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Sample records for encoding laminin-binding protein

  1. Increased mRNA expression of a laminin-binding protein in human colon carcinoma: Complete sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, Hsiukang; Wong, Jau Min; Chen, Hai Shiene; Lee, C.; Steele, G.D. Jr.; Chen, Lanbo

    1988-09-01

    Reliable markers to distinguish human colon carcinoma from normal colonic epithelium are needed particularly for poorly differentiated tumors where no useful marker is currently available. To search for markers the authors constructed cDNA libraries from human colon carcinoma cell lines and screened for clones that hybridize to a greater degree with mRNAs of colon carcinomas than with their normal counterparts. Here they report one such cDNA clone that hybridizes with a 1.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA, the level of which is /approx/9-fold greater in colon carcinoma than in adjacent normal colonic epithelium. Blot hybridization of total RNA from a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines shows that the level of this 1.2-kb mRNA in poorly differentiated colon carcinomas is as high as or higher than that in well-differentiated carcinomas. Molecular cloning and complete sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the full-length open reading frame of this 1.2-kb mRNA unexpectedly show it to contain all the partial cDNA sequence encoding 135 amino acid residues previously reported for a human laminin receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this putative laminin-binding protein from human colon carcinomas consists of 295 amino acid residues with interesting features. There is an unusual C-terminal 70-amino acid segment, which is trypsin-resistant and highly negatively charged.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, Christian; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  3. Expression and identification of a laminin-binding protein in Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed Central

    Tronchin, G; Esnault, K; Renier, G; Filmon, R; Chabasse, D; Bouchara, J P

    1997-01-01

    Adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of human aspergillosis, to the extracellular matrix protein laminin has been previously demonstrated. This study investigated the expression of laminin receptors during swelling of conidia, a step leading to germination and subsequent colonization of tissues. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the laminin binding sites were distributed over the external rodlet layer of resting conidia. During swelling, the characteristic rodlet layer progressively disintegrated and conidia surrounded by a smooth cell wall layer appeared. Flow cytometry using fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated laminin demonstrated that expression of laminin receptors at the surface of conidia was swelling dependent. Resting conidia expressed high levels of laminin receptors on their surface. A gradual decrease of laminin binding was then observed as swelling occurred, reaching a minimum for 4-h-swollen conidia. This correlated with a loss of adherence of swollen conidia to laminin immobilized on microtiter plates. Trypsin pretreatment of conidia reduced laminin binding. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ligand blotting with laminin identified in a cell wall extract a major 72-kDa cell wall glycoprotein which binds laminin. Thus, one of the initial events in the host colonization may be the recognition of basement membrane laminin by this 72-kDa cell wall surface component. PMID:8975886

  4. Induction of a putative laminin-binding protein of Streptococcus gordonii in human infective endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, P; Gleyzal, C; Guerret, S; Etienne, J; Grimaud, J A

    1992-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the virulence of Streptococcus strains in infective endocarditis might be due to the expression of binding sites for the extracellular matrix proteins of damaged valves. In this communication, we draw attention to one laminin-binding protein from a strain of Streptococcus gordonii isolated from a patient with human endocarditis. This 145-kDa protein was found on the cell wall of the bacterium. The level of expression of this binding protein might be regulated by the presence of extracellular matrix proteins: the protein was lacking after in vitro selection of laminin, collagen I, and fibronectin nonbinding variants, and it was recovered after growth of the variants when laminin or collagen I was added to the growth medium. It was also missing after 10 subcultures in minimal medium, indicating some positive control. Furthermore, the 145-kDa protein was recognized as a major antigen by sera from patients treated for streptococcal infective endocarditis, while sera from patients with valvulopathies gave only slight recognition, suggesting an increase of the expression of this protein during infective endocarditis. It was also shown that the 145-kDa protein carried a collagen I-like determinant detected with anti-human collagen I antibodies. Images PMID:1530927

  5. The laminin binding protein p40 is involved in inducing limb abnormality of mouse fetuses as the effects of methoxyacetic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruyani, Aceng; Sudarwati, Sri; Sutasurya, Lien A; Sumarsono, Sony H; Gloe, Torsten

    2003-09-01

    This study is intended to characterize a protein that is linked with mouse limb teratogenicity as the effects of methoxyacetic acid (MAA) treatment. A single dose of MAA (10 mmol/kg body weight) was given by gavage on gestation day (GD) 11, whereas the control group were administered vehicle only. The pregnant mice were killed at 4 h after MAA treatment, and forelimb buds were isolated from both the control and treated group embryos. Proteins from forelimb buds GD 11 + 4 h, which were precipitated out using 40-60% ammonium sulfate, then were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D SDS-PAGE) technique. The 2-D gels reveal one protein with 41.6 kDa and pI 6.4, which expression was downregulated after MAA treatment. Tentative protein identification via peptide mass database search and definitive protein identification via a primary sequence database search indicate that the protein matches exactly to 34/67 kDa laminin binding protein (LBP; P14206, SwissProt), which is encoded by p40 gene (MGI:105381). The identity was further verified by Western blotting with an antibody against the 67 kDa LBP. The results suggest that MAA treatment to pregnant mice downregulates the LBP-p40 in the forelimb buds.

  6. Force-induced globule-coil transition in laminin binding protein and its role for viral-cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris N; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Mikhaylov, Andrey G; Korneev, Denis V; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Karakouz, Tanya; Belavin, Pavel A; Netesova, Nina A; Protopopova, Elena V; Konovalova, Svetlana N; Dietler, Giovanni; Loktev, Valery B

    2014-12-01

    The specific interactions of the pairs laminin binding protein (LBP)-purified tick-borne encephalitis viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of this protein, as well as West Nile viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of that protein, are studied by combined methods of single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy (SMDFS), enzyme immunoassay and optical surface waves-based biosensor measurements. The experiments were performed at neutral pH (7.4) and acid pH (5.3) conditions. The data obtained confirm the role of LBP as a cell receptor for two typical viral species of the Flavivirus genus. A comparison of these data with similar data obtained for another cell receptor of this family, namely human αVβ3 integrin, reveals that both these receptors are very important. Studying the specific interaction between the cell receptors in question and specially prepared monoclonal antibodies against them, we could show that both interaction sites involved in the process of virus-cell interaction remain intact at pH 5.3. At the same time, for these acid conditions characteristic for an endosome during flavivirus-cell membrane fusion, SMDFS data reveal the existence of a force-induced (effective already for forces as small as 30-70 pN) sharp globule-coil transition for LBP and LBP-fragments of protein E complexes. We argue that this conformational transformation, being an analog of abrupt first-order phase transition and having similarity with the famous Rayleigh hydrodynamic instability, might be indispensable for the flavivirus-cell membrane fusion process. PMID:25319621

  7. The adaptor protein LAD/TSAd mediates laminin-dependent T cell migration via association with the 67 kDa laminin binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunkyung; Choi, Youngbong; Ahn, Eunseon; Park, Inyoung

    2009-01-01

    The adaptor protein, LAD/TSAd, plays essential roles in T cell activation. To further understand the functions of this protein, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening using TSAd as bait and identified 67 kDa laminin binding protein (LBP) as the interacting partner. Subsequently, TSAd-LBP interaction was confirmed in D1.1 T cell line. Upon costimulation by T cell receptor (TCR) plus laminin crosslinking or TCR plus integrin α6 crosslinking, LBP was coimmunoprecipitated with TSAd. Moreover, TCR plus laminin costimulation-dependent T cell migration was enhanced in D1.1 T cells overexpressing TSAd but was disrupted in D1.1 cells overexpressing dominant negative form of TSAd or TSAd shRNA. These data show that, upon TCR plus integrin costimulation, TSAd associates with LBP and mediates T lymphocyte migration. PMID:19561400

  8. The 67-kD elastin/laminin-binding protein is related to an enzymatically inactive, alternatively spliced form of beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed Central

    Hinek, A; Rabinovitch, M; Keeley, F; Okamura-Oho, Y; Callahan, J

    1993-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that a 67-kD cell surface elastin/laminin-binding protein (EBP) is responsible for cell adhesion to elastin and laminin and for mediating the process of elastin fiber assembly, but the nature of this protein was unknown. In this report we provide evidence that a 67-kD catalytically inactive form of beta-galactosidase produced by alternative splicing demonstrates immunological and functional similarity and sequence homology to the 67-kD EBP, suggesting that the two might be the same. Antibody prepared to a synthetic peptide, N-Ac-GSPSAQDEASPL, corresponding to a frame-shift-generated sequence unique to the alternatively spliced form of human beta-galactosidase, also recognized sheep EBP both on Western blotting and in aortic tissue. Furthermore, this synthetic peptide (S-GAL) binds to elastin and laminin, but not to fibronectin, collagen I, or collagen III. Moreover, both tropoelastin and laminin which bind to S-GAL peptide affinity columns can be specifically eluted from them with an excess of free S-GAL peptides. In addition, sequence homology among this splice variant of human beta-galactosidase, sheep EBP, and NH2-terminal sequences of some elastases suggests that these proteins share a common ligand-binding motif that has not been previously recognized. Images PMID:8383699

  9. The gene for human E2 small nucleolar RNA resides in an intron of a laminin-binding protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamurugan, N.; Eliceiri, G.L.

    1995-11-20

    Several of the known small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) species have been shown to be required for processing of ribosomal RNA precursors (pre-rRNA). The genes of most of the known vertebrate snoRNA species are located in introns of genes for messenger RNA precursors. E2 RNA is a nucleolar species that is 154 nucleotides long in human; it belongs to a new family of snoRNAs because it does not have the sequences named box C, C{prime} or D that are present in most vertebrate snoRNA species, and it does not bind fibrillarin, the nucleolar protein associated with most snoRNAs. E2 snoRNA is found in all tissues tested and in all vertebrates analyzed. E2 snoRNA is expected to have a unique function in ribosome formation, because it psoralen-photocrosslinks in vivo to a unique internal segment of the 28S rRNA sequence of pre-rRNA. Two observations are compatible with the possibility that the human E2 RNA gene may be intronic. First, the human E2 RNA gene lacks the intragenic or flanking sequences that are functional in other genes. Second, the 5{prime} end of E2 RNA is monophosphorylated, suggesting that is formed by RNA processing. Intron-encoded snoRNAs have monophosphorylated 5{prime}termini. Until now, it was not known whether the E2 RNA gene resides in an intron. This information is important for studying the biosynthesis of E2 RNA. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA Is a Laminin-Binding Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashutosh; Brissette, Catherine A.; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA outer surface protein plays a significant role in mammalian infection by the Lyme disease spirochete and is an important antigen for the serodiagnosis of human infection. B. burgdorferi adheres to host extracellular matrix components, including laminin. The results of our studies indicate that BmpA and its three paralogous proteins, BmpB, BmpC, and BmpD, all bind to mammalian laminin. BmpA did not bind mammalian type I or type IV collagens or fibronectin. BmpA-directed antibodies significantly inhibited the adherence of live B. burgdorferi to laminin. The laminin-binding domain of BmpA was mapped to the carboxy-terminal 80 amino acids. Solubilized collagen inhibited BmpA-laminin binding, suggesting interactions through the collagen-binding domains of laminin. These results, together with previous data, indicate that BmpA and its paralogs are targets for the development of preventative and curative therapies for Lyme disease. PMID:19703983

