subsequently be able to choose from. We found that the opportunity to choose from a larger number of items was equivalent to greater amounts of money, indicating that participants valued having more choice; moreover, participants varied in the degree to which they valued having the opportunity to choose, with some valuing it more than the increased probability of obtaining preferred items. Neural activations in the mid striatum increased with the value of the opportunity to choose. The same region also coded the value of the items. Conversely, activation in the dorsolateral striatum was not related to the value of the items but was elevated when participants were offered more choices, particularly in those participants who overvalued the opportunity to choose. These data suggest a functional dissociation of value representations within the striatum, with general representations in mid striatum and specific representations of the value of freedom provided by the opportunity to choose in dorsolateral striatum. PMID:23864380

  15. Biomechanical Response of Human Liver in Tensile Loading

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Andrew R.; Santago, Anthony C.; Stitzel, Joel D.; Sparks, Jessica L.; Duma, Stefan M.

    2010-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions commonly result in serious life threatening liver injuries. Although finite element models are becoming an integral tool in the reduction of automotive related liver injuries, the establishment of accurate material models and tissue level tolerance values is critical for accurate injury risk assessment. This study presents a total of 51 tension tests performed on human liver parenchyma at various loading rates in order to characterize the viscoelastic and failure properties of human liver. Standard dog-bone coupons were obtained from fresh human livers and tested within 48 hours of death. Each coupon was tested once to failure at one of four loading rates (0.008 s–1, 0.089 s–1, 0.871 s–1, and 9.477 s–1) to investigate the effects of rate dependence. Load and acceleration data were obtained from each of the specimen grips. High-speed video and optical markers placed on the specimens were used to measure local displacement. Failure stress and strain were calculated at the location of failure in the gage length of the coupon. The results of the study showed that liver parenchyma is rate dependent, with higher rate tests giving higher failure stresses and lower failure strains. The failure strains for all tests ranged from 11% to 54% and the failure stresses ranged from 7 kPa to 95 kPa. This study provides novel biomechanical data that can be used in the development of both rate dependent material models and tissue level tolerance values critical for the validation of finite element models used to assess injury risk in automobile collisions. PMID:21050588

  16. Molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding human carnitine acetyltransferase and mapping of the corresponding gene to chromosome 9q34.1

    SciTech Connect

    Corti, O.; Finocchiaro, G.; DiDonato, S.

    1994-09-01

    Using a combination of PCR screening of cDNA libraries and reverse transcription PCR, we have cloned three overlapping DNA fragments that encode human carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT), a key enzyme for metabolic pathways involved with the control of the acyl-Co/CoA ratio in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum. The resulting cDNA (2436 bp) hybridizes to a mRNA species of {approximately}2.9 kb that is particularly abundant in skeletal muscle and encodes a 68-kDa protein containing a peroxisomal targeting signal. The sequence matches those of several tryptic peptides obtained from purified human liver CAT and shows striking similarities with other members of the carnitine/choline acetyltransferase family very distant throughout evolution. CAT cDNA has also been used for fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase spreads of human chromosomes, and the corresponding gene, CAT1, has been mapped to chromosome 9q34.1. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Mutations in GANAB, Encoding the Glucosidase IIα Subunit, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Porath, Binu; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Dillinger, Elizabeth K; Heyer, Christina M; Hopp, Katharina; Edwards, Marie E; Madsen, Charles D; Mauritz, Sarah R; Banks, Carly J; Baheti, Saurabh; Reddy, Bharathi; Herrero, José Ignacio; Bañales, Jesús M; Hogan, Marie C; Tasic, Velibor; Watnick, Terry J; Chapman, Arlene B; Vigneau, Cécile; Lavainne, Frédéric; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Ferec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-02

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, progressive, adult-onset disease that is an important cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which requires transplantation or dialysis. Mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 (∼85% and ∼15% of resolved cases, respectively) are the known causes of ADPKD. Extrarenal manifestations include an increased level of intracranial aneurysms and polycystic liver disease (PLD), which can be severe and associated with significant morbidity. Autosomal-dominant PLD (ADPLD) with no or very few renal cysts is a separate disorder caused by PRKCSH, SEC63, or LRP5 mutations. After screening, 7%-10% of ADPKD-affected and ∼50% of ADPLD-affected families were genetically unresolved (GUR), suggesting further genetic heterogeneity of both disorders. Whole-exome sequencing of six GUR ADPKD-affected families identified one with a missense mutation in GANAB, encoding glucosidase II subunit α (GIIα). Because PRKCSH encodes GIIβ, GANAB is a strong ADPKD and ADPLD candidate gene. Sanger screening of 321 additional GUR families identified eight further likely mutations (six truncating), and a total of 20 affected individuals were identified in seven ADPKD- and two ADPLD-affected families. The phenotype was mild PKD and variable, including severe, PLD. Analysis of GANAB-null cells showed an absolute requirement of GIIα for maturation and surface and ciliary localization of the ADPKD proteins (PC1 and PC2), and reduced mature PC1 was seen in GANAB(+/-) cells. PC1 surface localization in GANAB(-/-) cells was rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, GIIα. Overall, we show that GANAB mutations cause ADPKD and ADPLD and that the cystogenesis is most likely driven by defects in PC1 maturation.

  18. Distribution of elastic system fibres in human fetal liver.

    PubMed Central

    Monte, A; Costa, A; Porto, L C

    1996-01-01

    Elastic system fibres are extracellular matrix components found in different organs for which they provide elasticity and some mechanical resistance. Oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibres, which possess graduated amounts of elastin, are the 3 forms of elastic system fibres that are identifiable by their tinctorial and ultrastructural features. The distribution of these fibres in adult human liver is well-established but little, if anything, is known about them in fetal liver. The distribution of elastic system fibres was therefore investigated in human fetal liver, and the process of elastogenesis characterised. Specimens of liver from 24 human fetuses ranging in age from 13 to 38 wk postfertilisation were studied. The results are presented in relation to gestational age and the size of the portal tracts. Portal tracts exhibited a network of oxytalan fibres at 13 wk; elaunin fibres appeared later after 20 wk postfertilisation. Elastogenesis occurred more rapidly in venous than in arterial walls, and in veins it was more evident in the adventitia. A microfibrillar network of oxytalan fibres was observed around biliary ducts from the outset of their development. Elastogenesis follows the sequence oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibres, but the elastogenetic process only completes its maturation in arterial walls, thus leading to the internal elastic lamina. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8763481

  19. GENCODE: The reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L.; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  20. Identification of three related human GRO genes encoding cytokine functions

    SciTech Connect

    Haskill, S.; Peace, A.; Morris, J.; Sporn, S.A. ); Anisowicz, A.; Lee, S.W.; Sager, R. ); Smith, T. ); Martin, G.; Ralph, P. )

    1990-10-01

    The product of the human GRO gene is a cytokine with inflammatory and growth-regulatory properties; GRO is also called MGSA for melanoma growth-stimulatory activity. The authors have identified two additional genes, GRO{beta} and GRO{gamma}, that share 90{percent} and 86{percent} identity at the deduced amino acid level with the original GRO{alpha} isolate. One amino acid substitution of proline in GRO{alpha} by leucine in GRO{beta} and GRO{gamma} leads to a large predicted change in protein conformation. Significant differences also exist in the 3' untranslated region, including different numbers of ATTTA repeats associated with mRNA instability. A 122-base-pair region in the 3' region is conserved among the three GRO genes, and a part of it is also conserved in the Chinese hamster genome, suggesting a role in regulation. DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and partial sequence analysis of the genomic clones confirm that the three forms are derived from related but different genes. Only one chromosomal locus has been identified, at 4q21, by using a GRO{alpha} cDNA clone that hybridized to all three genes. Expression studies reveal tissue-specific regulation as well as regulation by specific inducing agents, including interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and lipopolysaccharide.

  1. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    PubMed

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers.

  2. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  3. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  4. Activated Human T Cells Express Alternative mRNA Transcripts Encoding a Secreted Form of RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, NC; Alexander, KA; Manning, CA; Karmakar, S; Wang, JF; Weyand, CM; Pettit, AR; Gravallese, EM

    2013-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB -ligand (RANKL), encoded by the gene TNFSF11, is required for osteoclastogenesis, and its expression is upregulated in pathologic bone loss. Transcript variants of TNFSF11 mRNA have been described that encode a membrane-bound and a putative secreted form of RANKL. We identify a TNFSF11 transcript variant that extends the originally identified transcript encoding secreted RANKL. We demonstrate that this TNFSF11 transcript variant is expressed by the human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2, and by both primary human T cells and Jurkat T cells. Of relevance to the production of RANKL in pathologic bone loss, expression of this secreted TNFSF11 transcript is upregulated in Jurkat T cells and primary human T cells upon activation. Furthermore, this transcript can be translated and secreted in Jurkat T cells in vitro and is able to support osteoclast differentiation. Our data highlight the complexity of the TNFSF11 genomic locus and demonstrate the potential for the expression of alternate mRNA transcripts encoding membrane-bound and secreted forms of RANKL. Implications of alternate mRNA transcripts encoding different RANKL protein isoforms should be carefully considered and specifically examined in future studies, particularly those implicating RANKL in pathologic bone loss. PMID:23698708

  5. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  6. Characterization of human antibody-reactive epitopes encoded by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18.

    PubMed Central

    Jenison, S A; Yu, X P; Valentine, J M; Galloway, D A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously reported that the most common human serum immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to human papillomavirus type 16 and type 18 (HPV16 and HPV18)-encoded proteins are directed against the minor capsid proteins (HPV16 L2 and HPV18 L2) and to the E7 protein of HPV16 (S. A. Jenison, X.-P. Yu, J. M. Valentine, L. A. Koutsky, A. E. Christiansen, A. M. Beckmann, and D. A. Galloway, J. Infect. Dis. 162:60-69, 1990). In this study, the antibody-reactive segments of the HPV16 E7, HPV16 L2, and HPV18 L2 polypeptides were mapped by using nested sets of deleted recombinant proteins. A single major immunoreactive region was identified in the HPV16 E7 polypeptide between amino acids (aa) 21 and 34 (DLYCYE-QLNDSSEE). In contrast, three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV16 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa149 and aa204, and three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV18 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa110 and aa211. With the exception of one serum sample, serum immunoglobulin G antibodies which reacted with HPV16 L2 polypeptides or with HPV18 L2 polypeptides were not cross-reactive. Images PMID:1704924

  7. Biological and immunological characterization of a human liver immunoregulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Schrempf-Decker, G E; Baron, D P; Brattig, N W; Bockhorn, H; Berg, P A

    1983-01-01

    The liver immunoregulatory protein (LIP) was originally characterized as human liver-derived soluble factor which inhibited the alloantigen and phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation of human lymphocytes (1). Soluble extracts prepared under the same experimental conditions from kidney, spleen, heart, lymph nodes, and erythrocytes did not exert any inhibitory activity (2). The purpose of this study was to characterize the immunobiological properties of LIP. In the primary one-way mixed lymphocyte culture, LIP depressed the generation of suppressor T cells which inhibited the lymphocyte proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or alloantigens. In addition, LIP suppressed in primary mixed lymphocyte culture the induction of cytotoxic T cells and memory cells as determined by cell-mediated lympholysis and secondary mixed lymphocyte culture, respectively. In the presence of LIP, the concanavalin A-mediated induction of suppressor T cells, the pokeweed mitogen-induced IgG synthesis in vitro and the cytolytic activity of K cells reacting in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity were also inhibited. Cytotoxic effects could be excluded since the viability of human lymphoblastoid cells, hepatocytes, and allogeneically stimulated lymphocytes was not affected by LIP. LIP was shown to be different from other liver-derived substances like acute phase proteins, immunoregulatory alpha-globulins, C-reactive protein, lipoproteins, and F antigen. Furthermore, LIP is not identical to other serum components like the immunoregulatory rosette inhibition factor and the serum inhibitory factor (3). However, the characteristics described herein strongly indicate that LIP is very similar to the liver extract described by Chisari (4) and the liver-derived inhibitory protein (LIP) described by Grol and Schumacher (5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Mutations in TFAM, encoding mitochondrial transcription factor A, cause neonatal liver failure associated with mtDNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Ashlee R; Simon, Mariella T; Stover, Alexander; Eftekharian, Shaya; Khanlou, Negar; Wang, Hanlin L; Magaki, Shino; Lee, Hane; Partynski, Kate; Dorrani, Nagmeh; Chang, Richard; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Abdenur, Jose E

    2016-09-01

    In humans, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders that arise as a consequence of defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide synthesis. Clinical manifestations are variable and include myopathic, encephalomyopathic, neurogastrointestinal or hepatocerebral phenotypes. Through clinical exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense variant (c.533C>T; p.Pro178Leu) in mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) segregating in a consanguineous kindred of Colombian-Basque descent in which two siblings presented with IUGR, elevated transaminases, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and hypoglycemia with progression to liver failure and death in early infancy. Results of the liver biopsy in the proband revealed cirrhosis, micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, cholestasis and mitochondrial pleomorphism. Electron microscopy of muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology and distribution while enzyme histochemistry was underwhelming. Electron transport chain testing in muscle showed increased citrate synthase activity suggesting mitochondrial proliferation, while respiratory chain activities were at the lower end of normal. mtDNA content was reduced in liver and muscle (11% and 21% of normal controls respectively). While Tfam mRNA expression was upregulated in primary fibroblasts, Tfam protein level was significantly reduced. Furthermore, functional investigations of the mitochondria revealed reduced basal respiration and spare respiratory capacity, decreased mtDNA copy number and markedly reduced nucleoids. TFAM is essential for transcription, replication and packaging of mtDNA into nucleoids. Tfam knockout mice display embryonic lethality secondary to severe mtDNA depletion. In this report, for the first time, we associate a homozygous variant in TFAM with a novel mtDNA depletion syndrome.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  10. Timing predictability enhances regularity encoding in the human subcortical auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Gorina-Careta, Natàlia; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Escera, Carles

    2016-11-17

    The encoding of temporal regularities is a critical property of the auditory system, as short-term neural representations of environmental statistics serve to auditory object formation and detection of potentially relevant novel stimuli. A putative neural mechanism underlying regularity encoding is repetition suppression, the reduction of neural activity to repeated stimulation. Although repetitive stimulation per se has shown to reduce auditory neural activity in animal cortical and subcortical levels and in the human cerebral cortex, other factors such as timing may influence the encoding of statistical regularities. This study was set out to investigate whether temporal predictability in the ongoing auditory input modulates repetition suppression in subcortical stages of the auditory processing hierarchy. Human auditory frequency-following responses (FFR) were recorded to a repeating consonant-vowel stimuli (/wa/) delivered in temporally predictable and unpredictable conditions. FFR amplitude was attenuated by repetition independently of temporal predictability, yet we observed an accentuated suppression when the incoming stimulation was temporally predictable. These findings support the view that regularity encoding spans across the auditory hierarchy and point to temporal predictability as a modulatory factor of regularity encoding in early stages of the auditory pathway.

  11. Timing predictability enhances regularity encoding in the human subcortical auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gorina-Careta, Natàlia; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Escera, Carles

    2016-01-01

    The encoding of temporal regularities is a critical property of the auditory system, as short-term neural representations of environmental statistics serve to auditory object formation and detection of potentially relevant novel stimuli. A putative neural mechanism underlying regularity encoding is repetition suppression, the reduction of neural activity to repeated stimulation. Although repetitive stimulation per se has shown to reduce auditory neural activity in animal cortical and subcortical levels and in the human cerebral cortex, other factors such as timing may influence the encoding of statistical regularities. This study was set out to investigate whether temporal predictability in the ongoing auditory input modulates repetition suppression in subcortical stages of the auditory processing hierarchy. Human auditory frequency–following responses (FFR) were recorded to a repeating consonant–vowel stimuli (/wa/) delivered in temporally predictable and unpredictable conditions. FFR amplitude was attenuated by repetition independently of temporal predictability, yet we observed an accentuated suppression when the incoming stimulation was temporally predictable. These findings support the view that regularity encoding spans across the auditory hierarchy and point to temporal predictability as a modulatory factor of regularity encoding in early stages of the auditory pathway. PMID:27853313

  12. Isolation of human liver angiotensin-converting enzyme by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Sakharov IYu; Danilov, S M; Sukhova, N V

    1987-10-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1) has been isolated from human liver by chromatofocusing. The isolation procedure permitted us to obtain a 9000-fold purified enzyme with a 22% yield. Specific activity of the angiotensin-converting enzyme was 10 units/mg of protein. The molecular mass of enzyme determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions was 150,000. The isoelectric point (4.2-4.3) was also determined by chromatofocusing. The Km values of the enzyme for hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-histidyl-L-leucine are 5000 and 125 microM, respectively. The human liver angiotensin-converting enzyme is inhibited by bradykinin-potentiating factor SQ 20881 (IC50 = 18 nM).

  13. [Metabolism of mitomycin C by human liver microsomes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fu-rong; Yan, Min-fen; Hu, Zhuo-han; Jin, Yi-zun

    2007-02-01

    To provide the profiles of metabolism of mitomycin C (MMC) by human liver microsomes in vitro, MMC was incubated with human liver microsomes, then the supernatant component was isolated and detected by HPLC. Types of metabolic enzymes were estimated by the effect of NADPH or dicumarol (DIC) on metabolism of MMC. Standard, reaction, background control (microsomes was inactivated), negative control (no NADPH), and inhibitor group (adding DIC) were assigned, the results were analyzed by Graphpad Prism 4. 0 software. Reaction group compared with background control and negative control groups, 3 NADPH-dependent absorption peaks were additionally isolated by HPLC after MMC were incubated with human liver microsomes. Their retention times were 10. 0, 14. 0, 14. 8 min ( named as Ml, M2, M3) , respectively. Their formation was kept as Sigmoidal dose-response and their Km were 0. 52 (95% CI, 0. 40 - 0.67) mmol x L(-1), 0. 81 (95% CI, 0. 59 - 1. 10) mmol x L(-1), 0. 54 (95% CI, 0. 41 -0. 71) mmol x L(-1) , respectively. The data indicated that the three absorption peaks isolated by HPLC were metabolites of MMC. DIC can inhibit formation of M2, it' s dose-effect fitted to Sigmoidal curve and it' s IC50 was 59. 68 (95% CI, 40. 66 - 87. 61) micromol x L(-1) , which indicated DT-diaphorase could take part in the formation of M2. MMC can be metabolized by human liver microsomes in vitro, and at least three metabolites of MMC could be isolated by HPLC in the experiment, further study showed DT-diaphorase participated in the formation of M2.

  14. Intranasal arginine vasopressin enhances the encoding of happy and angry faces in humans.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Adam J; Kenyon, Amanda R; Alvares, Gail A; Carson, Dean S; Hickie, Ian B

    2010-06-15

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has a complex but crucial role in social behavior. In nonhuman mammals it facilitates social recognition and bonding while also promoting defensive, aggressive, and territorial behaviors. There has been little research in humans exploring its effect on social cognition, including the encoding of social memories. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, between-subject design, we administered AVP (20 IU) or a placebo intranasally to 48 healthy human male volunteers and then presented 54 happy, angry, or neutral human faces. Participants returned the following day to make "remember", "know", or "new" judgments for a mix of 108 new and previously seen faces. Participants who were administered AVP were more likely to make know judgments for previously seen happy and angry faces in comparison with neutral human faces. Arginine vasopressin did not influence judgments for faces that had not been presented previously. Administration of AVP to male humans enhances the encoding of both happy and angry social information to make this more memorable. Results suggest that AVP could facilitate both bonding and aggressive related behaviors in humans by enhancing the encoding of positive and negative social cues within everyday interactions.

  15. Determination of the electrical conductivity of human liver metastases: impact on therapy planning in the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Zurbuchen, Urte; Poch, Franz; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Kreis, Martin E; Niehues, Stefan M; Vahldieck, Janis L; Lehmann, Kai S

    2017-02-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation is used to induce thermal necrosis in the treatment of liver metastases. The specific electrical conductivity of a liver metastasis has a distinct influence on the heat formation and resulting tumor ablation within the tissue. Purpose To examine the electrical conductivity σ of human colorectal liver metastases and of tumor-free liver tissue in surgical specimens. Material and Methods Surgical specimens from patients with resectable colorectal liver metastases were used for measurements (size of metastases <30 mm). A four-needle measuring probe was used to determine the electrical conductivity σ of human colorectal liver metastasis (n = 8) and tumor-free liver tissue (n = 5) in a total of five patients. All measurements were performed at 470 kHz, which is the relevant frequency for radiofrequency ablation. The tissue temperature was also measured. Hepatic resections were performed in accordance with common surgical standards. Measurements were performed in the operating theater immediately after resection. Results The median electrical conductivity σ was 0.57 S/m in human colorectal liver metastases at a median temperature of 35.1℃ and 0.35 S/m in tumor-free liver tissue at a median temperature of 34.9℃. The electrical conductivity was significantly higher in tumor tissue than in tumor-free liver tissue ( P = 0.005). There were no differences in tissue temperature between the two groups ( P = 0.883). Conclusion The electrical conductivity is significantly higher in human colorectal liver metastases than in tumor-free liver tissue at a frequency of 470 kHz.

  16. Visualization of hepatitis E virus RNA and proteins in the human liver.

    PubMed

    Lenggenhager, Daniela; Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Malehmir, Mohsen; Bawohl, Marion; Honcharova-Biletska, Hanna; Kreutzer, Susanne; Semela, David; Neuweiler, Jörg; Hürlimann, Sandra; Aepli, Patrick; Fraga, Montserrat; Sahli, Roland; Terracciano, Luigi; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Müllhaupt, Beat; Sempoux, Christine; Moradpour, Darius; Weber, Achim

    2017-09-01

    Although hepatitis E constitutes a substantial disease burden worldwide, surprisingly little is known about the localization of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in the human liver. We therefore aimed to visualize HEV RNA and proteins in situ. A panel of 12 different antibodies against HEV open reading frame (ORF) 1-3 proteins was evaluated for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and two probes for in situ hybridization (ISH) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) HuH7 cells transfected with HEV ORF1-3 expression vectors. IHC (and partly ISH) were then applied to Hep293TT cells replicating infectious HEV and liver specimens from patients with hepatitis E (n=20) and controls (n=134). Whereas ORF1-3 proteins were all detectable in transfected, HEV protein-expressing cells, only ORF2 and 3 proteins were traceable in cells replicating infectious HEV. Only the ORF2-encoded capsid protein was also unequivocally detectable in liver specimens from patients with hepatitis E. IHC for ORF2 protein revealed a patchy expression in individual or grouped hepatocytes, generally stronger in chronic compared to acute hepatitis. Besides cytoplasmic and canalicular, ORF2 protein also displayed a hitherto unknown nuclear localization. Positivity for ORF2 protein in defined areas correlated with HEV RNA detection by ISH. IHC was specific and comparably sensitive as PCR for HEV RNA. ORF2 protein can be reliably visualized in the liver of patients with hepatitis E, allowing for sensitive and specific detection of HEV in FFPE samples. Its variable subcellular distribution in individual hepatocytes of the same liver suggests a redistribution of ORF2 protein during infection and interaction with nuclear components. The open reading frame (ORF) 2 protein can be used to visualize the hepatitis E virus (HEV) in the human liver. This enabled us to discover a hitherto unknown localization of the HEV ORF2 protein in the nucleus of hepatocytes and to develop a test for rapid histopathologic diagnosis of

  17. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  18. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  19. Encoding of relative enclosure size in a dynamic three-dimensional virtual environment by humans.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Bradley R; Kelly, Debbie M

    2009-10-01

    Human participants searched in a dynamic three-dimensional virtual-environment rectangular enclosure for a distinctly colored bin located in one of the four corners. During test trials, all bins were rendered identical in color, and the shape of the rectangular search space either remained the same or was modified to a relatively sized contracted rectangle, an expanded rectangle, or a square. Participants made one choice response during test trials. In the rectangular enclosures, more of participants' choice responses were allocated to the geometrically correct corners than to the geometrically incorrect corners. In the square enclosure, participants' choice responses were allocated equivalently to each of the four corners. Results replicate previous enclosure size studies demonstrating encoding of enclosure geometry with human and non-human animal subjects conducted in real environments and extend these results to include encoding of relative enclosure geometry. Results are discussed with respect to theoretical accounts of geometry learning.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a novel human gene encoding a zinc finger protein with 25 fingers.

    PubMed

    Li, X A; Kokame, K; Okubo, K; Shimokado, K; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyata, T; Kato, H; Yutani, C

    1999-12-23

    This study reports cloning and characterization of a human cDNA encoding a novel human zinc finger protein, ZFD25. ZFD25 cDNA is 6118 bp long and has an open reading frame of 2352 bp that encodes a 783 amino acid protein with 25 C2H2-type zinc fingers. The ZFD25 cDNA also contains a region with high sequence similarity to the Krüppel-associated box A and B domain in the 5'-untranslated region, suggesting that ZFD25 belongs to the Krüppel-associated box zinc finger protein family. The ZFD25 gene was localized to chromosome 7q11.2. Northern blot analysis showed that ZFD25 was expressed in a wide range of human organs. In cultured endothelial cells, the mRNA level was decreased upon serum starvation.

  1. Effects of Acute Methamphetamine on Emotional Memory Formation in Humans: Encoding vs Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  2. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  3. Liver stem cells: Experimental findings and implications for human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from human histopathology and experimental studies with rodents and zebrafish has shown that hepatocytes and cholangiocytes may function as facultative stem cells for each other in conditions of impaired regeneration. The interpretation of the findings derived from these studies has generated considerable discussion and some controversies. This review examines the evidence obtained from the different experimental models and considers implications that these studies may have for human liver disease. Few topics of liver tissue biology have attracted as much attention as the existence of liver-specific tissue stem cells. Routine liver histology reveals two types of epithelial cells, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes (also known as biliary epithelial cells). Endothelial cells line the hepatic capillaries (sinusoids), with macrophages (Kupffer cells) interspersed along the sinusoid lumen. Stellate cells exist under the sinusoids and in close proximity to hepatocytes. None of these cells appears to have functions of a fully committed tissue specific stem cell, analogous to the cells of the intestinal crypts, the basal layer of the epidermis, bone marrow stem cells, etc. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes can be easily identified based on their morphology and cell-specific biomarkers. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, however, often have mutually mixed expression of biomarkers in pathologic conditions. In patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), there is rampant proliferation of cholangiocytes organized in ductular structures (“ductular reaction”1, 2). Many of these cholangiocytes (known as ductular hepatocytes) express biomarkers associated with hepatocytes, (HNF4, albumin, HEPPAR3, etc.). They are seen surrounding cells ranging in size from small to typical hepatocytes, and with a gradient of expression of cholangiocyte-associated biomarkers (e.g. EpCAM) decreasing from the periphery to the center (Regenerative Clusters: see Figure 1). It is not clear in FHF

  4. Uptake and cytotoxicity of chitosan nanoparticles in human liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen; Yeoh, George; Saunders, Martin; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive research into the biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanoparticles, and the liver being the main detoxifying organ in the human body, there are limited studies which delineate the hepatotoxicity of nanoparticles. This paper reports on the biological interactions between liver cells and chitosan nanoparticles, which have been widely recognised as biocompatible. Using the MTT assay, human liver cells were shown to tolerate up to 4 h of exposure to 0.5% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles (18 {+-} 1 nm, 7.5 {+-} 1.0 mV in culture medium). At nanoparticle concentrations above 0.5% w/v, cell membrane integrity was compromised as evidenced by leakage of alanine transaminase into the extracellular milieu, and there was a dose-dependent increase in CYP3A4 enzyme activity. Uptake of chitosan nanoparticles into the cell nucleus was observed by confocal microscopic analysis after 4 h exposure with 1% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles. Electron micrographs further suggest necrotic or autophagic cell death, possibly caused by cell membrane damage and resultant enzyme leakage.

  5. Cultures of human liver cells in simulated microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Yoffe, B; Darlington, G J; Soriano, H E; Krishnan, B; Risin, D; Pellis, N R; Khaoustov, V I

    1999-01-01

    We used microgravity-simulated bioreactors that create the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer to establish long-term cultures of primary human liver cells (HLC). To assess the feasibility of establishing HLC cultures, human liver cells obtained either from cells dissociated by collagenase perfusion or minced tissues were cultured in rotating vessels. Formation of multidimensional tissue-like spheroids (up to 1.0 cm) comprised of hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells that arranged as bile duct-like structures along newly formed vascular sprouts were observed. Electron microscopy revealed clusters of round hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight junctions. Scanning EM revealed rounded hepatocytes that were organized in tight clusters surrounded by a complex mesh of extracellular matrix. Also, we observed that co-culture of hepatocytes with endothelial cells stimulate albumin mRNA expression. In summary, a simulated microgravity environment is conducive for the establishment of long-term HLC cultures and allows the dissection of the mechanism of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that resembles in vivo conditions.

  6. Interaction of rocuronium with human liver cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Anzenbacherova, Eva; Spicakova, Alena; Jourova, Lenka; Ulrichova, Jitka; Adamus, Milan; Bachleda, Petr; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    Rocuronium is a neuromuscular blocking agent acting as a competitive antagonist of acetylcholine. Results of an inhibition of eight individual liver microsomal cytochromes P450 (CYP) are presented. As the patients are routinely premedicated with diazepam, possible interaction of diazepam with rocuronium has been also studied. Results indicated that rocuronium interacts with human liver microsomal CYPs by binding to the substrate site. Next, concentration dependent inhibition of liver microsomal CYP3A4 down to 42% (at rocuronium concentration 189 μM) was found. This effect has been confirmed with two CYP3A4 substrates, testosterone (formation of 6β-hydroxytestosterone) and diazepam (temazepam formation). CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 activities were inhibited down to 75-80% (at the same rocuronium concentration). Activities of other microsomal CYPs have not been inhibited by rocuronium. To prove the possibility of rocuronium interaction with other drugs (diazepam), the effect of rocuronium on formation of main diazepam metabolites, temazepam (by CYP3A4) and desmethyldiazepam, (also known as nordiazepam; formed by CYP2C19) in primary culture of human hepatocytes has been examined. Rocuronium has caused inhibition of both reactions by 20 and 15%, respectively. The results open a possibility that interactions of rocuronium with drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 (and possibly also CYP2C19) may be observed. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultures of human liver cells in simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, B.; Darlington, G. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Krishnan, B.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Khaoustov, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    We used microgravity-simulated bioreactors that create the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer to establish long-term cultures of primary human liver cells (HLC). To assess the feasibility of establishing HLC cultures, human liver cells obtained either from cells dissociated by collagenase perfusion or minced tissues were cultured in rotating vessels. Formation of multidimensional tissue-like spheroids (up to 1.0 cm) comprised of hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells that arranged as bile duct-like structures along newly formed vascular sprouts were observed. Electron microscopy revealed clusters of round hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight junctions. Scanning EM revealed rounded hepatocytes that were organized in tight clusters surrounded by a complex mesh of extracellular matrix. Also, we observed that co-culture of hepatocytes with endothelial cells stimulate albumin mRNA expression. In summary, a simulated microgravity environment is conducive for the establishment of long-term HLC cultures and allows the dissection of the mechanism of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that resembles in vivo conditions.

  8. Encoding human sexual chemosensory cues in the orbitofrontal and fusiform cortices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Chen, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensory communication of affect and motivation is ubiquitous among animals. In humans, emotional expressions are naturally associated with faces and voices. Whether chemical signals play a role as well has hardly been addressed. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that the right orbitofrontal cortex, right fusiform cortex, and right hypothalamus respond to airborne natural human sexual sweat, indicating that this particular chemosensory compound is encoded holistically in the brain. Our findings provide neural evidence that socioemotional meanings, including the sexual ones, are conveyed in the human sweat. PMID:19118174

  9. Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J.

    1995-04-10

    We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by human liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Nada; Prip-Buus, Carina; Vons, Corinne; Lenoir, Véronique; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Guedouari-Bounihi, Hala; Lombès, Anne; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter discovered. Sulfide shares with the two others (NO and CO) the same inhibiting properties towards mitochondrial respiration. However, in contrast with NO or CO, sulfide at concentrations lower than the toxic (μM) level is an hydrogen donor and a substrate for mitochondrial respiration. This is due to the activity of a sulfide quinone reductase found in a large majority of mitochondria. An ongoing study of the metabolic state of liver in obese patients allowed us to evaluate the sulfide oxidation capacity with twelve preparations of human liver mitochondria. The results indicate relatively high rates of sulfide oxidation with a large variability between individuals. These observations made with isolated mitochondria appear in agreement with the main characteristics of sulfide oxidation as established before with the help of cellular models.

  11. Radionuclide imaging of the liver in human fascioliasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.V.; Bermudez, R.H.

    1984-08-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and scintigraphic findings in four cases of human fascioliasis are described. Acute onset of fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss in a person who has ingested watercress constitutes the clinical syndrome often seen. Eosinophilia and alteration in liver function tests, particularly alkaline phosphatase are frequent. Tc-99m sulfur colloid images showed hepatomegaly in four patients, focal defects in two, splenomegaly in three, and increased splenic uptake in two. Gallium citrate (Ga 67) images show increased uptake in the focal lesions in two of two. Sonographic imaging showed focal lucent abnormality in one of three. Liver biopsy findings were nonspecific. The differential diagnosis from other invasive parasitic diseases is discussed. A possible role of hepatic imaging in the evaluation of fascioliasis is suggested.

  12. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    McSharry, Brian P.; Avdic, Selmir; Slobedman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance. PMID:23202490

  13. Theta oscillations at encoding mediate the context-dependent nature of human episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Staudigl, Tobias; Hanslmayr, Simon

    2013-06-17

    Human episodic memory is highly context dependent. Therefore, retrieval benefits when a memory is recalled in the same context compared to a different context. This implies that items and contexts are bound together during encoding, such that the reinstatement of the initial context at test improves retrieval. Animal studies suggest that theta oscillations and theta-to-gamma cross-frequency coupling modulate such item-context binding, but direct evidence from humans is scarce. We investigated this issue by manipulating the overlap of contextual features between encoding and retrieval. Participants studied words superimposed on movie clips and were later tested by presenting the word with either the same or a different movie. The results show that memory performance and the oscillatory correlates of memory formation crucially depend on the overlap of the context between encoding and test. When the context matched, high theta power during encoding was related to successful recognition, whereas the opposite pattern emerged in the context-mismatch condition. In addition, cross-frequency coupling analysis revealed a context-dependent theta-to-gamma memory effect specifically in the left hippocampus. These results reveal for the first time that context-dependent episodic memory effects are mediated by theta oscillatory activity.

  14. Non-spin-echo 3D transverse hadamard encoded proton spectroscopic imaging in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ouri; Tal, Assaf; Goelman, Gadi; Gonen, Oded

    2013-07-01

    A non-spin-echo multivoxel proton MR localization method based on three-dimensional transverse Hadamard spectroscopic imaging is introduced and demonstrated in a phantom and the human brain. Spatial encoding is achieved with three selective 90° radiofrequency pulses along perpendicular axes: The first two create a longitudinal ±M(Z) Hadamard order in the volume of interest. The third pulse spatially Hadamard-encodes the ±M(Z)s in the volume of interest in the third direction while bringing them to the transverse plane to be acquired immediately. The approaching-ideal point spread function of Hadamard encoding and very short acquisition delay yield signal-to-noise-ratios of 20 ± 8, 23 ± 9, and 31 ± 10 for choline, creatine, and N-acetylaspartate in the human brain at 1.5 T from 1 cm(3) voxels in 21 min. The advantages of transverse Hadamard spectroscopic imaging are that unlike gradient (Fourier) phase-encoding: (i) the volume of interest does not need to be smaller than the field of view to prevent aliasing; (ii) the number of partitions in each direction can be small, 8, 4, or even 2 at no cost in point spread function; (iii) the volume of interest does not have to be contiguous; and (iv) the voxel profile depends on the available B1 and pulse synthesis paradigm and can, therefore, at least theoretically, approach "ideal" "1" inside and "0" elsewhere.

  15. Can 19-nortestosterone derivatives be aromatized in the liver of adult humans? Are there clinical implications?

    PubMed

    Kuhl, H; Wiegratz, I

    2007-08-01

    Previous studies in postmenopausal women have demonstrated that, after oral administration of norethisterone, a small proportion of the compound is rapidly converted into ethinylestradiol. The shape of the concentration - time curve suggested that this occurred in the liver. The results were confirmed by in vitro investigations with adult human liver tissue. In 2002, it was shown that, after oral treatment of women with tibolone, aromatization of the compound occurred, resulting in the formation of a potent estrogen, 7 alpha-methyl-ethinylestradiol. The result has been called into question, because the adult human liver does not express cytochrome P450 aromatase, which is encoded by the CYP 19 gene. Moreover, it has been claimed that the serum level of 7 alpha-methyl-ethinylestradiol measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was an artifact. Aromatization of steroids is a complex process of consecutive oxidation reactions which are catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes. The conversion of the natural C19 steroids, testosterone and androstenedione, into estradiol-17beta and estrone is dependent on the oxidative elimination of the angular C19-methyl group. This complex key reaction is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 aromatase, which is expressed in many tissues of the adult human (e.g. ovary, fat tissue), but not in the liver. However, 19-nortestosterone derivatives are characterized by the lack of the C19-methyl group. Therefore, for the aromatization of these synthetic steroids, the action of the cytochrome P450 aromatase is not necessary and the oxidative introduction of double bonds into the A-ring can be catalyzed by other hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes. The final key process in the formation of a phenolic A-ring, both in natural androgens and 19-nortestosterone derivatives, is the enolization of a 3-keto group to the C2-C3-enol or the C3-C4-enol moiety, which occurs without the action of enzymes. 19-nortestosterone derivatives (norethisterone

  16. Identification of a human cDNA sequence which encodes a novel membrane-associated protein containing a zinc metalloprotease motif.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ying-Chun; Tsuruga, Hiromichi; Hirai, Momoki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Yokoi, Norihide; Kitamura, Toshio; Kumagai, Hidetoshi

    2003-06-30

    We report the cloning and characterization of a human cDNA predicted to encode a novel hydrophobic protein containing four transmembrane domains and a zinc metalloprotease motif, HEXXH, between the third and fourth transmembrane domains, and have named the molecule metalloprotease-related protein-1 (MPRP-1). The MPRP-1 gene was localized to chromosome 1-p32.3 by radiation hybrid mapping, and Northern blot analysis revealed expression in many organs, with strong expression in the heart, skeletal muscle, kidney and liver. Immunohistochemical analyisis showed that MPRP-1 was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and not in the Golgi compartment. Fragments of DNA encoding a segment homologous to the HEXXH motif of MPRP-1 are widely found in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals. These results suggest that the MPRP-1 may have highly conserved functions, such as in intracellular proteolytic processing in the ER.