  11. Relationship between laminin binding capacity and laminin expression on tumor cells sensitive or resistant to natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Laybourn, K.A.; Varani, J.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Hiserodt, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Previous studies have identified the presence of laminin binding sites on murine NK and NC sensitive tumor cells by /sup 125/I-laminin binding and laminin induced cell-cell aggregation. The finding that the addition of exogenous laminin inhibits NK/NC binding to sensitive tumor cells suggests laminin binding sites may serve as target antigens for NK cells. The present study extends earlier reports by analyzing a large panel of tumor cells for laminin binding capacity, laminin expression and sensitivity to NK/NC killing. The data indicate that all tumor cells which bind to NK/NC cells (8 lines tested) express laminin binding sites. All of these tumor cells were capable of competing for NK lysis of YAC-1 cells in cold target competition assays, and all bound enriched NK cells in direct single cell binding assays. In contrast, tumor cells expressing high levels of surface laminin (B16 melanomas, C57B1/6 fibrosarcomas, and RAS transfected 3T3 fibroblasts) but low levels of laminin binding capacity did not bind NK/NC cells and were resistant to lysis. These data support the hypothesis that expression of laminin/laminin binding sites may contribute to tumor cell sensitivity to NK/NC binding and/or killing.

  12. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  13. Laminin-binding integrin gene copy number alterations in distinct epithelial-type cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harryman, William L; Pond, Erika; Singh, Parminder; Little, Andrew S; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Nagle, Raymond B; Cress, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Background: The laminin-binding integrin (LBI) family are cell adhesion molecules that are essential for invasion and metastasis of human epithelial cancers and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance. We investigated whether copy number alteration (CNA) or mutations of a five-gene signature (ITGB4, ITGA3, LAMB3, PLEC, and SYNE3), representing essential genes for LBI adhesion, would correlate with patient outcomes within human epithelial-type tumor data sets currently available in an open access format. Methods: We investigated the relative alteration frequency of an LBI signature panel (integrin β4 (ITGB4), integrin α3 (ITGA3), laminin β3 chain (LAMB3), plectin (PLEC), and nesprin 3 (SYNE3)), independent of the epithelial cancer type, within publically available and published data using cBioPortal and Oncomine software. We rank ordered the results using a 20% alteration frequency cut-off and limited the analysis to studies containing at least 100 samples. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were analyzed to determine if alterations in the LBI signature correlated with patient survival. The Oncomine data mining tool was used to compare the heat map expression of the LBI signature without SYNE3 (as this was not included in the Oncomine database) to drug resistance patterns. Results: Twelve different cancer types, representing 5,647 samples, contained at least a 20% alteration frequency of the five-gene LBI signature. The frequency of alteration ranged from 38.3% to 19.8%. Within the LBI signature, PLEC was the most commonly altered followed by LAMB3, ITGB4, ITGA3, and SYNE3 across all twelve cancer types. Within cancer types, there was little overlap of the individual amplified genes from each sample, suggesting different specific amplicons may alter the LBI adhesion structures. Of the twelve cancer types, overall survival was altered by CNA presence in bladder urothelial carcinoma (p=0.0143*) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma and endocervical adenocarcinoma (p=0

  14. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  15. Functional regeneration of the transected recurrent laryngeal nerve using a collagen scaffold loaded with laminin and laminin-binding BDNF and GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Jiafeng; Li, Yu; Dong, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a challenge due to the lack of effective treatments. In this study, we established a new drug delivery system consisting of a tube of Heal-All Oral Cavity Repair Membrane loaded with laminin and neurotrophic factors and tested its ability to promote functional recovery following RLN injury. We created recombinant fusion proteins consisting of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) fused to laminin-binding domains (LBDs) in order to prevent neurotrophin diffusion. LBD-BDNF, LBD-GDNF, and laminin were injected into a collagen tube that was fitted to the ends of the transected RLN in rats. Functional recovery was assessed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after injury. Although vocal fold movement was not restored until 12 weeks after injury, animals treated with the collagen tube loaded with laminin, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF showed improved recovery in vocalisation, arytenoid cartilage angles, compound muscle action potentials and regenerated fibre area compared to animals treated by autologous nerve grafting (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the drug delivery system induced nerve regeneration following RLN transection that was superior to that induced by autologus nerve grafting. It may have potential applications in nerve regeneration of RLN transection injury. PMID:27558932

  16. Functional regeneration of the transected recurrent laryngeal nerve using a collagen scaffold loaded with laminin and laminin-binding BDNF and GDNF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Jiafeng; Li, Yu; Dong, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a challenge due to the lack of effective treatments. In this study, we established a new drug delivery system consisting of a tube of Heal-All Oral Cavity Repair Membrane loaded with laminin and neurotrophic factors and tested its ability to promote functional recovery following RLN injury. We created recombinant fusion proteins consisting of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) fused to laminin-binding domains (LBDs) in order to prevent neurotrophin diffusion. LBD-BDNF, LBD-GDNF, and laminin were injected into a collagen tube that was fitted to the ends of the transected RLN in rats. Functional recovery was assessed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after injury. Although vocal fold movement was not restored until 12 weeks after injury, animals treated with the collagen tube loaded with laminin, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF showed improved recovery in vocalisation, arytenoid cartilage angles, compound muscle action potentials and regenerated fibre area compared to animals treated by autologous nerve grafting (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the drug delivery system induced nerve regeneration following RLN transection that was superior to that induced by autologus nerve grafting. It may have potential applications in nerve regeneration of RLN transection injury. PMID:27558932

  17. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  18. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  19. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  20. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  1. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  2. Structural basis of laminin binding to the LARGE glycans on dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Briggs, David C; Yoshida-Moriguchi, Takako; Zheng, Tianqing; Venzke, David; Anderson, Mary E; Strazzulli, Andrea; Moracci, Marco; Yu, Liping; Hohenester, Erhard; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-10-01

    Dystroglycan is a highly glycosylated extracellular matrix receptor with essential functions in skeletal muscle and the nervous system. Reduced matrix binding by α-dystroglycan (α-DG) due to perturbed glycosylation is a pathological feature of several forms of muscular dystrophy. Like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE) synthesizes the matrix-binding heteropolysaccharide [-glucuronic acid-β1,3-xylose-α1,3-]n. Using a dual exoglycosidase digestion, we confirm that this polysaccharide is present on native α-DG from skeletal muscle. The atomic details of matrix binding were revealed by a high-resolution crystal structure of laminin-G-like (LG) domains 4 and 5 (LG4 and LG5) of laminin-α2 bound to a LARGE-synthesized oligosaccharide. A single glucuronic acid-β1,3-xylose disaccharide repeat straddles a Ca(2+) ion in the LG4 domain, with oxygen atoms from both sugars replacing Ca(2+)-bound water molecules. The chelating binding mode accounts for the high affinity of this protein-carbohydrate interaction. These results reveal a previously uncharacterized mechanism of carbohydrate recognition and provide a structural framework for elucidating the mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy. PMID:27526028

  3. Genetically Encoded Protein Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Organic voltage-sensitive dyes offer very high spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal function. However these dyes suffer from the drawbacks of non-specificity of cell staining and low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. Further progress in imaging activity is expected from the development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. Cell type specificity of expression of these fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors can be obtained via several different mechanisms. One is cell type specificity of infection by individual virus subtypes. A second mechanism is specificity of promoter expression in individual cell types. A third, depends on the offspring of transgenic animals with cell type specific expression of cre recombinase mated with an animal that has the DNA for the FP voltage sensor in all of its cells but its expression is dependent on the recombinase activity. Challenges remain. First, the response time constants of many of the new FP voltage sensors are slower (2-10 ms) than those of organic dyes. This results in a relatively small fractional fluorescence change, ΔF/F, for action potentials. Second, the largest signal presently available is only ~40% for a 100 mV depolarization and many of the new probes have signals that are substantially smaller. Large signals are especially important when attempting to detect fast events because the shorter measurement interval results in a relatively small number of detected photons and therefore a relatively large shot noise (see Chap. 1). Another kind of challenge has occurred when attempts were made to transition from one species to another or from one cell type to another or from cell culture to in vivo measurements.Several laboratories have recently described a number of novel FP voltage sensors. Here we attempt to critically review the current status of these developments in terms of signal size, time course, and in vivo function.

  4. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  5. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  6. Protein constraints induced by multiframe encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.F.; Waterman, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent sequencing of viral genomes supports the existence of multiframe codon reading. This study considers the restrictions imposed on proteins coded for in overlapping regions. Calculation of conditional probabilities shows that the restrictions imposed are severe, even at the amino acid-protein structural level. These conditional probabilities are used to calculate conditional information per codon, showing the nonequivalence of the various pairs of reading frames. In addition, the coevolution or primary-secondary evolution of two overlapping proteins should be distinguishable.

  7. Fluorescence-based multiplex protein detection using optically encoded microbeads.

    PubMed

    Jun, Bong-Hyun; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong

    2012-01-01

    Potential utilization of proteins for early detection and diagnosis of various diseases has drawn considerable interest in the development of protein-based multiplex detection techniques. Among the various techniques for high-throughput protein screening, optically-encoded beads combined with fluorescence-based target monitoring have great advantages over the planar array-based multiplexing assays. This review discusses recent developments of analytical methods of screening protein molecules on microbead-based platforms. These include various strategies such as barcoded microbeads, molecular beacon-based techniques, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based techniques. Their applications for label-free protein detection are also addressed. Especially, the optically-encoded beads such as multilayer fluorescence beads and SERS-encoded beads are successful for generating a large number of coding.

  8. Chemokine binding proteins encoded by pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio; Saraiva, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Chemokines are chemoattractant cytokines that play an important role in immunity. The role of chemokines against invading pathogens is emphasized by the expression of chemokine inhibitors by many pathogens. A mechanims employed by poxviruses and herpesviruses is the secretion of chemokine bindingproteins unrelated to host receptors that bind chemokines with high affinity and block their activity. Soluble chemokine binding proteins have also been identified in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and in ticks. The binding specificity of these inhibitors of cell migration point at chemokines that contribute to host defense mechanisms against various pathogens. Chemokine binding proteins modulate the immune response and may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat inflamatory diseases.