  17. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Debora B.; Faust, Daniela M.; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  18. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Faust, Daniela M; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  19. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kenneth T; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; White, Jason P; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul E M; Montague, P Read

    2016-01-05

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson's disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson's disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons.

  20. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  1. Characterization and immunological identification of cDNA clones encoding two human DNA topoisomerase II isozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.D.Y.; Drake, F.H.; Tan, K.B.; Per, S.R.; Crooke, S.T.; Mirabelli, C.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Several DNA topoisomerase II partial cDNA clones obtained from a human Raji-HN2 cDNA library were sequenced and two classes of nucleotide sequences were found. One member of the first class, SP1, was identical to an internal fragment of human HeLa cell Topo II cDNA described earlier. A member of the second class, SP11, shared extensive nucleotide (75%) and predicted peptide (92%) sequence similarities with the first two-thirds of HeLa Topo II. Each class of cDNAs hybridized to unique, nonoverlapping restriction enzyme fragments of genomic DNA from several human cell lines. Synthetic 24-mer oligonucleotide probes specific for each cDNA class hybridized to 6.5-kilobase mRNAs; furthermore, hybridization of probe specific for one class was not blocked by probe specific for the other. Antibodies raised against a synthetic SP1-encoded dodecapeptide specifically recognized the 170-kDa form of Topo II, while antibodies raised against the corresponding SP11-encoded dodecapeptide, or a second unique SP11-encoded tridecapeptide, selectively recognized the 180-kDa form of Topo II. These data provide genetic and immunochemical evidence for two Topo II isozymes.

  2. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Kenneth T.; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; White, Jason P.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Montague, P. Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson’s disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson’s disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  3. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. This technique can now be extended to the study of other HERV genomes within the human chromosomes that may have contributed to

  4. Localization of the human genes encoding the two subunits of general transcription factor TFIIE.

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Motta, S; Pavone, L; Grzeschik, K H; Sichel, G

    1994-09-01

    TFIIE is a general transcription factor for class II genes composed of two types of subunits, a large one of 56 kDa and a small of 34 kDa. By Southern analysis at high and at low stringency of a panel of mouse/human hybrid cell lines and by in situ chromosomal hybridization, we have demonstrated that both polypeptides are encoded by genes that are single copy in the human genome and are localized at 3q13-q21 and at 8p12, respectively. A TaqI RFLP (heterozygosity index of 0.07) was detected at the locus for the 56-kDa subunit.

  5. Population-level expression variability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Mandhan, Ishita; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondria contain multiple copies of a circular genome made up of double-stranded DNA (mtDNA) that encodes proteins involved in cellular respiration. Transcript abundance of mtDNA-encoded genes varies between human individuals, yet the level of variation in the general population has not been systematically assessed. In the present study, we revisited large-scale RNA sequencing data generated from lymphoblastoid cell lines of HapMap samples of European and African ancestry to estimate transcript abundance and quantify expression variation for mtDNA-encoded genes. In both populations, we detected up to over 100-fold difference in mtDNA gene expression between individuals. The marked variation was not due to differences in mtDNA copy number between individuals, but was shaped by the transcription of hundreds of nuclear genes. Many of these nuclear genes were co-expressed with one another, resulting in a module-enriched co-expression network. Significant correlations in expression between genes of the mtDNA and nuclear genomes were used to identify factors involved with the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In conclusion, we determined the baseline amount of variability in mtDNA gene expression in general human populations and cataloged a complete set of nuclear genes whose expression levels are correlated with those of mtDNA-encoded genes. Our findings will enable the integration of information from both mtDNA and nuclear genetic systems, and facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial functions. PMID:24398800

  6. The human HNRPD locus maps to 4q21 and encodes a highly conserved protein.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, L A; Li, M J; DePace, A; Bray-Ward, P; Maizels, N

    1998-05-01

    The hnRNP D protein interacts with nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Like many other proteins that interact with RNA, it contains RBD (or "RRM") domains and arg-gly-gly (RGG) motifs. We have examined the organization and localization of the human and murine genes that encode the hnRNP D protein. Comparison of the predicted sequences of the hnRNP D proteins in human and mouse shows that they are 96.9% identical (98.9% similar). This very high level of conservation suggests a critical function for hnRNP D. Sequence analysis of the human HNRPD gene shows that the protein is encoded by eight exons and that two additional exons specify sequences in the 3' UTR. Use of two of the coding exons is determined by alternative splicing of the HNRPD mRNA. The human HNRPD gene maps to 4q21. The mouse Hnrpd gene maps to the F region of chromosome 3, which is syntenic with the human 4q21 region.

  7. Liver X receptor (LXR) regulates human adipocyte lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Britta M; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M L; Mairal, Aline; Aström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W E; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-07

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression.

  8. Liver X Receptor (LXR) Regulates Human Adipocyte Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, Britta M.; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M. L.; Mairal, Aline; Åström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W. E.; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-01

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression. PMID:21030586

  9. Stoichiometries of Transferrin Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo levels of mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR and concentrations of these proteins by quantitative immunoblotting in human liver tissues. The level of TfR2 mRNA was 21- and 63- fold higher than that of TfR1 and HFE, respectively. Molar concentration of TfR2 protein was the highest and determined to be 1.95 nmoles/g protein in whole cell lysates and 10.89 nmoles/g protein in microsomal membranes. Molar concentration of TfR1 protein was 4.5- and 6.1-fold lower than that of TfR2 in whole cell lysates and membranes, respectively. The level of HFE protein was below 0.53 nmoles/g of total protein. HFE is thus present in substoichiometric concentrations with respect to both TfR1 and TfR2 in human liver tissue. This finding supports a model, in which availability of HFE is limiting for formation of complexes with TfR1 or TfR2. PMID:19819738

  10. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The human subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus differentially encode reward during action control.

    PubMed

    Justin Rossi, Peter; Peden, Corinna; Castellanos, Oscar; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have recently been shown to encode reward, but few studies have been performed in humans. We investigated STN and GPi encoding of reward and loss (i.e., valence) in humans with Parkinson's disease. To test the hypothesis that STN and GPi neurons would change their firing rate in response to reward- and loss-related stimuli, we recorded the activity of individual neurons while participants performed a behavioral task. In the task, action choices were associated with potential rewarding, punitive, or neutral outcomes. We found that STN and GPi neurons encode valence-related information during action control, but the proportion of valence-responsive neurons was greater in the STN compared to the GPi. In the STN, reward-related stimuli mobilized a greater proportion of neurons than loss-related stimuli. We also found surprising limbic overlap with the sensorimotor regions in both the STN and GPi, and this overlap was greater than has been previously reported. These findings may help to explain alterations in limbic function that have been observed following deep brain stimulation therapy of the STN and GPi. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1952-1964, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of benidipine on simvastatin metabolism in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yuka; Mimura, Nobuhito; Kuwabara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ushiki, Junko; Fuse, Eiichi

    2007-06-01

    Benidipine, which is a calcium channel blocker that has clinical advantages in the treatment of hypertension, is metabolized by CYP3A4 in humans. The effect of benidipine on the metabolism of simvastatin by human liver microsomes was investigated in order to predict the potential of in vivo drug-drug interactions between benidipine and other substrates of CYP3A4. The results were compared with data generated with azelnidipine, which is also metabolized by CYP3A4. Both benidipine and azelnidipine inhibited simvastatin metabolism in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Assuming competitive inhibition, the K(i) values based on the unbound concentrations, were calculated to be 0.846 and 0.0181 microM for benidipine and azelnidipine, respectively. If simvastatin (10 mg) and benidipine (8 mg, the clinically recommended highest dose) were to be administered concomitantly, the ratio of the areas under the concentration-time curves of simvastatin with and without benidipine (AUC((+I))/AUC) was predicted to be 1.01. On the other hand, if simvastatin (10 mg) and azelnidipine (8 mg) were co-administered, the AUC((+I))/AUC for simvastatin was predicted to be 1.72, which is close to the observed value (1.9) in healthy volunteers. These data suggest that benidipine is unlikely to cause a drug interaction by inhibiting CYP3A4 activity in the liver.

  13. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  14. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  15. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-02-15

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses.

  16. Roughness Encoding in Human and Biomimetic Artificial Touch: Spatiotemporal Frequency Modulation and Structural Anisotropy of Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Oddo, Calogero Maria; Beccai, Lucia; Wessberg, Johan; Wasling, Helena Backlund; Mattioli, Fabio; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    The influence of fingerprints and their curvature in tactile sensing performance is investigated by comparative analysis of different design parameters in a biomimetic artificial fingertip, having straight or curved fingerprints. The strength in the encoding of the principal spatial period of ridged tactile stimuli (gratings) is evaluated by indenting and sliding the surfaces at controlled normal contact force and tangential sliding velocity, as a function of fingertip rotation along the indentation axis. Curved fingerprints guaranteed higher directional isotropy than straight fingerprints in the encoding of the principal frequency resulting from the ratio between the sliding velocity and the spatial periodicity of the grating. In parallel, human microneurography experiments were performed and a selection of results is included in this work in order to support the significance of the biorobotic study with the artificial tactile system. PMID:22163915

  17. Roughness encoding in human and biomimetic artificial touch: spatiotemporal frequency modulation and structural anisotropy of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Calogero Maria; Beccai, Lucia; Wessberg, Johan; Wasling, Helena Backlund; Mattioli, Fabio; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    The influence of fingerprints and their curvature in tactile sensing performance is investigated by comparative analysis of different design parameters in a biomimetic artificial fingertip, having straight or curved fingerprints. The strength in the encoding of the principal spatial period of ridged tactile stimuli (gratings) is evaluated by indenting and sliding the surfaces at controlled normal contact force and tangential sliding velocity, as a function of fingertip rotation along the indentation axis. Curved fingerprints guaranteed higher directional isotropy than straight fingerprints in the encoding of the principal frequency resulting from the ratio between the sliding velocity and the spatial periodicity of the grating. In parallel, human microneurography experiments were performed and a selection of results is included in this work in order to support the significance of the biorobotic study with the artificial tactile system.

  18. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  19. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S.

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Dual temporal encoding mechanisms in human auditory cortex: Evidence from MEG and EEG.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huizhen; Crain, Stephen; Johnson, Blake W

    2016-03-01

    Current hypotheses about language processing advocate an integral relationship between encoding of temporal information and linguistic processing in the brain. All such explanations must accommodate the evident ability of the perceptual system to process both slow and fast time scales in speech. However most cortical neurons are limited in their capability to precisely synchronise to temporal modulations at rates faster than about 50Hz. Hence, a central question in auditory neurophysiology concerns how the full range of perceptually relevant modulation rates might be encoded in the cerebral cortex. Here we show with concurrent noninvasive magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) measurements that the human auditory cortex transitions between a phase-locked (PL) mode of responding to modulation rates below about 50Hz, and a non-phase-locked (NPL) mode at higher rates. Precisely such dual response modes are predictable from the behaviours of single neurons in auditory cortices of non-human primates. Our data point to a common mechanistic explanation for the single neuron and MEG/EEG results and support the hypothesis that two distinct types of neuronal encoding mechanisms are employed by the auditory cortex to represent a wide range of temporal modulation rates. This dual encoding model allows slow and fast modulations in speech to be processed in parallel and is therefore consistent with theoretical frameworks in which slow temporal modulations (such as rhythm or syllabic structure) are akin to the contours or edges of visual objects, whereas faster modulations (such as periodicity pitch or phonemic structure) are more like visual texture.

  1. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  2. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  3. Human posterior parietal cortex encodes the movement goal in a pro-/anti-reach task

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on reach planning in humans has implicated a frontoparietal network, including the precuneus (PCu), a putative human homolog of the monkey parietal reach region (PRR), and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Using a pro-/anti-reach task, electrophysiological studies in monkeys have demonstrated that the movement goal rather than the location of the visual cue is encoded in PRR and PMd. However, if only the effector but not the movement goal is specified (underspecified condition), the PRR and PMd have been shown to represent all potential movement goals. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated whether the human PCu and PMd likewise encode the movement goal, and whether these reach-related areas also engage in situations with underspecified compared with specified movement goals. By using a pro-/anti-reach task, we spatially dissociated the location of the visual cue from the location of the movement goal. In the specified conditions, pro- and anti-reaches activated similar parietal and premotor areas. In the PCu contralateral to the moving arm, we found directionally selective activation fixed to the movement goal. In the underspecified conditions, we observed activation in reach-related areas of the posterior parietal cortex, including PCu. However, the activation was substantially weaker in parietal areas and lacking in PMd. Our results suggest that human PCu encodes the movement goal rather than the location of the visual cue if the movement goal is specified and even engages in situations when only the visual cue but not the movement goal is defined. PMID:25904714

  4. Development of a New Diagnostic System for Human Liver Diseases Based on Conventional Ultrasonic Diagnostic Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tsuneo; Nakazawa, Toshihiro; Harada, Akimitsu; Sato, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Yukio; Sato, Sojun

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the experimental results of using a quantitative ultrasonic diagnosis technique for human liver diseases using the fractal dimension (FD) of the shape of the power spectra (PS) of RF signals. We have developed an experimental system based on a conventional ultrasonic diagnostic system. As a result, we show that normal livers, fatty livers and liver cirrhosis can be identified using the FD values.

  5. Molecular expression and enzymatic characterization of thioredoxin from the carcinogenic human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Loukas, Alex; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob

    2012-03-01

    The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, induces inflammation of the hepatobiliary system. Despite being constantly exposed to inimical oxygen radicals released from inflammatory cells, the parasite survives for years. Defense against oxidative damage can be mediated through glutathione and/or thioredoxin utilizing systems. Here, we report the molecular expression and biochemical characterization of a thioredoxin (Trx) from O. viverrini. O. viverrini Trx cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 105 amino acid residues, of molecular mass 11.63 kDa. The predicted protein has similarity to previously characterized thioredoxins with 26-51% identity. Recombinant O. viverrini Trx (Ov-Trx-1) was expressed as soluble protein in E. coli. The recombinant protein showed insulin reduction activity and supported the enzymatic function of O. viverrini thioredoxin peroxidase. Expression of Ov-Trx-1 at mRNA and protein levels was observed in all obtainable developmental stages of the liver fluke. Ov-Trx-1 was also detected in excretory-secretory products released by adult O. viverrini. Immunohistochemistry, Ov-Trx-1 was expressed in nearly all parasite tissue excepted ovary and mature sperms. Interestingly, Ov-Trx-1 was observed in the infected biliary epithelium but not in normal bile ducts. These results suggest that Ov-Trx-1 is essential for the parasite throughout the life cycle. In the host-parasite interaction aspect, Ov-Trx-1 may support thioredoxin peroxidase in protecting the parasite against damage induced by reactive oxygen species from inflammation.

  6. Mutations in the human SC4MOL gene encoding a methyl sterol oxidase cause psoriasiform dermatitis, microcephaly, and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    He, Miao; Kratz, Lisa E.; Michel, Joshua J.; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Ferris, Laura; Kelley, Richard I.; Hoover, Jacqueline J.; Jukic, Drazen; Gibson, K. Michael; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Ramachandran, Dhanya; Zwick, Michael E.; Vockley, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Defects in cholesterol synthesis result in a wide variety of symptoms, from neonatal lethality to the relatively mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay found in individuals with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. We report here the identification of mutations in sterol-C4-methyl oxidase–like gene (SC4MOL) as the cause of an autosomal recessive syndrome in a human patient with psoriasiform dermatitis, arthralgias, congenital cataracts, microcephaly, and developmental delay. This gene encodes a sterol-C4-methyl oxidase (SMO), which catalyzes demethylation of C4-methylsterols in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. C4-Methylsterols are meiosis-activating sterols (MASs). They exist at high concentrations in the testis and ovary and play roles in meiosis activation. In this study, we found that an accumulation of MASs in the patient led to cell overproliferation in both skin and blood. SMO deficiency also substantially altered immunocyte phenotype and in vitro function. MASs serve as ligands for liver X receptors α and β (LXRα and LXRβ), which are important in regulating not only lipid transport in the epidermis, but also innate and adaptive immunity. Deficiency of SMO represents a biochemical defect in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, the clinical spectrum of which remains to be defined. PMID:21285510

  7. AMC-Bio-Artificial Liver culturing enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in human liver cell lines: The role of oxygen, medium perfusion and 3D configuration.

    PubMed

    Adam, Aziza A A; van Wenum, Martien; van der Mark, Vincent A; Jongejan, Aldo; Moerland, Perry D; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Wanders, Ronald J A; Oude Elferink, Ronald P; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2017-08-24

    Human liver cell lines, like HepaRG and C3A, acquire higher functionality when cultured in the AMC-Bio-Artificial Liver (AMC-BAL). The three main differences between BAL and monolayer culture are the oxygenation (40% vs 20%O2), dynamic vs absent medium perfusion and 3D vs 2D configuration. Here, we investigated the background of the differences between BAL-cultures and monolayers. We performed whole-genome microarray analysis on HepaRG monolayer and BAL-cultures. Next, mitochondrial biogenesis was studied in monolayer and BAL-cultures of HepaRG and C3A. The driving forces for mitochondrial biogenesis by BAL-culturing were investigated in representative culture models differing in oxygenation level, medium flow or 2D vs 3D configuration. Gene-sets related to mitochondrial energy metabolism were most prominently up-regulated in HepaRG-BAL vs monolayer cultures. This was confirmed by a 2.4-fold higher mitochondrial abundance with increased expression of mitochondrial OxPhos complexes. Moreover, the transcript levels of mitochondria-encoded genes were up to 3.6-fold induced and mitochondrial membrane potential activity was 8.3-fold increased in BAL vs monolayers. Culturing with 40% O2, dynamic medium flow and/or in 3D increased the mitochondrial abundance and expression of mitochondrial complexes vs standard monolayer culturing. The stimulatory effect of the BAL culture on mitochondrial biogenesis was confirmed in C3A cells in which mitochondrial abundance increased 2.2-fold with induction of mitochondria-encoded genes. The increased functionality of liver cell lines upon AMC-BAL culturing is associated with increased mitochondrial biogenesis. High oxygenation, medium perfusion and 3D configuration contribute to the up-regulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of human lactoferrin with the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Debanne, M.T.; Regoeczi, E.; Sweeney, G.D.; Krestynski, F.

    1985-04-01

    Binding of human lactoferrin (hLf) by purified rat liver plasma membranes was studied to clarify whether the liver possesses specific hLf receptors. The binding was rapid between 4 degrees and 37 degrees C, with a pH optimum close to 5.0. At 22 degrees C and in glycine-NaOH (5 mM, pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.5% albumin, 1 microgram of membrane bound a maximum of 11.8 ng hLf. The dissociation constant of the interaction was 1.6 X 10(-7) M. Other proteins of high isoelectric points (lactoperoxidase, lysozyme, and particularly salmine sulfate) and a piperazine derivative inhibited hLf binding in a concentration- dependent manner. In contrast, monosaccharides (galactose, N- acetylgalactosamine, mannose, and fucose) were ineffective. By omitting NaCl from the incubation buffer, binding was increased 3.6-fold. Erythrocyte ghosts bound hLf less firmly and alveolar macrophages more firmly than hepatic plasma membranes. Liver cell fractionations performed after the intravenous injection of labeled hLf showed that approximately 88% of the hepatic radioligand was associated with parenchymal cells. When binding was expressed per unit of cell volume, however, more hLf was present in nonparenchymal than in parenchymal cells, implying that the above value was determined by the relative cell masses rather than affinities alone. It is concluded that the binding of hLf by hepatic plasma membranes is electrostatic, i.e., is mediated by the cationic nature of the ligand, and that it is explicable in terms of a ''specific nonreceptor interaction'' of the generalized type proposed by Cuatrecasas and Hollenberg.

  9. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A brief review on the Human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international research consortium that aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The second phase of the project comprised 1640 datasets from 147 different cell types, yielding a set of 30 publications across several journals. These data revealed that 80.4% of the human genome displays some functionality in at least one cell type. Many of these regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and further form a network or three-dimensional conformation to affect gene expression. These elements are also related to sequence variants associated with diseases or traits. All these findings provide us new insights into the organization and regulation of genes and genome, and serve as an expansive resource for understanding human health and disease. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-02-26

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development. PMID:26719341

  13. Theta band power increases in the posterior hippocampus predict successful episodic memory encoding in humans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jui-Jui; Rugg, Michael D; Das, Sandhitsu; Stein, Joel; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J; Lega, Bradley C

    2017-10-01

    Functional differences in the anterior and posterior hippocampus during episodic memory processing have not been examined in human electrophysiological data. This is in spite of strong evidence for such differences in rodent data, including greater place cell specificity in the dorsal hippocampus, greater sensitivity to the aversive or motivational content of memories in ventral regions, connectivity analyses identifying preferential ventral hippocampal connections with the amygdala, and gene expression analyses identifying a dorsal-ventral gradient. We asked if memory-related oscillatory patterns observed in human hippocampal recordings, including the gamma band and slow-theta (2.5-5 Hz) subsequent memory effects, would exhibit differences along the longitudinal axis and between hemispheres. We took advantage of a new dataset of stereo electroencephalography patients with simultaneous, robotically targeted anterior, and posterior hippocampal electrodes to directly compare oscillatory subsequent memory effects during item encoding. This same data set allowed us to examine left-right connectivity and hemispheric differences in hippocampal oscillatory patterns. Our data suggest that a power increase during successful item encoding in the 2.5-5 Hz slow-theta frequency range preferentially occurs in the posterior hippocampus during the first 1,000 ms after item presentation, while a gamma band power increase is stronger in the dominant hemisphere. This dominant-nondominant pattern in the gamma range appears to reverse during item retrieval, however. Intrahippocampal phase coherence was found to be stronger during successful item encoding. Our phase coherence data are also consistent with existing reports of a traveling wave for theta oscillations propagating along the septotemporal (longitudinal) axis of the human hippocampus. We examine how our findings fit with theories of functional specialization along the hippocampal axis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Whole human genome proteogenomic mapping for ENCODE cell line data: identifying protein-coding regions.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Jainab; Yu, Yanbao; Wrobel, John A; Risk, Brian A; Gunawardena, Harsha P; Secrest, Ashley; Spitzer, Wendy J; Xie, Ling; Wang, Li; Chen, Xian; Giddings, Morgan C

    2013-02-28

    Proteogenomic mapping is an approach that uses mass spectrometry data from proteins to directly map protein-coding genes and could aid in locating translational regions in the human genome. In concert with the ENcyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, we applied proteogenomic mapping to produce proteogenomic tracks for the UCSC Genome Browser, to explore which putative translational regions may be missing from the human genome. We generated ~1 million high-resolution tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra for Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines K562 and GM12878 and mapped them against the UCSC hg19 human genome, and the GENCODE V7 annotated protein and transcript sets. We then compared the results from the three searches to identify the best-matching peptide for each MS/MS spectrum, thereby increasing the confidence of the putative new protein-coding regions found via the whole genome search. At a 1% false discovery rate, we identified 26,472, 24,406, and 13,128 peptides from the protein, transcript, and whole genome searches, respectively; of these, 481 were found solely via the whole genome search. The proteogenomic mapping data are available on the UCSC Genome Browser at http://genome.ucsc.edu/cgi-bin/hgTrackUi?db=hg19&g=wgEncodeUncBsuProt. The whole genome search revealed that ~4% of the uniquely mapping identified peptides were located outside GENCODE V7 annotated exons. The comparison of the results from the disparate searches also identified 15% more spectra than would have been found solely from a protein database search. Therefore, whole genome proteogenomic mapping is a complementary method for genome annotation when performed in conjunction with other searches.

  15. TMS interference with primacy and recency mechanisms reveals bimodal episodic encoding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Iglis; Cappa, Stefano F; Feurra, Matteo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Bianco, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Rossi, Simone

    2013-01-01

    A classic finding of the psychology of memory is the "serial position effect." Immediate free recall of a word list is more efficient for items presented early (primacy effect) or late (recency effect), with respect to those in the middle. In an event-related, randomized block design, we interfered with the encoding of unrelated words lists with brief trains of repetitive TMS (rTMS), applied coincidently with the acoustic presentation of each word to the left dorsolateral pFC, the left intraparietal lobe, and a control site (vertex). Interference of rTMS with encoding produced a clear-cut double dissociation on accuracy during immediate free recall. The primacy effect was selectively worsened by rTMS of the dorsolateral pFC, whereas recency was selectively worsened by rTMS of the intraparietal lobe. These results are in agreement with the double dissociation between short-term and long-term memory observed in neuropsychological patients and provide direct evidence of distinct cortical mechanisms of encoding in the human brain.

  16. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a human macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, W Y; Temple, P A; Witek-Giannotti, J S; Remold, H G; Clark, S C; David, J R

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was isolated, through functional expression cloning in COS-1 cells, from a cDNA library prepared from a lectin-stimulated T-cell hybridoma, T-CEMB. The 115-amino acid polypeptide encoded by the MIF cDNA (p7-1) was effectively released from the transfected COS-1 cells and yielded readily detectable MIF activity in the culture supernatant despite the apparent lack of a classical protein secretory sequence. Insertional mutational analysis and elution of MIF activity from polyacrylamide gel slices demonstrated that the Mr 12,000 protein with MIF activity released by the COS-1 cells is encoded by p7-1. The p7-1 cDNA hybridized with a 700-base mRNA expressed by Con-A-stimulated lymphocytes but not unstimulated lymphocytes. The availability of the MIF cDNA clone and recombinant MIF will facilitate the analysis of the role of this lymphokine in cell-mediated immunity, immunoregulation, and inflammation. Images PMID:2552447

  17. The Roles of Human Lateral Temporal Cortical Neuronal Activity in Recent Verbal Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfield-McNeill, Julie; Corina, David

    2009-01-01

    Activity of 98 single neurons in human lateral temporal cortex was measured during memory encoding for auditory words, text, or pictures and compared with identification of material of the same modality in extracellular recordings during awake neurosurgery for epilepsy. Frequency of activity was divided into early or late epochs or activity sustained throughout both; 44 neurons had significant changes in one or more categories. Polymodal and sustained changes lateralized to dominant hemisphere and late changes to nondominant. The majority of polymodal neurons shifted categories for different modalities. In dominant hemisphere, the timing and nature of changes in activity provide the basis for a model of the roles of temporal cortex in encoding. Superior temporal gyrus excitatory activity was related to the early epoch, when perception and processing occur, and middle gyrus to the late epoch, when semantic labeling occurs. The superior two-thirds of middle gyrus also demonstrated sustained inhibition. In a subset of lateral temporal neurons, memory-encoding activity reflected simultaneous convergence of sustained attentional and early perceptual inputs. PMID:18469317

  18. Direct evidence for encoding of motion streaks in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Apthorp, Deborah; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Kaul, Christian; Bahrami, Bahador; Alais, David; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Temporal integration in the visual system causes fast-moving objects to generate static, oriented traces (‘motion streaks’), which could be used to help judge direction of motion. While human psychophysics and single-unit studies in non-human primates are consistent with this hypothesis, direct neural evidence from the human cortex is still lacking. First, we provide psychophysical evidence that faster and slower motions are processed by distinct neural mechanisms: faster motion raised human perceptual thresholds for static orientations parallel to the direction of motion, whereas slower motion raised thresholds for orthogonal orientations. We then used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain activity while human observers viewed either fast (‘streaky’) or slow random dot stimuli moving in different directions, or corresponding static-oriented stimuli. We found that local spatial patterns of brain activity in early retinotopic visual cortex reliably distinguished between static orientations. Critically, a multivariate pattern classifier trained on brain activity evoked by these static stimuli could then successfully distinguish the direction of fast (‘streaky’) but not slow motion. Thus, signals encoding static-oriented streak information are present in human early visual cortex when viewing fast motion. These experiments show that motion streaks are present in the human visual system for faster motion. PMID:23222445

  19. Color signal encoding for high dynamic range and wide color gamut based on human perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Mahdi; Miller, Scott; Daly, Scott; Atkins, Robin

    2014-01-01

    A new EOTF based on human perception, called PQ (Perceptual Quantizer), was proposed in a previous work (SMPTE Mot. Imag. J 2013, 122:52-59) and its performance was evaluated for a wide range of luminance levels and encoding bitdepth values. This paper is an extension of that previous work to include the color aspects of the PQ signal encoding. The efficiency of the PQ encoding and bit-depth requirements were evaluated and compared for standard color gamuts of Rec 709 (SRGB), and the wide color gamuts of Rec 2020, P3, and ACES for a variety of signal representations as RGB, YCbCr, and XYZ. In a selected color space for any potential local gray level 26 color samples were simulated by deviating one quantization step from the original color in each signal dimension. The quantization step sizes were simulated based on the PQ and gamma curves for different bit-depth values and luminance ranges for each of the color gamut spaces and signal representations. Color differences between the gray field and the simulated color samples were computed using CIE DE2000 color difference equation. The maximum color difference values (quantization error) were used as a metric to evaluate the performance of the corresponding EOTF curve. Extended color gamuts were found to require more bits to maintain low quantization error. Extended dynamic range required fewer additional bits in to maintain quantization error. Regarding the visual detection thresholds, the minimum bit-depth required by the PQ and gamma encodings are evaluated and compared through visual experiments.

  20. Cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the enzyme deficient in hereditary tyrosinemia: assignment of the gene to chromosome 15.

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, D; Labelle, Y; Bérubé, D; Arden, K; Cavenee, W; Gagné, R; Tanguay, R M

    1991-01-01

    Type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia (HT) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2). We have isolated human FAH cDNA clones by screening a liver cDNA expression library using specific antibodies and plaque hybridization with a rat FAH cDNA probe. A 1,477-bp cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for FAH by an in vitro transcription-translation assay and sequence homology with tryptic fragments of purified FAH. Transient expression of this FAH cDNA in transfected CV-1 mammalian cells resulted in the synthesis of an immunoreactive protein comigrating with purified human liver FAH on SDS-PAGE and having enzymatic activity as shown by the hydrolysis of the natural substrate fumarylacetoacetate. This indicates that the single polypeptide chain encoded by the FAH gene contains all the genetic information required for functional activity, suggesting that the dimer found in vivo is a homodimer. The human FAH cDNA was used as a probe to determine the gene's chromosomal localization using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The human FAH gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 15 in the region q23-q25. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:1998338

  1. Development of in silico models for human liver microsomal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pil H.; Cucurull-Sanchez, Lourdes; Lu, Jing; Du, Yuhua J.

    2007-12-01

    We developed highly predictive classification models for human liver microsomal (HLM) stability using the apparent intrinsic clearance (CLint, app) as the end point. HLM stability has been shown to be an important factor related to the metabolic clearance of a compound. Robust in silico models that predict metabolic clearance are very useful in early drug discovery stages to optimize the compound structure and to select promising leads to avoid costly drug development failures in later stages. Using Random Forest and Bayesian classification methods with MOE, E-state descriptors, ADME Keys, and ECFP_6 fingerprints, various highly predictive models were developed. The best performance of the models shows 80 and 75% prediction accuracy for the test and validation sets, respectively. A detailed analysis of results will be shown, including an assessment of the prediction confidence, the significant descriptors, and the application of these models to drug discovery projects.

  2. Chromosome Studies of Virus-infected Semi-continuous Human Embryonic Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, A. J.; Taylor, P. E.; Jacobs, J. P.; Jones, C. A.

    1970-01-01

    Semi-continuous human embryonic liver cells infected with San Carlos virus 3 exhibited an increased frequency of chromosomal breaks and other chromosomal abnormalities when compared with uninoculated control cultures. The chromosomes of cells inoculated with AR-17 virus retained their normal structure. The strain of liver cells used in this study is essentially diploid. It represents the first strain of diploid cells so far described from human liver. ImagesFigs. 2-3Fig. 1 PMID:4985032

  3. Differential processing of colony-stimulating factor 1 precursors encoded by two human cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rettenmier, C W; Roussel, M F

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthesis of macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) was examined in mouse NIH-3T3 fibroblasts transfected with a retroviral vector expressing the 554-amino-acid product of a human 4-kilobase (kb) CSF-1 cDNA. Similar to results previously obtained with a 1.6-kb human cDNA that codes for a 256-amino-acid CSF-1 precursor, the results of the present study showed that NIH-3T3 cells expressing the product of the 4-kb clone produced biologically active human CSF-1 and were transformed by an autocrine mechanism when cotransfected with a vector containing a human c-fms (CSF-1 receptor) cDNA. The 4-kb CSF-1 cDNA product was synthesized as an integral transmembrane glycoprotein that was assembled into disulfide-linked dimers and rapidly underwent proteolytic cleavage to generate a soluble growth factor. Although the smaller CSF-1 precursor specified by the 1.6-kb human cDNA was stably expressed as a membrane-bound glycoprotein at the cell surface and was slowly cleaved to release the extracellular growth factor, the cell-associated product of the 4-kb clone was efficiently processed to the secreted form and was not detected on the plasma membrane. Digestion with glycosidic enzymes indicated that soluble CSF-1 encoded by the 4-kb cDNA contained both asparagine(N)-linked and O-linked carbohydrate chains, whereas the product of the 1.6-kb clone had only N-linked oligosaccharides. Removal of the carbohydrate indicated that the polypeptide chain of the secreted 4-kb cDNA product was longer than that of the corresponding form encoded by the smaller clone. These differences in posttranslational processing may reflect diverse physiological roles for the products of the two CSF-1 precursors in vivo. Images PMID:3264877

  4. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  5. Extensive double humanization of both liver and hematopoiesis in FRGN mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Elizabeth M; Bial, J; Tarlow, Branden; Bial, G; Jensen, B; Greiner, D L; Brehm, M A; Grompe, M

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical research in animals often fails to adequately predict the outcomes observed in human patients. Chimeric animals bearing individual human tissues have been developed to provide improved models of human-specific cellular processes. Mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells can be used to study human immune responses, infections of blood cells and processes of hematopoiesis. Animals with humanized livers are useful for modeling hepatotropic infections as well as drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, many pathophysiologic processes involve both the liver and the hematolymphoid system. Examples include hepatitis C/HIV co-infection, immune mediated liver diseases, liver injuries with inflammation such as steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. We developed a robust protocol enabling the concurrent double-humanization of mice with mature hepatocytes and human blood. Immune-deficient, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah(-/-)), Rag2(-/-) and Il2rg(-/-) deficient animals on the NOD-strain background (FRGN) were simultaneously co-transplanted with adult human hepatocytes and hematopoietic stem cells after busulfan and Ad:uPA pre-conditioning. Four months after transplantation the average human liver repopulation exceeded 80% and hematopoietic chimerism also was high (40-80% in bone marrow). Importantly, human macrophages (Kupffer cells) were present in the chimeric livers. Double-chimeric FRGN mice will serve as a new model for disease processes that involve interactions between hepatocytes and hematolymphoid cells.

  6. The impact of PPARα activation on whole genome gene expression in human precision cut liver slices.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Aafke W F; Betzel, Bark; Stoopen, Geert; Berends, Frits J; Janssen, Ignace M; Peijnenburg, Ad A; Kersten, Sander

    2015-10-08

    Studies in mice have shown that PPARα is an important regulator of lipid metabolism in liver and key transcription factor involved in the adaptive response to fasting. However, much less is known about the role of PPARα in human liver. Here we set out to study the function of PPARα in human liver via analysis of whole genome gene regulation in human liver slices treated with the PPARα agonist Wy14643. Quantitative PCR indicated that PPARα is well expressed in human liver and human liver slices and that the classical PPARα targets PLIN2, VLDLR, ANGPTL4, CPT1A and PDK4 are robustly induced by PPARα activation. Transcriptomics analysis indicated that 617 genes were upregulated and 665 genes were downregulated by PPARα activation (q value < 0.05). Many genes induced by PPARα activation were involved in lipid metabolism (ACSL5, AGPAT9, FADS1, SLC27A4), xenobiotic metabolism (POR, ABCC2, CYP3A5) or the unfolded protein response, whereas most of the downregulated genes were involved in immune-related pathways. Among the most highly repressed genes upon PPARα activation were several chemokines (e.g. CXCL9-11, CCL8, CX3CL1, CXCL6), interferon γ-induced genes (e.g. IFITM1, IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3) and numerous other immune-related genes (e.g. TLR3, NOS2, and LCN2). Comparative analysis of gene regulation by Wy14643 between human liver slices and primary human hepatocytes showed that down-regulation of gene expression by PPARα is much better captured by liver slices as compared to primary hepatocytes. In particular, PPARα activation markedly suppressed immunity/inflammation-related genes in human liver slices but not in primary hepatocytes. Finally, several putative new target genes of PPARα were identified that were commonly induced by PPARα activation in the two human liver model systems, including TSKU, RHOF, CA12 and VSIG10L. Our paper demonstrates the suitability and superiority of human liver slices over primary hepatocytes for studying the functional

  7. Steroid metabolism in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Lootens, Leen; Van Eenoo, Peter; Meuleman, Philip; Pozo, Oscar J; Van Renterghem, Pieter; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Delbeke, Frans T

    2009-11-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are considered to be doping agents and are prohibited in sports. Their metabolism needs to be elucidated to allow for urinary detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Steroid metabolism was assessed using uPA(+/+) SCID mice with humanized livers (chimeric mice). This study presents the results of 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (19-norAD) administration to these in vivo mice. As in humans, 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone are the major detectable metabolites of 19-norAD in the urine of chimeric mice.A summary is given of the metabolic pathways found in chimeric mice after administration of three model steroid compounds (methandienone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione). From these studies we can conclude that all major metabolic pathways for anabolic steroids in humans are present in the chimeric mouse. It is hoped that, in future, this promising chimeric mouse model might assist the discovery of new and possible longer detectable metabolites of (designer) steroids.

  8. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Şahin, Sevinç; Arslan, Ergin; Börekci, Hasan; Metin, Bayram; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations. PMID:26457000

  9. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding.

    PubMed

    van Stegeren, Anda H; Roozendaal, Benno; Kindt, Merel; Wolf, Oliver T; Joëls, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions involving the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we test whether interactions between these two stress hormone systems also affect human memory formation as well as the associated pattern of brain activation. To this end, forty-eight male human subjects received hydrocortisone, yohimbine or both before presentation of emotional and neutral pictures. Activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and PFC was monitored with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during encoding of these stimuli, when hormonal levels were elevated. Memory performance was tested 1 week later. We investigated whether an increased level of one of the two hormone systems would lead to differential effects compared to the combined application of the drugs on brain activation and memory performance. We report that the application of cortisol led to an overall enhancing effect on recognition memory, with no significant additional effect of yohimbine. However, during encoding the brain switched from amygdala/hippocampus activation with either hormone alone, to a strong deactivation of prefrontal areas under the influence of the combination of both exogenous hormones. Although we did not find evidence that exogenous stimulation of the noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems led to significant interaction effects on memory performance in this experiment, we conclude that stress hormone levels during encoding did differentially determine the activation pattern of the brain circuits here involved.

  10. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  11. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  12. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  13. Chimeric TK-NOG Mice: A Predictive Model for Cholestatic Human Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan; Wu, Manhong; Nishimura, Sachiko; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Michie, Sara A.; Zheng, Ming; Yang, Zicheng; Yates, Alexander John; Day, Jeffrey S.; Hillgren, Kathleen M.; Takeda, Saori Takedai; Guan, Yuan; Guo, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    Due to the substantial interspecies differences in drug metabolism and disposition, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is often not predicted by studies performed in animal species. For example, a drug (bosentan) used to treat pulmonary artery hypertension caused unexpected cholestatic liver toxicity in humans, which was not predicted by preclinical toxicology studies in multiple animal species. In this study, we demonstrate that NOG mice expressing a thymidine kinase transgene (TK-NOG) with humanized livers have a humanized profile of biliary excretion of a test (cefmetazole) drug, which was shown by an in situ perfusion study to result from interspecies differences in the rate of biliary transport and in liver retention of this drug. We also found that readily detectable cholestatic liver injury develops in TK-NOG mice with humanized livers after 1 week of treatment with bosentan (160, 32, or 6 mg/kg per day by mouth), whereas liver toxicity did not develop in control mice after 1 month of treatment. The laboratory and histologic features of bosentan-induced liver toxicity in humanized mice mirrored that of human subjects. Because DILI has become a significant public health problem, drug safety could be improved if preclinical toxicology studies were performed using humanized TK-NOG. PMID:25424997

  14. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of a human cDNA and gene encoding a novel acid ceramidase-like protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, S B; Li, C M; Rhee, H J; Park, J H; He, X; Levy, B; Yoo, O J; Schuchman, E H

    1999-12-01

    Computer-assisted database analysis of sequences homologous to human acid ceramidase (ASAH) revealed a 1233-bp cDNA (previously designated cPj-LTR) whose 266-amino-acid open reading frame had approximately 36% identity with the ASAH polypeptide. Based on this high degree of homology, we undertook further molecular characterization of cPj-LTR and now report the full-length cDNA sequence, complete gene structure (renamed human ASAHL since it is a human acid ceramidase-like sequence), chromosomal location, primer extension and promoter analysis, and transient expression results. The full-length human ASAHL cDNA was 1825 bp and contained an open-reading frame encoding a 359-amino-acid polypeptide that was 33% identical and 69% similar to the ASAH polypeptide over its entire length. Numerous short regions of complete identity were observed between these two sequences and two sequences obtained from the Caenorhabditis elegans genome database. The 30-kb human ASAHL genomic sequence contained 11 exons, which ranged in size from 26 to 671 bp, and 10 introns, which ranged from 150 bp to 6.4 kb. The gene was localized to the chromosomal region 4q21.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Northern blotting experiments revealed a major 2.0-kb ASAHL transcript that was expressed at high levels in the liver and kidney, but at relatively low levels in other tissues such as the lung, heart, and brain. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the human ASAHL gene revealed a putative promoter region that lacked a TATA box and was GC rich, typical features of a housekeeping gene promoter, as well as several tissue-specific and/or hormone-induced transcription regulatory sites. 5'-Deletion analysis localized the promoter activity to a 1. 1-kb fragment within this region. A major transcription start site also was located 72 bp upstream from the ATG translation initiation site by primer extension analysis. Expression analysis of a green fluorescence protein/ASAHL fusion

  16. Pupillometry as a glimpse into the neurochemical basis of human memory encoding

    PubMed Central

    Hoffing, Russell Cohen; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical systems are well studied in animal learning, however ethical issues limit methodologies to explore these systems in humans. Pupillometry provides a glimpse into the brain’s neurochemical systems, where pupil dynamics in monkeys have been linked with locus coeruleus activity, which releases norepinephrine (NE) throughout the brain. Here, we use pupil dynamics as a surrogate measure of neurochemical activity to explore the hypothesis that NE is involved in modulating memory encoding. We examine this using a task irrelevant learning paradigm in which learning is boosted for stimuli temporally paired with task-targets. We show that participants better recognize images that are paired with task-targets than distractors, and in correspondence that pupil-size changes more for target-paired than distractor-paired images. To further investigate the hypothesis that NE non-specifically guides learning for stimuli that are present with its release, a second procedure was used that employed an unexpected sound to activate the LC-NE system and induce pupil-size changes; results indicated a corresponding increase in memorization of images paired with the unexpected sounds. Together, these results suggest a relationship between the LC-NE system, pupil-size changes and human memory encoding. PMID:25390194

  17. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  18. Encoding of Rules by Neurons in the Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Matthew K.; Sheth, Sameer A.; Patel, Shaun R.; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos; Eskandar, Emad N.; Williams, Ziv M.

    2014-01-01

    We use rules to extend learned behavior beyond specific instances to general scenarios. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to play an important role in representing rules, as evidenced by subjects who have difficulty in following rules after PFC damage and by animal studies demonstrating rule sensitivity of individual PFC neurons. How rules are instantiated at the single-neuronal level in the human brain, however, remains unclear. Here, we recorded from individual neurons in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as subjects performed a task in which they evaluated pairs of images using either of 2 abstract rules. We find that DLPFC neurons selectively encoded these rules while carrying little information about the subjects' responses or the sensory cues used to guide their decisions. PMID:23172774

  19. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Rebecca P.; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J.; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans. PMID:25071182

  20. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  1. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; García Pérez, José Luis; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-08-05

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells.

  2. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-04-11

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined.

  3. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined. Images PMID:2027750

  4. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans.

  5. Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Maria Paulina; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-01

    A crucial problem in liver disease biology and a major obstacle to the development of new therapies is the inability to conduct mechanistic studies of live human hepatocytes. Liver tissue from patients is difficult to obtain and only reveals the disease aftermath, while animal models lack the significant genetic diversity of humans. Monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver are an ideal platform to explore the complex gene-environment interactions and the role of genetic variation in the onset and progression of liver disease. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC) technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to generate live cellular models of disease for therapeutic candidate discovery and cell replacement therapy. In this review, we discuss the potential of hIPSC to increase our understanding of human disease with a focus on the current efforts to model metabolic diseases of the liver and to generate suitable populations of human hepatocytes for cell transplantation.

  6. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kimura, Kiminori; Chiyo, Tomoko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Tobita, Yoshimi; Tokunaga, Yuko; Yasui, Fumihiko; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Wakita, Takaji; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Mizuno, Kyosuke; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Matsushima, Kouji; Kohara, Michinori

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis), liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25), which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-))/MxCre((+/-)) mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor) TNF-α and (interleukin) IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  7. Variant Exported Blood-Stage Proteins Encoded by Plasmodium Multigene Families Are Expressed in Liver Stages Where They Are Exported into the Parasitophorous Vacuole.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Aurélie; Jackson, Andrew P; Bechtsi, Dafni Paraskevi; Braks, Joanna A M; Annoura, Takeshi; Fonager, Jannik; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Klop, Onny; van der Laan, Annelies M A; Tanke, Hans J; Kocken, Clemens H M; Pasini, Erica M; Khan, Shahid M; Böhme, Ulrike; van Ooij, Christiaan; Otto, Thomas D; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine

    2016-11-01

    Many variant proteins encoded by Plasmodium-specific multigene families are exported into red blood cells (RBC). P. falciparum-specific variant proteins encoded by the var, stevor and rifin multigene families are exported onto the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBC) and mediate interactions between iRBC and host cells resulting in tissue sequestration and rosetting. However, the precise function of most other Plasmodium multigene families encoding exported proteins is unknown. To understand the role of RBC-exported proteins of rodent malaria parasites (RMP) we analysed the expression and cellular location by fluorescent-tagging of members of the pir, fam-a and fam-b multigene families. Furthermore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of the fam-a and fam-b multigene families, which indicate that both families have a history of functional differentiation unique to RMP. We demonstrate for all three families that expression of family members in iRBC is not mutually exclusive. Most tagged proteins were transported into the iRBC cytoplasm but not onto the iRBC plasma membrane, indicating that they are unlikely to play a direct role in iRBC-host cell interactions. Unexpectedly, most family members are also expressed during the liver stage, where they are transported into the parasitophorous vacuole. This suggests that these protein families promote parasite development in both the liver and blood, either by supporting parasite development within hepatocytes and erythrocytes and/or by manipulating the host immune response. Indeed, in the case of Fam-A, which have a steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain, we found that several family members can transfer phosphatidylcholine in vitro. These observations indicate that these proteins may transport (host) phosphatidylcholine for membrane synthesis. This is the first demonstration of a biological function of any exported variant protein family of rodent malaria parasites.

  8. Variant Exported Blood-Stage Proteins Encoded by Plasmodium Multigene Families Are Expressed in Liver Stages Where They Are Exported into the Parasitophorous Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevi Bechtsi, Dafni; Braks, Joanna A. M.; Annoura, Takeshi; Fonager, Jannik; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Klop, Onny; Tanke, Hans J.; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; Pasini, Erica M.; Khan, Shahid M.; Böhme, Ulrike; van Ooij, Christiaan; Otto, Thomas D.; Janse, Chris J.; Franke-Fayard, Blandine

    2016-01-01

    Many variant proteins encoded by Plasmodium-specific multigene families are exported into red blood cells (RBC). P. falciparum-specific variant proteins encoded by the var, stevor and rifin multigene families are exported onto the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBC) and mediate interactions between iRBC and host cells resulting in tissue sequestration and rosetting. However, the precise function of most other Plasmodium multigene families encoding exported proteins is unknown. To understand the role of RBC-exported proteins of rodent malaria parasites (RMP) we analysed the expression and cellular location by fluorescent-tagging of members of the pir, fam-a and fam-b multigene families. Furthermore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of the fam-a and fam-b multigene families, which indicate that both families have a history of functional differentiation unique to RMP. We demonstrate for all three families that expression of family members in iRBC is not mutually exclusive. Most tagged proteins were transported into the iRBC cytoplasm but not onto the iRBC plasma membrane, indicating that they are unlikely to play a direct role in iRBC-host cell interactions. Unexpectedly, most family members are also expressed during the liver stage, where they are transported into the parasitophorous vacuole. This suggests that these protein families promote parasite development in both the liver and blood, either by supporting parasite development within hepatocytes and erythrocytes and/or by manipulating the host immune response. Indeed, in the case of Fam-A, which have a steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain, we found that several family members can transfer phosphatidylcholine in vitro. These observations indicate that these proteins may transport (host) phosphatidylcholine for membrane synthesis. This is the first demonstration of a biological function of any exported variant protein family of rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27851824

  9. Molecular mechanisms deployed by virally encoded G protein-coupled receptors in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Montaner, Silvia; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transduction. Surprisingly, open reading frames for multiple GPCRs were hijacked in the process of coevolution between Herpesviridae family viruses and their human and mammalian hosts. Virally encoded GPCRs (vGPCRs) evolved as parts of viral genomes, and this evolution allowed the power of host GPCR signaling circuitries to be harnessed in order to ensure viral replicative success. Phylogenetically, vGPCRs are distantly related to human chemokine receptors, although they feature several unique characteristics. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying vGPCR-mediated viral pathogenesis. These mechanisms include constitutive activity, aberrant coupling to human G proteins and β-arrestins, binding and activation by human chemokines, and dimerization with other GPCRs expressed in infected cells. The likely structural basis for these molecular events is described for the two closest viral homologs of human GPCRs. This information may aid in the development of novel targeted therapeutic strategies against viral diseases.

  10. The role and regulation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha in human liver.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Sander; Stienstra, Rinke

    2017-05-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is abundantly expressed in liver. PPARα is activated by fatty acids and various other lipid species, as well as by a class of chemicals referred to as peroxisome proliferators. Studies in mice have shown that PPARα serves as the master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism during fasting. In addition, PPARα suppresses inflammation and the acute phase response. Comparatively little is known about PPARα in human liver. Here, an overview is provided of the role and regulation of PPARα in human liver. The main outcomes are: 1) the level of PPARA mRNA expression in human and mouse liver is similar. 2) Expression of PPARA in human liver is reduced in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or infected with the hepatitis C virus. 3) PPARα in human liver is able to effectively induce the expression of numerous genes involved in numerous lipid metabolic pathways, including microsomal, peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid binding and activation, fatty acid elongation and desaturation, synthesis and breakdown of triglycerides and lipid droplets, lipoprotein metabolism, gluconeogenesis, bile acid metabolism, and various other metabolic pathways and genes. 4) PPARα activation in human liver causes the down-regulation of a large number of genes involved in various immunity-related pathways. 5) Peroxisome proliferators do not promote tumour formation in human liver as opposed to mouse liver because of structural and functional differences between human and mouse PPARα. 6) In addition to helping to correct dyslipidemia, PPARα agonists may hold promise as a therapy for patients with cholestatic liver diseases, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and/or type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Photoacoustic physio-chemical analysis of liver conditions in animal and human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan; Tian, Chao; Wan, Shanshan; Welling, Theodore H.; Lok, Anna S. F.; Rubin, Jonathan M.

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease affecting 30% of the population in the United States. Biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD. Liver histology assesses the amount of fat, and determines type and extent of cell injury, inflammation and fibrosis. However, liver biopsy is invasive and is limited by sampling error. Current radiological diagnostic modalities can evaluate the 'physical' morphology in liver by quantifying the backscattered US signals, but cannot interrogate the 'histochemical' components forming these backscatterers. For example, ultrasound (US) imaging can detect the presence of fat but cannot differentiate steatosis alone from steatohepatitis. Our previous study of photoacoustic physiochemical analysis (PAPCA) has demonstrated that this method can characterize the histological changes in livers during the progression of NAFLD in animal models. In this study, we will further validate PAPCA with human livers. Ex vivo human liver samples with steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis will be scanned using optical illumination at wavelengths of 680-1700 nm and compared to histology results. In vivo study on human subjects with confirmed steatosis is planned using our PA-ultrasound (US) parallel imaging system based on Verasonic US imaging flatform with an L7-4 probe. 10 mJ/cm2 per pulse optical energy at 755 nm will be delivered to the skin surface, which is under the safety limit of American National Standard Institute. Preliminary study with ex vivo human tissue has demonstrated the potential of the proposed approach in differentiating human liver conditions.

  12. Cellular targets of the oncoproteins encoded by the cancer associated human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Howley, P M; Münger, K; Romanczuk, H; Scheffner, M; Huibregtse, J M

    1991-01-01

    Insight into the mechanisms by which DNA tumor viruses transform cells has come from the recognition that the virus-encoded oncoproteins interact specifically with important cell regulatory proteins. The "high risk" human papillomaviruses such as HPV-16 and HPV-18 which are associated with human anogenital carcinomas encode two transforming genes (E6 and E7) which are expressed in HPV positive cancers and derived cell lines. E7 shares functional and structural features with the adenovirus E1A proteins. Like Ad E1A and the large T proteins of the polyomaviruses, E7 can complex pRB. The E7 proteins of the "high risk" HPVs associate with pRB with approximately a 10-fold higher affinity than do the E7 proteins of the "low risk" HPVs, and important biological differences between the E7 proteins of these two groups of HPVs are determined by amino-terminal sequences which include the pRB binding domain. Like SV40 large T and Ad 5 E1B, the E6 oncoprotein encoded by the "high risk" HPVs can form a complex with p53. In vitro, E6 promotes the degradation of p53 and this degradation involves the ubiquitin-dependent protease system. The selective degradation of cellular proteins such as p53 with negative regulatory functions provides a novel mechanism of action for dominant acting oncoproteins. The relevance of the inactivation of the normal functions of pRB and p53 in human cervical carcinogenesis has recently been demonstrated by the analysis of these two genes and their products in a series of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cell lines. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with the HPV oncoproteins. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the HPV-negative cervical carcinoma cell lines, C33-A and HT-3. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of

  13. Hepatic glucokinase expression is associated with lipogenesis and fatty liver in humans.

    PubMed

    Peter, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Cegan, Alexander; Walenta, Mareike; Wagner, Silvia; Königsrainer, Alfred; Königsrainer, Ingmar; Machicao, Fausto; Schick, Fritz; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin

    2011-07-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) phosphorylates glucose to form glucose 6-phosphate and thereby regulates hepatic glucose disposal and activates hepatic lipogenesis. Hepatic GCK activity is regulated on the level of GCK mRNA expression and by the inhibitory glucokinase regulatory protein. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relation between GCK mRNA expression and markers of lipogenesis as well as liver fat content in human liver biopsies. Additionally, we investigated whether genetic variation in the liver specific GCK promoter determines liver fat content in humans. Hepatic mRNA expression and liver triglyceride content was analyzed in 50 human liver biopsies. In a second cohort of 330 individuals, liver fat was precisely measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Hepatic GCK mRNA expression is associated with triglyceride content in human liver biopsies (r = 0.50, P = 0.0002). Furthermore, hepatic GCK mRNA expression is associated with lipogenic gene expression (fatty acid synthase, r = 0.49, P = 0.0003; acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-α, r = 0.44, P = 0.0015, and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-β, r = 0.48, P = 0.0004) and the de novo lipogenesis index (r = 0.36, P = 0.01). In support of these findings, the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2041547 in the liver-specific GCK promoter is associated with liver fat content in prediabetic individuals (P = 0.047). In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that GCK mRNA expression is associated with markers of de novo lipogenesis and liver triglyceride content in humans. This suggests that increased GCK activity may induce fatty liver and its metabolic and hepatic consequences in humans. Thus, the widely used approach to nonspecifically activate β-cell and hepatic GCK to treat diabetes mellitus is therefore questionable and may cause serious side effects.

  14. Differential expression and function of alternative splicing variants of human liver X receptor α.

    PubMed

    Endo-Umeda, Kaori; Uno, Shigeyuki; Fujimori, Ko; Naito, Yoshikazu; Saito, Koichi; Yamagishi, Kenji; Jeong, Yangsik; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Yamada, Sachiko; Makishima, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    The liver X receptor α (LXRα) is a nuclear receptor that is involved in regulation of lipid metabolism, cellular proliferation and apoptosis, and immunity. In this report, we characterize three human LXRα isoforms with variation in the ligand-binding domain (LBD). While examining the expression of LXRα3, which lacks 60 amino acids within the LBD, we identified two novel transcripts that encode LXRα-LBD variants (LXRα4 and LXRα5). LXRα4 has an insertion of 64 amino acids in helix 4/5, and LXRα5 lacks the C-terminal helices 7 to 12 due to a termination codon in an additional exon that encodes an intron in the LXRα1 mRNA. LXRα3, LXRα4, and LXRα5 were expressed at lower levels compared with LXRα1 in many human tissues and cell lines. We also observed weak expression of LXRα3 and LXRα4 in several tissues of mice. LXR ligand treatment induced differential regulation of LXRα isoform mRNA expression in a cell type-dependent manner. Whereas LXRα3 had no effect, LXRα4 has weak transactivation, retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimerization, and coactivator recruitment activities. LXRα5 interacted with a corepressor in a ligand-independent manner and inhibited LXRα1 transactivation and target gene expression when overexpressed. Combination of LXRα5 cotransfection and LXRα antagonist treatment produced additive effects on the inhibition of ligand-dependent LXRα1 activation. We constructed structural models of the LXRα4-LBD and its complexes with ligand, RXR-LBD, and coactivator peptide. The models showed that the insertion in the LBD can be predicted to disrupt RXR heterodimerization. Regulation of LXRα pre-mRNA splicing may be involved in the pathogenesis of LXRα-related diseases.

  15. Comparison of liver progenitor cells in human atypical ductular reactions with those seen in experimental models of liver injury.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    1998-02-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of liver progenitor cell types of human atypical ductular reactions seen in chronic cholestasis, in regenerating human liver after submassive necrosis, in alcoholic liver disease, and in focal nodular hyperplasia are compared with liver progenitor cell types seen during experimental cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters; during hepatocarcinogenesis in rats; and in response to periportal liver injury induced by allyl alcohol in rats. Three types of progenitor cells have been identified in human atypical ductular reactions: type I: primitive, has an oval shape, marginal chromatin, few cellular organelles, rare tonofilaments, and forms desmosomal junctions with adjacent liver cells; type II: bile duct-like, is located within ducts, has few organelles, and forms lateral membrane interdigitations with other duct-like cells; and type III: hepatocyte-like, is located in hepatic cords, forms a bile canaliculus, has tight junctions with other hepatocyte-like cells, prominent mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, and some have lysosomes and a poorly developed Golgi apparatus. Each type is seen during cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters, but the most prominent cell type is type II, duct-like. A more primitive cell type ("type 0 cell"), as well as type I cells, are seen in the intraportal zone of the liver within 1 to 2 days after carcinogen exposure or periportal injury in the rat, but both type II and type III are seen later as the progenitor cells expand into the liver lobule. After allyl alcohol injury, type 0 cells precede the appearance of type I and type III cells, but most of the cells that span the periportal necrotic zone are type III hepatocyte-like cells showing different degrees of hepatocytic differentiation. Some type II cells are also seen, but these are essentially limited to ducts. It is concluded that there is a primitive stem cell type in the liver (type 0) that may differentiate directly into type I and then into

  16. Current status of prediction of drug disposition and toxicity in humans using chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    1. Human-chimeric mice with humanized liver have been constructed by transplantation of human hepatocytes into several types of mice having genetic modifications that injure endogenous liver cells. Here, we focus on liver urokinase-type plasminogen activator-transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice, which are the most widely used human-chimeric mice. Studies so far indicate that drug metabolism, drug transport, pharmacological effects and toxicological action in these mice are broadly similar to those in humans. 2. Expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes is known to be different between humans and rodents. However, the expression pattern of cytochrome P450, aldehyde oxidase and phase II enzymes in the liver of human-chimeric mice resembles that in humans, not that in the host mice. 3. Metabolism of various drugs, including S-warfarin, zaleplon, ibuprofen, naproxen, coumarin, troglitazone and midazolam, in human-chimeric mice is mediated by human drug-metabolizing enzymes, not by host mouse enzymes, and thus resembles that in humans. 4. Pharmacological and toxicological effects of various drugs in human-chimeric mice are also similar to those in humans. 5. The current consensus is that chimeric mice with humanized liver are useful to predict drug metabolism catalyzed by cytochrome P450, aldehyde oxidase and phase II enzymes in humans in vivo and in vitro. Some remaining issues are discussed in this review.

  17. Development of multiple activities of UDP-glucuronyltransferase in human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Leakey, J E; Hume, R; Burchell, B

    1987-01-01

    UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities towards eight substrates were assayed in samples of foetal, term and adult human liver. Activities towards bilirubin, androsterone, testosterone, 1-naphthol, 4-nitrophenol and 2-aminophenol were present in foetal and term liver samples at less than 14% of adult values, whereas activity towards 5-hydroxytryptamine was present in foetal and term liver at 109 and 121% of adult values respectively. Thus a 'foetal' form of UDP-glucuronyltransferase may exist in human liver that is more restricted in substrate specificity than are those of the rat or rhesus monkey. PMID:3117034

  18. Discoidin domain receptor 1: isoform expression and potential functions in cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A; Wang, Xin M; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2011-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell-collagen interactions in chronic liver injury.

  19. Detection of regulatory SNPs in human genome using ChIP-seq ENCODE data.

    PubMed

    Bryzgalov, Leonid O; Antontseva, Elena V; Matveeva, Marina Yu; Shilov, Alexander G; Kashina, Elena V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Merkulova, Tatyana I

    2013-01-01

    A vast amount of SNPs derived from genome-wide association studies are represented by non-coding ones, therefore exacerbating the need for effective identification of regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) among them. However, this task remains challenging since the regulatory part of the human genome is annotated much poorly as opposed to coding regions. Here we describe an approach aggregating the whole set of ENCODE ChIP-seq data in order to search for rSNPs, and provide the experimental evidence of its efficiency. Its algorithm is based on the assumption that the enrichment of a genomic region with transcription factor binding loci (ChIP-seq peaks) indicates its regulatory function, and thereby SNPs located in this region are more likely to influence transcription regulation. To ensure that the approach preferably selects functionally meaningful SNPs, we performed enrichment analysis of several human SNP datasets associated with phenotypic manifestations. It was shown that all samples are significantly enriched with SNPs falling into the regions of multiple ChIP-seq peaks as compared with the randomly selected SNPs. For experimental verification, 40 SNPs falling into overlapping regions of at least 7 TF binding loci were selected from OMIM. The effect of SNPs on the binding of the DNA fragments containing them to the nuclear proteins from four human cell lines (HepG2, HeLaS3, HCT-116, and K562) has been tested by EMSA. A radical change in the binding pattern has been observed for 29 SNPs, besides, 6 more SNPs also demonstrated less pronounced changes. Taken together, the results demonstrate the effective way to search for potential rSNPs with the aid of ChIP-seq data provided by ENCODE project.

  20. Detection of Regulatory SNPs in Human Genome Using ChIP-seq ENCODE Data

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Marina Yu.; Shilov, Alexander G.; Kashina, Elena V.; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2013-01-01

    A vast amount of SNPs derived from genome-wide association studies are represented by non-coding ones, therefore exacerbating the need for effective identification of regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) among them. However, this task remains challenging since the regulatory part of the human genome is annotated much poorly as opposed to coding regions. Here we describe an approach aggregating the whole set of ENCODE ChIP-seq data in order to search for rSNPs, and provide the experimental evidence of its efficiency. Its algorithm is based on the assumption that the enrichment of a genomic region with transcription factor binding loci (ChIP-seq peaks) indicates its regulatory function, and thereby SNPs located in this region are more likely to influence transcription regulation. To ensure that the approach preferably selects functionally meaningful SNPs, we performed enrichment analysis of several human SNP datasets associated with phenotypic manifestations. It was shown that all samples are significantly enriched with SNPs falling into the regions of multiple ChIP-seq peaks as compared with the randomly selected SNPs. For experimental verification, 40 SNPs falling into overlapping regions of at least 7 TF binding loci were selected from OMIM. The effect of SNPs on the binding of the DNA fragments containing them to the nuclear proteins from four human cell lines (HepG2, HeLaS3, HCT-116, and K562) has been tested by EMSA. A radical change in the binding pattern has been observed for 29 SNPs, besides, 6 more SNPs also demonstrated less pronounced changes. Taken together, the results demonstrate the effective way to search for potential rSNPs with the aid of ChIP-seq data provided by ENCODE project. PMID:24205329

  1. Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Laubacher, Claire M.; Olausson, Håkan; Wang, Binquan; Spagnolo, Primavera A.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Growing interest in affective touch has identified a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, cast doubt on the separation of touch discrimination and affect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to demonstrate the representation of touch discrimination and intensity in S1, but the representation of pleasantness in the anterior cingulate cortex, not S1. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Our study contributes to growing delineation of the affective touch system, a crucial step in understanding its dysregulation in numerous clinical conditions such as autism, eating disorders, depression, and chronic pain. PMID:27225773

  2. Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Laubacher, Claire M; Olausson, Håkan; Wang, Binquan; Spagnolo, Primavera A; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2016-05-25

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Growing interest in affective touch has identified a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, cast doubt on the separation of touch discrimination and affect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to demonstrate the representation of touch discrimination and intensity in S1, but the representation of pleasantness in the anterior cingulate cortex, not S1. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Our study contributes to growing delineation of the affective touch system, a crucial step in understanding its dysregulation in numerous clinical conditions such as autism, eating disorders, depression, and chronic pain. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/365850-11$15.00/0.

  3. Encoding of nested levels of acoustic regularity in hierarchically organized areas of the human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Recasens, Marc; Grimm, Sabine; Wollbrink, Andreas; Pantev, Christo; Escera, Carles

    2014-11-01

    Our auditory system is able to encode acoustic regularity of growing levels of complexity to model and predict incoming events. Recent evidence suggests that early indices of deviance detection in the time range of the middle-latency responses (MLR) precede the mismatch negativity (MMN), a well-established error response associated with deviance detection. While studies suggest that only the MMN, but not early deviance-related MLR, underlie complex regularity levels, it is not clear whether these two mechanisms interplay during scene analysis by encoding nested levels of acoustic regularity, and whether neuronal sources underlying local and global deviations are hierarchically organized. We registered magnetoencephalographic evoked fields to rapidly presented four-tone local sequences containing a frequency change. Temporally integrated local events, in turn, defined global regularities, which were infrequently violated by a tone repetition. A global magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm) was obtained at 140-220 ms when breaking the global regularity, but no deviance-related effects were shown in early latencies. Conversely, Nbm (45-55 ms) and Pbm (60-75 ms) deflections of the MLR, and an earlier MMNm response at 120-160 ms, responded to local violations. Distinct neuronal generators in the auditory cortex underlay the processing of local and global regularity violations, suggesting that nested levels of complexity of auditory object representations are represented in separated cortical areas. Our results suggest that the different processing stages and anatomical areas involved in the encoding of auditory representations, and the subsequent detection of its violations, are hierarchically organized in the human auditory cortex.

  4. Four phosphoproteins with common amino termini are encoded by human cytomegalovirus AD169

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Staprans, S.I.; Spector, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the authors identify the proteins encoded by the 2.2-kilobase class of early transcripts arising from a region of the strain AD169 human cytomegalovirus genome (map units 0.682 to 0.713) which contains cell-related sequences. These transcripts, encoded by adjacent EcoRI fragments R and d, have a complex spliced structure with 5' and 3' coterminal ends. Antiserum directed against a synthetic 11-amino-acid peptide corresponding to the predicted amino terminus of the proteins was generated and found to immunoprecipitate four-infected-cell proteins of 84, 50, 43, and 34 kilodaltons. These proteins were phosphorylated and were associated predominantly with the nuclei of infected cells. The 43-kilodalton protein was the most abundant of the four proteins, and its level of expression remained relatively constant throughout the infection. Expression of the other proteins increased as the infection progressed. Pulse-chase analysis failed to show a precursor-product relationship between any of the proteins. A comparison of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled tryptic peptide maps of the four proteins from infected cells and an in vitro-generated polypeptide derived from the putative first exon showed that all four infected-cell proteins were of viral origin and contained a common amino-terminal region.

  5. Germline-encoded neutralization of a Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor by the human antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Yik Andy; Foletti, Davide; Deng, Xiaodi; Abdiche, Yasmina; Strop, Pavel; Glanville, Jacob; Pitts, Steven; Lindquist, Kevin; Sundar, Purnima D.; Sirota, Marina; Hasa-Moreno, Adela; Pham, Amber; Melton Witt, Jody; Ni, Irene; Pons, Jaume; Shelton, David; Rajpal, Arvind; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both an important pathogen and a human commensal. To explore this ambivalent relationship between host and microbe, we analysed the memory humoral response against IsdB, a protein involved in iron acquisition, in four healthy donors. Here we show that in all donors a heavily biased use of two immunoglobulin heavy chain germlines generated high affinity (pM) antibodies that neutralize the two IsdB NEAT domains, IGHV4-39 for NEAT1 and IGHV1-69 for NEAT2. In contrast to the typical antibody/antigen interactions, the binding is primarily driven by the germline-encoded hydrophobic CDRH-2 motifs of IGHV1-69 and IGHV4-39, with a binding mechanism nearly identical for each antibody derived from different donors. Our results suggest that IGHV1-69 and IGHV4-39, while part of the adaptive immune system, may have evolved under selection pressure to encode a binding motif innately capable of recognizing and neutralizing a structurally conserved protein domain involved in pathogen iron acquisition. PMID:27857134

  6. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13420.001 PMID:26880543

  7. Human anterior prefrontal cortex encodes the 'what' and 'when' of future intentions.

    PubMed

    Momennejad, Ida; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-05-15

    On a daily basis we form numerous intentions to perform specific actions. However, we often have to delay the execution of intended actions while engaging in other demanding activities. Previous research has shown that patterns of activity in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) can reveal our current intentions. However, two fundamental questions have remained unresolved: (a) how does the PFC encode information about future tasks while we are busy engaging in other activities, and (b) how does the PFC enable us to commence a stored task at the intended time? Here we investigate how the brain stores and retrieves future intentions during occupied delays, i.e. while a person is busy performing a different task. For this purpose, we conducted a neuroimaging study with a time-based prospective memory paradigm. Using multivariate pattern classification and fMRI we show that during an occupied delay, activity patterns in the anterior PFC encode the content of 'what' subjects intend to do next, and 'when' they intend to do it. Importantly, distinct anterior PFC regions store the 'what' and 'when' components of future intentions during occupied maintenance and self-initiated retrieval. These results show a role for anterior PFC activity patterns in storing future action plans and ensuring their timely retrieval.

  8. The human GNAS1 gene is imprinted and encodes distinct paternally and biallelically expressed G proteins.

    PubMed

    Hayward, B E; Kamiya, M; Strain, L; Moran, V; Campbell, R; Hayashizaki, Y; Bonthron, D T

    1998-08-18

    The GNAS1 gene encodes the alpha subunit of the G protein Gs, which couples receptor binding by several hormones to activation of adenylate cyclase. Null mutations of GNAS1 cause pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia, in which hormone resistance occurs in association with a characteristic osteodystrophy. The observation that PHP Ia almost always is inherited maternally has led to the suggestion that GNAS1 may be an imprinted gene. Here, we show that, although Gsalpha expression (directed by the promoter upstream of exon 1) is biallelic, GNAS1 is indeed imprinted in a promoter-specific fashion. We used parthenogenetic lymphocyte DNA to screen by restriction landmark genomic scanning for loci showing differential methylation between paternal and maternal alleles. This screen identified a region that was found to be methylated exclusively on a maternal allele and was located approximately 35 kb upstream of GNAS1 exon 1. This region contains three novel exons that are spliced into alternative GNAS1 mRNA species, including one exon that encodes the human homologue of the large G protein XLalphas. Transcription of these novel mRNAs is exclusively from the paternal allele in all tissues examined. The differential imprinting of separate protein products of GNAS1 therefore may contribute to the anomalous inheritance of PHP Ia.

  9. The human GNAS1 gene is imprinted and encodes distinct paternally and biallelically expressed G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Bruce E.; Kamiya, Mamoru; Strain, Lisa; Moran, Veronica; Campbell, Roderick; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bonthron, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The GNAS1 gene encodes the α subunit of the G protein Gs, which couples receptor binding by several hormones to activation of adenylate cyclase. Null mutations of GNAS1 cause pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia, in which hormone resistance occurs in association with a characteristic osteodystrophy. The observation that PHP Ia almost always is inherited maternally has led to the suggestion that GNAS1 may be an imprinted gene. Here, we show that, although Gsα expression (directed by the promoter upstream of exon 1) is biallelic, GNAS1 is indeed imprinted in a promoter-specific fashion. We used parthenogenetic lymphocyte DNA to screen by restriction landmark genomic scanning for loci showing differential methylation between paternal and maternal alleles. This screen identified a region that was found to be methylated exclusively on a maternal allele and was located ≈35 kb upstream of GNAS1 exon 1. This region contains three novel exons that are spliced into alternative GNAS1 mRNA species, including one exon that encodes the human homologue of the large G protein XLαs. Transcription of these novel mRNAs is exclusively from the paternal allele in all tissues examined. The differential imprinting of separate protein products of GNAS1 therefore may contribute to the anomalous inheritance of PHP Ia. PMID:9707596

  10. Functional Mechanisms Encoding Others' Direction of Gaze in the Human Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin J; Clifford, Colin W G

    2017-10-01

    The direction of others' gaze is a strong social signal to their intentions and future behavior. Pioneering electrophysiological research identified cell populations in the primate visual cortex that are tuned to specific directions of observed gaze, but the functional architecture of this system is yet to be precisely specified. Here, we develop a computational model of how others' gaze direction is flexibly encoded across sensory channels within the gaze system. We incorporate the divisive normalization of sensory responses-a computational mechanism that is thought to be widespread in sensory systems but has not been examined in the context of social vision. We demonstrate that the operation of divisive normalization in the gaze system predicts a surprising and distinctive pattern of perceptual changes after sensory adaptation to gaze stimuli and find that these predictions closely match the psychophysical effects of adaptation in human observers. We also find that opponent coding, broadband multichannel, and narrowband multichannel models of sensory coding make distinct predictions regarding the effects of adaptation in a normalization framework and find evidence in favor of broadband multichannel coding of gaze. These results reveal the functional principles that govern the neural encoding of gaze direction and support the notion that divisive normalization is a canonical feature of nervous system function. Moreover, this research provides a strong foundation for testing recent computational theories of neuropsychiatric conditions in which gaze processing is compromised, such as autism and schizophrenia.