  9. Protein sequences encode safeguards against aggregation.

    PubMed

    Reumers, Joke; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Fréderic

    2009-03-01

    Functional requirements shaped proteins into globular structures. Under these structural constraints, which require both regular secondary structure and a hydrophobic core, protein aggregation is an unavoidable corollary to protein structure. However, as aggregation results in reduced fitness, natural selection will tend to eliminate strongly aggregating sequences. The analysis of distribution and variation of aggregation patterns in the human proteome using the TANGO algorithm confirms the findings of a previous study on several proteomes: the flanks of aggregation-prone regions are enriched with charged residues and proline, the so-called gatekeeper-residues. Moreover, in this study, we observed a widespread redundancy in gatekeeper usage. Interestingly, aggregating regions from key proteins such as p53 or huntingtin are among the most extensive "gatekept" sequences. As a consequence, mutations that remove gatekeepers could therefore result in a strong increase in disease-susceptibility. In a set of disease-associated mutations from the UniProt database, we find a strong enrichment of mutations that disrupt gatekeeper motifs. Closer inspection of a number of case studies indicates clearly that removing gatekeepers may play a determining role in widely varying disorders, such as van der Woude syndrome (VWS), X-linked Fabry disease (FD), and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. PMID:19156839

  10. Genetically encoded cleavable protein photo-cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shixian; He, Dan; Long, Teng; Zhang, Shuai; Meng, Rong; Chen, Peng R

    2014-08-27

    We have developed a genetically encoded, selenium-based cleavable photo-cross-linker that allows for the separation of bait and prey proteins after protein photo-cross-linking. We have further demonstrated the efficient capture of the in situ generated selenenic acid on the cleaved prey proteins. Our strategy involves tagging the selenenic acid with an alkyne-containing dimethoxyaniline molecule and subsequently labeling with an azide-bearing fluorophore or biotin probe. This cleavage-and-capture after protein photo-cross-linking strategy allows for the efficient capture of prey proteins that are readily accessible by two-dimensional gel-based proteomics and mass spectrometry analysis.

  11. Mechanism of action of regulatory proteins encoded by complex retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, B R

    1992-01-01

    Complex retroviruses are distinguished by their ability to control the expression of their gene products through the action of virally encoded regulatory proteins. These viral gene products modulate both the quantity and the quality of viral gene expression through regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The most intensely studied retroviral regulatory proteins, termed Tat and Rev, are encoded by the prototypic complex retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, considerable information also exists on regulatory proteins encoded by human T-cell leukemia virus type I, as well as several other human and animal complex retroviruses. In general, these data demonstrate that retrovirally encoded transcriptional trans-activators can exert a similar effect by several very different mechanisms. In contrast, posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression appears to occur via a single pathway that is probably dependent on the recruitment of a highly conserved cellular cofactor. These two shared regulatory pathways are proposed to be critical to the ability of complex retroviruses to establish chronic infections in the face of an ongoing host immune response. Images PMID:1406488

  12. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Erin R.; Howe, Christopher J.; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  13. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Erin R; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2016-01-21

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events.

  14. Biosensor studies of collagen and laminin binding with immobilized Escherichia coli O157:H7 and inhibition with naturally occurring food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Marjorie B.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks were mostly due to consumption of undercooked contaminated beef which resulted in severe illness and several fatalities. Recalls of contaminated meat are costly for the meat industry. Our research attempts to understand the mechanisms of bacterial adhesion on animal carcass in order to eliminate or reduce pathogens in foods. We have reported the interactions of immobilized E. coli O157:H7 cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) components using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor (BIAcore). These studies showed that immobilized bacterial cells allowed the study of real-time binding interactions of bacterial surface with the ECM compounds, collagen I, laminin and fibronectin. Collagen I and laminin bound to the E. coli sensor surface with dissociation and association rates ranging from 106 to 109. Binding of collagen I and laminin mixture resulted in synergistic binding signals. An inhibition model was derived using collagen-laminin as the ligand which binds with E. coli sensor. A select group of naturally occurring food additives was evaluated by determining their effectivity in inhibiting the collagen-laminin binding to the bacterial sensor. Bound collagen-laminin was detached from the E. coli sensor surface with the aid of an organic acid. The biosensor results were verified with cell aggregation assays which were observed with optical and electron microscopes. These biosensor studies provided understanding of bacterial adhesion to connective tissue macromolecules. It also provided a model system for the rapid assessment of potential inhibitors that can be used in carcass treatment to inhibit or reduce bacterial contamination.

  15. Neutron-Encoded Protein Quantification by Peptide Carbamylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Keller, Mark P.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet.

  16. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  17. Genetically encoded sensors of protein hydrodynamics and molecular proximity.

    PubMed

    Hoepker, Alexander C; Wang, Ariel; Le Marois, Alix; Suhling, Klaus; Yan, Yuling; Marriott, Gerard

    2015-05-19

    The specialized light organ of the ponyfish supports the growth of the bioluminescent symbiont Photobacterium leiognathi. The bioluminescence of P. leiognathi is generated within a heteromeric protein complex composed of the bacterial luciferase and a 20-kDa lumazine binding protein (LUMP), which serves as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor protein, emitting a cyan-colored fluorescence with an unusually long excited state lifetime of 13.6 ns. The long fluorescence lifetime and small mass of LUMP are exploited for the design of highly optimized encoded sensors for quantitative fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements of protein hydrodynamics. In particular, large differences in the FA values of the free and target-bound states of LUMP fusions appended with capture sequences of up to 20 kDa are used in quantitative FA imaging and analysis of target proteins. For example, a fusion protein composed of LUMP and a 5-kDa G protein binding domain is used as an FA sensor to quantify the binding of the GTP-bound cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) (21 kDa) in solution and within Escherichia coli. Additionally, the long fluorescence lifetime and the surface-bound fluorescent cofactor 6,7-dimethyl-8- (1'-dimethyl-ribityl) lumazine in LUMP are utilized in the design of highly optimized FRET probes that use Venus as an acceptor probe. The efficiency of FRET in a zero-length LUMP-Venus fusion is 62% compared to ∼ 31% in a related CFP-Venus fusion. The improved FRET efficiency obtained by using LUMP as a donor probe is used in the design of a FRET-optimized genetically encoded LUMP-Venus substrate for thrombin. PMID:25931526

  18. Genetically encoded sensors of protein hydrodynamics and molecular proximity

    PubMed Central

    Hoepker, Alexander C.; Wang, Ariel; Le Marois, Alix; Suhling, Klaus; Yan, Yuling; Marriott, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The specialized light organ of the ponyfish supports the growth of the bioluminescent symbiont Photobacterium leiognathi. The bioluminescence of P. leiognathi is generated within a heteromeric protein complex composed of the bacterial luciferase and a 20-kDa lumazine binding protein (LUMP), which serves as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor protein, emitting a cyan-colored fluorescence with an unusually long excited state lifetime of 13.6 ns. The long fluorescence lifetime and small mass of LUMP are exploited for the design of highly optimized encoded sensors for quantitative fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements of protein hydrodynamics. In particular, large differences in the FA values of the free and target-bound states of LUMP fusions appended with capture sequences of up to 20 kDa are used in quantitative FA imaging and analysis of target proteins. For example, a fusion protein composed of LUMP and a 5-kDa G protein binding domain is used as an FA sensor to quantify the binding of the GTP-bound cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) (21 kDa) in solution and within Escherichia coli. Additionally, the long fluorescence lifetime and the surface-bound fluorescent cofactor 6,7-dimethyl-8- (1′-dimethyl-ribityl) lumazine in LUMP are utilized in the design of highly optimized FRET probes that use Venus as an acceptor probe. The efficiency of FRET in a zero-length LUMP-Venus fusion is 62% compared to ∼31% in a related CFP-Venus fusion. The improved FRET efficiency obtained by using LUMP as a donor probe is used in the design of a FRET-optimized genetically encoded LUMP-Venus substrate for thrombin. PMID:25931526

  19. Discovering DNA encodes heredity and prions are infectious proteins.

    PubMed

    Prusiner, Stanley B; McCarty, Maclyn

    2006-01-01

    The resemblance between the discoveries that DNA is the basis of heredity and that prions are infectious proteins is remarkable. Though four decades separated these two discoveries, the biochemical methodologies and scientific philosophies that were employed are surprisingly similar. In both cases, bioassays available at the time that the projects were initiated proved to be inadequate to support purification studies. Improved bioassays allowed the transforming principle (TP) to be purified from pneumococci and prions from scrapie-infected hamster brains. Publications describing TP as composed of DNA prompted some scientists to contend that undetected proteins must contaminate TP enriched fractions. The simplicity of DNA was thought to prevent it from encoding genetic information. By the time prions were discovered, the genomes of all infectious pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites had been shown to be comprised of nucleic acids and so an antithetical refrain became widely echoed: DNA or RNA molecules must be hiding among the proteins of prions. Finding the unexpected and being asked to demonstrate unequivocally the absence of a possible contaminant represent uncanny parallels between the discoveries that DNA encodes the genotype and that prions are infectious proteins.

  20. Vpu Protein: The Viroporin Encoded by HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    González, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Viral protein U (Vpu) is a lentiviral viroporin encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains. This small protein of 81 amino acids contains a single transmembrane domain that allows for supramolecular organization via homoligomerization or interaction with other proteins. The topology and trafficking of Vpu through subcellular compartments result in pleiotropic effects in host cells. Notwithstanding the high variability of its amino acid sequence, the functionality of Vpu is well conserved in pandemic virus isolates. This review outlines our current knowledge on the interactions of Vpu with the host cell. The regulation of cellular physiology by Vpu and the validity of this viroporin as a therapeutic target are also discussed. PMID:26247957

  1. Bioinformatics Annotation of Human Y Chromosome-Encoded Protein Pathways and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of human Y chromosome-encoded proteins, their pathways, and their interactions using bioinformatics tools. From the NCBI annotation release 107 of human genome, we retrieved a total of 66 proteins encoded on Y chromosome. Most of the retrieved proteins were also matched with the proteins listed in the core databases of the Human Proteome Project including neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and the Human Protein Atlas. When we examined the pathways of human Y-encoded proteins through KEGG database and Pathway Studio software, many of proteins fall into the categories related to cell signaling pathways. Using the STRING program, we found a total of 49 human Y-encoded proteins showing strong/medium interaction with each other. While using the Pathway studio software, we found that a total of 16 proteins interact with other chromosome-encoded proteins. In particular, the SRY protein interacted with 17 proteins encoded on other chromosomes. Additionally, we aligned the sequences of human Y-encoded proteins with the sequences of chimpanzee and mouse Y-encoded proteins using the NCBI BLAST program. This analysis resulted in a significant number of orthologous proteins between human, chimpanzee, and mouse. Collectively, our findings provide the scientific community with additional information on the human Y chromosome-encoded proteins.

  2. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  3. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  4. Genetically encoded force sensors for measuring mechanical forces in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    There are three sources of free energy for cells: chemical potential, electrical potential and mechanical potential. There is little known about the last one since there have not been simple ways to measure stress in proteins in cells. we have now developed genetically encoded force sensors to assess the stress in fibrous proteins in living cells. These FReT based fluorescence sensors can be read out at video rates and provide real time maps of the stress distribution in cells, tissues and animals. The sensors can be inserted into specific proteins and in general do not disturb the normal function or anatomy. The original sensors used mutant GFPs linked by elastic linkers. These sensors provide a linear output with applied stress but the response is linear in strain. To improve contrast and dynamic range we have now developed a new class of sensors that are smaller making them less invasive, and have much higher intrinsic sensitivity since force modulates the angle between the donor and acceptor much more than the distance between them. Known as cpstFRET, the probe shows improved biocompatibility, wider dynamic range and higher sensitivity. PMID:21966553

  5. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  6. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Pardo Garcia, Alan; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them. PMID:26501285

  7. Characterization of Mapuera virus: structure, proteins and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Henderson, G W; Laird, C; Dermott, E; Rima, B K

    1995-10-01

    The molecular biology of Mapuera virus was studied at both the protein and nucleic acid levels. Seven virus-encoded proteins were detected in infected Vero cells. The sizes and characteristics of each of the proteins determined from various radiolabelling experiments allowed preliminary identification of the proteins as the large (L; 190 kDa), haemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN; 74 kDa), nucleocapsid (N; 66 kDa), fusion (F0; 63 kDa), phosphoprotein (P; 49 kDa), matrix (M; 43 kDa) and non-structural (V; 35 kDa) proteins. Western blot analysis showed that the HN, N and P proteins were major antigens recognized in the mouse. A cDNA library of total virus-infected cellular mRNA was created and screening of the library resulted in the detection of cDNA sequences representing the N mRNA transcript of Mapuera virus. The N mRNA sequence determined from the clones was 1731 nt in length and contained an ORF that encoded 537 amino acids, the complete 3' untranslated region and part of the 5' non-coding region. The calculated M(r) of the N protein was 59 kDa, which is close to the 66 kDa protein observed by SDS-PAGE. PMID:7595354

  8. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  9. Ribosomal proteins are encoded by single copy genes in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Steel, L F; Jacobson, A

    1986-01-01

    Five recombinant plasmids which encode ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) from Dictyostelium discoideum have been isolated. Poly(A) + RNA was size-fractionated by preparative agarose gel electrophoresis and a fraction encoding proteins of less than 35 kDa was used to construct a cDNA library in the plasmid vector pBR322. Individual clones from the library were screened by hybrid-selected translation and those encoding r-proteins were identified by co-migration of the translation products in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with marker proteins purified from Dictyostelium ribosomes. Initial characterization using the five cDNA plasmids indicates that these r-proteins are encoded by single copy genes and that they are not tightly clustered in the genome.

  10. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  11. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp. PMID:7665074

  13. Experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michael F; Peterson, Craig L; Smale, Stephen T

    2012-02-01

    This article describes experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins. DNA-binding proteins are most commonly identified by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) or DNase I footprinting. To identify the gene encoding a protein detected by EMSA or DNase footprinting, the protein often needs to be purified and its sequence analyzed, as described here. Other methods are also available which do not resort to protein purification, including the one-hybrid screen, in vitro expression library screen, and mammalian expression cloning. These methods are outlined, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:22301659

  14. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on research directed toward introducing a gene (Gmg 17.1) encoding the ..cap alpha..'-subunit of ..beta..-conglycinin, a soybean seed protein, into petunia plants using gene transfer mechanisms. (ACR)

  15. SurfaceomeDB: a cancer-orientated database for genes encoding cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Almeida, Renan Valieris Bueno; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas; Ohara, Daniel Takatori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Old, Lloyd J.; de Souza, Sandro José

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteins (CSPs) are excellent targets for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, and it is estimated that 10–20% of all genes in the human genome encode CSPs. In an effort to integrate all data publicly available for genes encoding cell surface proteins, a database (SurfaceomeDB) was developed. SurfaceomeDB is a gene-centered portal containing different types of information, including annotation for gene expression, protein domains, somatic mutations in cancer, and protein-protein interactions for all human genes encoding CSPs. SurfaceomeDB was implemented as an integrative and relational database in a user-friendly web interface, where users can search for gene name, gene annotation, or keywords. There is also a streamlined graphical representation of all data provided and links to the most important data repositories and databases, such as NCBI, UCSC Genome Browser, and EBI. PMID:23390370

  16. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  17. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  18. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  19. Evolutionary Characteristics of Missing Proteins: Insights into the Evolution of Human Chromosomes Related to Missing-Protein-Encoding Genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aishi; Li, Guang; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xu, Ping; He, Fuchu

    2015-12-01

    Although the "missing protein" is a temporary concept in C-HPP, the biological information for their "missing" could be an important clue in evolutionary studies. Here we classified missing-protein-encoding genes into two groups, the genes encoding PE2 proteins (with transcript evidence) and the genes encoding PE3/4 proteins (with no transcript evidence). These missing-protein-encoding genes distribute unevenly among different chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene clusters. In the view of evolutionary features, PE3/4 genes tend to be young, spreading at the nonhomology chromosomal regions and evolving at higher rates. Interestingly, there is a higher proportion of singletons in PE3/4 genes than the proportion of singletons in all genes (background) and OTCSGs (organ, tissue, cell type-specific genes). More importantly, most of the paralogous PE3/4 genes belong to the newly duplicated members of the paralogous gene groups, which mainly contribute to special biological functions, such as "smell perception". These functions are heavily restricted into specific type of cells, tissues, or specific developmental stages, acting as the new functional requirements that facilitated the emergence of the missing-protein-encoding genes during evolution. In addition, the criteria for the extremely special physical-chemical proteins were first set up based on the properties of PE2 proteins, and the evolutionary characteristics of those proteins were explored. Overall, the evolutionary analyses of missing-protein-encoding genes are expected to be highly instructive for proteomics and functional studies in the future.

  20. An intron-encoded protein assists RNA splicing of multiple similar introns of different bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing; Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2005-10-21

    Four group II introns were found in an unusually intron-rich dnaN gene (encoding the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum, and they have strong similarities to two introns of the RIR gene (encoding ribonucleotide reductase) of the same organism. Of these six introns, only the RIR-3 intron encodes a maturase protein and showed efficient RNA splicing when expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The other five introns do not encode a maturase protein and did not show RNA splicing in E. coli. But these maturase-less introns showed efficient RNA splicing when the RIR-3 intron-encoded maturase protein was co-expressed from a freestanding gene in the same cell. These findings demonstrated that an intron-encoded protein could function as a general maturase for multiple introns of different genes. Major implications may include an intron-mediated co-regulation of the different genes and a resemblance of the evolutionary origin of spliceosomal introns.

  1. The virally encoded killer proteins from Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several strains of Ustilago maydis, a causal agent of corn smut disease, exhibit a 'killer' phenotype that is due to persistent infection by double-stranded RNA Totiviruses. These viruses produce potent killer proteins that are secreted by the host. This is a rare example of virus/host symbiosis in ...

  2. Relating sequence encoded information to form and function of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Ruff, Kiersten M.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) showcase the importance of conformational plasticity and heterogeneity in protein function. We summarize recent advances that connect information encoded in IDP sequences to their conformational properties and functions. We focus on insights obtained through a combination of atomistic simulations and biophysical measurements that are synthesized into a coherent framework using polymer physics theories. PMID:25863585

  3. Chimeric proteins define variable and essential regions of Ha-ras-encoded protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.G.; Ricketts, M.; Levinson, A.D.; Goeddel, D.V.

    1988-02-01

    The biological role of amino acid differences between the human 21-kDa Ha-ras protein (p21) and the human 23-kDa R-ras protein (p23) was investigated by engineering mutant Ha-ras p21 molecules containing divergent amino acid sequences from R-ras p23. Variant amino acids from R-ras p23 regions 1-30, 52-57, 67-78, 1-30 and 67-78 together, and 112-124 were substituted for the corresponding Ha-ras p21 amino acid regions 1-4, 26-31, 41-52, 1-4 and 41-52 together, and 86-98, respectively. Rat fibroblasts transfected with genes encoding these position-12 valine-substituted chimeric Ha-ras proteins displayed the same properties of morphological transformation and anchorage-independent growth as Ha-ras T24 oncogene-transformed fibroblasts. However, substitution of variant amino acids from the 80 C-terminal residues (amino acids 138-218) of R-ras p23 for the corresponding p21 amino acids (residues 112-189) inactivated the transforming activity of position-12 valine-substituted p21. The converse substitution of Ha-ras p21 C-terminal residues into R-ras p23 did not result in transformation by position-38 valine-substituted p232. These data are discussed in terms of the structure of ras proteins and the nature of interactions determining the specificity of effector function.

  4. Rate of spontaneous mutation at human loci encoding protein structure.

    PubMed Central

    Neel, J V; Mohrenweiser, H W; Meisler, M H

    1980-01-01

    The techniques of electrophoresis were used in a search for evidence of mutation affecting protein structure, the indicators being hemoglobin and a set of serum proteins and erythrocyte enzymes. Among 94,796 locus tests on Amerindians from Central and South America, there was no evidence for mutation. Among 105,649 locus tests on newborn infants in Ann Arbor, Michigan, there was also no evidence for mutation. We have previously failed to encounter any mutations in a series of 208,196 locus tests involving Japanese children [Neel, J. V., Satoh, C., Hamilton, H. B., Otake, M., Goriki, K., Kageoka, T., Fugita, M., Neriishi, S & Asakawa,J. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 4221-4225], and H. Harris, D. A. Hopkinson, and E. B. Robson [(1974) Ann. Hum. Genet. 37, 237-253] found no mutations in 113,478 locus tests on inhabitants of the United Kingdom. This failure to demonstrate any mutations of this type in a total of 522,119 locus tests excludes, at the 95% level of probability, a mutation rate greater than 0.6 X 10(-5)/locus per generation in this combination of populations. PMID:6934530

  5. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  6. Synthesis of Non-linear Protein Dimers through a Genetically Encoded Thiol-ene Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Liu, Jihe; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal unnatural amino acids into proteins provides a useful tool for the installation of specific functionalities that will allow for the labeling of proteins with virtually any probe. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a set of alkene lysines using the orthogonal PylRS/PylTCUA pair in Escherichia coli. The installed double bond functionality was then applied in a photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction of the protein with a fluorescent thiol-bearing probe, as well as a cysteine residue of a second protein, showing the applicability of this approach in the formation of heterogeneous non-linear fused proteins. PMID:25181502

  7. Nucleic acid encoding DS-CAM proteins and products related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, Julie R.

    2005-11-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there are provided Down Syndrome-Cell Adhesion Molecule (DS-CAM) proteins. Nucleic acid sequences encoding such proteins and assays employing same are also disclosed. The invention DS-CAM proteins can be employed in a variety of ways, for example, for the production of anti-DS-CAM antibodies thereto, in therapeutic compositions and methods employing such proteins and/or antibodies. DS-CAM proteins are also useful in bioassays to identify agonists and antagonists thereto.