  11. Persistent expression of human clotting factor IX from mouse liver after intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Alexander, Ian E.; Halbert, Christine L.; Russell, David W.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1997-01-01

    We previously found that gene transduction by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in cell culture can be stimulated over 100-fold by treatment of the target cells with agents that affect DNA metabolism, such as irradiation or topoisomerase inhibitors. Here we show that previous γ-irradiation increased the transduction rate in mouse liver by up to 900-fold, and the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide increased transduction by about 20-fold. Similar rates of hepatic transduction were obtained by direct injection of the liver or by systemic delivery via tail vein injection. Hepatocytes were much more efficiently transduced than other cells after systemic delivery, and up to 3% of all hepatocytes could be transduced after one vector injection. The presence of wild-type AAV, which contaminates many AAV vector preparations, was required to observe a full response to γ-irradiation. Injection of mice with AAV vectors encoding human clotting factor IX after γ-irradiation resulted in synthesis of low levels of human clotting factor IX for the 5-month period of observation. These studies show the potential of targeted gene transduction of the liver by AAV vectors for treatment of various hematological or metabolic diseases. PMID:9037069

  12. Evidence that the SRY protein is encoded by a single exon on the human Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Behlke, M.A. Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Bogan, J.S.; Beer-Romero, P.; Page, D.C. )

    1993-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the SRY gene, a 4741-bp portion of the sex-determining region of the human Y chromosome was sequenced and characterized. Two RNAs were found to hybridize to this genomic segment, one transcript deriving from SRY and the second cross-hybridizing to a pseudogene located 2.5 kb 5[prime] of the SRY open reading frame (ORF). Analysis of the SRY transcript using 3[prime] and 5[prime] rapid amplification and cloning of ends suggested that the entire SRY protein is encoded by a single exon. A 700-bp CpG island is located immediately 5[prime] of the pseudogene (and 2 kb 5[prime] of the SRY ORF). Within this CpG island lies the sequence CGCCCCCGC, a potential binding site for the EGR-1/WT1 family of transcription factors, some of which appear to function in gonadal development. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Evidence for joint encoding of motion and disparity in human visual perception.

    PubMed

    Neri, Peter; Levi, Dennis M

    2008-12-01

    Electrophysiological recordings have established that motion and disparity signals are jointly encoded by subpopulations of neurons in visual cortex. However, the question of whether these neurons play a perceptual role has proven challenging and remains open. To answer this question we combined two powerful psychophysical techniques: perceptual adaptation and reverse correlation. Our results provide a detailed picture of how visual information about motion and disparity is processed by human observers, and how this processing is modified by prolonged sensory stimulation. We were able to isolate two perceptual components: a separable component, supported by separate motion and disparity signals, and an inseparable joint component, supported by motion and disparity signals that are concurrently represented at the level of the same neural mechanism. Both components are involved in the perception of stimuli containing motion and disparity information in line with the known existence of corresponding neuronal subpopulations in visual cortex.

  14. Campylobacter spp. in New Zealand raw sheep liver and human campylobacteriosis cases.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, A J; Nicol, C; Hudson, J A

    2005-03-01

    Sheep liver samples were tested for the presence and numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli during both spring and autumn. Over the same period, isolates were obtained from human clinical cases from the same geographical area as where the food samples were purchased. A subset of the C. jejuni isolates was typed by both Penner serotyping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis using the restriction enzyme SmaI, to estimate the proportion of liver isolate types that were also isolated from human cases of campylobacteriosis. Of the 272 liver samples tested, 180 (66.2%) contained Campylobacter. Most of the positive samples contained <3 MPN/g of the organism, and only 12 (6.7%) were contaminated at a level exceeding 100 MPN/g. A total of 180 C. jejuni isolates were obtained from sheep liver and another 200 from human faeces. Of these, 212 isolates were randomly selected for typing, half from raw liver and half from human faeces. More than half (61.1%) of the 106 C. jejuni isolates from liver were of subtypes that were also isolated from human cases. While the C. jejuni present in sheep liver were mostly of subtypes also isolated from human cases, the significance of this food as a vehicle of human campylobacteriosis needs to be examined further in respect to other factors such as dose-response information, consumption data, frequency of undercooking and cross contamination.

  15. Transient delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT rapidly extends telomeres in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramunas, John; Yakubov, Eduard; Brady, Jennifer J.; Corbel, Stéphane Y.; Holbrook, Colin; Brandt, Moritz; Stein, Jonathan; Santiago, Juan G.; Cooke, John P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere extension has been proposed as a means to improve cell culture and tissue engineering and to treat disease. However, telomere extension by nonviral, nonintegrating methods remains inefficient. Here we report that delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT to human fibroblasts and myoblasts increases telomerase activity transiently (24–48 h) and rapidly extends telomeres, after which telomeres resume shortening. Three successive transfections over a 4 d period extended telomeres up to 0.9 kb in a cell type-specific manner in fibroblasts and myoblasts and conferred an additional 28 ± 1.5 and 3.4 ± 0.4 population doublings (PDs), respectively. Proliferative capacity increased in a dose-dependent manner. The second and third transfections had less effect on proliferative capacity than the first, revealing a refractory period. However, the refractory period was transient as a later fourth transfection increased fibroblast proliferative capacity by an additional 15.2 ± 1.1 PDs, similar to the first transfection. Overall, these treatments led to an increase in absolute cell number of more than 1012-fold. Notably, unlike immortalized cells, all treated cell populations eventually stopped increasing in number and expressed senescence markers to the same extent as untreated cells. This rapid method of extending telomeres and increasing cell proliferative capacity without risk of insertional mutagenesis should have broad utility in disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.—Ramunas, J., Yakubov, E., Brady, J. J., Corbel, S. Y., Holbrook, C., Brandt, M., Stein, J., Santiago, J. G., Cooke, J. P., Blau, H. M. Transient delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT rapidly extends telomeres in human cells. PMID:25614443

  16. Decoding the disease-associated proteins encoded in the human chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lien-Chin; Liu, Mei-Ying; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Choong, Wai-Kok; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Liao, Pao-Chi; Sung, Ting-Yi; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Yu, Jau-Song; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-01-04

    Chromosome 4 is the fourth largest chromosome, containing approximately 191 megabases (~6.4% of the human genome) with 757 protein-coding genes. A number of marker genes for many diseases have been found in this chromosome, including genetic diseases (e.g., hepatocellular carcinoma) and biomedical research (cardiac system, aging, metabolic disorders, immune system, cancer and stem cell) related genes (e.g., oncogenes, growth factors). As a pilot study for the chromosome 4-centric human proteome project (Chr 4-HPP), we present here a systematic analysis of the disease association, protein isoforms, coding single nucleotide polymorphisms of these 757 protein-coding genes and their experimental evidence at the protein level. We also describe how the findings from the chromosome 4 project might be used to drive the biomarker discovery and validation study in disease-oriented projects, using the examples of secretomic and membrane proteomic approaches in cancer research. By integrating with cancer cell secretomes and several other existing databases in the public domain, we identified 141 chromosome 4-encoded proteins as cancer cell-secretable/shedable proteins. Additionally, we also identified 54 chromosome 4-encoded proteins that have been classified as cancer-associated proteins with successful selected or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) assays developed. From literature annotation and topology analysis, 271 proteins were recognized as membrane proteins while 27.9% of the 757 proteins do not have any experimental evidence at the protein-level. In summary, the analysis revealed that the chromosome 4 is a rich resource for cancer-associated proteins for biomarker verification projects and for drug target discovery projects.

  17. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Explicit encoding of multimodal percepts by single neurons in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2009-08-11

    Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol's famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the "ventral pathway," via both single-cell recordings in monkeys and functional imaging in humans. Interestingly, in humans, the same "concept" of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices and visual word forms. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities.

  19. Explicit Encoding of Multimodal Percepts by Single Neurons in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Summary Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol’s famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the “ventral pathway,” via both single-cell recordings in monkeys [1, 2] and functional imaging in humans [3, 4]. Interestingly, in humans, the same “concept” of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices [5, 6] and visual word forms [7, 8]. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities. PMID:19631538

  20. Cloning of a human cDNA encoding a novel enzyme involved in the elongation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A E; Bobik, E G; Dorado, J; Kroeger, P E; Chuang, L T; Thurmond, J M; Parker-Barnes, J M; Das, T; Huang, Y S; Mukerji, P

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein ELO2p is involved in the elongation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Among several sequences with limited identity with the S. cerevisiae ELO2 gene, a consensus cDNA sequence was identified from the LifeSeq(R) database of Incyte Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Human liver cDNA was amplified by PCR using oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' and 3' ends of the putative human cDNA sequence. The resulting full-length sequence, termed HELO1, consisted of 897 bp, which encoded 299 amino acids. However, in contrast with the ELO2 gene, expression of this open reading frame in S. cerevisiae demonstrated that the encoded protein was involved in the elongation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, as determined by the conversion of gamma-linolenic acid (C(18:3, n-6)) into dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (C(20:3, n-6)), arachidonic acid (C(20:4, n-6)) into adrenic acid (C(22:4, n-6)), stearidonic acid (C(18:4, n-3)) into eicosatetraenoic acid (C(20:4, n-3)), eicosapentaenoic acid (C(20:5, n-3)) into omega3-docosapentaenoic acid (C(22:5, n-3)) and alpha-linolenic acid (C(18:3, n-3)) into omega3-eicosatrienoic acid (C(20:3, n-3)). The predicted amino acid sequence of the open reading frame had only 29% identity with the yeast ELO2 sequence, contained a single histidine-rich domain and had six transmembrane-spanning regions, as suggested by hydropathy analysis. The tissue expression profile revealed that the HELO1 gene is highly expressed in the adrenal gland and testis. Furthermore, the HELO1 gene is located on chromosome 6, best known for encoding the major histocompatibility complex, which is essential to the human immune response. PMID:10970790

  1. Characterisation of theophylline metabolism in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R A; Matthews, A P; Miners, J O; McManus, M E; Meyer, U A; Hall, P M; Birkett, D J

    1987-01-01

    1. A radiometric high performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the assay of theophylline metabolism in vitro by the microsomal fraction of human liver. 2. Formation of the three metabolites of theophylline (3-methylxanthine, 1-methylxanthine and 1,3-dimethyluric acid) were linear with protein concentrations to 4 mg ml-1 and with incubation times up to 180 min. 3. The coefficients of variation for the formation of 3-methylxanthine, 1-methylxanthine and 1,3-dimethyluric acid were 1.2%, 1% and 1.6%, respectively. 4. Theophylline is metabolised by microsomal enzymes with a requirement for NADPH. 5. The mean (n = 7) Km values for 1-demethylation, 3-demethylation and 8-hydroxylation were 545, 630 and 788 microM, respectively, and the mean Vmax values were 2.65, 2.84 and 11.23 pmol min-1 mg-1, respectively. 6. There was a high correlation between the Km and Vmax values for the two demethylation pathways suggesting that the demethylations are performed by the same enzyme. 7. Overall the in vitro studies are consistent with the in vivo results which suggest the involvement of two cytochrome P-450 isozymes in the metabolism of theophylline. PMID:3663445

  2. Role of Chymase in the Development of Liver Cirrhosis and Its Complications: Experimental and Human Data

    PubMed Central

    Sansoè, Giovanni; Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Mengozzi, Giulio; Novo, Erica; Parola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue Angiotensin II (Ang-II), produced through local non ACE-dependent pathways, stimulates liver fibrogenesis, renal vasoconstriction and sodium retention. Aim To highlight chymase-dependent pathway of Ang-II production in liver and kidney during cirrhosis development. Methods Liver histology, portal pressure, liver and kidney function, and hormonal status were investigated in rat liver cirrhosis induced through 13 weeks of CCl4, with or without chymase inhibitor SF2809E, administered between 4th and 13th CCl4 weeks; liver and kidney chymase immunolocation and Ang-II content were assessed. Chymase immunohistochemistry was also assessed in normal and cirrhotic human liver, and chymase mRNA transcripts were measured in human HepG2 cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC/MFs) in vitro. Results Rats receiving both CCl4 and SF2809E showed liver fibrotic septa focally linking portal tracts but no cirrhosis, as compared to ascitic cirrhotic rats receiving CCl4. SF2809E reduced portal pressure, plasma bilirubin, tissue content of Ang-II, plasma renin activity, norepinephrine and vasopressin, and increased glomerular filtration rate, water clearance, urinary sodium excretion. Chymase tissue content was increased and detected in α-SMA-positive liver myofibroblasts and in kidney tubular cells of cirrhotic rats. In human cirrhosis, chymase was located in hepatocytes of regenerative nodules. Human HepG2 cells and HSC/MFs responded to TGF-β1 by up-regulating chymase mRNA transcription. Conclusions Chymase, through synthesis of Ang-II and other mediators, plays a role in the derangement of liver and kidney function in chronic liver diseases. In human cirrhosis, chymase is well-represented and apt to become a future target of pharmacological treatment. PMID:27637026

  3. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-02-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambdagt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16/sup +/ natural killer cells and CD3/sup +/, CD16/sup -/ T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

  4. Treatment of surgically induced acute liver failure with transplantation of highly differentiated immortalized human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Miyazaki, M; Fukaya, K; Inoue, Y; Sakaguchi, M; Noguchi, H; Matsumura, T; Watanabe, T; Totsugawa, T; Tanaka, N; Namba, M

    2000-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source of hepatic function in bioartficial liver (BAL), but the shortage of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation limits this modality. To resolve this issue, primary human fetal hepatocytes were immortalized using simian virus 40 large T antigen. One of the immortal cell lines, OUMS-29, showed highly differentiated liver functions. Intrasplenic transplantation of OUMS-29 cells protected 90% hepatectomized rats from hyperammonemia and significantly prolonged their survival. Essentially unlimited availability of OUMS-29 cells supports their clinical use for BAL treatment.

  5. Characterization of the antioxidant enzyme, thioredoxin peroxidase, from the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Loukas, Alex; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Gaze, Soraya; Brindley, Paul J.; Sripa, Banchob

    2013-01-01

    The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, induces inflammation of the hepatobiliary system. Despite being constantly exposed to inimical oxygen radicals released from inflammatory cells, the parasite survives for many years. The mechanisms by which it avoids oxidative damage are unknown. In this study, thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), a member of the peroxiredoxin superfamily, was cloned from an O. viverrini cDNA library. O. viverrini TPx cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 212 amino acid residues, of molecular mass 23.57 kDa. The putative amino acid sequence shared 60-70% identity with TPXs from other helminths and from mammals, and phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between TPxs from O. viverrini and other trematodes. Recombinant O. viverrini TPx was expressed as soluble protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein dimerized, and its antioxidant activity was deduced by observing protection of nicking of supercoiled plasmid DNA by hydroxyl radicals. Antiserum raised against O. viverrini TPx recognized native proteins from egg, metacercaria and adult developmental stages of the liver fluke and excretory-secretory products released by adult O. viverrini. Immunolocalization studies revealed ubiquitous expression of TPx in O. viverrini organs and tissues. TPx was also detected in bile fluid and bile duct epithelial cells surrounding the flukes two weeks after infection of hamsters with O. viverrini. In addition, TPx was observed in the secondary (small) bile ducts where flukes cannot reach due to their large size. These results suggested that O. viverrini TPx plays a significant role in protecting the parasite against damage induced by reactive oxygen species from inflammation. PMID:18538872

  6. Characterization of the antioxidant enzyme, thioredoxin peroxidase, from the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Loukas, Alex; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Gaze, Soraya; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob

    2008-08-01

    The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, induces inflammation of the hepatobiliary system. Despite being constantly exposed to inimical oxygen radicals released from inflammatory cells, the parasite survives for many years. The mechanisms by which it avoids oxidative damage are unknown. In this study, thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), a member of the peroxiredoxin superfamily, was cloned from an O. viverrini cDNA library. O. viverrini TPx cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 212 amino acid residues, of molecular mass 23.57kDa. The putative amino acid sequence shared 60-70% identity with TPXs from other helminths and from mammals, and phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between TPxs from O. viverrini and other trematodes. Recombinant O. viverrini TPx was expressed as soluble protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein dimerized, and its antioxidant activity was deduced by observing protection of nicking of supercoiled plasmid DNA by hydroxyl radicals. Antiserum raised against O. viverrini TPx recognized native proteins from egg, metacercaria and adult developmental stages of the liver fluke and excretory-secretory products released by adult O. viverrini. Immunolocalization studies revealed ubiquitous expression of TPx in O. viverrini organs and tissues. TPx was also detected in bile fluid and bile duct epithelial cells surrounding the flukes 2 weeks after infection of hamsters with O. viverrini. In addition, TPx was observed in the secondary (small) bile ducts where flukes cannot reach due to their large size. These results suggested that O. viverrini TPx plays a significant role in protecting the parasite against damage induced by reactive oxygen species from inflammation.

  7. Liver stiffness predicts clinical outcome in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients with compensated liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Merchante, Nicolás; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Téllez, Francisco; Merino, Dolores; José Ríos-Villegas, Maria; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Omar, Mohamed; Macías, Juan; Camacho, Angela; Pérez-Pérez, Montserrat; Gómez-Mateos, Jesús; Rivero, Antonio; Antonio Pineda, Juan

    2012-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the predictive value of liver stiffness (LS), measured by transient elastography (TE), for clinical outcome in human immunodeficiency virus / hepatitis C virus (HIV/HCV)-coinfected patients with compensated liver cirrhosis. This was a prospective cohort study of 239 consecutive HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with a new diagnosis of cirrhosis, done by TE, and no previous decompensation of liver disease. The time from diagnosis to the first liver decompensation and death from liver disease, as well as the predictors of these outcomes, were evaluated. After a median (Q1-Q3) follow-up of 20 (9-34) months, 31 (13%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9%-17%) patients developed a decompensation. The incidence of decompensation was 6.7 cases per 100 person-years (95% CI, 4.7-9-6). Fourteen (8%) out of 181 patients with a baseline LS < 40 kPa developed a decompensation versus 17 (29%) out of 58 with LS ≥ 40 kPa (P = 0.001). Factors independently associated with decompensation were Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class B versus A (hazard ratio [HR] 7.7; 95% CI 3.3-18.5; P < 0.0001), log-plasma HCV RNA load (HR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.6; P = 0.01), hepatitis B virus coinfection (HR, 10.3; 95% CI, 2.1-50.4; P = 0.004) and baseline LS (HR 1.03; 95% CI 1.01-1.05; P = 0.02). Fifteen (6%, 95% CI: 3.5%-9.9%) patients died, 10 of them due to liver disease, and one underwent liver transplantation. CTP class B (HR 16.5; 95% CI 3.4-68.2; P < 0.0001) and previous exposure to HCV therapy (HR 7.4; 95% CI 1.7-32.4, P = 0.007) were independently associated with liver-related death; baseline LS (HR 1.03; 95% CI 0.98-1.07; P = 0.08) was of borderline significance. LS predicts the development of hepatic decompensations and liver-related mortality in HIV/HCV-coinfection with compensated cirrhosis and provides additional prognostic information to that provided by the CTP score. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro. Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  9. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  10. Non-human lnc-DC orthologs encode Wdnm1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Johannes M.; Ballingall, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication in Science, Wang et al. found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expressed in human dendritic cells (DC), which they designated lnc-DC. Based on lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in human and murine systems, they concluded that lnc-DC is important in differentiation of monocytes into DC. However, Wang et al. did not mention that their so-called “mouse lnc-DC ortholog” gene was already designated “ Wdnm1-like” and is known to encode a small secreted protein.  We found that incapacitation of the Wdnm1-like open reading frame (ORF) is very rare among mammals, with all investigated primates except for hominids having an intact ORF. The null-hypothesis by Wang et al. therefore should have been that the human lnc-DC transcript might only represent a non-functional relatively young evolutionary remnant of a protein coding locus.  Whether this null-hypothesis can be rejected by the experimental data presented by Wang et al. depends in part on the possible off-target (immunogenic or otherwise) effects of their RNAi procedures, which were not exhaustive in regard to the number of analyzed RNAi sequences and control sequences.  If, however, the conclusions by Wang et al. on their human model are correct, and they may be, current knowledge regarding the Wdnm1-like locus suggests an intriguing combination of different functions mediated by transcript and protein in the maturation of several cell types at some point in evolution. We feel that the article by Wang et al. tends to be misleading without the discussion presented here. PMID:25309733

  11. Breast Milk Jaundice: Effect of 3α 20β-pregnanediol on Bilirubin Conjugation by Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Adlard, B. P. F.; Lathe, G. H.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of 3α,20β-pregnanediol and other steroids on bilirubin conjugation was examined using liver tissue from human and four other species. Neither 3α,20β-pregnanediol nor 3α,20β-pregnanediol inhibited conjugation by human liver slices or by solubilized human liver microsomes. 3α,20β-pregnanediol is unlikely to be the inhibitor causing breast milk jaundice. Oestriol inhibited conjugation by human liver slices. A comparison of species indicated that the response of the human liver slice system to steroids resembles that of the rabbit and guinea-pig rather than the rat or mouse. PMID:4246186

  12. Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a human Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) homologous to the Arabidopsis thaliana UBC-16 gene product.

    PubMed

    Yin, Gang; Ji, Chaoneng; Wu, Tong; Shen, Zhouliang; Xu, Xin; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2006-05-01

    Ubiquitin charging and activation of class III E2 enzymes has been directly linked to their nuclear import. It has not been published whether other classes E2s also abide by this mechanism. During the large-scale sequencing analysis of a human fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA clone that is 2252 base pair in length, encoding a putative 162 amino acid protein, which shares high homology to Arabidopsis thaliana ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (Accession number NP_565110, 51% identity and 71% similarity) at protein level. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the gene is composed of 7 exons, located on human chromosome 8q13-8q21.1, and that the predicted protein of the gene is a class I E2, for only composed of a conserved approximately 150-amino acid catalytic core, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 domain (UBC domain). In the C-terminal of the UBC domain sequence, there are two nuclear localization signals (NLSs). RT-PCR showed that this gene is ubiquitously expressed in 16 kinds of normal human tissues, but expression level is very low, unless in human heart, brain, liver, and pancreas. The subcellular localizations of the new human Ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2 and its mutation were also examined, which showed that the nuclear localization of hUBC16 depended on two conditions: It has NLS, and at the same time, has enzyme active site, too, at least in HEK293 cells.

  13. Establishment of transgenic mice carrying gene encoding human zinc finger protein 191

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xia; Yang, Hua; Wang, Shui-Liang; Gong, Xue-Lian; Feng, Hao; Guo, Bao-Yu; Yu, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191) was cloned and characterized as a Krüppel-like transcription factor, which might be relevant to many diseases such as liver cancer, neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made recently, the biological function of ZNF191 remains largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish a ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model, which would promote the functional study of ZNF191. METHODS: Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudo-pregnant female mice. The offsprings were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. ZNF 191 gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The first generation (F1) and the second generation (F2) mice were identified by PCR analysis. Ten-week transgenic mice were used for pathological examination. RESULTS: Four mice were identified as carrying copies of ZNF191 gene. The results of RT-PCR showed that ZNF 191 gene was expressed in the liver, testis and brain in one of the transgenic mouse lineages. Genetic analysis of transgenic mice demonstrated that ZNF 191 gene was integrated into the chromosome at a single site and could be transmitted stably. Pathological analysis showed that the expression of ZNF 191 did not cause obvious pathological changes in multiple tissues of transgenic mice. CONCLUSION: ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model would facilitate the investigation of biological functions of ZNF191 in vivo. PMID:14716836

  14. Liver X receptor (LXR) mediates negative regulation of mouse and human Th17 differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guoliang; Qin, Xia; Wu, Lili; Zhang, Yuebo; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Yu, Qiwen; Sheng, Hongguang; Xi, Beili; Zhang, Jingwu Z.; Zang, Ying Qin

    2011-01-01

    Th17 cells are a subset of CD4+ T cells with an important role in clearing certain bacterial and fungal pathogens. However, they have also been implicated in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Exposure of naive CD4+ T cells to IL-6 and TGF-β leads to Th17 cell differentiation through a process in which many proteins have been implicated. We report here that ectopic expression of liver X receptor (LXR) inhibits Th17 polarization of mouse CD4+ T cells, while LXR deficiency promotes Th17 differentiation in vitro. LXR activation in mice ameliorated disease in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis, whereas LXR deficiency exacerbated disease. Further analysis revealed that Srebp-1, which is encoded by an LXR target gene, mediated the suppression of Th17 differentiation by binding to the E-box element on the Il17 promoter, physically interacting with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) and inhibiting Ahr-controlled Il17 transcription. The putative active site (PAS) domain of Ahr and the N-terminal acidic region of Srebp-1 were essential for this interaction. Additional analyses suggested that similar LXR-dependent mechanisms were operational during human Th17 differentiation in vitro. This study reports what we believe to be a novel signaling pathway underlying LXR-mediated regulation of Th17 cell differentiation and autoimmunity. PMID:21266776

  15. Human cytomegalovirus UL49 encodes an early, virion-associated protein essential for virus growth in human foreskin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Yuan, Jian; Li, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Zhi-Feng; Luo, Zhi-Wen; Li, Shi-Qian; He, Chi-Qiang; Jia, Xue-Fang; Zhang, Xin; Zuo, Hui; Liu, Yi-Min; Chang, Martin; Li, Yue-Qin; Zhou, Tian-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Despite recent results of deletion experiments showing that open reading frame (ORF) UL49 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is essential, the expression, function and functional location of its encoded protein remain unknown. We generated an antibody specific for pUL49 to investigate the protein product encoded by the UL49 ORF and identified its function in HCMV-infected host foreskin fibroblasts. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) of HCMV strain Towne (pRV-Towne) and the UL49-deleted mutant pRV-delUL49Towne were used to observe virus growth by plaque assay. Using a UL49-protein-binding antibody, we located pUL49 in the fibroblast cytoplasm. pUL49 exhibited expression kinetics resembling those of the class β-2 proteins and was detected in the virion tegument. Following deletion of UL49 ORF, the virus failed to replicate, but it could be recovered by addition of pUL49 from pCDNA3.1 (+)-UL49. Our findings indicate that UL49 ORF is essential for HCMV replication in host foreskin fibroblasts.

  16. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  17. Functional constraint and small insertions and deletions in the ENCODE regions of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Taane G; Andrew, Toby; Cooper, Gregory M; Margulies, Elliott H; Mullikin, James C; Balding, David J

    2007-01-01

    Background We describe the distribution of indels in the 44 Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) regions (about 1% of the human genome) and evaluate the potential contributions of small insertion and deletion polymorphisms (indels) to human genetic variation. We relate indels to known genomic annotation features and measures of evolutionary constraint. Results Indel rates are observed to be reduced approximately 20-fold to 60-fold in exonic regions, 5-fold to 10-fold in sequence that exhibits high evolutionary constraint in mammals, and up to 2-fold in some classes of regulatory elements (for instance, formaldehyde assisted isolation of regulatory elements [FAIRE] and hypersensitive sites). In addition, some noncoding transcription and other chromatin mediated regulatory sites also have reduced indel rates. Overall indel rates for these data are estimated to be smaller than single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rates by a factor of approximately 2, with both rates measured as base pairs per 100 kilobases to facilitate comparison. Conclusion Indel rates exhibit a broadly similar distribution across genomic features compared with SNP density rates, with a reduction in rates in coding transcription and evolutionarily constrained sequence. However, unlike indels, SNP rates do not appear to be reduced in some noncoding functional sequences, such as pseudo-exons, and FAIRE and hypersensitive sites. We conclude that indel rates are greatly reduced in transcribed and evolutionarily constrained DNA, and discuss why indel (but not SNP) rates appear to be constrained at some regulatory sites. PMID:17784950

  18. The human mRNA encoding the Goodpasture antigen is alternatively spliced.

    PubMed

    Bernal, D; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1993-06-05

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the human collagen alpha 3(IV)-chain is the primary target of autoantibodies produced in Goodpasture syndrome and, therefore, has been designated as the Goodpasture antigen. In this report, we show that Goodpasture antigen mRNA undergoes processing to at least two alternatively spliced forms in a variety of human tissues, resulting in the exclusion of sequence encoded by either one or two exons. Interestingly, no alternatively spliced forms were observed in bovine or rat tissues. The derived amino acid sequences of the two variant mRNA forms are identical and significantly shorter than that arising from the complete Goodpasture antigen mRNA. They lack the carboxyl-terminal region contributing to the formation of the Goodpasture epitope and all but one of the cysteines found in the complete form. These sequence characteristics suggest that, if translated, the variant Goodpasture antigen is likely to be defective in triple helix formation and no longer reactive with Goodpasture autoantibodies. Although each tissue expressing Goodpasture antigen displayed a specific mRNA pattern, the complete form was always the most abundant and was present at levels apparently unrelated to whether or not the organ of origin is a potential target in Goodpasture syndrome. Furthermore, the antigen sequence was identical in the kidneys of normal and Goodpasture-affected individuals, and no major differences in the expression of the complete and spliced forms were observed.

  19. Metabolism of zaleplon by human liver: evidence for involvement of aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lake, B G; Ball, S E; Kao, J; Renwick, A B; Price, R J; Scatina, J A

    2002-10-01

    1. The metabolism of Zaleplon (CL-284,846; ZAL) has been studied in precision-cut human liver slices and liver cytosol preparations. 2. Human liver slices metabolized ZAL to a number of products including 5-oxo-ZAL (M2), N-desethyl-5-oxo-ZAL (M1) and N-desethyl-ZAL (DZAL), the latter metabolite being known to be formed by CYP3A forms. 3. Human liver cytosol preparations catalysed the metabolism of ZAL to M2. Kinetic analysis of three cytosol preparations revealed mean (+/- SEM) K(m) and V(max) of 93 +/- 18 mm and 317 +/- 241 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. 4. Using 16 individual human liver cytosol preparations a 33-fold variability in the metabolism of 80 micro M ZAL to M2 was observed. Correlations were observed between M2 formation and the metabolism of the aldehyde oxidase substrates phenanthridine (r(2) = 0.774) and phthalazine (r(2) = 0.460). 5. The metabolism of 80 micro M ZAL to M2 in liver cytosol preparations was markedly inhibited by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitors chlorpromazine, promethazine, hydralazine and menadione. Additional kinetic analysis suggested that chlorpromazine and promethazine were non-competitive inhibitors of M2 formation with K(i) of 2.3 and 1.9 micro M, respectively. ZAL metabolism to M2 was also inhibited by cimetidine. 6. Incubations conducted with human liver cytosol and H(2)(18)O demonstrated that the oxygen atom incorporated into ZAL and DZAL to form M2 and M1, respectively, was derived from water and not from molecular oxygen. 7. In summary, by correlation analysis, chemical inhibition and H(2)(18)O incorporation studies, ZAL metabolism to M2 in human liver appears to be catalysed by aldehyde oxidase. With human liver slices, ZAL was metabolized to products dependent on both aldehyde oxidase and CYP3A forms.

  20. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Human liver physiology and the genetic etiology of the liver diseases can potentially be elucidated through the identification of proteins with enriched expression in the liver. Here, we combined data from RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and antibody-based immunohistochemistry across all major human tissues to explore the human liver proteome with enriched expression, as well as the cell type-enriched expression in hepatocyte and bile duct cells. We identified in total 477 protein-coding genes with elevated expression in the liver: 179 genes have higher expression as compared to all the other analyzed tissues; 164 genes have elevated transcript levels in the liver shared with at least one other tissue type; and an additional 134 genes have a mild level of increased expression in the liver. We identified the precise localization of these proteins through antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of these proteins through immunofluorescent-based profiling. We also identified the biological processes and metabolic functions associated with these proteins, investigated their contribution in the occurrence of liver diseases, and identified potential targets for their treatment. Our study demonstrates the use of RNA-Seq and antibody-based immunohistochemistry for characterizing the human liver proteome, as well as the use of tissue-specific proteins in identification of novel drug targets and discovery of biomarkers.-Kampf, C., Mardinoglu, A., Fagerberg, L., Hallström, B. M., Edlund, K., Lundberg, E., Pontén, F., Nielsen, J., Uhlen, M. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling. © FASEB.

  1. Fixation methods for electron microscopy of human and other liver

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Eddie; Braet, Filip; Duimel, Hans; Vreuls, Celien; Koek, Ger; Olde Damink, Steven WM; van den Broek, Maartje AJ; De Geest, Bart; Dejong, Cees HC; Tateno, Chise; Frederik, Peter

    2010-01-01

    For an electron microscopic study of the liver, expertise and complicated, time-consuming processing of hepatic tissues and cells is needed. The interpretation of electron microscopy (EM) images requires knowledge of the liver fine structure and experience with the numerous artifacts in fixation, embedding, sectioning, contrast staining and microscopic imaging. Hence, the aim of this paper is to present a detailed summary of different methods for the preparation of hepatic cells and tissue, for the purpose of preserving long-standing expertise and to encourage new investigators and clinicians to include EM studies of liver cells and tissue in their projects. PMID:20556830

  2. Sequential metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in human liver.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Kamakura, Masaki; Munetsuna, Eiji; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    Our previous study revealed that CYP2C9 played a central role in sesamin monocatecholization. In this study, we focused on the metabolism of sesamin monocatechol that was further converted into the dicatechol form by cytochrome P450 (P450) or the glucuronide by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Catecholization of sesamin monocatechol enhances its antioxidant activity, whereas glucuronidation strongly reduces its antioxidant activity. In human liver microsomes, the glucuronidation activity was much higher than the catecholization activity toward sesamin monocatechol. In contrast, in rat liver microsomes, catecholization is predominant over glucuronidation. In addition, rat liver produced two isomers of the glucuronide, whereas human liver produced only one glucuronide. These results suggest a significant species-based difference in the metabolism of sesamin between humans and rats. Kinetic studies using recombinant human UGT isoforms identified UGT2B7 as the most important UGT isoform for glucuronidation of sesamin monocatechol. In addition, a good correlation was observed between the glucuronidation activity and UGT2B7-specific activity in in vitro studies using 10 individual human liver microsomes. These results strongly suggest that UGT2B7 plays an important role in glucuronidation of sesamin monocatechol. Interindividual difference among the 10 human liver microsomes is approximately 2-fold. These results, together with our previous results on the metabolism of sesamin by human P450, suggest a small interindividual difference in sesamin metabolism. We observed the methylation activity toward sesamin monocatechol by catechol O-methyl transferase (COMT) in human liver cytosol. On the basis of these results, we concluded that CYP2C9, UGT2B7, and COMT played essential roles in the metabolism of sesamin in the human liver.

  3. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  4. IRF5 governs liver macrophage activation that promotes hepatic fibrosis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Alzaid, Fawaz; Lagadec, Floriane; Albuquerque, Miguel; Ballaire, Raphaëlle; Orliaguet, Lucie; Hainault, Isabelle; Blugeon, Corinne; Lemoine, Sophie; Lehuen, Agnès; Saliba, David G.; Udalova, Irina A.; Paradis, Valérie; Foufelle, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis arises from inflammation in the liver initiated by resident macrophage activation and massive leukocyte accumulation. Hepatic macrophages hold a central position in maintaining homeostasis in the liver and in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic liver injury linked to fibrogenesis. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has recently emerged as an important proinflammatory transcription factor involved in macrophage activation under acute and chronic inflammation. Here, we revealed that IRF5 is significantly induced in liver macrophages from human subjects developing liver fibrosis from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or hepatitis C virus infection. Furthermore, IRF5 expression positively correlated with clinical markers of liver damage, such as plasma transaminase and bilirubin levels. Interestingly, mice lacking IRF5 in myeloid cells (MKO) were protected from hepatic fibrosis induced by metabolic or toxic stresses. Transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages lacking IRF5 was characterized by immunosuppressive and antiapoptotic properties. Consequently, IRF5 MKO mice respond to hepatocellular stress by promoting hepatocyte survival, leading to complete protection from hepatic fibrogenesis. Our findings reveal a regulatory network, governed by IRF5, that mediates hepatocyte death and liver fibrosis in mice and humans. Therefore, modulating IRF5 function may be an attractive approach to experimental therapeutics in fibroinflammatory liver disease. PMID:27942586

  5. Fractionation of human liver mitochondria: enzymic and morphological characterization of the inner and outer membranes as compared to rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Benga, G; Hodarnau, A; Tilinca, R; Porutiu, D; Dancea, S; Pop, V; Wrigglesworth, J

    1979-02-01

    The fractionation of human liver mitochondria into inner membrane, outer membrane and matrix material is reported. Compared with rat, human liver mitochondria are more fragile. Fractionation can be achieved in only 2 steps, a digitonin treatment for removal of the outer membrane and centrifugation of the inner membrane plus matrix particles through a linear sucrose gradient resulting in purified inner membranes and matrix.

  6. Normothermic ex vivo liver perfusion using steen solution as perfusate for human liver transplantation: First North American results.