  8. Learning from Bacteriophages - Advantages and Limitations of Phage and Phage-Encoded Protein Applications

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application. PMID:23305359

  9. IQCJ-SCHIP1, a novel fusion transcript encoding a calmodulin-binding IQ motif protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasnicka-Crawford, Dorota A. . E-mail: dakc@yorku.ca; Carson, Andrew R.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2006-12-01

    The existence of transcripts that span two adjacent, independent genes is considered rare in the human genome. This study characterizes a novel human fusion gene named IQCJ-SCHIP1. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is the longest isoform of a complex transcriptional unit that bridges two separate genes that encode distinct proteins, IQCJ, a novel IQ motif containing protein and SCHIP1, a schwannomin interacting protein that has been previously shown to interact with the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) protein. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is located on the chromosome 3q25 and comprises a 1692-bp transcript encompassing 11 exons spanning 828 kb of the genomic DNA. We show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 mRNA is highly expressed in the brain. Protein encoded by the IQCJ-SCHIP1 gene was localized to cytoplasm and actin-rich regions and in differentiated PC12 cells was also seen in neurite extensions.

  10. A ubiquitous plant housekeeping gene, PAP, encodes a major protein component of bell pepper chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pozueta-Romero, J; Rafia, F; Houlné, G; Cheniclet, C; Carde, J P; Schantz, M L; Schantz, R

    1997-11-01

    We have isolated a cDNA (PAP) corresponding to a single nuclear gene that encodes an approximately 30-kD major protein of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit chromoplasts. RNA and protein analyses revealed that, although at a low level, this gene is also expressed in every organ of the plant, the amount of the corresponding transcript and protein dramatically increasing in the latter stages of fruit development. Western-blot and immunocytochemical analyses of purified chloroplasts from leaves and fruits and of chromoplasts from red fruits showed that the encoded protein is the major component of plastoglobules and fibrils and is localized on the outer surface of these lipid structures. Analyses of PAP in plants belonging to different taxa revealed that it is expressed and highly conserved in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. The presence of the protein in plastids not differentiating into chromoplasts indicates that PAP is expressed irrespective of the ontogeny of various plastid lines. In light of our results and since the encoded protein, identical to that previously named ChrB or fibrillin, is present in plastoglobules from several species and accumulates in the fibrils of bell pepper chromoplast, we propose to designate it as a plastid-lipid-associated protein.

  11. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  12. Yeast spindle pole body duplication gene MPS1 encodes an essential dual specificity protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzé, E; Stoelcker, B; Luca, F C; Weiss, E; Schutz, A R; Winey, M

    1995-01-01

    The MPS1 gene has been previously identified by a mutant allele that shows defects in spindle pole body (SPB) duplication and cell cycle control. The SPB is the centrosome-equivalent organelle in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it nucleates all the microtubules in the cell. We report the isolation of the MPS1 gene, which encodes an essential protein kinase homolog. The MPS1 open reading frame has been fused to those that encode the LexA protein or the GST protein and both of these constructs function in yeast. The fusion proteins have been affinity-purified from yeast extracts and the GST chimeric protein has been found to be a phosphoprotein. Both proteins have been used to demonstrate intrinsic in vitro protein kinase activity of Mps1p against exogenous substrates and itself (autophosphorylation). A mutation predicted to abolish kinase function not only eliminates in vitro protein kinase activity, but also behaves like a null mutation in vivo, suggesting that kinase activity contributes to the essential function of the protein. Phosphoamino acid analysis of substrates phosphorylated by Mps1p indicates that this kinase can phosphorylate serine, threonine and tyrosine residues, identifying Mps1p as a dual specificity protein kinase. Images PMID:7737118

  13. The exception proves the rule? Dual targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins into endosymbiotic organelles.

    PubMed

    Baudisch, Bianca; Langner, Uwe; Garz, Ingo; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells harbor two types of endosymbiotic organelle: mitochondria and chloroplasts. As a consequence of endosymbiotic gene transfer, the majority of their proteins are encoded in the nucleus and post-translationally 're'-imported into the respective target organelle. The corresponding transport signals are usually selective for a single organelle, but several proteins are transported into both the mitochondria and chloroplasts. To estimate the number of proteins with such dual targeting properties in Arabidopsis, we classified the proteins encoded by nuclear genes of endosymbiotic origin according to the respective targeting specificity of their N-terminal transport signals as predicted by the TargetP software package. Selected examples of the resulting protein classes were subsequently analyzed by transient transformation assays as well as by in organello protein transport experiments. It was found that most proteins with high prediction values for both organelles show dual targeting with both experimental approaches. Unexpectedly, however, dual targeting was even found among those proteins that are predicted to be localized solely in one of the two endosymbiotic organelles. In total, among the 16 candidate proteins analyzed, we identified 10 proteins with dual targeting properties. This unexpectedly high proportion suggests that such transport properties are much more abundant than anticipated.

  14. Post-anthesis Fertilizer Influences Expression of Genes Encoding Allergenic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Omega-gliadins comprise between 5-10% of the wheat flour protein and have been implicated in food allergies. In particular, omega-gliadins encoded by the 1B chromosome have been associated with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphalaxis (WDEIA) and urticaria. Because the omega-gliadins consist alm...

  15. Storable N-Phenylcarbamate Palladacycles for Rapid Functionalization of An Alkyne-Encoded Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Lim, Reyna K. V.; Ramil, Carlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the synthesis of storable N-phenyl-carbamate palladacycles that showed robust reactivity in the cross-coupling reaction with an alkyne-encoded protein with second-order rate constantapproaching 19 770 ± 930 M−1 s−1. PMID:25140915

  16. A cDNA encoding tyrosinase-related protein maps to the brown locus in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, I J

    1988-01-01

    A mouse melanoma cDNA clone was isolated by virtue of its reactivity with two antisera raised against tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) from two species, hamster and mouse. The cDNA (5A) cross-hybridizes with another, pMT4 [Shibahara, S., Tomita, V., Sakakura, T., Nager, C., Bhabatosh, C. & Muller, R. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 2413-2427], previously thought to encode mouse tyrosinase. Two other cDNAs, one human and one mouse, have been reported recently [Kwon, B. S., Haq, A. K., Pomerantz, S. H. & Halaban, R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 7473-7477; and Yamamoto, H., Takeuchi, S., Kudo, T., Makino, K., Nakata, A., Shinoda, T. & Takeuchi, T. (1987) Jpn. J. Genet. 62, 271-277] as candidates for tyrosinase, and they map at or very close to the mouse albino (c) locus. The proteins they encode are very similar to each other but are distinct from (although related to) the pMT4-encoded protein. Here I use recombinant inbred strains to localize pMT4 at or close to the mouse brown (b) locus. I suggest that the gene mapping to c is the authentic tyrosinase gene, whereas that mapping to b encodes a tyrosinase-related protein. All b mutations in laboratory strains are associated with the same diagnostic Taq I fragment, suggesting that all derive from the same original mutation. I discuss possible function(s) of the tyrosinase-related protein. Images PMID:3132713

  17. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection.

  18. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection. PMID:27639146

  19. Isolation and analysis of a cDNA clone encoding an S. guttatum alternataive oxidase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Antibodies that recognize the 35, 36, and 37 kilodalton (kDa) alternative oxidase proteins were used to isolate a cDNA proteins were used to isolate a cDNA clone of a nuclearly encoded protein of Sauromatum guttatum. The amino acid sequence deduced from clone pAOSG81 revealed a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kDa, while a 42 kDa protein is immunoprecipitated from in vitro translation products made using S. guttatum poly A+ RNA. The protein contains a 60-65 amino acid transit peptide which is predicted to form amphiphilic helices. We have also identified regions of the mature 42 kDa protein which are likely to be membrane associated. Clone pAOSG81 is being used to screen a genomic library. The genomic clone encoding the 42 kDa protein will be used to investigate the salicylic-acid-controlled transcriptional regulation of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase proteins.

  20. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Hincha, Dirk K

    2008-01-01

    Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE) and/or low temperature response (LTRE) elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for future efforts to elucidate

  1. Genetically encoded norbornene directs site-specific cellular protein labelling via a rapid bioorthogonal reaction

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Deiters, Alexander; Chin, Jason W.

    2013-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal groups via genetic code expansion provides a powerful general strategy for site-specifically labelling proteins with any probe. However, the slow reactivity of the bioorthogonal functional groups that can be encoded genetically limits the utility of this strategy. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a norbornene amino acid using the pyrrolysyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. We developed a series of tetrazine-based probes that exhibit `turn-on' fluorescence on their rapid reaction with norbornenes. We demonstrate that the labelling of an encoded norbornene is specific with respect to the entire soluble E. coli proteome and thousands of times faster than established encodable bioorthogonal reactions. We show explicitly the advantages of this approach over state-of-the-art bioorthogonal reactions for protein labelling in vitro and on mammalian cells, and demonstrate the rapid bioorthogonal site-specific labelling of a protein on the mammalian cell surface. PMID:22437715

  2. Bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonins can substitute for Escherichia coli’s essential GroES protein

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, France; Rychner, Monique; Georgopoulos, Costa

    2002-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin machine is composed of two members, GroEL and GroES. The GroEL chaperonin can bind 10–15% of E. coli’s unfolded proteins in one of its central cavities and help them fold in cooperation with the GroES cochaperonin. Both proteins are absolutely essential for bacterial growth. Several large, lytic bacteriophages, such as T4 and RB49, use the host-encoded GroEL in conjunction with their own bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonin for the correct assembly of their major capsid protein, suggesting a cochaperonin specificity for the in vivo folding of certain substrates. Here, we demonstrate that, when the cochaperonin of either bacteriophage T4 (Gp31) or RB49 (CocO) is expressed in E. coli, the otherwise essential groES gene can be deleted. Thus, it appears that, despite very little sequence identity with groES, the bacteriophage-encoded Gp31 and CocO proteins are capable of replacing GroES in the folding of E. coli’s essential, housekeeping proteins. PMID:12189177

  3. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  4. Gene encoding T-cell-activating protein TAP maps to the Ly-6 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Yeh, E T; Gramm, C F; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    Recently we described two murine T-cell membrane proteins, TAP (T-cell-activating protein) and TAPa (TAP-associated protein). Previous experiments suggested that TAP is involved in physiologic T-cell activation. The subject of this report is a genetic analysis of these molecules. TAP and TAPa map to the Ly-6 locus. The relationship of these molecules to other antigens encoded in this locus is examined. Based on tissue distribution, molecular structure, and functional properties, TAP is distinct from any previously described Ly-6 antigen, whereas TAPa is probably identical to the 34-11-3 antigen. TAP and TAPa are coexpressed on all cell types examined so far. Moreover, comparative studies demonstrate a complex developmentally regulated pattern in the expression of molecules encoded in this locus. Images PMID:3010324

  5. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  6. Pollen specific expression of maize genes encoding actin depolymerizing factor-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, I; Anthony, R G; Maciver, S K; Jiang, C J; Khan, S; Weeds, A G; Hussey, P J

    1996-01-01

    In pollen development, a dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton takes place during the passage of the pollen grain into dormancy and on activation of pollen tube growth. A role for actin-binding proteins is implicated and we report here the identification of a small gene family in maize that encodes actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)-like proteins. The ADF group of proteins are believed to control actin polymerization and depolymerization in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Two of the maize genes ZmABP1 and ZmABP2 are expressed specifically in pollen and germinating pollen suggesting that the protein products may be involved in pollen actin reorganization. A third gene, ZmABP3, encodes a protein only 56% and 58% identical to ZmABP1 and ZmABP2, respectively, and its expression is suppressed in pollen and germinated pollen. The fundamental biochemical characteristics of the ZmABP proteins has been elucidated using bacterially expressed ZmABP3 protein. This has the ability to bind monomeric actin (G-actin) and filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, it decreases the viscosity of polymerized actin solutions consistent with an ability to depolymerize filaments. These biochemical characteristics, taken together with the sequence comparisons, support the inclusion of the ZmABP proteins in the ADF group. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8693008

  7. African swine fever virus encodes a serine protein kinase which is packaged into virions.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, S A; Banham, A H; Vydelingum, S; Dixon, L K; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the SalI j region of the virulent Malawi (LIL20/1) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) identified an open reading frame (ORF), designated j9L, with extensive similarity to the family of protein kinases. This ORF encodes a 35.1-kDa protein of 299 amino acids which shares 24.6% amino acid identity with the human pim-1 proto-oncogene and 21.0% identity with the vaccinia virus B1R-encoded protein kinase. The ASFV ORF contains the motifs characteristic of serine-threonine protein kinases, with the exception of the presumed ATP-binding site, which is poorly conserved. The ORF was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated a calf thymus histone protein on serine residues in vitro. An antibody raised to an amino-terminal peptide of the ASFV protein kinase was reactive with the recombinant protein in Western immunoblot analyses and was used to demonstrate the presence of the protein kinase in ASF virions. Images PMID:8331722

  8. Newly identified RNAs of raspberry leaf blotch virus encoding a related group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwen; McGavin, Wendy; Cock, Peter J A; Schnettler, Esther; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Members of the genus Emaravirus, including Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), are enveloped plant viruses with segmented genomes of negative-strand RNA, although the complete genome complement for any of these viruses is not yet clear. Currently, wheat mosaic virus has the largest emaravirus genome comprising eight RNAs. Previously, we identified five genomic RNAs for RLBV; here, we identify a further three RNAs (RNA6-8). RNA6-8 encode proteins that have clear homologies to one another, but not to any other emaravirus proteins. The proteins self-interacted in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments, and the P8 protein interacted with the virus nucleocapsid protein (P3) using BiFC. Expression of two of the proteins (P6 and P7) using potato virus X led to an increase in virus titre and symptom severity, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in RLBV pathogenicity; however, using two different tests, RNA silencing suppression activity was not detected for any of the RLBV proteins encoded by RNA2-8.

  9. Identification and transcriptional control of Caulobacter crescentus genes encoding proteins containing a cold shock domain.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elza A S; Marques, Marilis V

    2004-09-01

    The cold shock proteins are small peptides that share a conserved domain, called the cold shock domain (CSD), that is important for nucleic acid binding. The Caulobacter crescentus genome has four csp genes that encode proteins containing CSDs. Three of these (cspA, cspB, and cspC) encode peptides of about 7 kDa and are very similar to the cold shock proteins of other bacteria. Analysis by reverse transcription-PCR of the fourth gene (cspD), which was previously annotated as encoding a 7-kDa protein, revealed that the mRNA is larger and probably encodes a putative 21-kDa protein, containing two CSDs. A search in protein sequences databases revealed that this new domain arrangement has thus far only been found among deduced peptides of alpha-proteobacteria. Expression of each Caulobacter csp gene was studied both in response to cold shock and to growth phase, and we have found that only cspA and cspB are induced by cold shock, whereas cspC and cspD are induced at stationary phase, with different induction rates. The transcription start sites were determined for each gene, and a deletion mapping of the cspD promoter region defined a sequence required for maximal levels of expression, indicating that regulation of this gene occurs at the transcriptional level. Deletion of cspA, but not cspD, caused a reduction in viability when cells were incubated at 10 degrees C for prolonged times, suggesting that cspA is important for adaptation to a low temperature.

  10. A novel, mouse mammary tumor virus encoded protein with Rev-like properties

    SciTech Connect

    Indik, Stanislav; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian . E-mail: salmons@austrianova.com; Rouault, Francoise

    2005-06-20

    We have identified a novel, multiple spliced, subgenomic mRNA species in MMTV producing cells of different origin containing an open reading frame encoding a 39-kDa Rev-like protein, Rem (regulator of expression of MMTV). An EGFP-Rem fusion protein is shown to be predominantly in the nucleolus. Further leptomycin B inhibits the nuclear export of nonspliced MMTV transcripts, implicating Rem in nuclear export by the Crm1 pathway in MMTV. Rem is thus reminiscent of the Rec protein from the related endogenous human retrovirus, HERV-K.

  11. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  12. Precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease A4 amyloid is encoded by 16 exons

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, H.G.; Kang, J.; Mueller-Hill, B. ); Salbaum, J.M.; Multhaup, G.; Beyreuther, K. ); Bayney, R.M.; Unterbeck, A. )

    1989-01-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cerebral deposition of fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid A4 protein. Complementary DNA's coding for the precursor of the amyloid A4 protein have been described. In order to identify the structure of the precursor gene relevant clones from several human genomic libraries were isolated. Sequence analysis of the various clones revealed 16 exons to encode the 695 residue precursor protein (PreA4{sub 695}) of Alzheimer's disease amyloid A4 protein. The DNA sequence coding for the amyloid A4 protein is interrupted by an intron. This finding supports the idea that amyloid A4 protein arises by incomplete proteolysis of a larger precursor, and not by aberrant splicing.

  13. RNA helicase: a novel activity associated with a protein encoded by a positive strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Laín, S; Riechmann, J L; García, J A

    1990-01-01

    Most positive strand RNA viruses infecting plants and animals encode proteins containing the so-called nucleotide binding motif (NTBM) (1) in their amino acid sequences (2). As suggested from the high level of sequence similarity of these viral proteins with the recently described superfamilies of helicase-like proteins (3-5), the NTBM-containing cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein from plum pox virus (PPV), which belongs to the potyvirus group of positive strand RNA viruses, is shown to be able to unwind RNA duplexes. This activity was found to be dependent on the hydrolysis of NTP to NDP and Pi, and thus it can be considered as an RNA helicase activity. In the in vitro assay used, the PPV CI protein was only able to unwind double strand RNA substrates with 3' single strand overhangs. This result indicates that the helicase activity of the PPV CI protein functions in the 3' to 5' direction (6). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a helicase activity associated with a protein encoded by an RNA virus. Images PMID:2263459

  14. Absence of repellents in Ustilago maydis induces genes encoding small secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Teertstra, Wieke R; Krijgsheld, Pauline; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-08-01

    The rep1 gene of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis encodes a pre-pro-protein that is processed in the secretory pathway into 11 peptides. These so-called repellents form amphipathic amyloid fibrils at the surface of aerial hyphae. A SG200 strain in which the rep1 gene is inactivated (∆rep1 strain) is affected in aerial hyphae formation. We here assessed changes in global gene expression as a consequence of the inactivation of the rep1 gene. Microarray analysis revealed that only 31 genes in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain had a fold change in expression of ≥2. Twenty-two of these genes were up-regulated and half of them encode small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown functions. Seven of the SSP genes and two other genes that are over-expressed in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain encode proteins that can be classified as secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SCRPs). Interestingly, most of the SCRPs are predicted to form amyloids. The SCRP gene um00792 showed the highest up-regulation in the ∆rep1 strain. Using GFP as a reporter, it was shown that this gene is over-expressed in the layer of hyphae at the medium-air interface. Taken together, it is concluded that inactivation of rep1 hardly affects the expression profile of U. maydis, despite the fact that the mutant strain has a strong reduced ability to form aerial hyphae.

  15. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  16. Neurally expressed Drosophila genes encoding homologs of the NSF and SNAP secretory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, R W; Pallanck, L; Ganetzky, B

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have now converged to indicate that the neurotransmitter release apparatus is formed by assembly of cytosolic proteins with proteins of the synaptic vesicle and presynaptic terminal membranes. We are undertaking a genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the functions of two types of cytosolic proteins thought to function in this complex: N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and the soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs). We have identified Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate and yeast NSF and SNAP genes. Both Drosophila genes encode polypeptides that closely resemble their vertebrate counterparts and are expressed in the nervous system; neither appears to be in a family of closely related Drosophila genes. These results indicate that the Drosophila NSF and SNAP genes are excellent candidates for mutational analysis of neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:8202553

  17. Length-encoded multiplex binding site determination: application to zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J R; Berg, J M

    1994-01-01

    The screening of combinatorial libraries is becoming a powerful method for identifying or refining the structures of ligands for binding proteins, enzymes, and other receptors. We describe an oligonucleotide library search procedure in which the identity of each member is encoded in the length of oligonucleotides. This encoding scheme allows binding-site preferences to be evaluated via DNA length determination by denaturing gel electrophoresis. We have applied this method to determine the binding-site preferences for 18 Cys2His2 zinc finger domains as the central domain within a fixed context of flanking zinc fingers. An advantage of the method is that the relative affinities of all members of the library can be estimated in addition to simply determining the sequence of the optimal or consensus ligand. The zinc finger domain specificities determined will be useful for modular zinc finger protein design. Images PMID:7972017

  18. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits. PMID:27189918

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of a prion protein encoding gene in guppy ( Poecilia reticulata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Suihan; Wei, Qiwei; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Dengqiang; Zou, Guiwei; Chen, Daqing

    2008-11-01

    The full length cDNA of a prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of guppy ( Poecilia reticulata) and the corresponding genomic DNA were cloned. The cDNA was 2245 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1545 bp encoding a protein of 515 amino acids, which held all typical structural characteristics of the functional PrP. The cloned genomic DNA fragment corresponding to the cDNA was 3720 bp in length, consisting of 2 introns and 2 exons. The 5' untranslated region of cDNA originated from the 2 exons, while the ORF originated from the second exon. Although the gene was transcribed in diverse tissues including brain, eye, liver, intestine, muscle and tail, its transcript was most abundant in the brain. In addition, the transcription of the gene was enhanced by 5 salinity, implying that it was associated with the response of guppy to saline stress.