    PubMed

    Selzner, Markus; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Echeverri, Juan; Kaths, Johan M; Linares, Ivan; Selzner, Nazia; Serrick, Cyril; Marquez, Max; Sapisochin, Gonzalo; Renner, Eberhard L; Bhat, Mamatha; McGilvray, Ian D; Lilly, Leslie; Greig, Paul D; Tsien, Cynthia; Cattral, Mark S; Ghanekar, Anand; Grant, David R

    2016-11-01

    The European trial investigating normothermic ex vivo liver perfusion (NEVLP) as a preservation technique for liver transplantation (LT) uses gelofusine, a non-US Food and Drug Administration-approved, bovine-derived, gelatin-based perfusion solution. We report a safety and feasibility clinical NEVLP trial with human albumin-based Steen solution. Transplant outcomes of 10 human liver grafts that were perfused on the Metra device at 37 °C with Steen solution, plus 3 units of erythrocytes were compared with a matched historical control group of 30 grafts using cold storage (CS) as the preservation technique. Ten liver grafts were perfused for 480 minutes (340-580 minutes). All livers cleared lactate (final lactate 1.46 mmol/L; 0.56-1.74 mmol/L) and produced bile (61 mL; 14-146 mL) during perfusion. No technical problems occurred during perfusion, and all NEVLP-preserved grafts functioned well after LT. NEVLP versus CS had lower aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase values on postoperative days 1-3 without reaching significance. No difference in postoperative graft function between NEVLP and CS grafts was detected as measured by day 7 international normalized ratio (1.1 [1-1.56] versus 1.1 [1-1.3]; P = 0.5) and bilirubin (1.5; 1-7.7 mg/dL versus 2.78; 0.4-15 mg/dL; P = 0.5). No difference was found in the duration of intensive care unit stay (median, 1 versus 2 days; range, 0-8 versus 0-23 days; P = 0.5) and posttransplant hospital stay (median, 11 versus 13 days; range, 8-17 versus 7-89 days; P = 0.23). Major complications (Dindo-Clavien ≥ 3b) occurred in 1 patient in the NEVLP group (10%) compared with 7 (23%) patients in the CS group (P = 0.5). No graft loss or patient death was observed in either group. Liver preservation with normothermic ex vivo perfusion with the Metra device using Steen solution is safe and results in comparable outcomes to CS after LT. Using US Food and Drug Administration-approved Steen

  7. Novel human growth hormone like protein HGH-V encoded in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Seeburg, P.H.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes the human growth hormone protein, HGH-V, having the amino acid sequence: phe pro thr ile pro leu ser arg leu phe asp asn ala met leu arg ala arg arg leu tyr gln leu ala tyr asp thr tyr gln glu phe glu glu ala tyr ile leu lys glu gln lys tyr ser phe leu gln asn pro gln thr ser leu cys phe ser glu ser ile pro thr pro ser asn arg val lys thr gln gln lys ser asn leu glu leu leu arg ile ser leu leu leu ile gln ser trp leu glu pro val gln leu leu arg ser val phe ala asn ser leu val tyr gly ala ser asp ser asn val tyr arg his leu lys asp leu glu glu gly ile gln thr leu met trp arg leu glu asp gly ser pro arg thr gly gln ile phe asn-glycosylation site gln ser tyr ser lys phe asp thr lys ser his asn asp asp ala leu leu lys asn tyr gly leu leu tyr cys Phe arg lys asp met asp lys val glu thr phe leu arg ile val gln cys arg ser val glu gly ser cys gly phe.

  8. Comparative metabolism of mycophenolic acid by glucuronic acid and glucose conjugation in human, dog, and cat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Slovak, J E; Mealey, K; Court, M H

    2017-04-01

    Use of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA) in cats is limited because MPA elimination depends on glucuronidation, which is deficient in cats. We evaluated formation of major (phenol glucuronide) and minor (acyl glucuronide, phenol glucoside, and acyl glucoside) MPA metabolites using liver microsomes from 16 cats, 26 dogs, and 48 humans. All MPA metabolites were formed by human liver microsomes, while dog and cat liver microsomes formed both MPA glucuronides, but only one MPA glucoside (phenol glucoside). Intrinsic clearance (CLint) of MPA for phenol glucuronidation by cat liver microsomes was only 15-17% that of dog and human liver microsomes. However, CLint for acyl glucuronide and phenol glucoside formation in cat liver microsomes was similar to or greater than that for dog and human liver microsomes. While total MPA conjugation CLint was generally similar for cat liver microsomes compared with dog and human liver microsomes, relative contributions of each pathway varied between species with phenol glucuronidation predominating in dog and human liver microsomes and phenol glucosidation predominating in cat liver microsomes. MPA conjugation variation between cat liver microsomes was threefold for total conjugation and for phenol glucosidation, sixfold for phenol glucuronidation, and 11-fold for acyl glucuronidation. Our results indicate that total MPA conjugation is quantitatively similar between liver microsomes from cats, dogs, and humans despite large differences in the conjugation pathways that are utilized by these species.

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of complementary DNA encoding an aberrantly rearranged human T-cell gamma chain.

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, D P; Murre, C; Quertermous, T; Boss, J M; Leiden, J M; Seidman, J G; Strominger, J L

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding a human T-cell gamma chain has been cloned and sequenced. At the junction of the variable and joining regions, there is an apparent deletion of two nucleotides in the human cDNA sequence relative to the murine gamma-chain cDNA sequence, resulting simultaneously in the generation of an in-frame stop codon and in a translational frameshift. For this reason, the sequence presented here encodes an aberrantly rearranged human T-cell gamma chain. There are several surprising differences between the deduced human and murine gamma-chain amino acid sequences. These include poor homology in the variable region, poor homology in a discrete segment of the constant region precisely bounded by the expected junctions of exon CII, and the presence in the human sequence of five potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. Images PMID:3458221

  10. Tumor lipids and liver lipid metabolism in the model human lung carcinoma/nude mice.

    PubMed

    de Antueno, R J; Niedfeld, G; De Tomás, M E; Mercuri, O F; Quintans, C

    1987-06-01

    Tumor lipids were studied in the experimental model Human Lung Carcinoma/nude mice as well as the effect of this human neoplasm on the host liver lipid metabolism. Fatty acid profiles from tumoral lipids revealed the loss of specificity for fatty acid composition in triglycerides. Host liver fatty acid composition and cholesterol metabolism were affected by the implanted human lung tissue. A noticeable increase ratio between saturated/unsaturated fatty acids was observed in host liver fatty acid phospholipids (1.17 +/- 0.17) in comparison to control liver (0.84 +/- 0.04). Cholesterol synthesis was assessed "in vivo" by means of [14C]acetate incorporation. The specific radioactivity of [14C] cholesterol was increased by a factor of about 6 in host liver as compared with control liver. This observation along with the marked decrease in the cholesterol content of host liver and the hypocholesterolemia detected in the host mice led us to suggest an increase in the liver cholesterol catabolism promoted by the presence of the tumor.

  11. Metabolism and Metabolic Inhibition of Xanthotoxol in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianbao; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome p450 (CYP450) enzymes are predominantly involved in Phase I metabolism of xenobiotics. In this study, the CYP450 isoforms involved in xanthotoxol metabolism were identified using recombinant CYP450s. In addition, the inhibitory effects of xanthotoxol on eight CYP450 isoforms and its pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using human liver microsomes. CYP1A2, one of CYP450s, played a key role in the metabolism of xanthotoxol compared to other CYP450s. Xanthotoxol showed stronger inhibition on CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 compared to other isoenzymes with the IC50 of 7.43 μM for CYP3A4 and 27.82 μM for CYP1A2. The values of inhibition kinetic parameters (Ki) were 21.15 μM and 2.22 μM for CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, respectively. The metabolism of xanthotoxol obeyed the typical monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Vmax, Km, and CLint values were calculated as 0.55 nmol·min−1·mg−1, 8.46 μM, and 0.06 mL·min−1·mg−1. In addition, the results of molecular docking showed that xanthotoxol was bound to CYP1A2 with hydrophobic and π-π bond and CYP3A4 with hydrogen and hydrophobic bond. We predicted the hepatic clearance (CLH) and the CLH value was 15.91 mL·min−1·kg−1 body weight. These data were significant for the application of xanthotoxol and xanthotoxol-containing herbs. PMID:27034690

  12. HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION FACTORS IN THE HUMAN LIVER : ANEMIAS, HYPOPROTEINEMIA, CIRRHOSIS, PIGMENT ABNORMALITIES, AND PREGANCY.

    PubMed

    Whipple, G H; Robscheit-Robbins, F S

    1942-09-01

    Human liver tissue has been assayed to determine the amount of hemoglobin production factors in normal and abnormal states. Standardized dogs made anemic by blood removal have been used in this biological assay. Normal animal liver as control is rated as 100 per cent. Normal human liver tissue as compared with the normal animal control contains more of these hemoglobin production factors-a biological assay ratio of 120 to 160 per cent. Infections, acute and chronic, do not appear to modify these values, the concentration of hemoglobin-producing factors falling within the normal range. Pernicious anemia and aplastic anemia both show large liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors-a biological assay ratio of 200 to 240 per cent. Therapy in pernicious anemia reduces these liver stores as new red cells are formed. Secondary anemia presents a low normal or subnormal liver store of hemoglobin-producing factors-an assay of 60 to 130 per cent. Hemochromatosis, erythroblastic anemia, and hemolytic icterus in spite of large iron deposits in the liver usually show a biological assay which is normal or close to normal. Polycythemia shows low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Leukemias present a wide range of values discussed above. Hypoproteinemia almost always is associated with low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors in the liver-biological assays of 60 to 80 per cent. Hypoproteinemia means a depletion of body protein reserve stores including the labile protein liver reserves-a strong indication that the prehemoglobin material (or globin) is related to these liver stores. Pregnancy, eclampsia, and lactation all may present subnormal liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Exhaustion of protein stores lowers the barrier to infection and renders the liver very susceptible to many toxic substances. It should not be difficult to correct hypoproteinemia under these conditions and thus relieve the patient of a real hazard.

  13. Selenium chemoprevention of liver cancer in animals and possible human applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, S Y; Chu, Y J; Li, W G

    1988-01-01

    An inverse correlation between geographic distribution of liver cancer incidence and the selenium (Se) contents of whole blood and grains was observed in Qidong county, Jiangsu province, a high liver cancer area of the People's Republic of China. Animal experiments demonstrated that supplementation of Se reduced the incidence of liver cancer in rats exposed to aflatoxin B1. Se was also shown to inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors. A lower incidence of liver preneoplastic alterations and reduction of hepatitis B virus infection in ducks by Se-supplementation was observed, and three pilot studies for a Se-intervention trial on human liver cancer were carried out on the residents of Qidong county. A protective effect on the cellular DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B1 was observed in lympocytes from human with Se-supplements.

  14. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  15. Muscle spindles in human tibialis anterior encode muscle fascicle length changes.

    PubMed

    Day, James; Bent, Leah R; Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2017-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide exquisitely sensitive proprioceptive information regarding joint position and movement. Through passively driven length changes in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), muscle spindles detect joint rotations because of their in-parallel mechanical linkage to muscle fascicles. In human microneurography studies, muscle fascicles are assumed to follow the MTU and, as such, fascicle length is not measured in such studies. However, under certain mechanical conditions, compliant structures can act to decouple the fascicles, and, therefore, the spindles, from the MTU. Such decoupling may reduce the fidelity by which muscle spindles encode joint position and movement. The aim of the present study was to measure, for the first time, both the changes in firing of single muscle spindle afferents and changes in muscle fascicle length in vivo from the tibialis anterior muscle (TA) during passive rotations about the ankle. Unitary recordings were made from 15 muscle spindle afferents supplying TA via a microelectrode inserted into the common peroneal nerve. Ultrasonography was used to measure the length of an individual fascicle of TA. We saw a strong correlation between fascicle length and firing rate during passive ankle rotations of varying rates (0.1-0.5 Hz) and amplitudes (1-9°). In particular, we saw responses observed at relatively small changes in muscle length that highlight the sensitivity of the TA muscle to small length changes. This study is the first to measure spindle firing and fascicle dynamics in vivo and provides an experimental basis for further understanding the link between fascicle length, MTU length, and spindle firing patterns.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle spindles are exquisitely sensitive to changes in muscle length, but recordings from human muscle spindle afferents are usually correlated with joint angle rather than muscle fascicle length. In this study, we monitored both muscle fascicle length and spindle firing from the human tibialis

  16. Cathepsin F Cysteine Protease of the Human Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Morales, Maria E.; Mann, Victoria H.; Parriott, Sandi K.; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Robinson, Mark W.; To, Joyce; Dalton, John P.; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is classified as a class I carcinogen due to the association between cholangiocarcinoma and chronic O. viverrini infection. During its feeding activity within the bile duct, the parasite secretes several cathepsin F cysteine proteases that may induce or contribute to the pathologies associated with hepatobiliary abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the cDNA, gene organization, phylogenetic relationships, immunolocalization, and functional characterization of the cathepsin F cysteine protease gene, here termed Ov-cf-1, from O. viverrini. The full length mRNA of 1020 nucleotides (nt) encoded a 326 amino acid zymogen consisting of a predicted signal peptide (18 amino acids, aa), prosegment (95 aa), and mature protease (213 aa). BLAST analysis using the Ov-CF-1 protein as the query revealed that the protease shared identity with cathepsin F-like cysteine proteases of other trematodes, including Clonorchis sinensis (81%), Paragonimus westermani (58%), Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum (52%), and with vertebrate cathepsin F (51%). Transcripts encoding the protease were detected in all developmental stages that parasitize the mammalian host. The Ov-cf-1 gene, of ∼3 kb in length, included seven exons interrupted by six introns; the exons ranged from 69 to 267 bp in length, the introns from 43 to 1,060 bp. The six intron/exon boundaries of Ov-cf-1 were conserved with intron/exon boundaries in the human cathepsin F gene, although the gene structure of human cathepsin F is more complex. Unlike Ov-CF-1, human cathepsin F zymogen includes a cystatin domain in the prosegment region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fluke, human, and other cathepsin Fs branched together in a clade discrete from the cathepsin L cysteine proteases. A recombinant Ov-CF-1 zymogen that displayed low-level activity was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Although the recombinant protease did not

  17. Fibronectin of human liver sinusoids binds hepatitis B virus: identification by an anti-idiotypic antibody bearing the internal image of the pre-S2 domain.

    PubMed Central

    Budkowska, A; Bedossa, P; Groh, F; Louise, A; Pillot, J

    1995-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Ids) have been successfully used to characterize and isolate receptors of several cell ligands. To prepare an immunological probe for identification of cellular components interacting with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), polyclonal antisera against a panel of five HBV-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced in syngeneic BALB/c mice. MAbs to HBV used for immunization (Ab1) recognized biologically important and potentially neutralizing epitopes, located in the pre-S1, pre-S2, or S region-encoded domains of HBV proteins. All the anti-Ids (Ab2) were specific to idiotopes of the homologous Ab1 and inhibited their interaction with the corresponding viral epitopes, suggesting that they recognized unique determinants on the paratope of each immunizing Ab1. Therefore, all five generated polyclonal anti-Ids were of the Ab2 beta type and could represent internal images of viral epitopes. Ab2 raised against the pre-S2 region-specific MAb F124 bound to the extracellular matrix fibronectin of human liver sinusoids. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated the attachment of viral and recombinant (S, M) hepatitis B surface antigen particles with the pre-S2 region-encoded epitopes to the fibronectin of human liver sinusoids. In contrast, recombinant (S, L*) hepatitis B surface antigen particles, in which the epitope recognized by F124 MAb was not expressed, did not show any binding capacity. These findings suggest that human liver fibronectin may bind HBV in vivo by the pre-S2 region-encoded epitopes in a species-restricted manner. Furthermore, binding of the circulating virus to liver sinusoids could facilitate its subsequent uptake by hepatocytes. PMID:7815551

  18. Assessment of liver function in chronic liver diseases and regional function of irradiated liver by means of 99mTc-galactosyl-human serum albumin liver scintigraphy and quantitative spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, A; Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Fujii, T; Ikezoe, J

    2000-12-01

    Scintigraphy with 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid galactosyl human serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) was performed on 102 patients, then the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF), the rate constant for liver uptake of the tracer from the blood (K1) and the hepatic blood flow index (HBFI) were determined by spectral analysis. The HEF, K1 and HBFI values correlated moderately or closely with various indices of hepatic function, and the HEF and K1 values decreased according to the stage of liver dysfunction. The HEF and K1 values linearly and nonlinearly correlated with HH15 and LHL15, respectively. The HEF, K1 and HBFI values for the irradiated portion of 20 patients before and alter irradiation were compared. The HEF value in patients with a cirrhotic liver significantly (p < 0.002) decreased compared with that in patients with a normal liver at a dose of less than 40 Gy, whereas the HBFI value in patients with a normal liver significantly (p < 0.05) decreased compared with that in patients with a cirrhotic liver at a dose of 40 Gy or greater. This method appears to be a simple, non-invasive and useful tool with which to quantitatively evaluate liver function and it also helps clarify changes in regional function of the irradiated liver.

  19. Vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissue from engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Ohashi, Kazuo; Koike, Makiko; Utoh, Rie; Hasegawa, Hideko; Muraoka, Izumi; Suematsu, Takashi; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Subcutaneous liver tissue engineering is an attractive and minimally invasive approach used to curative treat hepatic failure and inherited liver diseases. However, graft failure occurs frequently due to insufficient infiltration of blood vessels (neoangiogenesis), while the maintenance of hepatocyte phenotype and function requires in vivo development of the complex cellular organization of the hepatic lobule. Here we describe a subcutaneous human liver construction allowing for rapidly vascularized grafts by transplanting engineered cellular sheets consisting of human primary hepatocytes adhered onto a fibroblast layer. The engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets (EHFSs) showed superior expression levels of vascularization-associated growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, and hepatocyte growth factor) in vitro. EHFSs developed into vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissues contained glycogen stores, synthesized coagulation factor IX, and showed significantly higher synthesis rates of liver-specific proteins (albumin and alpha 1 anti-trypsin) in vivo than tissues from hepatocyte-only sheets. The present study describes a new approach for vascularized human liver organogenesis under mouse skin. This approach could prove valuable for establishing novel cell therapies for liver diseases.

  20. Molecular cloning of MER-2, a human chromosome-11-encoded red blood cell antigen, using linkage of cotransfected markers.

    PubMed

    Bill, J; Palmer, E; Jones, C

    1987-09-01

    We report the molecular cloning of a human gene MER-2 located on chromosome 11 that encodes a cell surface antigen which is polymorphic on red blood cells. An essential element of the cloning strategy was cotransfection-induced linkage of pSV2-neo, which encodes resistance to the antibiotic G418, to the human MER-2 gene. An important feature of the pSV2-neo construct is that the same gene (the transposon, Tn5) that encodes G418 resistance in eukaryotic cells confers neomycin resistance in bacteria. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cotransfected with pSV2-neo and genomic DNA from a CHO X human cell hybrid containing a single human chromosome (chromosome 11). Transfectants expressing both the human MER-2 gene and G418 resistance were isolated by selection in the antibiotic G418, followed by indirect immunofluorescence using the monoclonal antibody 1D12, which recognizes the MER-2 antigen, manual enrichment, and single-cell cloning. Genomic DNA from a primary transfectant positive for MER-2 expression and G418 resistance was used to construct a cosmid library and cosmid clones able to grow in neomycin were isolated. Of 150,000 cosmid clones screened, 90 were resistant to neomycin and of these, 11 contained human repetitive sequences. Five neomycin-resistant cosmid clones containing human repetitive DNA were able to transfect CHO cells for G418 resistance and MER-2 expression.

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 greatly contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in human liver.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-04-01

    The major metabolic pathway of vildagliptin in mice, rats, dogs, and humans is hydrolysis at the cyano group to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7 (LAY151), whereas the major metabolic enzyme of vildagliptin has not been identified. In the present study, we determined the contribution rate of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in the liver. We performed hydrolysis assay of the cyano group of vildagliptin using mouse, rat, and human liver samples. Additionally, DPP-4 activities in each liver sample were assessed by DPP-4 activity assay using the synthetic substrate H-glycyl-prolyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Gly-Pro-AMC). M20.7 formation rates in liver microsomes were higher than those in liver cytosol. M20.7 formation rate was significantly positively correlated with the DPP-4 activity using Gly-Pro-AMC in liver samples (r = 0.917, P < 0.01). The formation of M20.7 in mouse, rat, and human liver S9 fraction was inhibited by sitagliptin, a selective DPP-4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that DPP-4 is greatly involved in vildagliptin hydrolysis in the liver. Additionally, we established stable single expression systems of human DPP-4 and its R623Q mutant, which is the nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism of human DPP-4, in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells to investigate the effect of R623Q mutant on vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. M20.7 formation rate in HEK293 cells expressing human DPP-4 was significantly higher than that in control HEK293 cells. Interestingly, R623Q mutation resulted in a decrease of the vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. Our findings might be useful for the prediction of interindividual variability in vildagliptin pharmacokinetics.

  2. Morphological and biochemical characterization of a human liver in a uPA-SCID mouse chimera.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Philip; Libbrecht, Louis; De Vos, Rita; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Gevaert, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Roskams, Tania; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2005-04-01

    A small animal model harboring a functional human liver cell xenograft would be a useful tool to study human liver cell biology, drug metabolism, and infections with hepatotropic viruses. Here we describe the repopulation, organization, and function of human hepatocytes in a mouse recipient and the infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the transplanted cells. Homozygous urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-SCID mice underwent transplantation with primary human hepatocytes, and at different times animals were bled and sacrificed to analyze plasma and liver tissue, respectively. The plasma of mice that were successfully transplanted contained albumin and an additional 21 human proteins. Liver histology showed progressive and massive replacement of diseased mouse tissue by human hepatocytes. These cells were accumulating glycogen but appeared otherwise normal and showed no signs of damage or death. They formed functional bile canaliculi that connected to mouse canaliculi. Besides mature hepatocytes, human hepatic progenitor cells that were differentiating into mature hepatocytes could be identified within liver parenchyma. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV or HCV resulted in an active infection that did not alter the liver function and architecture. Electron microscopy showed the presence of viral and subviral structures in HBV infected hepatocytes. In conclusion, human hepatocytes repopulate the uPA(+/+)-SCID mouse liver in a very organized fashion with preservation of normal cell function. The presence of human hepatic progenitor cells in these chimeric animals necessitates a critical review of the observations and conclusions made in experiments with isolated "mature" hepatocytes. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index.html).

  3. Packaging of an AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase for gene therapy in glycogen storage disease type II with a modified hybrid adenovirus-AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Chen, Y-T; Bird, Andrew; Xu, Fang; Hou, Yang-Xun; Amalfitano, Andrea; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2003-04-01

    We have developed an improved method for packaging adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors with a replication-defective adenovirus-AAV (Ad-AAV) hybrid virus. The AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA) was cloned into an E1, polymerase/preterminal protein-deleted adenovirus, such that it is packaged as an Ad vector. Importantly, the Ad-AAV hybrid cannot replicate during AAV vector packaging in 293 cells, because of deletion of polymerase/preterminal protein. The residual Ad-AAV in the AAV vector stock was reduced to <1 infectious particle per 10(10) AAV vector particles. These modifications resulted in approximately 30-fold increased packaging of the AAV vector for the hybrid Ad-AAV vector method as compared with standard transfection-only methods. Similarly improved packaging was demonstrated for pseudotyping the AAV vector as AAV6, and for AAV vector packaging with a second Ad-AAV vector encoding canine glucose-6-phosphatase. Liver-targeted delivery of either the Ad-AAV hybrid or AAV vector particles in acid alpha-glucosidase-knockout (GAA-KO) mice revealed secretion of hGAA with the Ad-AAV vector, and sustained secretion of hGAA with an AAV vector in hGAA-tolerant GAA-KO mice. Further development of hybrid Ad-AAV vectors could offer distinct advantages for gene therapy in glycogen storage diseases.

  4. Genetic analysis of the variable region genes encoding a monospecific human natural anti-DNA antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, M D; Misener, V; Olee, T; Chen, P P; Siminovitch, K A

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that natural autoantibodies may play an integral role in the development of the normal immune repertoire. To explore the genetic origins of these antibodies, we have isolated and sequenced the variable (V) region genes encoding both the heavy (H) and light (L) chains of a natural anti-DNA antibody, Kim11.4. The genes appear to be derived from the VH4.18 (subgroup VHIV), JH5, Hum1L1 (subgroup V lambda I) and J lambda 3 germline genes. The origin of the H chain diversity gene is more obscure, being potentially derived from one or more of several germline genes, arranged in either the forward or reverse orientations. Both the Kim11.4 VH and VL genes share significant degrees of similarity with those utilized in other autoantibodies, indicating that at least some degree of V restriction may exist in human autoreactive B cells. The pattern of nucleotide differences between the Kim11.4 VH and VL genes and their putative germline counterparts suggests that the Kim11.4 genes may have undergone somatic mutation and arisen as a result of antigen selection. PMID:8324896

  5. Aspartylglucosaminuria: cDNA encoding human aspartylglucosaminidase and the missense mutation causing the disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ikonen, E; Baumann, M; Grön, K; Syvänen, A C; Enomaa, N; Halila, R; Aula, P; Peltonen, L

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a 2.1 kb cDNA which encodes human aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA, E.C. 3.5.1.26). The activity of this lysosomal enzyme is deficient in aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU), a recessively inherited lysosomal accumulation disease resulting in severe mental retardation. The polypeptide chain deduced from the AGA cDNA consists of 346 amino acids, has two potential N-glycosylation sites and 11 cysteine residues. Transient expression of this cDNA in COS-1 cells resulted in increased expression of immunoprecipitable AGA protein. Direct sequencing of amplified AGA cDNA from an AGU patient revealed a G----C transition resulting in the substitution of cysteine 163 with serine. This mutation was subsequently found in all the 20 analyzed Finnish AGU patients, in the heterozygous form in all 53 carriers and in none of 67 control individuals, suggesting that it represents the major AGU causing mutation enriched in this isolated population. Since the mutation produces a change in the predicted flexibility of the AGA polypeptide chain and removes an intramolecular S-S bridge, it most probably explains the deficient enzyme activity found in cells and tissues of AGU patients. Images PMID:1703489

  6. Mutations in the ANKRD1 gene encoding CARP are responsible for human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Duboscq-Bidot, Laëtitia; Charron, Philippe; Ruppert, Volker; Fauchier, Laurent; Richter, Anette; Tavazzi, Luigi; Arbustini, Eloisa; Wichter, Thomas; Maisch, Bernard; Komajda, Michel; Isnard, Richard; Villard, Eric

    2009-09-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is familial in approximately 30% of cases, and mutations have been identified in several genes. However, in a majority of familial cases, the responsible genes are still to be discovered. The ANKRD1 gene is over-expressed in heart failure in human and animal models. The encoded protein CARP interacts with partners such as myopalladin or titin, previously shown to be involved in DCM. We hypothesized that mutations in ANKRD1 could be responsible for DCM. We sequenced the coding region of ANKRD1 from 231 independent DCM cases. We identified five missense mutations (three sporadic and two familial) absent from 400 controls and affecting highly conserved residues. Expression of the mutant CARP proteins after transfection in rat neonate cardiomyocytes indicated that most of them led to both significantly less repressor activity measured in a reporter gene assay and greater phenylephrin-induced hypertrophy, suggesting altered function of CARP mutant proteins. On the basis of genetic and functional analysis of CARP mutations, we have identified ANKRD1 as a new gene associated with DCM, accounting for approximately 2% of cases.

  7. US28, a Virally-Encoded GPCR as an Antiviral Target for Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungjin; Chung, Yoon Hee; Lee, Choongho

    2017-01-01

    Viruses continue to evolve a new strategy to take advantage of every aspect of host cells in order to maximize their survival. Due to their central roles in transducing a variety of transmembrane signals, GPCRs seem to be a prime target for viruses to pirate for their own use. Incorporation of GPCR functionality into the genome of herpesviruses has been demonstrated to be essential for pathogenesis of many herpesviruses-induced diseases. Here, we introduce US28 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as the best-studied example of virally-encoded GPCRs to manipulate host GPCR signaling. In this review, we wish to summarize a number of US28-related topics including its regulation of host signaling pathways, its constitutive internalization, its structural and functional analysis, its roles in HCMV biology and pathogenesis, its proliferative activities and role in oncogenesis, and pharmacological modulation of its biological activities. This review will aid in our understanding of how pathogenic viruses usurp the host GPCR signaling for successful viral infection. This kind of knowledge will enable us to build a better strategy to control viral infection by normalizing the virally-dysregulated host GPCR signaling. PMID:28035083

  8. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Nan; Yang, Fengling; Li, Ang; Prifti, Edi; Chen, Yanfei; Shao, Li; Guo, Jing; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Yao, Jian; Wu, Lingjiao; Zhou, Jiawei; Ni, Shujun; Liu, Lin; Pons, Nicolas; Batto, Jean Michel; Kennedy, Sean P; Leonard, Pierre; Yuan, Chunhui; Ding, Wenchao; Chen, Yuanting; Hu, Xinjun; Zheng, Beiwen; Qian, Guirong; Xu, Wei; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-09-04

    Liver cirrhosis occurs as a consequence of many chronic liver diseases that are prevalent worldwide. Here we characterize the gut microbiome in liver cirrhosis by comparing 98 patients and 83 healthy control individuals. We build a reference gene set for the cohort containing 2.69 million genes, 36.1% of which are novel. Quantitative metagenomics reveals 75,245 genes that differ in abundance between the patients and healthy individuals (false discovery rate < 0.0001) and can be grouped into 66 clusters representing cognate bacterial species; 28 are enriched in patients and 38 in control individuals. Most (54%) of the patient-enriched, taxonomically assigned species are of buccal origin, suggesting an invasion of the gut from the mouth in liver cirrhosis. Biomarkers specific to liver cirrhosis at gene and function levels are revealed by a comparison with those for type 2 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease. On the basis of only 15 biomarkers, a highly accurate patient discrimination index is created and validated on an independent cohort. Thus microbiota-targeted biomarkers may be a powerful tool for diagnosis of different diseases.

  9. A Human Torque Teno Virus Encodes a MicroRNA That Inhibits Interferon Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, Rodney P.; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele; Sullivan, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Torque teno viruses (TTVs) are a group of viruses with small, circular DNA genomes. Members of this family are thought to ubiquitously infect humans, although causal disease associations are currently lacking. At present, there is no understanding of how infection with this diverse group of viruses is so prevalent. Using a combined computational and synthetic approach, we predict and identify miRNA-coding regions in diverse human TTVs and provide evidence for TTV miRNA production in vivo. The TTV miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II, processed by Drosha and Dicer, and are active in RISC. A TTV mutant defective for miRNA production replicates as well as wild type virus genome; demonstrating that the TTV miRNA is dispensable for genome replication in a cell culture model. We demonstrate that a recombinant TTV genome is capable of expressing an exogenous miRNA, indicating the potential utility of TTV as a small RNA vector. Gene expression profiling of host cells identifies N-myc (and STAT) interactor (NMI) as a target of a TTV miRNA. NMI transcripts are directly regulated through a binding site in the 3′UTR. SiRNA knockdown of NMI contributes to a decreased response to interferon signaling. Consistent with this, we show that a TTV miRNA mediates a decreased response to IFN and increased cellular proliferation in the presence of IFN. Thus, we add Annelloviridae to the growing list of virus families that encode miRNAs, and suggest that miRNA-mediated immune evasion can contribute to the pervasiveness associated with some of these viruses. PMID:24367263

  10. Direction of Movement Is Encoded in the Human Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1. PMID:22110768

  11. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-01-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  12. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  13. Large-area spectrally encoded confocal endomicroscopy of the human esophagus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongkyun; Schlachter, Simon C; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Wu, Tao; Tabatabaei, Nima; Soomro, Amna R; Grant, Catriona N; Rosenberg, Mireille; Nishioka, Norman S; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2017-03-01

    Diagnosis of esophageal diseases is often hampered by sampling errors that are inherent in endoscopic biopsy, the standard of care. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal endomicroscopy technology that has the potential to visualize cellular features from large regions of the esophagus, greatly decreasing the likelihood of sampling error. In this paper, we report results from a pilot clinical study imaging the human esophagus in vivo with a prototype SECM endoscopic probe. In this pilot clinical study, six patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for surveillance of Barrett's esophagus (BE) were imaged with the SECM endoscopic probe. The device had a diameter of 7 mm, a length of 2 m, and a rapid-exchange guide wire provision for esophageal placement. During EGD, the distal portion of the esophagus of each patient was sprayed with 2.5% acetic acid to enhance nuclear contrast. The SECM endoscopic probe was then introduced over the guide wire to the distal esophagus and large-area confocal images were obtained by helically scanning the optics within the SECM probe. Large area confocal images of the distal esophagus (image length = 4.3-10 cm; image width = 2.2 cm) were rapidly acquired at a rate of ∼9 mm(2) /second, resulting in short procedural times (1.8-4 minutes). SECM enabled the visualization of clinically relevant architectural and cellular features of the proximal stomach and normal and diseased esophagus, including squamous cell nuclei, BE glands, and goblet cells. This study demonstrates that comprehensive spectrally encoded confocal endomicroscopy is feasible and can be used to visualize architectural and cellular microscopic features from large segments of the distal esophagus at the gastroesophageal junction. By providing microscopic images that are less subject to sampling error, this technology may find utility in guiding biopsy and planning and assessing endoscopic therapy

  14. Expression, purification and bioactivity of human augmenter of liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang-De; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Peng, Jian; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xin-Sheng; Jia, Ze-Ming

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct the expression vectors for prokaryotic and eukaryotic human augmenter of liver regeneration (hALR) and to study their biological activity. METHODS: hALRcDNA clone was obtained from plasmid pGEM-T-hALR, and cDNA was subcloned into the prokatyotic expression vector pGEX-4T-2. The recombinant vector and pGEX-4T-2hALR were identified by enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing and transformed into E coli JM109. The positively selected clone was induced by the expression of GST-hALR fusion protein with IPTG, then the fusion protein was purified by glutathine s-transferase (GST) sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, cleaved by thrombin and the hALR monomer was obtained and detected by measuring H thymidine incorporation. RESULTS: The product of PCR from plasmid pGEM-T-hALR was examined by 1.5% sepharose electrophoresis. The specific strap was coincident with the theoretical one. The sequence was accurate and pGEX-4T-hALP digested by enzymes was coincident with the theoretical one. The sequence was accurate and the fragment was inserted in the positive direction. The recombinant vector was transformed into E coli JM109. SDS-PAGE proved that the induced expressive fusion protein showed a single band with a molecular weight of 41 kDa. The product was purified and cleaved. The molecular weights of GST and hALR were 26 kDa, 15 kDa respectively. The recombinant fusion protein accounted for 31% of the total soluble protein of bacterial lysate. HALR added to the culture medium of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture and HepG2 cell line could significantly enhance the rate of DNA synthesis compared to the relevant control groups (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Purified hALR has the ability to stimulate DNA synthesis of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture and HepG2 cells in vitro, and can provide evidence for its clinical application. PMID:16865786

  15. Human Liver Cytochrome P450 3A4 Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YongQiang; Kim, Sung-Mi; Trnka, Michael J.; Liu, Yi; Burlingame, A. L.; Correia, Maria Almira

    2015-01-01

    CYP3A4 is an abundant and catalytically dominant human liver endoplasmic reticulum-anchored cytochrome P450 enzyme engaged in the biotransformation of endo- and xenobiotics, including >50% of clinically relevant drugs. Alterations of CYP3A4 protein turnover can influence clinically relevant drug metabolism and bioavailability and drug-drug interactions. This CYP3A4 turnover involves endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent 26 S proteasomal system that relies on two highly complementary E2 Ub-conjugating-E3 Ub-ligase (UBC7-gp78 and UbcH5a-C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP)-Hsc70-Hsp40) complexes, as well as protein kinases (PK) A and C. We have documented that CYP3A4 Ser/Thr phosphorylation (Ser(P)/Thr(P)) by PKA and/or PKC accelerates/enhances its Lys ubiquitination by either of these E2-E3 systems. Intriguingly, CYP3A4 Ser(P)/Thr(P) and ubiquitinated Lys residues reside within the cytosol-accessible surface loop and/or conformationally assembled acidic Asp/Glu clusters, leading us to propose that such post-translational Ser/Thr protein phosphorylation primes CYP3A4 for ubiquitination. Herein, this possibility was examined through various complementary approaches, including site-directed mutagenesis, chemical cross-linking, peptide mapping, and LC-MS/MS analyses. Our findings reveal that such CYP3A4 Asp/Glu/Ser(P)/Thr(P) surface clusters are indeed important for its intermolecular electrostatic interactions with each of these E2-E3 subcomponents. By imparting additional negative charge to these Asp/Glu clusters, such Ser/Thr phosphorylation would generate P450 phosphodegrons for molecular recognition by the E2-E3 complexes, thereby controlling the timing of CYP3A4 ubiquitination and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Although the importance of phosphodegrons in the CHIP targeting of its substrates is known, to our knowledge this is the first example of phosphodegron involvement in gp78-substrate

  16. In Vivo Stable Transduction of Humanized Liver Tissue in Chimeric Mice via High-Capacity Adenovirus–Lentivirus Hybrid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Miho; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawasaki, Yoshiko; Kimura, Takahiro; Faure-Kumar, Emmanuelle; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Okamura, Haruki; Kasahara, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We developed hybrid vectors employing high-capacity adenovirus as a first-stage carrier encoding all the components required for in situ production of a second-stage lentivirus, thereby achieving stable transgene expression in secondary target cells. Such vectors have never previously been tested in normal tissues, because of the scarcity of suitable in vivo systems permissive for second-stage lentivirus assembly. Here we employed a novel murine model in which endogenous liver tissue is extensively reconstituted with engrafted human hepatocytes, and successfully achieved stable transduction by the second-stage lentivirus produced in situ from first-stage adenovirus. This represents the first demonstration of the functionality of adenoviral-lentiviral hybrid vectors in a normal parenchymal organ in vivo. PMID:19725756

  17. Reconstruction and analysis of human liver-specific metabolic network based on CNHLPP data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Geng, Chao; Tao, Lin; Zhang, Duanfeng; Jiang, Ying; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Weidong; He, Fuchu; Li, Yixue; Cao, Zhiwei

    2010-04-05

    Liver is the largest internal organ in the body that takes central roles in metabolic homeostasis, detoxification of various substances, as well as in the synthesis and storage of nutrients. To fulfill these complex tasks, thousands of biochemical reactions are going on in liver to cope with a wide range of foods and environmental variations, which are densely interconnected into an intricate metabolic network. Here, the first human liver-specific metabolic network was reconstructed according to proteomics data from Chinese Human Liver Proteome Project (CNHLPP), and then investigated in the context of the genome-scale metabolic network of Homo sapiens. Topological analysis shows that this organ-specific metabolic network exhibits similar features as organism-specific networks, such as power-law degree distribution, small-world property, and bow-tie structure. Furthermore, the structure of liver network exhibits a modular organization where the modules are formed around precursors from primary metabolism or hub metabolites from derivative metabolism, respectively. Most of the modules are dominated by one major category of metabolisms, while enzymes within same modules have a tendency of being expressed concertedly at protein level. Network decomposition and comparison suggest that the liver network overlays a predominant area in the global metabolic network of H. sapiens genome; meanwhile the human network may develop extra modules to gain more specialized functionality out of liver. The results of this study would permit a high-level interpretation of the metabolite information flow in human liver and provide a basis for modeling the physiological and pathological metabolic states of liver.

  18. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Clinical translation of bioartificial liver support systems with human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakiyama, Ryoichi; Blau, Brandon J; Miki, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    There is currently a pressing need for alternative therapies to liver transplantation. The number of patients waiting for a liver transplant is substantially higher than the number of transplantable donor livers, resulting in a long waiting time and a high waiting list mortality. An extracorporeal liver support system is one possible approach to overcome this problem. However, the ideal cell source for developing bioartificial liver (BAL) support systems has yet to be determined. Recent advancements in stem cell technology allow researchers to generate highly functional hepatocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In this mini-review, we summarize previous clinical trials with different BAL systems, and discuss advantages of and potential obstacles to utilizing hPSC-derived hepatic cells in clinical-scale BAL systems. PMID:28373763

  20. Encoding/retrieval dissociation in working memory for human body forms.

    PubMed

    Bauser, Denise A Soria; Mayer, Kerstin; Daum, Irene; Suchan, Boris

    2011-06-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of working memory (WM) load on body processing mechanisms by using event-related potentials (ERPs). It is well known that WM load modulates the P3b (amplitude decreases as WM load increases). Additionally, WM load for faces modulates earlier ERPs like the N170. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of WM load for bodies on the P3b which is associated with WM. Additionally, we explored the effect of WM load on the N170, which is thought to be associated with configural processing, and P1, which has been observed in body as well as in face processing. Effects were analyzed during the encoding and retrieval phases. WM load was modulated by presenting one to four unfamiliar bodies simultaneously for memory encoding. The present study showed that early encoding processes (reflected by the P1 and N170) might not be modulated by WM load, whereas during the retrieval phase, early processes associated with structural encoding (N170) were affected by WM load. A possible explanation of the encoding/retrieval differences might be that subjects used distinct processing strategies in both phases. Parallel encoding of the simultaneously presented bodies might play an important role during the encoding phase where one to four bodies have to be stored, whereas serial matching might be used to compare the probe with the stored pictures during the retrieval phase. Additionally, WM load modulations were observed in later processing steps, which might be associated with stimulus identification and matching processes (reflected by the early P3b) during the encoding but not during the retrieval phase. The current findings further showed for both the encoding and the retrieval phase that the late P3b amplitude decreased as WM load for body images increased indicating that the late P3b is involved in WM processes which do not appear to be category-specific.

  1. Involvement of human liver cytochrome P4502B6 in the metabolism of propofol

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yutaka; Hamaoka, Naoya; Hiroi, Toyoko; Imaoka, Susumu; Hase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Funae, Yoshihiko; Ishizaki, Takashi; Asada, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Aims To determine the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. Methods The rate constant calculated from the disappearance of propofol in an incubation mixture with human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYP isoforms was used as a measure of the rate of metabolism of propofol. The correlation of these rate constants with rates of metabolism of CYP isoform-selective substrates by liver microsomes, the effect of CYP isoform-selective chemical inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies on propofol metabolism by liver microsomes, and its metabolism by recombinant human CYP isoforms were examined. Results The mean rate constant of propofol metabolism by liver microsomes obtained from six individuals was 4.2 (95% confidence intervals 2.7, 5.7) nmol min−1 mg−1 protein. The rate constants of propofol by microsomes were significantly correlated with S-mephenytoin N-demethylation, a marker of CYP2B6 (r = 0.93, P < 0.0001), but not with the metabolic activities of other CYP isoform-selective substrates. Of the chemical inhibitors of CYP isoforms tested, orphenadrine, a CYP2B6 inhibitor, reduced the rate constant of propofol by liver microsomes by 38% (P < 0.05), while other CYP isoform-selective inhibitors had no effects. Of the recombinant CYP isoforms screened, CYP2B6 produced the highest rate constant for propofol metabolism (197 nmol min−1 nmol P450−1). An antibody against CYP2B6 inhibited the disappearance of propofol in liver microsomes by 74%. Antibodies raised against other CYP isoforms had no effect on the metabolism of propofol. Conclusions CYP2B6 is predominantly involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. PMID:11298076

  2. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  3. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sarada Devi; Schirmer, Katharina; Münst, Bernhard; Heinz, Stefan; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Wölfl, Stefan; Simon-Keller, Katja; Marx, Alexander; Øie, Cristina Ionica; Ebert, Matthias P.; Walles, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte® cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte® cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacity (upcyte® process). Proliferating upcyte® cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions, i.e., 20 to 40 population doublings, but upon withdrawal of proliferation stimulating factors, they regain most of the cell specific characteristics of primary cells. When a defined mixture of differentiated human upcyte® cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) was cultured in vitro on a thick layer of Matrigel™, they self-organized to form liver organoid-like structures within 24 hours. When further cultured for 10 days in a bioreactor, these liver organoids show typical functional characteristics of liver parenchyma including activity of cytochromes P450, CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2C9 as well as mRNA expression of several marker genes and other enzymes. In summary, we hereby describe that 3D functional hepatic structures composed of primary human cell strains can be generated in vitro. They can be cultured for a prolonged period of time and are potentially useful ex vivo models to study liver functions. PMID:26488607

  4. Phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding β-glucuronidase activity in human colonic bacteria and the impact of diet on faecal glycosidase activities.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Freda M; Maison, Nathalie; Holtrop, Grietje; Young, Pauline; Stevens, Valerie J; Ince, Jennifer; Johnstone, Alexandra M; Lobley, Gerald E; Flint, Harry J; Louis, Petra

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial β-glucuronidase in the human colon plays an important role in cleaving liver conjugates of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, while other glycosidase activities are involved in the conversion of dietary plant glycosides. Here we detected an increase in β-glucuronidase activity in faecal samples from obese volunteers following a high-protein moderate carbohydrate weight-loss diet, compared with a weight maintenance diet, but little or no changes were observed when the type of fermentable carbohydrate was varied. Other faecal glycosidase activities showed little or no change over a fivefold range of dietary NSP intake, although α-glucosidase increased on a resistant starch-enriched diet. Two distinct groups of gene, gus and BG, have been reported to encode β-glucuronidase activity among human colonic bacteria. Degenerate primers were designed against these genes. Overall, Firmicutes were found to account for 96% of amplified gus sequences, with three operational taxonomic units particularly abundant, whereas 59% of amplified BG sequences belonged to Bacteroidetes and 41% to Firmicutes. A similar distribution of operational taxonomic units was found in a published metagenome dataset involving a larger number of volunteers. Seven cultured isolates of human colonic bacteria that carried only the BG gene gave relatively low β-glucuronidase activity that was not induced by 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucuronide. By comparison, in three of five isolates that possessed only the gus gene, β-glucuronidase activity was induced. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  6. Androgen regulation of the human FERM domain encoding gene EHM2 in a cell model of steroid-induced differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay; Pandey, Ritu; Way, Jeffrey F.; Sroka, Thomas C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Kunz, Susan; Cress, Anne E.; Mount, David W.; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a cell model to investigate steroid control of differentiation using a subline of HT1080 cells (HT-AR1) that have been engineered to express the human androgen receptor. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment of HT-AR1 cells induced growth arrest and cytoskeletal reorganization that was associated with the expression of fibronectin and the neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. Expression profiling analysis identified the human FERM domain-encoding gene EHM2 as uniquely induced in HT-AR1 cells as compared to 16 other FERM domain containing genes. Since FERM domain proteins control cytoskeletal functions in differentiating cells, and the human EHM2 gene has not been characterized, we investigated EHM2 steroid-regulation, genomic organization, and sequence conservation. We found that DHT, but not dexamethasone, induced the expression of a 3.8 kb transcript in HT-AR1 cells encoding a 504 amino acid protein, and moreover, that human brain tissue contains a 5.8 kb transcript encoding a 913 amino acid isoform. Construction of an unrooted phylogenetic tree using 98 FERM domain proteins revealed that the human EHM2 gene is a member of a distinct subfamily consisting of nine members, all of which contain a highly conserved 325 amino acid FERM domain. PMID:14521927

  7. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  8. Human precision-cut liver slices as a model to test antifibrotic drugs in the early onset of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Westra, Inge M; Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Luangmonkong, Theerut; Hadi, Mackenzie; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; de Jong, Koert P; Groothuis, Geny M M; Olinga, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is the progressive accumulation of connective tissue ultimately resulting in loss of organ function. Currently, no effective antifibrotics are available due to a lack of reliable human models. Here we investigated the fibrotic process in human precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and studied the efficacy of multiple putative antifibrotic compounds. Our results demonstrated that human PCLS remained viable for 48h and the early onset of fibrosis was observed during culture, as demonstrated by an increased gene expression of Heat Shock Protein 47 (HSP47) and Pro-Collagen 1A1 (PCOL1A1) as well as increased collagen 1 protein levels. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) showed a marked decrease in HSP47 and PCOL1A1 gene expression, whereas specific inhibitors of Smad 3 and Rac-1 showed no or only minor effects. Regarding the studied antifibrotics, gene levels of HSP47 and PCOL1A1 could be down-regulated with sunitinib and valproic acid, while PCOL1A1 expression was reduced following treatment with rosmarinic acid, tetrandrine and pirfenidone. These results are in contrast with prior data obtained in rat PCLS, indicating that antifibrotic drug efficacy is clearly species-specific. Thus, human PCLS is a promising model for liver fibrosis. Moreover, MAPK signaling plays an important role in the onset of fibrosis in this model and transforming growth factor beta pathway inhibitors appear to be more effective than platelet-derived growth factor pathway inhibitors in halting fibrogenesis in PCLS.

  9. Slowly adapting mechanoreceptors in the borders of the human fingernail encode fingertip forces.

    PubMed

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G; Westling, Göran; Johansson, Roland S

    2009-07-22

    There are clusters of slowly adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors in the skin folds bordering the nail. These "SA-IInail" afferents, which constitute nearly one fifth of the tactile afferents innervating the fingertip, possess the general discharge characteristics of slowly adapting type II (SA-II) tactile afferents located elsewhere in the glabrous skin of the human hand. Little is known about the signals in the SA-IInail afferents when the fingertips interact with objects. Here we show that SA-IInail afferents reliably respond to fingertip forces comparable to those arising in everyday manipulations. Using a flat stimulus surface, we applied forces to the finger pad while recording impulse activity in 17 SA-IInail afferents. Ramp-and-hold forces (amplitude 4 N, rate 10 N/s) were applied normal to the skin, and at 10, 20, or 30 degrees from the normal in eight radial directions with reference to the primary site of contact (25 force directions in total). All afferents responded to the force stimuli, and the responsiveness of all but one afferents was broadly tuned to a preferred direction of force. The preferred directions among afferents were distributed all around the angular space, suggesting that the population of SA-IInail afferents could encode force direction. We conclude that signals in the population of SA-IInail afferents terminating in the nail walls contain vectorial information about fingertip forces. The particular tactile features of contacted surfaces would less influence force-related signals in SA-IInail afferents than force-related signals present in afferents terminating in the volar skin areas that directly contact objects.

  10. Effect of naked eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding rat augmenter of liver regeneration on acute hepatic injury and hepatic failure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Liu, Dian-Wu; Liu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Long-Mei; Wang, Li-Qin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) on acute hepatic injury and hepatic failure in rats. METHODS: The PCR-amplified ALR gene was recombined with pcDNA3 plasmid, and used to treat rats with acute hepatic injury. The rats with acute hepatic injury induced by intraperitoneal injection of 2 mL/kg 50% carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were randomly divided into saline control group and recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid treatment groups. Recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid DNA (50 or 200 μg/kg) was injected into the rats with acute hepatic injury intraven-ously, intraperitoneally, or intravenously and intraperitoneally in combination 4 h after CCl4 administration, respectively. The recombinant plasmid was injected once per 12 h into all treatment groups four times, and the rats were decapitated 12 h after the last injection. Hepatic histopathological alterations were observed after HE staining, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in liver tissue was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and the level of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was determined by biochemical method. The recombinant plasmid DNA (200 μg/kg) and saline were intraperitoneally injected into the rats with acute hepatic failure induced by intraperitoneal injection of 4 mL/kg 50% CCl4 after 4 h of CCl4 administration, respectively. Rats living over 96 h were considered as survivals. RESULTS: The sequence of ALR cDNA of recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid was accordant with the reported sequence of rat ALR cDNA. After the rats with acute hepatic injury were treated with recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid, the degree of liver histopathological injury markedly decreased. The pathologic liver tissues, in which hepatic degeneration and necrosis of a small amount of hepatocytes and a large amount of infiltrating inflammatory cells were observed, and they became basically normal in the

  11. Metabolic profiling during ex vivo machine perfusion of the human liver.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Bote G; Sridharan, Gautham V; Weeder, Pepijn D; Avruch, James H; Saeidi, Nima; Özer, Sinan; Geerts, Sharon; Porte, Robert J; Heger, Michal; van Gulik, Thomas M; Martins, Paulo N; Markmann, James F; Yeh, Heidi; Uygun, Korkut

    2016-03-03

    As donor organ shortages persist, functional machine perfusion is under investigation to improve preservation of the donor liver. The transplantation of donation after circulatory death (DCD) livers is limited by poor outcomes, but its application may be expanded by ex vivo repair and assessment of the organ before transplantation. Here we employed subnormothermic (21 °C) machine perfusion of discarded human livers combined with metabolomics to gain insight into metabolic recovery during machine perfusion. Improvements in energetic cofactors and redox shifts were observed, as well as reversal of ischemia-induced alterations in selected pathways, including lactate metabolism and increased TCA cycle intermediates. We next evaluated whether DCD livers with steatotic and severe ischemic injury could be discriminated from 'transplantable' DCD livers. Metabolomic profiling was able to cluster livers with similar metabolic patterns based on the degree of injury. Moreover, perfusion parameters combined with differences in metabolic factors suggest variable mechanisms that result in poor energy recovery in injured livers. We conclude that machine perfusion combined with metabolomics has significant potential as a clinical instrument for the assessment of preserved livers.

  12. Flexible transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration: A feasibility study in humans (with video).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Yaping; Chen, Danlei; Li, Xi; Wu, Renpei; Liu, Weifen; Leung, Joseph W; Zhang, Chuansen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2016-12-01

    There is no clinical report on the use of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) for the management of patients with large liver cysts.This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of NOTES for liver cyst fenestration in humans using a currently available technique.From February 2009 to June 2010, 4 cases of transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration were performed; in which 3 cases received NOTES only, while 1 case received additional laparoscopic assistance.Mean time to endoscopically locate the liver cyst was 16 minutes (5-22 minutes). Cysts that were present in the left lobe or on the liver surface were easier to locate endoscopically. Transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration was successful in all patients. The use of an occlusion balloon helped in the endoscopic clipping of the gastrotomy incision. Mean operative time was 101.3 minutes (range, 90-112 minutes), and there were no intra- or postoperative complications including infections. All patients recovered well after the surgery, with only minor postoperative throat pain. There was no recurrence at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-48 months).Small sample size.It may be technically feasible and safe to perform transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration in humans with no recurrence at follow up.

  13. Induced and Evoked Human Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Working Memory Set-Size Effects at Encoding.

    PubMed

    Gurariy, Gennadiy; Killebrew, Kyle W; Berryhill, Marian E; Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2016-01-01

    The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM asymptotes at a small number of items. Research into the neural correlates of set size effects and VWM capacity limits in general largely focus on the maintenance period of VWM. However, we previously reported that neural resources allocated to individual items during VWM encoding correspond to successful VWM performance. Here we expand on those findings by investigating neural correlates of set size during VWM encoding. We hypothesized that neural signatures of encoding-related VWM capacity limitations should be differentiable as a function of set size. We tested our hypothesis using High Density Electroencephalography (HD-EEG) to analyze frequency components evoked by flickering target items in VWM displays of set size 2 or 4. We found that set size modulated the amplitude of the 1st and 2nd harmonic frequencies evoked during successful VWM encoding across frontal and occipital-parietal electrodes. Frontal sites exhibited the most robust effects for the 2nd harmonic (set size 2 > set size 4). Additionally, we found a set-size effect on the induced power of delta-band (1-4 Hz) activity (set size 2 > set size 4). These results are consistent with a capacity limited VWM resource at encoding that is distributed across to-be-remembered items in a VWM display. This resource may work in conjunction with a task-specific selection process that determines which items are to be encoded and which are to be ignored. These neural set size effects support the view that VWM capacity limitations begin with encoding related processes.

  14. Induced and Evoked Human Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Working Memory Set-Size Effects at Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Berryhill, Marian E.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM asymptotes at a small number of items. Research into the neural correlates of set size effects and VWM capacity limits in general largely focus on the maintenance period of VWM. However, we previously reported that neural resources allocated to individual items during VWM encoding correspond to successful VWM performance. Here we expand on those findings by investigating neural correlates of set size during VWM encoding. We hypothesized that neural signatures of encoding-related VWM capacity limitations should be differentiable as a function of set size. We tested our hypothesis using High Density Electroencephalography (HD-EEG) to analyze frequency components evoked by flickering target items in VWM displays of set size 2 or 4. We found that set size modulated the amplitude of the 1st and 2nd harmonic frequencies evoked during successful VWM encoding across frontal and occipital-parietal electrodes. Frontal sites exhibited the most robust effects for the 2nd harmonic (set size 2 > set size 4). Additionally, we found a set-size effect on the induced power of delta-band (1–4 Hz) activity (set size 2 > set size 4). These results are consistent with a capacity limited VWM resource at encoding that is distributed across to-be-remembered items in a VWM display. This resource may work in conjunction with a task-specific selection process that determines which items are to be encoded and which are to be ignored. These neural set size effects support the view that VWM capacity limitations begin with encoding related processes. PMID:27902738

  15. A New Human 3D-Liver Model Unravels the Role of Galectins in Liver Infection by the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Debora B.; Faust, Daniela M.; Deep Jhingan, Gagan; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica. PMID:25211477

  16. A new human 3D-liver model unravels the role of galectins in liver infection by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Faust, Daniela M; Deep Jhingan, Gagan; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica.

  17. HCV Infection Induces Autocrine Interferon Signaling by Human Liver Endothelial Cell and Release of Exosomes, Which Inhibits Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Giugliano, Silvia; Kriss, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Stone, Amy E.L.; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mitchell, Angela; Khetani, Salman R.; Yamane, Daisuke; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Edwards, Michael G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael; Shah, Vijay H.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) make up a large proportion of the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. LSECs are involved in induction of immune tolerance, but little is known about their functions during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Primary human LSECs (HLSECs) and immortalized liver endothelial cells (TMNK-1) were exposed to various forms of HCV, including full-length transmitted/founder virus, sucrose-purified Japanese Fulminant Hepatitis-1 (JFH-1), a virus encoding a luciferase reporter, and the HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. Cells were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and PCR assays. Results HLSECs internalized HCV, independent of cell–cell contacts; HCV RNA was translated but not replicated. Through pattern recognition receptors (TLR7 and retinoic acid inducible gene 1), HCV RNA induced consistent and broad transcription of multiple interferons (IFNs); supernatants from primary HLSECs transfected with HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules increased induction of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes in HLSECs. Recombinant type I and type III IFNs strongly up-regulated HLSEC transcription of interferon λ 3 (IFNL3) and viperin (RSAD2), which inhibit replication of HCV. Compared to CD8+ T cells, HLSECs suppressed HCV replication within Huh7.5.1 cells, also inducing IFN-stimulated genes in co-culture. Conditioned media from IFN-stimulated HLSECs induced expression of antiviral genes by uninfected primary human hepatocytes. Exosomes, derived from HLSECs following stimulation with either type I or type III IFNs, controlled HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Cultured HLSECs produce factors that mediate immunity against HCV. HLSECs induce self-amplifying IFN-mediated responses and release of exosomes with antiviral activity. PMID:25447848

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human ASB-8 gene encoding a novel member of ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing protein family.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhong; Li, Jinjun; Zhang, Fengrui; Qin, Wenxin; Yao, Genfu; He, Xianghuo; Xue, Peng; Ge, Chao; Wan, Dafang; Gu, Jianren

    2003-01-24

    We have cloned a new member of human ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing protein family (ASB), designed as hASB-8, from a human placental cDNA library and further extended by 5(') and 3(')-RACE. The full-length cDNA was 2545bp in length, with a predicted open reading frame encoding a protein of 288 amino acids, which was 96% identical to mouse ASB-8 protein. Computer analysis revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of the human ASB-8 contained four Ankyrin repeats and one SOCS box. The gene had four exons separated by three introns and was mapped to human chromosome 12q13. Human ASB-8 mRNA was expressed at the highest level of expression in skeletal muscle and at a varied level of expression in heart, brain, placenta, liver, kidney, and pancreas. The transcript of hASB-8 was not detected in adult normal lung tissue, but found in lung carcinoma cell lines SPC-A1, A549, and NCI-H446. Subcellular localization analysis showed that the EGFP-tagged hASB-8 protein was localized at cytoplasm in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BEL-7402. We also provided evidence that hASB-8 could interact with Elongin B-C complex in vitro. Furthermore, transfection with the truncated mutant of hASB-8 cDNA lacking SOCS box could suppress cell growth of lung adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 cells in vitro, which suggests that this gene might be related to the development of lung cancer.

  19. Tenascin-X: a novel extracellular matrix protein encoded by the human XB gene overlapping P450c21B

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A human gene termed XB overlaps the P450c21B gene encoding steroid 21- hydroxylase and encodes a protein that closely resembles extracellular matrix proteins. Sequencing of phage and cosmid clones and of cDNA fragments shows that the XB gene spans 65 kb of DNA, consisting of 39 exons that encode a 12-kb mRNA. The predicted protein of over 400 kD consists of five distinct domains: a signal peptide, a hydrophobic domain containing three heptad repeats, a series of 18.5 EGF-like repeats, 29 fibronectin type III repeats, and a carboxy-terminal fibrinogen-like domain. Because the structure of the protein encoded by the XB gene closely resembles tenascin, we term this protein tenascin-X (TN-X), and propose a simplified nomenclature system for the family of tenascins. RNase protection experiments show that the TN-X transcript is expressed ubiquitously in human fetal tissues, with the greatest expression in the fetal testis and in fetal skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. Two adrenal-specific transcripts, P450c21B (steroid 21- hydroxylase) and Y (an untranslated transcript) overlap the XB gene on the complementary strand of DNA, yielding a unique array of overlapping transcripts: a "polygene." In situ hybridization histochemistry experiments show that the TN-X transcript and the P450c21 and Y transcripts encoded on the complementary DNA strand are all expressed in the same cells of the human adrenal cortex. Genetic data suggest that TN-X may be essential for life. PMID:7686164

  20. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a possible tool to complement liver biopsy for grading hepatic fibrosis in paraffin-preserved human liver specimens.

    PubMed

    Fabila-Bustos, Diego A; Arroyo-Camarena, Ursula D; López-Vancell, María D; Durán-Padilla, Marco A; Azuceno-García, Itzel; Stolik-Isakina, Suren; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth; Brown, Blair; Escobedo, Galileo; de la Rosa-Vázquez, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A diffuse reflectance spectroscopy-based method to score fibrosis in paraffin-preserved human liver specimens has been developed and is reported here. Paraffin blocks containing human liver tissue were collected from the General Hospital of Mexico and included in the study with the patients' written consent. The score of liver fibrosis was determined in each sample by two experienced pathologists in a single-blind fashion. Spectral measurements were acquired at 450-750 nm by establishing surface contact between the optical probe and the preserved tissue. According to the histological evaluation, four liver samples showed no evidence of fibrosis and were categorized as F0, four hepatic specimens exhibited an initial degree of fibrosis (F1-F2), five liver specimens showed a severe degree of fibrosis (F3), and six samples exhibited cirrhosis (F4). The human liver tissue showed a characteristic diffuse reflectance spectrum associated with the progressive stages of fibrosis. In the F0 liver samples, the diffuse reflection intensity gradually increased in the wavelength range of 450-750 nm. In contrast, the F1-F2, F3, and F4 specimens showed corresponding 1.5-, 2-, and 5.5-fold decreases in the intensity of diffuse reflectance compared to the F0 liver specimens. At 650 nm, all the stages of liver fibrosis were clearly distinguished from each other with high sensitivity and specificity (92-100%). To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting a distinctive diffuse reflectance spectrum for each stage of fibrosis in paraffin-preserved human liver specimens. These results suggest that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy may represent a complementary tool to liver biopsy for grading fibrosis.

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  2. Ultrastructure of Ebola virus particles in human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, D S; Simpson, I H; Francis, D P; Knobloch, J; Bowen, E T; Lolik, P; Deng, I M

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscopy of tissues from two necropsies carried out in the Sudan on patients with Ebola virus infection identified virus particles in lung and spleen, but the main concentrations of Ebola particles were seen in liver sections. Viral precursor proteins and cores were found in functional liver cells, often aligned in membrane-bound aggregations. Complete virions, usually found only extracellularly, were mainly seen as long tubular forms, some without cores. Many tubular forms had 'enlarged heads' or 'spores' and some branched and torus forms were identified. The size and structure of the Ebola virus forms appear to be virtually indistinguishable from those of Marburg virus. Images Figs 6, 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:641193

  3. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  4. Why do most human liver cytosol preparations lack xanthine oxidase activity?

    PubMed

    Barr, John T; Choughule, Kanika V; Nepal, Sahadev; Wong, Timothy; Chaudhry, Amarjit S; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Zientek, Michael; Strom, Stephen C; Schuetz, Erin G; Thummel, Kenneth E; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2014-04-01

    When investigating the potential for xanthine oxidase (XO)-mediated metabolism of a new chemical entity in vitro, selective chemical inhibition experiments are typically used. Most commonly, these inhibition experiments are performed using the inhibitor allopurinol (AP) and commercially prepared human liver cytosol (HLC) as the enzyme source. For reasons detailed herein, it is also a common practice to perfuse livers with solutions containing AP prior to liver harvest. The exposure to AP in HLC preparations could obviously pose a problem for measuring in vitro XO activity. To investigate this potential problem, an HPLC-MS/MS assay was developed to determine whether AP and its primary metabolite, oxypurinol, are retained within the cytosol for livers that were treated with AP during liver harvest. Differences in enzymatic activity for XO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) in human cytosol that can be ascribed to AP exposure were also evaluated. The results confirmed the presence of residual AP (some) and oxypurinol (all) human liver cytosol preparations that had been perfused with an AP-containing solution. In every case where oxypurinol was detected, XO activity was not observed. In contrast, the presence of AP and oxypurinol did not appear to have an impact on AO activity. Pooled HLC that was purchased from a commercial source also contained residual oxypurinol and did not show any XO activity. In the future, it is recommended that each HLC batch is screened for oxypurinol and/or XO activity prior to testing for XO-mediated metabolism of a new chemical entity.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Human Sample Effect on RF Penetration and Liver MR Imaging at Ultrahigh Field.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Wu, Bing; Wang, Chunsheng; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide clinically-valuable images for hepatic diseases and has become one of the most promising noninvasive methods in evaluating liver lesions. To facilitate the ultrahigh field human liver MRI, in this work, the RF penetration behavior in the conductive and high dielectric human body at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla (7T) is investigated and evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain numerical analysis. The study shows that in brain imaging at the ultrahigh field of 7T, the "dielectric resonance" effect dominates among other factors, resulting in improved B(1) penetration; while in liver imaging, due to its irregular geometry of the liver, the "dielectric resonance" effect is not readily to be established, leading to a reduced B(1) penetration or limited image coverage comparing to that in the brain. Therefore, it is necessary to build a large size coil to have deeper penetration to image human liver although the coil design may become more challenging due to the required high frequency. Based on this study, a bisected microstrip coil operating at 300 MHz range is designed and constructed. Three-dimensional in vivo liver images in axial, sagittal and coronal orientations are then acquired from healthy volunteers using this dedicated RF coil on a 7T whole body MR scanner.

  6. Biomonitoring perfluorinated compounds in Catalonia, Spain: concentrations and trends in human liver and milk samples.

    PubMed

    Kärrman, Anna; Domingo, José L; Llebaria, Xavier; Nadal, Martí; Bigas, Esther; van Bavel, Bert; Lindström, Gunilla

    2010-03-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are global environmental pollutants that bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. Laboratory experiments have revealed toxic effects such as delayed development, humoral suppression, and hepatotoxicity. Although numerous human blood levels have been reported, little is known about distribution in the human body. Knowledge about PFC distribution and accumulation in the human body is crucial to understanding uptake and subsequent effects as well as to conduct risk assessments. The present study reports PFC levels in human liver and breast milk from a general population living in Catalonia, Spain. Liver and milk levels are compared to previously reported levels in blood from the same geographic area as well as to other existing reports on human liver and milk levels in other countries. Human liver (n = 12) and milk (n = 10) samples were collected in 2007 and 2008 in Catalonia, Spain. Liver samples were taken postmortem from six males and six females aged 27-79 years. Milk samples were from healthy primipara women (30-39 years old). Both liver and milk were analyzed by solid-phase extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Six PFCs were detected in liver, with perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS, 26.6 ng/g wet weight) being the chemical with the highest mean concentration. Other PFCs such as perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and acids with chain lengths up to C11 were also detected, with mean levels ranging between 0.50 and 1.45 ng/g wet weight. On the other hand, PFOS and PFHxS were the only PFCs detected in human milk, with mean concentrations of 0.12 and 0.04 ng/mL, respectively. While milk concentrations were similar to reported levels from other countries, liver samples contained more PFCs above quantification limits and higher PFOS concentrations compared to the only two other reports found in the literature. Differences between the results of the present study and those

  7. Interaction of human TNF and beta2-microglobulin with Tanapox virus-encoded TNF inhibitor, TPV-2L.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Jeng, David; Singh, Rajkumari; Coughlin, Jake; Essani, Karim; McFadden, Grant

    2009-04-10

    Tanapox virus (TPV) encodes and expresses a secreted TNF-binding protein, TPV-2L or gp38, that displays inhibitory properties against TNF from diverse mammalian species, including human, monkey, canine and rabbit. TPV-2L also has sequence similarity with the MHC-class I heavy chain and interacts differently with human TNF as compared to the known cellular TNF receptors or any of the known virus-encoded TNF receptor homologs derived from many poxviruses. In order to determine the TNF binding region in TPV-2L, various TPV-2L C-terminal truncations and internal deletions were created and the muteins were expressed using recombinant baculovirus vectors. C-terminal deletions from TPV-2L resulted in reduced binding affinity for human TNF and specific mutants of TNF that discriminate between TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. However, deletion of C-terminal 42 amino acid residues totally abolished the binding of human TNF and its mutants. Removal of any of the predicted internal domains resulted in a mutant TPV-2L protein incapable of binding to human TNF. Deletion of C-terminal residues also affected the ability of TPV-2L to block TNF-induced cellular cytotoxicity. In addition to TNF, TPV-2L can also form complexes with human beta2-microglobulin to form a novel macromolecular complex. In summary, the TPV-2L protein is a bona fide MHC-1 heavy chain family member that binds and inhibits human TNF in a fashion very distinct from other known poxvirus-encoded TNF inhibitors, and also can form a novel complex with the human MHC-1 light chain, beta2-microglobulin.

  8. Identification of human cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the 7-hydroxylation of chlorpromazine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, K; Kobayashi, K; Tsumuji, M; Tani, M; Shimada, N; Chiba, K

    2000-01-01

    Studies to identify the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform(s) involved in chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation were performed using human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed human CYPs. The kinetics of chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation in human liver microsomes showed a simple Michaelis-Menten behavior. The apparent Km and Vmax values were 3.4+/-1.0 microM and 200.5+/-83.7 pmol/min/mg, respectively. The chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity in human liver microsomes showed good correlations with desipramine 2-hydroxylase activity (r = 0.763, p < 0.05), a marker activity for CYP2D6, and phenacetin O-deethylase activity (r = 0.638, p < 0.05), a marker activity for CYP1A2. Quinidine (an inhibitor of CYP2D6) completely inhibited while alpha-naphthoflavone (an inhibitor of CYP1A2) marginally inhibited the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity in a human liver microsomal sample showing high CYP2D6 activity. On the other hand, alpha-naphthoflavone inhibited the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity to 55-65% of control in a human liver microsomal sample showing low CYP2D6 activity. Among eleven cDNA-expressed CYPs studied, CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 exhibited significant activity for the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation. The Km values for the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation of both cDNA-expressed CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 were in agreement with the Km values of human liver microsomes. These results suggest that chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation is catalyzed mainly by CYP2D6 and partially by CYP1A2.

  9. Statistical modeling of human liver incorporating the variations in shape, size, and material properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Chiao; Kemper, Andrew R; Gayzik, Scott; Untaroiu, Costin D; Beillas, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    The liver is one of the most frequently injured abdominal organs during motor vehicle crashes. Realistic numerical assessments of liver injury risk for the entire occupant population require incorporating inter-subject variations into numerical models. The main objective of this study was to quantify the shape variations of human liver in a seated posture and the statistical distributions of its material properties. Statistical shape analysis was applied to construct shape models of the livers of 15 adult human subjects, recorded in a typical seated (occupant) posture. The principal component analysis was then utilized to obtain the modes of variation, the mean model, and 95% statistical boundary shape models. In addition, a total of 52 tensile tests were performed on the parenchyma of three fresh human livers at four loading rates (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 s^-1) to characterize the rate-dependent and failure properties of the human liver. A FE-based optimization approach was employed to identify the material parameters of an Ogden material model for each specimen. The mean material parameters were then determined for each loading rate from the characteristic averages of the stress-strain curves, and a stochastic optimization approach was utilized to determine the standard deviations of the material parameters. Results showed that the first five modes of the human liver shape models account for more than 60% of the overall anatomical variations. The distributions of the material parameters combined with the mean and statistical boundary shape models could be used to develop probabilistic finite element (FE) models, which may help to better understand the variability in biomechanical responses and injuries to the abdominal organs under impact loading.

  10. Complementary DNA encoding the human T-cell FK506-binding protein, a peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase distinct from cyclophilin

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Nishimaki, Junichi; Miwa, Keiko; Hayano, Toshiya; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Masanori )

    1990-07-01

    The recently discovered macrolide FK506 has been demonstrated to have potent immunosuppressive activity at concentrations 100-fold lower than cyclosporin A, a cyclic undecapeptide that is used to prevent rejection after transplantation of bone marrow and organs, such as kidney, heart, and liver. After the recent discovery that the cylcosporin A-binding protein cyclophilin is identical to peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase, a cellular binding protein for FK506 was found to be distinct from cyclophilin but to have the same enzymatic activity. In this study, the authors isolated a cDNA coding for FK506-binding protein (FKBP) from human peripheral blood T cells by using mixed 20-mer oligonucleotide probes synthesized on the basis of the sequence, Glu-Asp-Gly-Lys-Lys-Phe-Asp, reported for bovine FKBP. The DNA isolated contained an open reading frame encoding 108 amino acid residues. The first 40 residues of the deduced amino acid sequence were identical to those of the reported amino-terminal sequence of bovine FKBP, indicating that the DNA sequence isolated represents the gene coding for FKBP. This result suggests that two catalytically similar proteins, cyclophilin and FKBP, evolved independently. In Northern blot analysis, mRNA species of {approx}1.8 kilobases that hybridized with human FKBP cDNA were detected in poly(A){sup +} RNAs from brain, lung, liver, and placental cells and leukocytes. Induction of Jurkat leukemic T cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin did not affect the level of FKBP mRNA.