  20. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  1. tincar encodes a novel transmembrane protein expressed in the Tinman-expressing cardioblasts of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. The tinc mRNA was expressed specifically in four of the six pairs of cardioblasts in each segment, in a pattern identical to that of tinman (tin), a homeobox gene required for the specification of the dorsal vessel. In the non-Tin-expressing pairs of cardioblasts, tinc transcription seemed to be repressed by Seven-up. PMID:14516698

  2. tincar encodes a novel transmembrane protein expressed in the Tinman-expressing cardioblasts of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. The tinc mRNA was expressed specifically in four of the six pairs of cardioblasts in each segment, in a pattern identical to that of tinman (tin), a homeobox gene required for the specification of the dorsal vessel. In the non-Tin-expressing pairs of cardioblasts, tinc transcription seemed to be repressed by Seven-up. PMID:12617821

  3. Dissecting protein function: an efficient protocol for identifying separation-of-function mutations that encode structurally stable proteins.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K; Wuttke, Deborah S; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-03-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3(-) mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations.

  4. Dissecting Protein Function: An Efficient Protocol for Identifying Separation-of-Function Mutations That Encode Structurally Stable Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Johnathan W.; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K.; Wuttke, Deborah S.; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3− mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations. PMID:23307900

  5. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  7. Pez: a novel human cDNA encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase- and ezrin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Mitchell, P J; Shipley, J; Gusterson, B A; Rogers, M V; Crompton, M R

    1995-04-26

    We have isolated cDNAs from normal human breast tissue and breast tumour cells that encode a protein (pez) with features of a novel non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase possessing N-terminal sequence homology to the ezrin-band 4.1-merlin-radixin protein family. Northern blot analysis indicates that pez is expressed in a variety of human tissues including kidney, skeletal muscle, lung and placenta. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has mapped pez to chromosome 1 region q32.2-41. Sequence identity to a characterized polymorphic marker confirms this localization. PMID:7733990

  8. Pheromone binding proteins of Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are encoded at a single locus.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, R D; Sirey, T M; Rassam, M; Greenwood, D R

    2002-11-01

    The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) uses a blend of (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate and (E,E)-9,11-tetradecadienyl acetate as its sex pheromone. Odorant binding proteins, abundant in the antennae of male and female E. postvittana, were separated by native PAGE to reveal four major proteins with distinct mobilities. Microsequencing of their N-terminal residues showed that two were general odorant binding proteins (GOBPs) while two were pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). Full length cDNAs encoding these proteins were amplified using a combination of PCR and RACE-PCR. Sequence of the GOBPs revealed two genes (EposGOBP1, EposGOBP2), similar to orthologues in other species of Lepidoptera. Eleven cDNAs of the PBP gene were amplified, cloned and sequenced revealing two major phylogenetic clusters of PBP sequences differing by six amino acid substitutions. The position of the six amino acid differences on the protein was predicted by mapping onto the three-dimensional structure of PBP of Bombyx mori. All six substitutions were predicted to fall on the outside of the protein away from the inner pheromone binding pocket. One substitution does fall close to the putative dimerisation region of the protein (Ser63Thr). Expression of three of the cDNAs in a baculovirus expression system revealed that one class encodes an electrophoretically slow form (EposPBP1-12) while the other encodes a fast form (EposPBP1-2, EposPBP1-3). A native Western of these expressed proteins compared with antennal protein extracts demonstrated that PBP is also expressed in female antennae and that PBP may be present as a dimer as well as a monomer in E. postvittana. The fast and slow forms of EposPBP1 are allelic. Westerns on single antennal pair protein extracts and allele-specific PCR from genomic DNA both show a segregating pattern of inheritance in laboratory and wild populations. Radio labelled (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate binds to both fast and slow PBP forms in

  9. Subcellular localization and immunological detection of proteins encoded by the vir locus of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Stibitz, S; Yang, M S

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the central regulatory locus vir of Bordetella pertussis predicts that three gene products, BvgA, BvgB, and BvgC, are encoded. Features of the predicted primary structures of these proteins and their homology to other two-component systems suggest that BvgA is located in the cytoplasm, BvgB is located in the periplasm, and BvgC spans the inner membrane. We have used gene fusions to the phoA and lacZ genes of Escherichia coli to investigate the subcellular localization and membrane topology of these proteins. PhoA fusion proteins were also purified and used to raise antibodies that allowed visualization of the vir-encoded polypeptides by Western immunoblotting. Our results have largely confirmed the predictions of the DNA sequence, with the exception that BvgB and BvgC were found to constitute one larger protein that was homologous to the sensor class of two-component systems. We propose that this protein be named BvgS (for sensor) and that its gene be named bvgS. Images PMID:2066330

  10. A murine fer testis-specific transcript (ferT) encodes a truncated Fer protein.

    PubMed Central

    Fischman, K; Edman, J C; Shackleford, G M; Turner, J A; Rutter, W J; Nir, U

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA for a potential tyrosine kinase-encoding mRNA was isolated from a mouse testis cDNA library. In a survey of eight mouse tissues, a transcript of 2.4 kilobases restricted to testis tissue was found. The mRNA encodes a 453-amino-acid protein of 51,383 daltons, the smallest tyrosine kinase protein ever described. RNA synthesized from the cDNA template directs the synthesis of a 51,000-Mr protein in a cell-free translation system. The carboxy-terminal 409 amino acids are 98 and 90% identical to the carboxy halves of the rat and human Fer proteins, respectively. This suggests that the cDNA represents an alternatively spliced testis-specific fer mRNA and is therefore termed by us ferT. On the basis of the appearance time of the fer mRNA in the testis of maturing neonatal mice, we speculate on the role played by this protein in the development of this organ. Images PMID:2294399

  11. A fully genetically encoded protein architecture for optical control of peptide ligand concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are among the most important proteins in biology, regulating the activity of excitable cells and changing in diseases. Ideally it would be possible to actuate endogenous ion channels, in a temporally precise and reversible manner, and without requiring chemical cofactors. Here we present a modular protein architecture for fully genetically encoded, light-modulated control of ligands that modulate ion channels of a targeted cell. Our reagent, which we call a lumitoxin, combines a photoswitch and an ion channel-blocking peptide toxin. Illumination causes the photoswitch to unfold, lowering the toxin's local concentration near the cell surface, and enabling the ion channel to function. We explore lumitoxin modularity by showing operation with peptide toxins that target different voltage-dependent K+ channels. The lumitoxin architecture may represent a new kind of modular protein-engineering strategy for designing light-activated proteins, and thus may enable development of novel tools for modulating cellular physiology.

  12. Agrobacterium tumefaciens virE operon encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Das, A

    1988-05-01

    The virulence (vir) genes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid are essential for transformation of plant cells. Overproduction of a virE-encoded gene product in Escherichia coli was achieved by construction of an operon fusion with the E. coli tryptophan (trp) operon. The virE2 gene product in E. coli partitioned into the insoluble membrane fraction. The protein was solubilized by treatment with 4 M urea at 0 degree C. DNA-protein binding experiments showed that a strong single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding activity was present in protein fractions containing the virE2 gene product. The binding was highly specific with little or no binding observed with either double-stranded DNA or ssRNA. No significant binding to Ti plasmid DNA sequences was observed. Protein blotting studies indicated that the ssDNA-binding activity was associated with the 68-kDa virE2 polypeptide. PMID:2452439

  13. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Localization microscopy using noncovalent fluorogen activation by genetically encoded fluorogen activating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Suvrajit; Huang, Fang; Szent-Gyorgyi, Chris; Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2014-01-01

    The noncovalent equilibrium activation of a fluorogenic malachite green dye and its cognate fluorogen activating protein has been exploited to produce a sparse labeling distribution of densely tagged genetically encoded proteins, enabling single molecule detection and superresolution imaging in fixed and living cells. These sparse labeling conditions are achieved by control of the dye concentration in the milieu, and do not require any photoswitching or photoactivation. The labeling is achieved using physiological buffers and cellular media, and does not require additives or switching buffer to obtain superresolution images. We evaluate superresolution properties and images obtained from a selected fluorogen activating protein clone fused to actin, and show that the photon counts per object fall between those typically reported for fluorescent proteins and switching dye-pairs, resulting in 10-30 nm localization precision per object. This labeling strategy complements existing approaches, and may simplify multicolor labeling of cellular structures. PMID:24194371

  15. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians. PMID:27311567

  16. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  17. Interactions between Proteins Encoded within the Human Cytomegalovirus UL133-UL138 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Petrucelli, Alex; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Zagallo, Patricia; Rak, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We previously described a novel genetic locus within the ULb′ region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome that, while dispensable for replication in fibroblasts, suppresses replication in hematopoietic progenitors and augments replication in endothelial cells. This locus, referred to as the UL133-UL138 locus, encodes four proteins, pUL133, pUL135, pUL136, and pUL138. In this work, we have mapped the interactions among these proteins. An analysis of all pairwise interactions during transient expression revealed a robust interaction between pUL133 and pUL138. Potential interactions between pUL136 and both pUL133 and pUL138 were also revealed. In addition, each of the UL133-UL138 locus proteins self-associated, suggesting a potential to form higher-order homomeric complexes. As both pUL133 and pUL138 function in promoting viral latency in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infected in vitro, we further focused on this interaction. pUL133 and pUL138 are the predominant complex detected when all proteins are expressed together and require no other proteins in the locus for their association. During infection, the interaction between pUL133 and pUL138 or pUL136 can be detected. A recombinant virus that fails to express both pUL133 and pUL138 exhibited a latency phenotype similar to that of viruses that fail to express either pUL133 or pUL138, indicating that these proteins function cooperatively in latency and do not have independent functions that additively contribute to HCMV latency. These studies identify protein interactions among proteins encoded by the UL133-UL138 locus and demonstrate an important interaction impacting the outcome of HCMV infection. PMID:22674978

  18. v-mos proteins encoded by myeloproliferative sarcoma virus and its ts159 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B; Stocking, C; Walker, R; Yang, Y D; Ostertag, W; Arlinghaus, R B

    1992-01-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) v-mos protein was predicted to be identical in size to p39c-mos because of an observed one-base deletion in the seventh codon of the env-mos open reading frame, which would allow translation to initiate at the methionine equivalent to codon 32 of the env-mos gene. On the basis of published results, p39c-mos is known to have greatly reduced in vitro protein kinase activity compared with p37env-mos encoded by Moloney murine sarcoma virus. Unexpectedly, the relative activity of the MPSV v-mos protein kinase was comparable to that of p37env-mos. Consistent with this finding, the size of MPSV v-mos protein was found to be similar to the size of p37env-mos. Moreover, the pattern and sizes of phosphorylated bands produced by autophosphorylation of the MPSV v-mos protein were similar to those of p37env-mos. These results were confirmed by in vitro transcription-translation of the MPSV v-mos gene. Resequencing portions of the MPSV mos gene failed to show the deletion within codon 7. Except for the codon 262 deletion, other mutations characteristic of MPSV and temperature-sensitive MPSV v-mos genes were confirmed. A glycine-to-arginine mutation at residue 338 of the MPSV env-mos sequence, previously shown to cause thermosensitivity of the mutant virus (termed ts159) transforming function, yielded a v-mos protein that had significantly reduced protein kinase activity in vitro. These findings indicate that MPSV, like other Moloney murine sarcoma virus strains, also encodes a functional env-mos protein. Images PMID:1309903

  19. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt7 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein Important for Transcription in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, L. J.; Dollard, C.; Tan, P.; Winston, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally were identified as suppressors of Ty and {delta small} insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Other genes that have been identified in mutant hunts of this type have been shown to play a role in transcription. In this work we show that SPT7 is also important for proper transcription in vivo. We have cloned and sequenced the SPT7 gene and have shown that it encodes a large, acidic protein that is localized to the nucleus. The SPT7 protein contains a bromodomain sequence; a deletion that removes the bromodomain from the SPT7 protein causes no detectable mutant phenotype. Strains that contain an spt7 null mutation are viable but grow very slowly and have transcriptional defects at many loci including insertion mutations, Ty elements, the INO1 gene and the MFA1 gene. These transcriptional defects and other mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by certain mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA binding protein (TBP). The similarity of the phenotypes of spt7 and spt15 mutants, including effects of spt7 mutations on the transcription start site of certain genes, suggests that SPT7 plays an important role in transcription initiation in vivo. PMID:7713415

  20. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  1. RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein containing a tract of 13 consecutive aspartates

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, P.; Weber, S.; Prakash, L.