  11. Reelin Expression in Human Liver of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carotti, Simone; Perrone, Giuseppe; Amato, Michelina; Gentilucci, Umberto Vespasiani; Righi, Daniela; Francesconi, Maria; Pellegrini, Claudio; Zalfa, Francesca; Zingariello, Maria; Picardi, Antonio; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Morini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Reelin is a secreted extracellular glyco-protein that plays a critical role during brain development. Several studies have described Reelin expression in hepatic stellate cells of the human liver. In order to investigate the possible role of Reelin in the process of hepatic fibrogenesis, in this study we investigated Reelin expression in the liver tissue of patients infected with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). On this basis, Reelin expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry during liver biopsies of 81 patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis. A Knodell score was used to stage liver fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblast immunohistochemical markers (CRBP-1, alpha-SMA) were also evaluated. As further confirmed by colocalization experiments (Reelin +CRBP-1), Reelin protein was expressed by hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts, and a significant positive correlation was found between Reelin expression and the stage of liver fibrosis (P=0.002). Moreover, Reelin correlated with CRBP-1 positive cells (P=0.002), but not with alpha-SMA, suggesting that Reelin should not be regarded as a marker of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts differentiation but rather as a functional protein expressed during some phases of liver fibrosis. Furthermore, Disabled-1 (Dab1), a Reelin adaptor protein, was expressed in cells of ductular reaction suggesting a paracrine role for Reelin with regards these elements. In conclusion, Reelin was expressed by human hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts and the number of these cells increased significantly in the lobule as the liver fibrosis progressed, suggesting a role for Reelin in the activation of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts during liver injury. Reelin may potentially be incorporated into liver injury evaluations in combination with other histological data. PMID:28348420

  12. Exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells alleviate liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingfen; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Bingying; Qian, Hui; Zhang, Xu; Shen, Li; Wang, Mei; Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Wei; Li, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2013-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been considered as an attractive tool for the therapy of diseases. Exosomes excreted from MSCs can reduce myocardial ischemia/reperfusion damage and protect against acute tubular injury. However, whether MSC-derived exosomes can relieve liver fibrosis and its mechanism remain unknown. Previous work showed that human umbilical cord-MSCs (hucMSCs) transplanted into acutely injured and fibrotic livers could restore liver function and improve liver fibrosis. In this study, it was found that transplantation of exosomes derived from hucMSC (hucMSC-Ex) reduced the surface fibrous capsules and got their textures soft, alleviated hepatic inflammation and collagen deposition in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrotic liver. hucMSC-Ex also significantly recovered serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, decreased collagen type I and III, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and phosphorylation Smad2 expression in vivo. In further experiments, we found that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated markers E-cadherin-positive cells increased and N-cadherin- and vimentin-positive cells decreased after hucMSC-Ex transplantation. Furthermore, the human liver cell line HL7702 underwent typical EMT after induction with recombinant human TGF-β1, and then hucMSC-Ex treatment reversed spindle-shaped and EMT-associated markers expression in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that hucMSC-Ex could ameliorate CCl4-induced liver fibrosis by inhibiting EMT and protecting hepatocytes. This provides a novel approach for the treatment of fibrotic liver disease.

  13. Alcohol Cirrhosis Alters Nuclear Receptor and Drug Transporter Expression in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    More, Vijay R.; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Buckley, David B.; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Unsafe use of alcohol results in approximately 2.5 million deaths worldwide, with cirrhosis contributing to 16.6% of reported deaths. Serum insulin levels are often elevated in alcoholism and may result in diabetes, which is why alcoholic liver disease and diabetes often are present together. Because there is a sizable population with these diseases alone or in combination, the purpose of this study was to determine whether transporter expression in human liver is affected by alcoholic cirrhosis, diabetes, and alcoholic cirrhosis coexisting with diabetes. Transporters aid in hepatobiliary excretion of many drugs and toxic chemicals and can be determinants of drug-induced liver injury. Drug transporter expression and transcription factor–relative mRNA and protein expression in normal, diabetic, cirrhotic, and cirrhosis with diabetes human livers were quantified. Cirrhosis significantly increased ABCC4, 5, ABCG2, and solute carrier organic anion (SLCO) 2B1 mRNA expression and decreased SLCO1B3 mRNA expression in the liver. ABCC1, 3–5, and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated by alcoholic cirrhosis. ABCC3-5 and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated in diabetic cirrhosis. Cirrhosis increased nuclear factor E2–related factor 2 mRNA expression, whereas it decreased pregnane-X-receptor and farnesoid-X-receptor mRNA expression in comparison with normal livers. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that expressions of ABCC2, 3, and 6; SLCO1B1 and 1B3; and ABCC4 and 5 were more closely related in the livers from this cohort. Overall, alcoholic cirrhosis altered transporter expression in human liver. PMID:23462698

  14. Alcohol cirrhosis alters nuclear receptor and drug transporter expression in human liver.

    PubMed

    More, Vijay R; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Donepudi, Ajay C; Buckley, David B; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L

    2013-05-01

    Unsafe use of alcohol results in approximately 2.5 million deaths worldwide, with cirrhosis contributing to 16.6% of reported deaths. Serum insulin levels are often elevated in alcoholism and may result in diabetes, which is why alcoholic liver disease and diabetes often are present together. Because there is a sizable population with these diseases alone or in combination, the purpose of this study was to determine whether transporter expression in human liver is affected by alcoholic cirrhosis, diabetes, and alcoholic cirrhosis coexisting with diabetes. Transporters aid in hepatobiliary excretion of many drugs and toxic chemicals and can be determinants of drug-induced liver injury. Drug transporter expression and transcription factor-relative mRNA and protein expression in normal, diabetic, cirrhotic, and cirrhosis with diabetes human livers were quantified. Cirrhosis significantly increased ABCC4, 5, ABCG2, and solute carrier organic anion (SLCO) 2B1 mRNA expression and decreased SLCO1B3 mRNA expression in the liver. ABCC1, 3-5, and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated by alcoholic cirrhosis. ABCC3-5 and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated in diabetic cirrhosis. Cirrhosis increased nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 mRNA expression, whereas it decreased pregnane-X-receptor and farnesoid-X-receptor mRNA expression in comparison with normal livers. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that expressions of ABCC2, 3, and 6; SLCO1B1 and 1B3; and ABCC4 and 5 were more closely related in the livers from this cohort. Overall, alcoholic cirrhosis altered transporter expression in human liver.

  15. Inhibition of mouse alkali burn induced-corneal neovascularization by recombinant adenovirus encoding human vasohibin-1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhao-lian; Xiao, Ou; Yang, Xiao-ru; Heng, Boon Chin; Sato, Yasufumi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the activity of recombinant adenovirus encoding human vasohibin-1 (Ad-Vasohibin-1) on mouse corneal neovasularization induced by alkali burn. Methods For the treatment group, 50 mice each received subconjunctival injection (5 μl) of 109 plaque forming units of replication-defective Ad-Vasohibin-1. Control group mice received the same dosage of blank adenoviral vector (AdNull). Five days after injection, corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced by placing 2.5 μl of 0.1 M NaOH on the right cornea for 30 s. Subsequently, CNV was observed and photographed every 3 days for a total duration of 9 days after the alkali burn. The percentage of neovascularized area was measured and compared with the AdNull control. The expression of human vasohibin-1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting at 5, 8, and 14 days after injection. The mRNA expression levels of murine vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf), VEGF receptor 1 and 2 (Vegfr1, Vegfr2), and vasohibin-1 (Vash1) were analyzed and compared by real time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results The percentage of neovascularized area within the cornea was significantly reduced in mice treated with Ad-Vasohibin-1 compared to mice treated with AdNull at every time point after alkali-induced injury (7.11%±3.91% and 15.48%±1.79% of corneal area in the treatment and control groups, respectively, on day 3; 31.64%±4.71% and 43.93%±6.15% on day 6, and 45.02%±9.98% and 66.24%±7.17% on day 9, all p<0.001). Human vasohibin-1 protein was detected at the injection sites on day 3 after corneal burn and was highly expressed in the central subepithelial stroma and co-localized with neovascularized vessels within the alkali-treated cornea on day 6. On day 9, the peripheral cornea exhibited a similar staining pattern as the central cornea, but a more intense vasohibin-1 immunostaining signal was detected in the deep stroma. Some of the vasohibin-1 stain

  16. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  17. Esterase detoxication of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moser, Virginia C; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxication can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are considered factors underlying age-related sensitivity differences. We used an in vitro system to measure detoxication of AChE-inhibiting pesticides mediated via these esterases. Recombinant human AChE was used as a bioassay of inhibitor concentration following incubation with detoxifying tissue: liver plus Ca(+2) (to stimulate PON1s, measuring activity of both esterases) or EGTA (to inhibit PON1s, thereby measuring CaE activity). AChE inhibitory concentrations of aldicarb, chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methamidophos, oxamyl, paraoxon, and methylparaoxon were incubated with liver homogenates from adult male rat or one of 20 commercially provided human (11-83 years of age) liver samples. Detoxication was defined as the difference in inhibition produced by the pesticide alone and inhibition measured in combination with liver plus Ca(+2) or liver plus EGTA. Generally, rat liver produced more detoxication than did the human samples. There were large detoxication differences across human samples for some pesticides (especially malaoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon) but not for others (e.g., aldicarb, methamidophos); for the most part these differences did not correlate with age or sex. Chlorpyrifos oxon was fully detoxified only in the presence of Ca(+2) in both rat and human livers. Detoxication of paraoxon and methylparaoxon in rat liver was greater with Ca(+2), but humans showed less differentiation than rats between Ca(+2) and EGTA conditions. This suggests the importance of PON1 detoxication for these three OPs in the rat, but mostly only for chlorpyrifos oxon in human samples. Malaoxon was detoxified similarly with Ca(+2) or EGTA, and the differences across humans correlated with metabolism of p

  18. Human major histocompatibility complex class I gene that encodes a protein with a shortened cytoplasmic segment

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, D.E.; Koller, B.H.; Orr, H.T.

    1987-12-01

    The authors have cloned genomic DNA encoding a non-HLA-A, -B, -C class I gene located within a HindIII-generated restriction fragment of 6.0 kilobase pairs. This gene, designated HLA-6.0, is as homologous to HLA-A and HLA-B as they are to each other. The HLA class I protein encoded by HLA-6.0 is similar in organization to the HLA-A-, -B-, and -C-encoded proteins except that an in-frame termination codon prevents translation of a majority of the cytoplasmic region of the HLA-6.0 polypeptide. Moreover, the promoter region of HLA-6.0 resembles the promoter region of a Qa region gene. These structural features of HLA-6.0 suggest that this nonHLA-A, -B, -C gene is a structural homolog of a murine Qa region class I gene.

  19. Effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; van Hell, Hendrika H; Zuurman, Lineke; Jansma, J Martijn; Mehta, Mitul A; van Gerven, Joop M A; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-03-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing evidence but suggest that administration of cannabinoid substances affects encoding rather than recall of information. In this study, we examined the effects of perturbation of the eCB system on memory function during both encoding and recall. We performed a pharmacological MRI study with a placebo-controlled, crossover design, investigating the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhalation on associative memory-related brain function in 13 healthy volunteers. Performance and brain activation during associative memory were assessed using a pictorial memory task, consisting of separate encoding and recall conditions. Administration of THC caused reductions in activity during encoding in the right insula, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the left middle occipital gyrus and a network-wide increase in activity during recall, which was most prominent in bilateral cuneus and precuneus. THC administration did not affect task performance, but while during placebo recall activity significantly explained variance in performance, this effect disappeared after THC. These findings suggest eCB involvement in encoding of pictorial information. Increased precuneus activity could reflect impaired recall function, but the absence of THC effects on task performance suggests a compensatory mechanism. These results further emphasize the eCB system as a potential novel target for treatment of memory disorders and a promising target for development of new therapies to reduce memory deficits in humans.

  20. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  1. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses.

  2. Evaluation of JPEG 2000 encoder options: human and model observer detection of variable signals in X-ray coronary angiograms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh; Eckstein, Miguel P

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the effect of the new still image compression standard JPEG 2000 using nontask based image quality metrics, i.e., peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) for nonmedical images. In this paper, the effect of JPEG 2000 encoder options was investigated using the performance of human and model observers (nonprewhitening matched filter with an eye filter, square-window Hotelling, Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling and channelized Hotelling model observer) for clinically relevant visual tasks. Two tasks were investigated: the signal known exactly but variable task (SKEV) and the signal known statistically task (SKS). Test images consisted of real X-ray coronary angiograms with simulated filling defects (signals) inserted in one of the four simulated arteries. The signals varied in size and shape. Experimental results indicated that the dependence of task performance on the JPEG 2000 encoder options was similar for all model and human observers. Model observer performance in the more tractable and computationally economic SKEV task can be used to reliably estimate performance in the complex but clinically more realistic SKS task. JPEG 2000 encoder settings different from the default ones resulted in greatly improved model and human observer performance in the studied clinically relevant visual tasks using real angiography backgrounds.

  3. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  4. A human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae REV3 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; McGregor, W. Glenn; Maher, Veronica M.; Nisson, Paul; Lawrence, Christopher W.

    1998-01-01

    To get a better understanding of mutagenic mechanisms in humans, we have cloned and sequenced the human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae REV3 gene. The yeast gene encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ, a nonessential enzyme that is thought to carry out translesion replication and is responsible for virtually all DNA damage-induced mutagenesis and the majority of spontaneous mutagenesis. The human gene encodes an expected protein of 3,130 residues, about twice the size of the yeast protein (1,504 aa). The two proteins are 29% identical in an amino-terminal region of ≈340 residues, 39% identical in a carboxyl-terminal region of ≈850 residues, and 29% identical in a 55-residue region in the middle of the two genes. The sequence of the expected protein strongly predicts that it is the catalytic subunit of a DNA polymerase of the pol ζ type; the carboxyl-terminal domain possesses, in the right order, the six motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DNA polymerases, most closely resembles yeast pol ζ among all polymerases in the GenBank database, and is different from the human α, δ, and ɛ enzymes. Human cells expressing high levels of an hsREV3 antisense RNA fragment grow normally, but show little or no UV-induced mutagenesis and are slightly more sensitive to killing by UV. The human gene therefore appears to carry out a function similar to that of its yeast counterpart. PMID:9618506

  5. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  6. Subnormothermic machine perfusion for ex vivo preservation and recovery of the human liver for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, B G; Yeh, H; Ozer, S; Martins, P N; Farmer, A; Wu, W; Saeidi, N; Op den Dries, S; Berendsen, T A; Smith, R N; Markmann, J F; Porte, R J; Yarmush, M L; Uygun, K; Izamis, M-L

    2014-06-01

    To reduce widespread shortages, attempts are made to use more marginal livers for transplantation. Many of these grafts are discarded for fear of inferior survival rates or biliary complications. Recent advances in organ preservation have shown that ex vivo subnormothermic machine perfusion has the potential to improve preservation and recover marginal livers pretransplantation. To determine the feasibility in human livers, we assessed the effect of 3 h of oxygenated subnormothermic machine perfusion (21°C) on seven livers discarded for transplantation. Biochemical and microscopic assessment revealed minimal injury sustained during perfusion. Improved oxygen uptake (1.30 [1.11-1.94] to 6.74 [4.15-8.16] mL O2 /min kg liver), lactate levels (4.04 [3.70-5.99] to 2.29 [1.20-3.43] mmol/L) and adenosine triphosphate content (45.0 [70.6-87.5] pmol/mg preperfusion to 167.5 [151.5-237.2] pmol/mg after perfusion) were observed. Liver function, reflected by urea, albumin and bile production, was seen during perfusion. Bile production increased and the composition of bile (bile salts/phospholipid ratio, pH and bicarbonate concentration) became more favorable. In conclusion, ex vivo subnormothermic machine perfusion effectively maintains liver function with minimal injury and sustains or improves various hepatobiliary parameters postischemia.

  7. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Human Orthotopic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. Jake; Jaffe, Ron; Tzakis, A.; Ramsey, Glenn; Todo, S.; Belle, Steven; Esquivel, Carlos; Shapiro, Ron; Markus, Bernd; Mroczek, Elizabeth; Van Thiel, D. H.; Sysyn, Greg; Gordon, Robert; Makowka, Leonard; Starzl, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A clinicopathologic analysis of liver transplantation across major ABO blood group barriers was carried out 1) to determine if antibody-mediated (humoral) rejection was a cause of graft failure and if humoral rejection can be identified, 2) to propose criteria for establishing the diagnosis, and 3) to describe the clinical and pathologic features of humoral rejection. A total of 51 (24 primary) ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) liver grafts were transplanted into 49 recipients. There was a 46% graft failure rate during the first 30 days for primary ABO-I grafts compared with an 11% graft failure rate for primary ABO compatible (ABO-C), crossmatch negative, age, sex and priority-matched control patients (P < 0.02). A similarly high early graft failure rate (60%) was seen for nonprimary ABO-I grafts during the first 30 days. Clinically, the patients experienced a relentless rise in serum transaminases, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy during the first weeks after transplant. Pathologic examination of ABO-I grafts that failed early demonstrated widespread areas of geographic hemorrhagic necrosis with diffuse intraorgan coagulation. Prominent arterial deposition of antibody and complement components was demonstrated by immunoflourescent staining. Elution studies confirmed the presence of tissue-bound, donor-specific isoagglutinins within the grafts. No such deposition was seen in control cases. These studies confirm that antibody mediated rejection of the liver occurs and allows for the development of criteria for establishing the diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3046369

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma antigen in human liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guido, M; Roskams, T; Pontisso, P; Fassan, M; Thung, S N; Giacomelli, L; Sergio, A; Farinati, F; Cillo, U; Rugge, M

    2008-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) is a serine protease inhibitor that can be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at both molecular and protein level, but no data are available on its expression in pre-malignant stages. To assess SCCA expression by immunohistochemistry in HCC and its nodular precursors in cirrhotic livers. 55 nodules from 42 explanted livers were evaluated: 7 large regenerative nodules (LRNs), 7 low-grade dysplastic nodules (LG-DNs), 10 high-grade DNs (HG-DNs), and 31 HCC. SCCA expression was semiquantitatively scored on a four-tiered scale. SCCA hepatocyte immunostaining was always restricted to the cytoplasm, mainly exhibiting a granular pattern. Stain intensity varied, ranging from weak to very strong. Within the nodules, positive cells were unevenly distributed, either scattered or in irregular clusters. The prevalence of SCCA expression was 29% in LRNs, 100% in DNs and 93% in HCC. A significant difference emerged in both prevalence and score for LRNs versus LG-DNs (p<0.039), HG-DNs (p = 0.001), and HCC (p = 0.000). A barely significant difference (p = 0.49) was observed between LG-DNs and HG-DNs, while no difference in SCCA expression was detected between HG-DNs and HCC. Cirrhotic tissue adjacent to the nodules was positive in 96% of cases, with a significant difference in the score (p = 0.000) between hepatocytes adjacent to HCC and those surrounding LRNs. This study provides the first evidence that aberrant SCCA expression is an early event in liver cell carcinomatous transformation.

  9. Human liver tumors in relation to steroidal usage.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, G H; Christopherson, W M

    1983-01-01

    Since 1973 a number of investigators have reported an association between liver neoplasia and steroid usage. Through referral material we have examined the histology of over 250 cases of hepatic neoplasia, most in patients receiving steroid medications. The majority have been benign, predominantly focal nodular hyperplasia (55%) and hepatocellular adenoma (39%). The average age was 31.4 years; 83% had significant steroid exposure with an average duration of 71 months for focal nodular hyperplasia and 79.6 months for hepatocellular adenoma. The type of estrogenic agent was predominantly mestranol; however, during the period mestranol was the most frequently used synthetic steroid. A distinct clinical entity of life threatening hemorrhage from the lesion occurred in 31% of patients with hepatocellular adenoma and 9% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia. Recurrence of benign tumors has occurred in some patients who continued using steroids and regression has been observed in patients who had incomplete tumor removal but discontinued steroid medication. Medial and intimal vascular changes have been present in a large number of the benign tumors. The relationship of these vascular changes to oncogenesis is unclear, but similar lesions have been described in the peripheral vasculature associated with steroid administration. A number of hepatocellular carcinomas have also been seen. Of significance is the young age of these patients and lack of abnormal histology in adjacent nonneoplastic liver. A striking number of the malignant hepatocellular tumors have been of the uncommon type described as "eosinophilic hepatocellular carcinoma with lamellar fibrosis." The epidemiology of liver lesions within this series is difficult to assess, since the material has been referred from very diverse locations. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:6307679

  10. Hydration of arene and alkene oxides by epoxide hydrase in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kapitulnik, J; Levin, W; Morecki, R; Dansette, P M; Jerina, D M; Conney, A H

    1977-02-01

    The comparative hydration of styrene 7,8-oxide, octene 1,2-oxide, naphthalene 1,2-oxide, phenanthrene 9,10-oxide, benzo[a]anthracene 5,6-oxide, 3-methylcholanthrene 11,12-oxide, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene 5,6-oxide, and benzo[a, 7,8-, 9,10-, and 11,12-oxides to their respective dihydrodiols was investigated in microsomes from nine human autopsy livers. The substrate specificity of the epoxide hydrase in human liver microsomes was very similar to that of the epoxide hydrase in rat liver microsomes. Phenanthrene 9,10-oxide was the best substrate for the human and rat epoxide hydrases and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene 5,6-oxide and benzo[a-a)pyrene 11, 12-oxide were the poorest substrates. Plotting epoxide hydrase activity obtained with one substrate against epoxide hydrase activity for another substrate for each of the nine human livers revealed excellent correlations for all combinations of the 11 substrates studied (r = 0.87 to 0.99). The data suggest the presence in human liver of a single epoxide hydrase with broad substrate specificity. However, the results do not exclude the possible presence in human liver of several epoxide hydrases that are under similar regulatory control. These results suggest the need for further investigation to determine whether there is a safe epoxide of a drug whose in vivo metabolism is predictive of the capacity of different individuals to metabolize a wide variety of epoxides of drugs and environmental chemicals.

  11. Absolute Quantification of Aldehyde Oxidase Protein in Human Liver Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A.; Rock, Dan A.

    2013-01-01

    The function of the enzyme human aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) is uncertain, however, recent studies have implicated significant biochemical involvement in humans. AOX1 has also rapidly become an important drug metabolizing enzyme. Until now, quantitation of AOX1 in complex matrices such as tissue has not been achieved. Herein, we developed and employed a trypsin digest and subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis to determine absolute amounts of AOX1 in human liver. E. coli expressed human purified AOX1 was used to validate the linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity of the method. Overall, the method is highly efficient and sensitive for determination of AOX1 in cytosolic liver fractions. Using this method, we observed substantial batch-to-batch variation in AOX1 content (21-40 pmol AOX1/mg total protein) between various pooled human liver cytosol preparations. We also observed inter batch variation in Vmax (3.3-4.9 nmol min−1 mg−1) and a modest correlation between enzyme concentration and activity. In addition, we measured a large difference in kcat/Km, between purified (kcat/Km of 1.4) and human liver cytosol (kcat/Km of 15-20) indicating cytosol to be 11-14 times more efficient in the turnover of DACA than the E. coli expressed purified enzyme. Finally, we discussed the future impact of this method for the development of drug metabolism models and understanding the biochemical role of this enzyme. PMID:24006961

  12. Metabolic difference of CZ48 in human and mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Dejesus, Albert; Cao, Zhisong; Vardeman, Dana; Giovanella, Beppino

    2012-01-01

    CZ48, chemically camptothecin-20-O-propionate hydrate, is currently under clinical investigation. The kinetics of the metabolite camptothecin (CPT) formation and of CZ48 depletion in mouse and human liver microsomes in the presence or absence of NADPH was examined. The formation rate of camptothecin in human liver microsomes was significantly higher than that in mouse with mean K(m)s of 1.9 and 0.5 nM and V(max)s of 9.3 and 2.2 pmol/min/mg, respectively. However, the apparent intrinsic clearance (V(max)/K(m)) ratios for camptothecin in human and mouse liver microsomes were not significantly different from each other (4.9 versus 4.4) in the presence of NADPH. The depletion of CZ48 in human microsomes was four times faster with 4.55% of CZ48 remaining intact while in mouse 19.11% of the drug remained unchanged after 60 min. These results suggest that there is a remarkable species difference of CZ48 biotransformation between human and mouse. The depletion rate of CZ48 in human liver microsomes is considerably higher than that in the mouse.

  13. Three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture supports differentiation of human fetal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Triolo, Fabio; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Reid, Lola M; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2010-06-01

    The ability of human fetal liver cells to survive, expand, and form functional tissue in vitro is of high interest for the development of bioartificial extracorporeal liver support systems, liver cell transplantation therapies, and pharmacologic models. Conventional static two-dimensional culture models seem to be inadequate tools. We focus on dynamic three-dimensional perfusion technologies and developed a scaled-down bioreactor, providing decentralized mass exchange with integral oxygenation. Human fetal liver cells were embedded in a hyaluronan hydrogel within the capillary system to mimic an in vivo matrix and perfusion environment. Metabolic performance was monitored daily, including glucose consumption, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and secretion of alpha-fetoprotein and albumin. At culture termination cells were analyzed for proliferation and liver-specific lineage-dependent cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4/3A7) gene expression. Occurrence of hepatic differentiation in bioreactor cultures was demonstrated by a strong increase in CYP3A4/3A7 gene expression ratio, lower alpha-fetoprotein, and higher albumin secretion than in conventional Petri dish controls. Cells in bioreactors formed three-dimensional structures. Viability of cells was higher in bioreactors than in control cultures. In conclusion, the culture model implementing three-dimensionality, constant perfusion, and integral oxygenation in combination with a hyaluronan hydrogel provides superior conditions for liver cell survival and differentiation compared to conventional culture.

  14. PEDIATRIC LIVER TRANSPLANTATION WITH EX-SITU LIVER TRANSECTION AND THE APPLICATION OF THE HUMAN FIBRINOGEN AND THROMBIN SPONGE IN THE WOUND AREA

    PubMed Central

    VICENTINE, Fernando Pompeu Piza; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; de AZEVEDO, Ramiro Anthero; BENINI, Barbara Burza; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; MARTINS, Jose Luiz; SALZEDAS-NETTO, Alcides Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Surgical strategy to increase the number of liver transplants in the pediatric population is the ex-situ liver transection (reduction or split). However, it is associated with complications such as hemorrhage and leaks. The human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge is useful for improving hemostasis in liver surgery. Aim: Compare pediatric liver transplants with ex-situ liver transection (reduction or split) with or without the human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge. Methods: Was performed a prospective analysis of 21 patients submitted to liver transplantation with ex-situ liver transection with the application of the human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge in the wound area (group A) and retrospective analysis of 59 patients without the sponge (group B). Results: The characteristics of recipients and donors were similar. There were fewer reoperations due to bleeding in the wound area in group A (14.2%) compared to group B (41.7%, p=0.029). There was no difference in relation to the biliary leak (group A: 17.6%, group B: 5.1%, p=0.14). Conclusion: There was a lower number of reoperations due to bleeding of the wound area of ​​the hepatic graft when the human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge were used. PMID:28076477

  15. Polymorphic acetylation of 7-amino-clonazepam in human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Peng, D R; Birgersson, C; von Bahr, C; Rane, A

    1984-01-01

    The N-acetylation of the reduced metabolite of clonazepam 7-amino-clonazepam was studied in cytosolic preparation from human fetal and adult livers. The metabolite formed 7-acetamido-clonazepam was measured with high performance liquid chromatography. A bimodal distribution of the N-acetyltransferase activities was observed in cytosols from human adult livers. These activities were 117 +/- 11 and 27 +/- 16 pmoles X mg-1 X min-1 for rapid and slow acetylators, respectively. The data observed in the fetal specimens did not allow any conclusion about bimodality because of a low number of samples.

  16. HMG-CoA reductase activity in human liver microsomes: comparative inhibition by statins.

    PubMed

    Dansette, P M; Jaoen, M; Pons, C

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a number of vastatins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, in human liver microsomes. HMG-CoA reductase activity was four times lower than the activity in untreated rat liver microsomes. Vastatins could be classified in this in vitro assay in three classes both in human and rat microsomes: the first one including cerivastatin with an IC50 of 6 nM, the second one with atorvastatin and fluvastatin (IC50) between 40 and 100 nM) and the third one containing pravastatin, simvastatin and lovastatin (IC50 between 100 and 300 nM).

  17. Dacarbazine (DTIC)-induced human liver damage light and electron-microscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Dancygier, H; Runne, U; Leuschner, U; Milbradt, R; Classen, M

    1983-06-01

    The first electron-microscopic description of DTIC-induced human liver injury is presented. A 61-year-old man developed signs of hepatic failure during the second treatment cycle with DTIC for malignant melanoma. Light-microscopic examination revealed extensive centrilobular liver necrosis. Terminal hepatic venules did not show any signs of vasculitis or thrombosis and there was a lack of inflammatory infiltration. At the ultrastructural level intracytoplasmic, membrane-bound, organelle-free vacuoles were found in the hepatocytes. Liver cells showed bleb formation. Bile canaliculi were dilated and their microvilli flattened. In the pericanalicular exoplasm electron-dense fibrillary material, thought to be of microfilamentous origin, accumulated. The patient received 250 mg methylprednisolone i.v. at the very onset of symptoms and was discharged 12 days after the peak rise of transaminases with normal liver parameters.

  18. High resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, M.; Spigos, D.G.; Mok, E.; Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Wilbur, A.C.; Langer, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    Water-suppressed and slice-selective proton spectra of live human brain exhibited several resonances that were tentatively assigned to metabolites such as N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine and creatine, choline derivatives, and taurine. In the liver spectrum of a healthy volunteer, the major resonance was tentatively assigned to a fatty acyl methylene and the minor resonances to protons in carnitine, taurine, glutamate, and glutamine. In the spectrum of a cancerous liver, resonances in addition to those present in the normal liver were seen. Protein degradation in the liver with cancer was indicated by resonances from urea and from the ring protons in tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Furthermore, increased nucleic acid synthesis was indicated by resonances from nucleotide protons.

  19. Spatial auditory regularity encoding and prediction: Human middle-latency and long-latency auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Cornella, M; Bendixen, A; Grimm, S; Leung, S; Schröger, E; Escera, C

    2015-11-11

    By encoding acoustic regularities present in the environment, the human brain can generate predictions of what is likely to occur next. Recent studies suggest that deviations from encoded regularities are detected within 10-50ms after stimulus onset, as indicated by electrophysiological effects in the middle latency response (MLR) range. This is upstream of previously known long-latency (LLR) signatures of deviance detection such as the mismatch negativity (MMN) component. In the present study, we created predictable and unpredictable contexts to investigate MLR and LLR signatures of the encoding of spatial auditory regularities and the generation of predictions from these regularities. Chirps were monaurally delivered in an either regular (predictable: left-right-left-right) or a random (unpredictable left/right alternation or repetition) manner. Occasional stimulus omissions occurred in both types of sequences. Results showed that the Na component (peaking at 34ms after stimulus onset) was attenuated for regular relative to random chirps, albeit no differences were observed for stimulus omission responses in the same latency range. In the LLR range, larger chirp-and omission-evoked responses were elicited for the regular than for the random condition, and predictability effects were more prominent over the right hemisphere. We discuss our findings in the framework of a hierarchical organization of spatial regularity encoding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention.

  20. The Drosophila pigmentation gene pink (p) encodes a homologue of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (HPS5).

    PubMed

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Brooks, Elizabeth S; Krantz, David E; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2007-02-01

    Lysosome-related organelles comprise a group of specialized intracellular compartments that include melanosomes and platelet dense granules (in mammals) and eye pigment granules (in insects). In humans, the biogenesis of these organelles is defective in genetic disorders collectively known as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). Patients with HPS-2, and two murine HPS models, carry mutations in genes encoding subunits of adaptor protein (AP)-3. Other genes mutated in rodent models include those encoding VPS33A and Rab38. Orthologs of all of these genes in Drosophila melanogaster belong to the 'granule group' of eye pigmentation genes. Other genes associated with HPS encode subunits of three complexes of unknown function, named biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC)-1, -2 and -3, for which the Drosophila counterparts had not been characterized. Here, we report that the gene encoding the Drosophila ortholog of the HPS5 subunit of BLOC-2 is identical to the granule group gene pink (p), which was first studied in 1910 but had not been identified at the molecular level. The phenotype of pink mutants was exacerbated by mutations in AP-3 subunits or in the orthologs of VPS33A and Rab38. These results validate D. melanogaster as a genetic model to study the function of the BLOCs.

  1. Transcriptional networks implicated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Liu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The transcriptome of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated in several studies. However, the implications of transcriptional networks in progressive NAFLD are not clear and mechanisms inducing transition from nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are still elusive. The aims of this study were to (1) construct networks for progressive NAFLD, (2) identify hub genes and functional modules in these networks and (3) infer potential linkages among hub genes, transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNA) for NAFLD progression. A systems biology approach by combining differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was utilized to dissect transcriptional profiles in 19 normal, 10 NAFL and 16 NASH patients. Based on this framework, 3 modules related to chromosome organization, proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and immune response were identified in NASH network. Furthermore, 9 modules of co-expressed genes associated with NAFL/NASH transition were found. Further characterization of these modules defined 13 highly connected hub genes in NAFLD progression network. Interestingly, 11 significantly changed miRNAs were predicted to target 10 of the 13 hub genes. Characterization of modules and hub genes that may be regulated by miRNAs could facilitate the identification of candidate genes and pathways responsible for NAFL/NASH transition and lead to a better understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. The identified modules and hub genes may point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  2. A cDNA clone encoding human cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit C. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, F.; Hanks, S.K. )

    1988-08-25

    The authors have determined the nucleotide sequence from both complementary strands of a human cDNA coding for cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit type {alpha} (cAPK-C{alpha}). This cDNA was one of many protein kinase cDNAs isolated from a HeLa cell library by screening with oligonucleotide probes designed to recognize target sequences encoding highly conserved segments within the catalytic domains. The deduced human cAPK-C{alpha} amino acid sequence of 350 residues differs from the bovine and murine sequences at 3 and 7 positions, respectively.

  3. Effect of ultrasound frequency on the Nakagami statistics of human liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Hung, Chieh-Ming; Chung, Shih-Jou; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of the backscattered statistics using the Nakagami parameter is an emerging ultrasound technique for assessing hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. Previous studies indicated that the echo amplitude distribution of a normal liver follows the Rayleigh distribution (the Nakagami parameter m is close to 1). However, using different frequencies may change the backscattered statistics of normal livers. This study explored the frequency dependence of the backscattered statistics in human livers and then discussed the sources of ultrasound scattering in the liver. A total of 30 healthy participants were enrolled to undergo a standard care ultrasound examination on the liver, which is a natural model containing diffuse and coherent scatterers. The liver of each volunteer was scanned from the right intercostal view to obtain image raw data at different central frequencies ranging from 2 to 3.5 MHz. Phantoms with diffuse scatterers only were also made to perform ultrasound scanning using the same protocol for comparisons with clinical data. The Nakagami parameter-frequency correlation was evaluated using Pearson correlation analysis. The median and interquartile range of the Nakagami parameter obtained from livers was 1.00 (0.98-1.05) for 2 MHz, 0.93 (0.89-0.98) for 2.3 MHz, 0.87 (0.84-0.92) for 2.5 MHz, 0.82 (0.77-0.88) for 3.3 MHz, and 0.81 (0.76-0.88) for 3.5 MHz. The Nakagami parameter decreased with the increasing central frequency (r = -0.67, p < 0.0001). However, the effect of ultrasound frequency on the statistical distribution of the backscattered envelopes was not found in the phantom results (r = -0.147, p = 0.0727). The current results demonstrated that the backscattered statistics of normal livers is frequency-dependent. Moreover, the coherent scatterers may be the primary factor to dominate the frequency dependence of the backscattered statistics in a liver.

  4. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Doepke, Mandy; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Todt, Daniel; Wölk, Benno; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Geffers, Robert; Lauber, Chris; Kaderali, Lars; Penin, François; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular infectivity point to

  5. Identification of CYP3A7 for glyburide metabolism in human fetal livers.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Diana L; Risler, Linda J; Prasad, Bhagwat; Calamia, Justina C; Voellinger, Jenna L; Kelly, Edward J; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Hebert, Mary F; Shen, Danny D; Thummel, Kenneth E; Mao, Qingcheng

    2014-12-15

    Glyburide is commonly prescribed for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus; however, fetal exposure to glyburide is not well understood and may have short- and long-term consequences for the health of the child. Glyburide can cross the placenta; fetal concentrations at term are nearly comparable to maternal levels. Whether or not glyburide is metabolized in the fetus and by what mechanisms has yet to be determined. In this study, we determined the kinetic parameters for glyburide depletion by CYP3A isoenzymes; characterized glyburide metabolism by human fetal liver tissues collected during the first or early second trimester of pregnancy; and identified the major enzyme responsible for glyburide metabolism in human fetal livers. CYP3A4 had the highest metabolic capacity towards glyburide, followed by CYP3A7 and CYP3A5 (Clint,u=37.1, 13.0, and 8.7ml/min/nmol P450, respectively). M5 was the predominant metabolite generated by CYP3A7 and human fetal liver microsomes (HFLMs) with approximately 96% relative abundance. M5 was also the dominant metabolite generated by CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and adult liver microsomes; however, M1-M4 were also present, with up to 15% relative abundance. CYP3A7 protein levels in HFLMs were highly correlated with glyburide Clint, 16α-OH DHEA formation, and 4'-OH midazolam formation. Likewise, glyburide Clint was highly correlated with 16α-OH DHEA formation. Fetal demographics as well as CYP3A5 and CYP3A7 genotype did not alter CYP3A7 protein levels or glyburide Clint. These results indicate that human fetal livers metabolize glyburide predominantly to M5 and that CYP3A7 is the major enzyme responsible for glyburide metabolism in human fetal livers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L M; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-05-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. AlthoughatRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whetheratRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity.atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrialβ-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally,atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1αand 1βand nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification.atRA also increasedβ-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδrevealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis andβ-oxidation byatRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice,atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition ofatRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects ofatRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show thatatRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasingatRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acidβ-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunopathogenesis in a Humanized Mouse Model: Induction of Human-Specific Liver Fibrosis and M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology. PMID:24651854

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection and immunopathogenesis in a humanized mouse model: induction of human-specific liver fibrosis and M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology.

  9. Early cytokine signatures of ischemia/reperfusion injury in human orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.; Zarrinpar, Ali; Lassman, Charles R.; Naini, Bita V.; Datta, Nakul; Rao, Ping; Harre, Nicholas; Zheng, Ying; Hoffmann, Alexander; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Gjertson, David W.; Zhai, Yuan; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is the primary therapy for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) can severely compromise allograft survival. To understand the evolution of immune responses underlying OLT-IRI, we evaluated longitudinal cytokine expression profiles from adult OLT recipients before transplant through 1 month after transplant. METHODS. We measured the expression of 38 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in preoperative and postoperative recipient circulating systemic blood (before transplant and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after transplant) and intraoperative portal blood (before and after reperfusion) of 53 OLT patients and analyzed this expression in relation to biopsy-proven IRI (n = 26 IRI+; 27 IRI–), clinical liver function tests early (days 1–7) after transplant, and expression of genes encoding cytokine receptors in biopsies of donor allograft taken before and after reperfusion. RESULTS. Bilirubin and arginine transaminase levels early after transplant correlated with IRI. Fourteen cytokines were significantly increased in the systemic and/or portal blood of IRI+ recipients that shifted from innate to adaptive-immune responses over time. Additionally, expression of cognate receptors for 10 of these cytokines was detected in donor organ biopsies by RNAseq. CONCLUSION. These results provide a mechanistic roadmap of the early immunological events both before and after IRI and suggest several candidates for patient stratification, monitoring, and treatment. FUNDING. Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32CA009120, Keck Foundation award 986722, and a Quantitative & Computational Biosciences Collaboratory Postdoctoral Fellowship. PMID:27942590

  10. Immunofluorescence identifies distinct subsets of endothelial cells in the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Otto; Phillips, Anthony; Ruggiero, Katya; Bartlett, Adam; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2017-01-01

    As well as systemic vascular endothelial cells, the liver has specialised sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). LSEC dysfunction has been documented in many diseased states yet their phenotype in normal human liver has not been comprehensively assessed. Our aim was to improve characterisation of subsets of endothelial cells and associated pericytes in the human liver. Immunofluorescence microscopy was performed on normal human liver tissue samples to assess endothelial and structural proteins in a minimum of three donors. LSEC are distributed in an acinar pattern and universally express CD36, but two distinctive subsets of LSEC can be identified in different acinar zones. Type 1 LSEC are CD36hiCD32−CD14−LYVE-1− and are located in acinar zone 1 of the lobule, while Type 2 LSEC are LYVE-1+CD32hiCD14+CD54+CD36mid-lo and are located in acinar zones 2 and 3 of the lobule. Portal tracts and central veins can be identified using markers for systemic vascular endothelia and pericytes, none of which are expressed by LSEC. In areas of low hydrostatic pressure LSEC are lined by stellate cells that express the pericyte marker CD146. Our findings identify distinctive populations of LSEC and distinguish these cells from adjacent stellate cells, systemic vasculature and pericytes in different zones of the liver acinus. PMID:28287163

  11. Human erythrocytes are not suitable for determination of intravascular volume of perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Karabey, Y; Sahin, S

    2006-01-01

    Homologous or heterologous erythrocytes have been widely used for the estimation of intravascular volume of the liver. However, cross-species blood mediates immune response in the organ, and foreign cells are rapidly cleared from the plasma, indicating that heterologous erythrocytes may not be a suitable marker for determination of vascular space. This aspect was investigated in the perfused rat liver preparation following bolus administration of human (heterologous) erythrocytes into the portal vein. To compare the extent of its distribution within the liver, rat (homologous) erythrocytes and Evans blue were chosen as the reference vascular and extracellular markers, respectively. Hepatic distribution of human erythrocytes was influenced by the perfusion medium (with and without protein) and injection number (first and second injections). Mean transit time and hence volume of distribution decreased in the presence of protein and repetition of the injection. Even in the presence of protein, the volume of distribution obtained for human erythrocytes was larger than that of the extracellular volume of the liver obtained with Evans blue (0.22 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 ml/g), indicating that they are not suitable for determination of intravascular volume of the perfused rat liver preparation.

  12. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a human cDNA encoding the antimutator enzyme 8-hydroxyguanine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Wei, Ying-Fei; Carter, Kenneth C.; Klungland, Arne; Anselmino, Catherine; Wang, Rui-Ping; Augustus, Meena; Lindahl, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    The major mutagenic base lesion in DNA caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species is 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine). In bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this damaged base is excised by a DNA glycosylase with an associated lyase activity for chain cleavage. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed a human cDNA with partial sequence homology to the relevant yeast gene. The encoded 47-kDa human enzyme releases free 8-hydroxyguanine from oxidized DNA and introduces a chain break in a double-stranded oligonucleotide specifically at an 8-hydroxyguanine residue base paired with cytosine. Expression of the human protein in a DNA repair-deficient E. coli mutM mutY strain partly suppresses its spontaneous mutator phenotype. The gene encoding the human enzyme maps to chromosome 3p25. These results show that human cells have an enzyme that can initiate base excision repair at mutagenic DNA lesions caused by active oxygen. PMID:9223306

  13. Criteria for Viability Assessment of Discarded Human Donor Livers during Ex Vivo Normothermic Machine Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Negin; Weeder, Pepijn D.; de Boer, Marieke T.; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate viable from non-viable livers we have studied functional performance as well as biochemical and histological evidence of hepatobiliary injury during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. After a median duration of cold storage of 6.5 h, twelve extended criteria human donor livers that were declined for transplantation were ex vivo perfused for 6 h at 37°C with an oxygenated solution based on red blood cells and plasma, using pressure controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion. During perfusion, two patterns of bile flow were identified: (1) steadily increasing bile production, resulting in a cumulative output of ≥30 g after 6 h (high bile output group), and (2) a cumulative bile production <20 g in 6 h (low bile output group). Concentrations of transaminases and potassium in the perfusion fluid were significantly higher in the low bile output group, compared to the high bile output group. Biliary concentrations of bilirubin and bicarbonate were respectively 4 times and 2 times higher in the high bile output group. Livers in the low bile output group displayed more signs of hepatic necrosis and venous congestion, compared to the high bile output group. In conclusion, bile production could be an easily assessable biomarker of hepatic viability during ex vivo machine perfusion of human donor livers. It could potentially be used to identify extended criteria livers that are suitable for transplantation. These ex vivo findings need to be confirmed in a transplant experiment or a clinical trial. PMID:25369327

  14. Criteria for viability assessment of discarded human donor livers during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Michael E; op den Dries, Sanna; Karimian, Negin; Weeder, Pepijn D; de Boer, Marieke T; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gouw, Annette S H; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate viable from non-viable livers we have studied functional performance as well as biochemical and histological evidence of hepatobiliary injury during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. After a median duration of cold storage of 6.5 h, twelve extended criteria human donor livers that were declined for transplantation were ex vivo perfused for 6 h at 37 °C with an oxygenated solution based on red blood cells and plasma, using pressure controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion. During perfusion, two patterns of bile flow were identified: (1) steadily increasing bile production, resulting in a cumulative output of ≥ 30 g after 6 h (high bile output group), and (2) a cumulative bile production <20 g in 6 h (low bile output group). Concentrations of transaminases and potassium in the perfusion fluid were significantly higher in the low bile output group, compared to the high bile output group. Biliary concentrations of bilirubin and bicarbonate were respectively 4 times and 2 times higher in the high bile output group. Livers in the low bile output group displayed more signs of hepatic necrosis and venous congestion, compared to the high bile output group. In conclusion, bile production could be an easily assessable biomarker of hepatic viability during ex vivo machine perfusion of human donor livers. It could potentially be used to identify extended criteria livers that are suitable for transplantation. These ex vivo findings need to be confirmed in a transplant experiment or a clinical trial.

  15. Conclusive identification of the oxybutynin-hydrolyzing enzyme in human liver.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Miyashita, Aiji; Iwatsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to conclusively determine the enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxybutynin in human liver. Hydrolysis in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and human liver cytosol (HLC) followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with similar K(m) values. In recombinant human carboxylesterase (CES)-expressing microsomes, CES1 was much more efficient than CES2 and yielded a K(m) value more comparable with that found in HLMs or HLC than did CES2. A correlation analysis using a set of individual HLMs, in which both CESs acted independently showed that the hydrolysis rate of oxybutynin, correlated significantly with a CES1 marker reaction, clopidogrel hydrolysis, but not with a CES2 marker reaction, irinotecan (CPT-11) hydrolysis. Chemical inhibition studies using bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate, clopidogrel, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, procainamide, physostigmine, and loperamide revealed that the effects of these compounds in HLMs, HLC, and recombinant CES1-expressing microsomes were similar, whereas those in CES2-expressing microsomes were clearly different. These results strongly suggest that CES1, rather than CES2, is the principal enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxybutynin in human liver.

  16. Towards a three-dimensional microfluidic liver platform for predicting drug efficacy and toxicity in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although the process of drug development requires efficacy and toxicity testing in animals prior to human testing, animal models have limited ability to accurately predict human responses to xenobiotics and other insults. Societal pressures are also focusing on reduction of and, ultimately, replacement of animal testing. However, a variety of in vitro models, explored over the last decade, have not been powerful enough to replace animal models. New initiatives sponsored by several US federal agencies seek to address this problem by funding the development of physiologically relevant human organ models on microscopic chips. The eventual goal is to simulate a human-on-a-chip, by interconnecting the organ models, thereby replacing animal testing in drug discovery and development. As part of this initiative, we aim to build a three-dimensional human liver chip that mimics the acinus, the smallest functional unit of the liver, including its oxygen gradient. Our liver-on-a-chip platform will deliver a microfluidic three-dimensional co-culture environment with stable synthetic and enzymatic function for at least 4 weeks. Sentinel cells that contain fluorescent biosensors will be integrated into the chip to provide multiplexed, real-time readouts of key liver functions and pathology. We are also developing a database to manage experimental data and harness external information to interpret the multimodal data and create a predictive platform. PMID:24565476

  17. A shift in paradigm towards human biology-based systems for cholestatic-liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Noor, Fozia

    2015-12-01

    Cholestatic-liver diseases (CLDs) arise from diverse causes ranging from genetic factors to drug-induced cholestasis. The so-called diseases of civilization (obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular diseases, etc.) are intricately implicated in liver and gall bladder diseases. Although CLDs have been extensively studied, there seem to be important gaps in the understanding of human disease. Despite the fact that many animal models exist and substantial clinical data are available, translation of this knowledge towards therapy has been disappointingly limited. Recent advances in liver cell culture such as in vivo-like 3D cultivation of human primary hepatic cells, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes; and cutting-edge analytical techniques such as 'omics' technologies and high-content screenings could play a decisive role in deeper mechanistic understanding of CLDs. This Topical Review proposes a roadmap to human biology-based research using omics technologies providing quantitative information on mechanisms in an adverse outcome/disease pathway framework. With modern sensitive tools, a shift in paradigm in human disease research seems timely and even inevitable to overcome species barriers in translation.

  18. Three-dimensional growth dynamics of the liver in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Szpinda, Michał; Paruszewska-Achtel, Monika; Woźniak, Alina; Badura, Mateusz; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2015-07-01

    The fetal liver is indubitably the earliest and the most severely affected organ by abnormal fetal growth. The size of the fetal liver assessed by three-dimensional ultrasonography is indispensable in determining the status of fetal growth, nutrition and maturity, and in the early recognition and monitoring fetal micro- and macrosomias. The aim of the present study was to measure the human fetal liver length, transverse and sagittal diameters to establish their age-specific reference intervals, the 3rd, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 97th smoothed centile curves, and the relative growth of the liver calculated for the 50th centile. Using anatomical, digital (NIS-Elements AR 3.0, Nikon) and statistical methods (one-way ANOVA test for paired data and post hoc RIR Tukey test, Shapiro-Wilk test, Fisher's test, Student's t test, the Altman-Chitty method), length, transverse and sagittal diameters of the liver for the 3rd, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 97th centiles were assessed in 69 human fetuses of both sexes (32 males and 37 females) aged 18-30 weeks, derived from spontaneous abortions or stillbirths. No male-female differences (P > 0.05) concerning the three parameters studied were found. During the study period, the fetal liver increased tri-dimensionally: in length from 19.51 ± 1.02 to 39.65 ± 7.05 mm, in transverse diameter from 29.44 ± 3.73 to 53.13 ± 5.31 mm, and in sagittal diameter from 22.97 ± 3.79 to 43.22 ± 5.49 mm. The natural logarithmic models were found to fit the data with gestational age (P < 0.001) in the following five cutoff points: 3rd, 10th, 50th, 90th and 97th centiles. The values of liver parameters in relation to gestational age in weeks were calculated by the following logarithmic regressions: y = -82.778 + 35.752 × ln(age) ± Z × (-2.778 + 0.308 × age) for liver length, y = -123.06 + 52.668 × ln(age) ± Z × (3.156 + 0.049 × age) for liver transverse diameter, and y = -108.94 + 46.052 × ln(age) ± Z × (-0.541 + 0.188 × age) for liver sagittal

  19. Monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal liver share common differentiation pathways and homeostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Klimchenko, Olena; Di Stefano, Antonio; Geoerger, Birgit; Hamidi, Sofiane; Opolon, Paule; Robert, Thomas; Routhier, Mélanie; El-Benna, Jamel; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Boukour, Siham; Lescure, Bernadette; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise

    2011-03-17

    The early emergence of macrophages and their large pattern of tissue distribution during development suggest that they may play a critical role in the initial steps of embryogenesis. In the present study, we show that monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and from fetal liver follow a differentiation pathway different to that of adult cells, leading to specific functions. Embryonic and fetal monocytic cells differentiated from a CD14(low)CD16(-) precursor to form CD14(high)CD16(+) cells without producing the CD14(high)CD16(-) cell population that predominates in adult peripheral blood. Both demonstrated an enhanced expression of genes encoding tissue-degrading enzymes, chemokines, and scavenger receptors, as was previously reported for M2 macrophages. Compared with adult blood monocytes, embryonic and fetal monocytic cells secreted high amounts of proteins acting on tissue remodeling and angiogenesis, and most of them expressed the Tie2 receptor. Furthermore, they promoted vascular remodeling in xenotransplanted human tumors. These findings suggest that the regulation of human fetal and embryonic monocytic cell differentiation leads to the generation of cells endowed mainly with anti-inflammatory and remodeling functions. Trophic and immunosuppressive functions of M2-polarized macrophages link fetus and tumor development, and hESCs offer a valuable experimental model for in vitro studies of mechanisms sustaining these processes.

  20. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE.

    PubMed

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Price, Nicholas; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    A recent slew of ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium publications, specifically the article signed by all Consortium members, put forward the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current estimates according to which the fraction of the genome that is evolutionarily conserved through purifying selection is less than 10%. Thus, according to the ENCODE Consortium, a biological function can be maintained indefinitely without selection, which implies that at least 80 - 10 = 70% of the genome is perfectly invulnerable to deleterious mutations, either because no mutation can ever occur in these "functional" regions or because no mutation in these regions can ever be deleterious. This absurd conclusion was reached through various means, chiefly by employing the seldom used "causal role" definition of biological function and then applying it inconsistently to different biochemical properties, by committing a logical fallacy known as "affirming the consequent," by failing to appreciate the crucial difference between "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA," by using analytical methods that yield biased errors and inflate estimates of functionality, by favoring statistical sensitivity over specificity, and by emphasizing statistical significance rather than the magnitude of the effect. Here, we detail the many logical and methodological transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE results were predicted by one of its authors to necessitate the rewriting of textbooks. We agree, many textbooks dealing with marketing, mass-media hype, and public relations may well have to be rewritten.

  1. The functional role of human right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta rhythm in environmental encoding during virtual spatial navigation.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi; Cornwell, Brian R; Cheyne, Douglas; Johnson, Blake W

    2017-03-01

    Low frequency theta band oscillations (4-8 Hz) are thought to provide a timing mechanism for hippocampal place cell firing and to mediate the formation of spatial memory. In rodents, hippocampal theta has been shown to play an important role in encoding a new environment during spatial navigation, but a similar functional role of hippocampal theta in humans has not been firmly established. To investigate this question, we recorded healthy participants' brain responses with a 160-channel whole-head MEG system as they performed two training sets of a virtual Morris water maze task. Environment layouts (except for platform locations) of the two sets were kept constant to measure theta activity during spatial learning in new and familiar environments. In line with previous findings, left hippocampal/parahippocampal theta showed more activation navigating to a hidden platform relative to random swimming. Consistent with our hypothesis, right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta was stronger during the first training set compared to the second one. Notably, theta in this region during the first training set correlated with spatial navigation performance across individuals in both training sets. These results strongly argue for the functional importance of right hippocampal theta in initial encoding of configural properties of an environment during spatial navigation. Our findings provide important evidence that right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta activity is associated with environmental encoding in the human brain. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1347-1361, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Evidence that a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin is encoded by a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, M A; Barondes, S H

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated by immunoscreening a human hepatoma cDNA library with an antiserum that bound specifically to a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin with Mr of approximately 14,000. The deduced amino acid sequences of the inserts of these two clones show considerable homology with each other, the sequence of chicken skin beta-galactoside-binding lectin, and eight peptides derived from purified human lung lectin of Mr approximately 14,000. However, the sequence differences between the two hepatoma clones as well as among each clone and the lung peptides suggest that at least three variants of the gene encoding this lectin are expressed in human tissue. Images PMID:3020551

  3. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Pinlaor, Porntip; Mulvenna, Jason; Sripa, Banchob; Sripa, Manop; Smout, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Brindley, Paul J; Loukas, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum) than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea) flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions, drugs and vaccines, to

  4. Modulation of Oscillatory Power and Connectivity in the Human Posterior Cingulate Cortex Supports the Encoding and Retrieval of Episodic Memories.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley; Germi, James; Rugg, Michael

    2017-04-07

    Existing data from noninvasive studies have led researchers to posit that the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) supports mnemonic processes: It exhibits degeneration in memory disorders, and fMRI investigations have demonstrated memory-related activation principally during the retrieval of memory items. Despite these data, the role of the PCC in episodic memory has received only limited treatment using the spatial and temporal precision of intracranial EEG, with previous analyses focused on item retrieval. Using data gathered from 21 human participants who underwent stereo-EEG for seizure localization, we characterized oscillatory patterns in the PCC during the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories. We identified a subsequent memory effect during item encoding characterized by increased gamma band oscillatory power and a low-frequency power desynchronization. Fourteen participants had stereotactic electrodes located simultaneously in the hippocampus and PCC, and with these unique data, we describe connectivity changes between these structures that predict successful item encoding and that precede item retrieval. Oscillatory power during retrieval matched the pattern we observed during encoding, with low-frequency (below 15 Hz) desynchronization and a gamma band (especially high gamma, 70-180 Hz) power increase. Encoding is characterized by synchrony between the hippocampus and PCC, centered at 3 Hz, consistent with other observations of properties of this oscillation akin to those for rodent theta activity. We discuss our findings in light of existing theories of episodic memory processing, including the information via desynchronization hypothesis and retrieved context theory, and examine how our data fit with existing theories for the functional role of the PCC. These include a postulated role for the PCC in modulating internally directed attention and for representing or integrating contextual information for memory items.

  5. FHL-1/reconectin and factor H: two human complement regulators which are encoded by the same gene are differently expressed and regulated.

    PubMed

    Friese, M A; Hellwage, J; Jokiranta, T S; Meri, S; Peter, H H; Eibel, H; Zipfel, P F

    1999-01-01

    FHL-1/reconectin and factor H are two human complement regulators which are encoded by a single gene. FHL-1/reconectin contains the first 7 of 20 SCR protein domains of factor H and has four unique residues attached to its C-terminal end. The overlapping region of 445 amino acids explains the related complement regulatory functions of the two proteins. However, unique biological functions have also been reported for FHL-1/reconectin, such as cell adhesion and binding to microbial surfaces. Both proteins are synthesised and secreted by the liver. Extrahepatic synthesis occurs in a wide variety of cells, e.g. in monocytes, fibroblasts or neuronal cells. Unexpectedly, FHL-1/reconectin and factor H exhibit distinct expression patterns. This is also observed in disease situations such as in rheumatoid arthritis or malignancies. In rheumatoid arthritis a potentially protective role is suggested by the local synthesis of both FHL-1/reconectin and factor H in synovial fibroblasts and their induction by the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone and the cytokine IFN-gamma, but not by TNF-alpha. FHL-1/reconectin is overexpressed in certain tumor cells such as glioblastoma, conferring an exceptional resistance to such cells against complement mediated lysis. Although FHL-1/reconectin and factor H are encoded by a single gene, regulated by the same gene promoter and initiate transcription at the same start site, their transcripts are differently regulated. The putative control levels, which are responsible for this complex regulation, include transcript elongation, RNA processing, alternative splicing and differential poly(A) site selection.

  6. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-11-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus.

  7. Prediction of Liver Injury Induced by Chemicals in Human With a Multiparametric Assay on Isolated Mouse Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is difficult to predict using classical in vitro cytotoxicity screening and regulatory animal studies. This explains why numerous compounds are stopped during clinical trials or withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity. Thus, it is important to improve early prediction of DILI in human. In this study, we hypothesized that this goal could be achieved by investigating drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as this toxic effect is a major mechanism of DILI. To this end, we developed a high-throughput screening platform using isolated mouse liver mitochondria. Our broad spectrum multiparametric assay was designed to detect the global mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (swelling), inner membrane permeabilization (transmembrane potential), outer membrane permeabilization (cytochrome c release), and alteration of mitochondrial respiration driven by succinate or malate/glutamate. A pool of 124 chemicals (mainly drugs) was selected, including 87 with documented DILI and 37 without reported clinical hepatotoxicity. Our screening assay revealed an excellent sensitivity for clinical outcome of DILI (94 or 92% depending on cutoff) and a high positive predictive value (89 or 82%). A highly significant relationship between drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity and DILI occurrence in patients was calculated (p < 0.001). Moreover, this multiparametric assay allowed identifying several compounds for which mitochondrial toxicity had never been described before and even helped to clarify mechanisms with some drugs already known to be mitochondriotoxic. Investigation of drug-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity and function with this multiparametric assay should be considered for integration into basic screening processes at early stage to select drug candidates with lower risk of DILI in human. This assay is also a valuable tool for assessing the mitochondrial toxicity profile and investigating the mechanism of action of new

  8. Microwave ablation of ex vivo human liver and colorectal liver metastases with a novel 14.5 GHz generator.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert P; Kitteringham, Neil R; Terlizzo, Monica; Hancock, Christopher; Dunne, Declan; Fenwick, Stephen W; Poston, Graeme J; Ghaneh, Paula; Malik, Hassan Z

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between time, power and ablation size using a novel high-frequency 14.5 GHz microwave applicator in ex vivo human hepatic parenchyma and colorectal liver metastases. Previous examination has demonstrated structurally normal but non-viable cells within the ablation zone. This study aimed to further investigate how ablation affects these cells, and to confirm non-viability. Ablations were performed in ex vivo human hepatic parenchyma and tumour for a variety of time (10-180 s) and power (10-50 W) settings. Histological examination was performed to assess cellular anatomy, whilst enzyme histochemistry was used to confirm cellular non-viability. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the subcellular structural effects of ablation within these fixed cells. Preliminary proteomic analysis was also performed to explore the mechanism of microwave cell death. Increasing time and power settings led to a predictable and reproducible increase in size of ablation. At 50 W and 180 s application, a maximum ablation diameter of 38.8 mm (±1.3) was produced. Ablations were produced rapidly, and at all time and power settings ablations remained spherical (longest:shortest diameter <1.2). Routine histological analysis using haematoxylin-eosin (H&E) confirmed well preserved cellular anatomy despite ablation. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated marked subcellular damage. Enzyme histochemistry showed complete absence of viability in ablated tissue. Large spherical ablation zones can be rapidly and reproducibly achieved in ex vivo human hepatic parenchyma and colorectal liver metastases using a 14.5 GHz microwave generator. Despite well preserved cellular appearance, ablated tissue is non-viable.

  9. Enhanced human memory consolidation with post-learning stress: interaction with the degree of arousal at encoding.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Larry; Gorski, Lukasz; Le, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Abundant evidence indicates that endogenous stress hormones such as epinephrine and corticosterone modulate memory consolidation in animals. We recently provided the first demonstration that an endogenous stress hormone (epinephrine) can enhance human memory consolidation. However, these findings also suggested that post-learning stress hormone activation does not uniformly enhance memory for all recently acquired information; rather, that it interacts with the degree of arousal at initial encoding of material in modulating memory for the material. Here we tested this hypothesis by administering cold pressor stress (CPS) or a control procedure to subjects after they viewed slides of varying emotional content, and assessing memory for the slides 1 wk later. CPS, which significantly elevated salivary cortisol levels, enhanced memory for emotionally arousing slides compared with the controls, but did not affect memory for relatively neutral slides. These findings further support the view that post-learning stress hormone-related activity interacts with arousal at initial encoding to modulate memory consolidation.

  10. Differential genomic effects of six different TiO2 nanomaterials on human liver HepG2 cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanoparticles are reported to cause liver toxicity in vivo. To better assess the mechanism of the in vivo liver toxicity, we used the human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) as a model system. Human HepG2 cells were exposed to 6 TiO2 nanomaterials (with dry primary partic...

  11. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  12. Identification of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol metabolites in human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Li, Dan; Zhong, Dafang

    2011-03-01

    20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD, 1) is one of the aglycones of the ginsenosides and has a wide range of pharmacological activities. At present, PPD has progressed to early clinical trials as an antidepressant. In this study, its fate in mixed human liver microsomes (HLMs) and human hepatocytes was examined for the first time. By using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, 24 metabolites were found. Four metabolites were isolated, and their structures were elucidated as (20S,24S)-epoxydammarane-3,12,25-triol (2), (20S,24R)-epoxydammarane-3,12,25-triol (3), (20S,24S)-epoxydammarane-12,25-diol-3-one (4), and (20S,24R)-epoxydammarane-12,25-diol-3-one (5) based on a detailed analysis of their spectroscopic data. The predominant metabolic pathway of PPD observed was the oxidation of the 24,25-double bond to yield 24,25-epoxides, followed by hydrolysis and rearrangement to form the corresponding 24,25-vicinal diol derivatives (M6) and the 20,24-oxide form (2 and 3). Further sequential metabolites (M2-M5) were also detected through the hydroxylation and dehydrogenation of 2 and 3. All of the phase I metabolites except for M1-1 possess a hydroxyl group at C-25 of the side chain, which was newly formed by biotransformation. Two glucuronide conjugates (M7) attributed to 2 and 3 were detected in human hepatocyte incubations, and their conjugation sites were tentatively assigned to the 25-hydroxyl group. The findings of this study strongly suggested that the formation of the 25-hydroxyl group is very important for the elimination of PPD.

  13. Dynamic changes in parietal activation during encoding: implications for human learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Elman, Jeremy A; Rosner, Zachary A; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Cerreta, Adelle G; Shimamura, Arthur P

    2013-11-15

    The ventral posterior parietal cortex (vPPC) monitors successful memory retrieval, yet its role during learning remains unclear. Indeed, increased vPPC activation during stimulus encoding is often negatively correlated with subsequent memory performance, suggesting that this region is suppressed during learning. Alternatively, the vPPC may engage in learning-related processes immediately after stimulus encoding thus facilitating retrieval at a later time. To investigate this possibility, we assessed vPPC activity during item presentation and immediately following its offset when a cue to remember was presented. We observed a dynamic change in vPPC response such that activity was negatively correlated with subsequent memory during stimulus presentation but positively correlated immediately following the stimulus during the cue phase. Furthermore, regional differences in this effect suggest a degree of functional heterogeneity within the vPPC. These findings demonstrate that the vPPC is engaged during learning and acts to facilitate post-encoding memory processes that establish long-term cortical representations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adiponectin oligomers and ectopic fat in liver and skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Kantartzis, Konstantinos; Staiger, Harald; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Claussen, Claus D; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Stefan, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    We aimed at determining which circulating forms of the adipokine adiponectin that increases lipid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscle are related to ectopic fat in these depots in humans. Plasma total-, high-molecular weight (HMW)-, middle-molecular weight (MMW)-, and low-molecular weight (LMW) adiponectin were quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Their relationships with liver- and intramyocellular fat, measured using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, were investigated in 54 whites without type 2 diabetes. Liver fat, adjusted for gender, age, and total body fat, was associated only with HMW adiponectin (r = -0.35, P = 0.012), but not with total-, MMW-, or LMW adiponectin. In addition, subjects with fatty liver (liver fat > or =5.56%, n = 15) had significantly lower HMW- (P = 0.04), but not total-, MMW-, or LMW adiponectin levels, compared to controls (n = 39). Similarly, intramyocellular fat correlated only with HMW (r = -0.32, P = 0.039), but not with the other circulating forms of adiponectin. These data indicate that, among circulating forms of adiponectin, HMW is strongly related to ectopic fat, thus possibly representing the form of adiponectin regulating lipid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscle.

  15. IL-2(high) tissue-resident T cells in the human liver: Sentinels for hepatotropic infection.

    PubMed

    Pallett, Laura J; Davies, Jessica; Colbeck, Emily J; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Easom, Nicholas J W; Burton, Alice R; Stegmann, Kerstin A; Schurich, Anna; Swadling, Leo; Gill, Upkar S; Male, Victoria; Luong, TuVinh; Gander, Amir; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Maini, Mala K

    2017-06-05

    The liver provides a tolerogenic immune niche exploited by several highly prevalent pathogens as well as by primary and metastatic tumors. We have sampled healthy and hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected human livers to probe for a subset of T cells specialized to overcome local constraints and mediate immunity. We characterize a population of T-bet(lo)Eomes(lo)Blimp-1(hi)Hobit(lo) T cells found within the intrahepatic but not the circulating memory CD8 T cell pool expressing liver-homing/retention markers (CD69(+)CD103(+) CXCR6(+)CXCR3(+)). These tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) are preferentially expanded in patients with partial immune control of HBV infection and can remain in the liver after the resolution of infection, including compartmentalized responses against epitopes within all major HBV proteins. Sequential IL-15 or antigen exposure followed by TGFβ induces liver-adapted TRM, including their signature high expression of exhaustion markers PD-1 and CD39. We suggest that these inhibitory molecules, together with paradoxically robust, rapid, cell-autonomous IL-2 and IFNγ production, equip liver CD8 TRM to survive while exerting local noncytolytic hepatic immunosurveillance. © 2017 Pallett et al.

  16. Human Glucocorticoid Receptor β Regulates Gluconeogenesis and Inflammation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Oakley, Robert H; Xiao, Xiao; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-12-28

    While in vitro studies have demonstrated that a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) splice isoform, β-isoform of human GR (hGRβ), acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of the classic hGRα and confers glucocorticoid resistance, the in vivo function of hGRβ is poorly understood. To this end, we created an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express hGRβ in the mouse liver under the control of the hepatocyte-specific promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of mouse livers showed that hGRβ significantly increased the expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in endocrine system disorders and the inflammatory response. Physiologically, hGRβ antagonized GRα's function and attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis through downregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in wild-type (WT) mouse liver. Interestingly, however, hGRβ did not repress PEPCK in GR liver knockout (GRLKO) mice. In contrast, hGRβ regulates the expression of STAT1 in the livers of both WT and GRLKO mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that hGRβ binds to the intergenic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the STAT1 gene. Furthermore, treatment with RU486 inhibited the upregulation of STAT1 mediated by hGRβ. Finally, our array data demonstrate that hGRβ regulates unique components of liver gene expression in vivo by both GRα-dependent and GRα-independent mechanisms.

  17. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  18. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  19. Specificity of procaine and ester hydrolysis by human, minipig, and rat skin and liver.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Christopher; Ackermann, Chrisita; Payne, N Ann; Fate, Gwendolyn; Voorman, Richard; Williams, Faith M

    2007-11-01

    The capacity of human, minipig, and rat skin and liver subcellular fractions to hydrolyze the anesthetic ester procaine was compared with carboxylesterase substrates 4-methylumbelliferyl-acetate, phenylvalerate, and para-nitrophenylacetate and the arylesterase substrate phenylacetate. Rates of procaine hydrolysis by minipig and human skin microsomal and cytosolic fractions were similar, with rat displaying higher activity. Loperamide inhibited procaine hydrolysis by human skin, suggesting involvement of human carboxylesterase hCE2. The esterase activity and inhibition profiles in the skin were similar for minipig and human, whereas rat had a higher capacity to metabolize esters and a different inhibition profile. Minipig and human liver and skin esterase activity was inhibited principally by paraoxon and bis-nitrophenyl phosphate, classical carboxylesterase inhibitors. Rat skin and liver esterase activity was inhibited additionally by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and the arylesterase inhibitor mercuric chloride, indicating a different esterase profile. These results have highlighted the potential of skin to hydrolyze procaine following topical application, which possibly limits its pharmacological effect. Skin from minipig used as an animal model for assessing transdermal drug preparations had similar capacity to hydrolyze esters to human skin.

  20. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes (nDNA), leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing, and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nDNA coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes. PMID:25806043

  1. Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Infused 3 Days Postsurgery Improve Liver Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Extended Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Astrid; Prigent, Julie; Lombard, Catherine; Rosseels, Valérie; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Breckpot, Karine; Najimi, Mustapha; Deblandre, Gisèle; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-16

    There is growing evidence that cell therapy constitutes a promising strategy for liver regenerative medicine. In the setting of hepatic cancer treatments, cell therapy could prove a useful therapeutic approach for managing the acute liver failure that occurs following extended hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the influence of delivering adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSCs) at two different early time points in an immunodeficient mouse model (Rag2-/-IL2Rγ-/-) that had undergone a 70% hepatectomy procedure. The hepatic mesenchymal cells were intrasplenically infused either immediately after surgery (n = 26) or following a critical 3-day period (n = 26). We evaluated the cells' capacity to engraft at day 1 and day 7 following transplantation by means of human Alu qPCR quantification, along with histological assessment of human albumin and α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, cell proliferation (anti-mouse and human Ki-67 staining) and murine liver weight were measured in order to evaluate liver regeneration. At day 1 posttransplantation, the ratio of human to mouse cells was similar in both groups, whereas 1 week posttransplantation this ratio was significantly improved (p < 0.016) in mice receiving ADHLSC injection at day 3 posthepatectomy (1.7%), compared to those injected at the time of surgery (1%). On the basis of liver weight, mouse liver regeneration was more extensive 1 week posttransplantation in mice transplanted with ADHLSCs (+65.3%) compared to that of mice from the sham vehicle group (+42.7%). In conclusion, infusing ADHLSCs 3 days after extensive hepatectomy improves the cell engraftment and murine hepatic tissue regeneration, thereby confirming that ADHLSCs could be a promising cell source for liver cell therapy and hepatic tissue repair.

  2. KINETICS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE METABOLISM BY CYTOCHROME P450 ISOENZYMES IN HUMAN LIVER MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetics of Bromodichloromethane Metabolism by
    Cytochrome P450 Isoenzymes in Human Liver Microsomes

    Guangyu Zhao and John W. Allis

    ABSTRACT
    The kinetic constants for the metabolism of bromodichloromethane (BDCM) by three cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes have ...

  3. KINETICS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE METABOLISM BY CYTOCHROME P450 ISOENZYMES IN HUMAN LIVER MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetics of Bromodichloromethane Metabolism by
    Cytochrome P450 Isoenzymes in Human Liver Microsomes

    Guangyu Zhao and John W. Allis

    ABSTRACT
    The kinetic constants for the metabolism of bromodichloromethane (BDCM) by three cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes have ...

  4. The PPAR alpha-humanized mouse: a model to investigate species differences in liver toxicity mediated by PPAR alpha.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Nagano, Tomokazu; Shah, Yatrik; Cheung, Connie; Ito, Shinji; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2008-01-01

    To determine the impact of the species difference between rodents and humans in response to peroxisome proliferators (PPs) mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPAR alpha-humanized transgenic mice were generated using a P1 phage artificial chromosome (PAC) genomic clone bred onto a ppar alpha-null mouse background, designated hPPAR alpha PAC. In hPPAR alpha PAC mice, the human PPAR alpha gene is expressed in tissues with high fatty acid catabolism and induced upon fasting, similar to mouse PPAR alpha in wild-type (Wt) mice. Upon treatment with the PP fenofibrate, hPPAR alpha PAC mice exhibited responses similar to Wt mice, including peroxisome proliferation, lowering of serum triglycerides, and induction of PPAR alpha target genes encoding enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism in liver, kidney, and heart, suggesting that human PPAR alpha (hPPAR alpha) functions in the same manner as mouse PPAR alpha in regulating fatty acid metabolism and lowering serum triglycerides. However, in contrast to Wt mice, treatment of hPPAR alpha PAC mice with fenofibrate did not cause significant hepatomegaly and hepatocyte proliferation, thus indicating that the mechanisms by which PPAR alpha affects lipid metabolism are distinct from the hepatocyte proliferation response, the latter of which is only induced by mouse PPAR alpha. In addition, a differential regulation of several genes, including the oncogenic let-7C miRNA by PPs, was observed between Wt and hPPAR alpha PAC mice that may contribute to the inherent difference between mouse and human PPAR alpha in activation of hepatocellular proliferation. The hPPAR alpha PAC mouse model provides an in vivo platform to investigate the species difference mediated by PPAR alpha and an ideal model for human risk assessment PPs exposure.

  5. MicroRNA-Mediated Suppression of Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3′ untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver. PMID:23349911

  6. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  7. The draft genome of the carcinogenic human liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Huang, Yan; Sun, Jiufeng; Men, Jingtao; Liu, Hailiang; Luo, Fang; Guo, Lei; Lv, Xiaoli; Deng, Chuanhuan; Zhou, Chenhui; Fan, Yongxiu; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Lisi; Hu, Yue; Liang, Chi; Hu, Xuchu; Xu, Jin; Yu, Xinbing

    2011-10-24

    Clonorchis sinensis is a carcinogenic human liver fluke that is widespread in Asian countries. Increasing infection rates of this neglected tropical disease are leading to negative economic and public health conseque