    1985-01-01

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA, for induced mutagenesis, and for sporulation. The authors have mapped the transcripts and determined the nucleotide sequence of the cloned RAD6 gene. The RAD6 gene encodes two transcripts of 0.98 and 0.86 kilobases which differ only in their 3' termini. The transcribed region contains an open reading frame of 516 nucleotides. The rad6-1 and rad6-3 mutant alleles, which the authors have cloned and sequenced, introduce amber and ochre nonsense mutations, respectively into the open reading frame, proving that it encodes the RAD6 protein. The RAD6 protein predicted by the nucleotide sequence is 172 amino acids long, has a molecular weight of 19,704, and contains 23.3% acidic and 11.6% basic residues. Its most striking feature is the highly acidic carboxyl terminus: 20 of the 23 terminal amino acids are acidic, including 13 consecutive aspartates. RAD6 protein thus resembles high mobility group proteins HMG-1 and HMG-2, which each contain a carboxyl-proximal tract of acidic amino acids. 48 references, 6 figures.

  2. Co-expression and co-localization of hub proteins and their partners are encoded in protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, Ariel; Ashkenazi, Shaul; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard; Ofran, Yanay

    2014-04-01

    Spatiotemporal coordination is a critical factor in biological processes. Some hubs in protein-protein interaction networks tend to be co-expressed and co-localized with their partners more strongly than others, a difference which is arguably related to functional differences between the hubs. Based on numerous analyses of yeast hubs, it has been suggested that differences in co-expression and co-localization are reflected in the structural and molecular characteristics of the hubs. We hypothesized that if indeed differences in co-expression and co-localization are encoded in the molecular characteristics of the protein, it may be possible to predict the tendency for co-expression and co-localization of human hubs based on features learned from systematically characterized yeast hubs. Thus, we trained a prediction algorithm on hubs from yeast that were classified as either strongly or weakly co-expressed and co-localized with their partners, and applied the trained model to 800 human hub proteins. We found that the algorithm significantly distinguishes between human hubs that are co-expressed and co-localized with their partners and hubs that are not. The prediction is based on sequence derived features such as "stickiness", i.e. the existence of multiple putative binding sites that enable multiple simultaneous interactions, "plasticity", i.e. the existence of predicted structural disorder which conjecturally allows for multiple consecutive interactions with the same binding site and predicted subcellular localization. These results suggest that spatiotemporal dynamics is encoded, at least in part, in the amino acid sequence of the protein and that this encoding is similar in yeast and in human.

  3. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N; Simmons, Shaneka S; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V; Udensi, Udensi K; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cohly, Hari H; Brown, Shyretha D; Dates, Centdrika R; Hentz, Sonya D; Hughes, Shawntae J; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R; Patterson, Carvey O; Sims, Jennifer N; Turner, Kelisha T; Williams, Baraka S; Johnson, Matilda O; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V; Anumudu, Chiaka I; Adeoye, Grace O; Thomas, Bolaji N; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  4. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N; Simmons, Shaneka S; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V; Udensi, Udensi K; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cohly, Hari H; Brown, Shyretha D; Dates, Centdrika R; Hentz, Sonya D; Hughes, Shawntae J; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R; Patterson, Carvey O; Sims, Jennifer N; Turner, Kelisha T; Williams, Baraka S; Johnson, Matilda O; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V; Anumudu, Chiaka I; Adeoye, Grace O; Thomas, Bolaji N; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  5. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E; Brandon, S E; Smale, G; Lloyd, D; Weber, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89 alpha and hsp89 beta) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89 alpha, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product (M. C. Simon, K. Kitchener, H. T. Kao, E. Hickey, L. Weber, R. Voellmy, N. Heintz, and J. R. Nevins, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:2884-2890, 1987). We have isolated a human hsp89 alpha gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression on a beta-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89 alpha protein sequence differed from the human hsp89 beta sequence reported elsewhere (N. F. Rebbe, J. Ware, R. M. Bertina, P. Modrich, and D. W. Stafford (Gene 53:235-245, 1987) in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89 alpha gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycle. hsp89 alpha mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells. Images PMID:2527334

  6. Regulation of adhE (Encoding Ethanol Oxidoreductase) by the Fis Protein in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Kwon, Ohsuk; De Wulf, Peter; Finkel, Steven E.; Lin, E. C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase whose expression is 10-fold higher under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. Transcription of the gene is under the negative control of the Cra (catabolite repressor-activator) protein, whereas translation of the adhE mRNA requires processing by RNase III. In this report, we show that the expression of adhE also depends on the Fis (factor for inversion stimulation) protein. A strain bearing a fis::kan null allele failed to grow anaerobically on glucose solely because of inadequate adhE transcription. However, fis expression itself is not under redox control. Sequence inspection of the adhE promoter revealed three potential Fis binding sites. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, using purified Fis protein and adhE promoter DNA, showed three different complexes. PMID:10572146

  7. The priA gene encoding the primosomal replicative n' protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E H; Masai, H; Allen, G C; Kornberg, A

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene encoding protein n' has been isolated and named priA for primosomal protein A. Protein n' is absolutely required for the conversion of single-stranded phi X174 DNA to the duplex replicative form in an in vitro-reconstituted system. The gene maps to 88.7 minutes on the chromosome adjacent to the cytR locus. Soluble protein extracts from cells harboring the priA gene on a multicopy plasmid contained 45-fold more n' replication activity than wild-type extracts. Enhanced overproduction of greater than 1000-fold was achieved by replacing the natural Shine-Dalgarno sequence with that of the phage T7 phi 10 gene and placing this priA under the control of the T7 phage promoter and RNA polymerase. The priA sequence reveals a 732-amino acid open reading frame and a nucleotide-binding consensus site consistent with the size and ATPase activity of the purified protein. The gene for protein n has been named priB and the putative gene for protein n", priC. Images PMID:2162050

  8. Ectromelia virus encodes a family of Ankyrin/F-box proteins that regulate NFκB

    SciTech Connect

    Burles, Kristin Buuren, Nicholas van; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-15

    A notable feature of poxviruses is their ability to inhibit the antiviral response, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. NFκB is a transcription factor that is sequestered in the cytoplasm until cell stimulation, and relies on the SCF (Skp1, culllin-1, F-box) ubiquitin ligase to target its inhibitor, IκBα, for degradation. IκBα is recruited to the SCF by the F-box domain-containing protein βTrCP. Here, we show that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox, encodes four F-box-containing proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165, all of which contain Ankyrin (Ank) domains. The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, and this inhibition is dependent on the F-box domain. We also demonstrate that EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165 prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting that they target the SCF. This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB. - Highlights: • Ectromelia virus encodes four Ank/F-box proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154 and EVM165. • The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, dependent on the F-box. • The Ank/F-box proteins prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting they target the SCF. • Deletion of a single Ank/F-box gene from ECTV does not prevent viral NFκB inhibition. • This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB.

  9. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  10. Backmasking in the yeast genome: encoding overlapping information for protein-coding and RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cakiroglu, S. Aylin; Zaugg, Judith B.; Luscombe, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Backmasking is a recording technique used to hide a sound or message in a music track in reverse, meaning that it is only audible when the record is played backwards. Analogously, the compact yeast genome encodes for diverse sources of information such as overlapping coding and non-coding transcripts, and protein-binding sites on the two complementary DNA strands. Examples are the consensus binding site sequences of the RNA-binding proteins Nrd1 and Nab3 that target non-coding transcripts for degradation. Here, by examining the overlap of stable (SUTs, stable unannotated transcripts) and unstable (CUTs, cryptic unstable transcripts) transcripts with protein-coding genes, we show that the predicted Nrd1 and Nab3-binding site sequences occur at differing frequencies. They are always depleted in the sense direction of protein-coding genes, thus avoiding degradation of the transcript. However in the antisense direction, predicted binding sites occur at high frequencies in genes with overlapping unstable ncRNAs (CUTs), so limiting the availability of non-functional transcripts. In contrast they are depleted in genes with overlapping stable ncRNAs (SUTs), presumably to avoid degrading the non-coding transcript. The protein-coding genes maintain similar amino-acid contents, but they display distinct codon usages so that Nrd1 and Nab3-binding sites can arise at differing frequencies in antisense depending on the overlapping transcript type. Our study demonstrates how yeast has evolved to encode multiple layers of information—protein-coding genes in one strand and the relative chance of degrading antisense RNA in the other strand—in the same regions of a compact genome. PMID:27492286

  11. Mesocestoides corti (syn. vogae, cestoda): characterization of genes encoding cysteine-rich secreted proteins (CRISP).

    PubMed

    Britos, Leticia; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Castillo, Estela; Cota, Germán; Señorale, Mario; Marín, Mónica

    2007-06-01

    With the aim of identifying genes involved in development and parasite adaptation in cestodes, four coding sequences were isolated from the cyclophyllidean Mesocestoides corti larval stage (tetrathyridium). Genes showed significant similarity to the cysteine-rich secreted protein (CRISP) encoding genes, a large family that includes stage and tissue-specific genes from diverse organisms, many associated with crucial biological processes. The full-length McCrisp2 cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 202 residues in length, containing 10 cysteines and a putative signal peptide. The expression level of McCrisp2 was estimated by Real-time PCR, relative to GAPDH, showing an increase of 75% in segmented worms compared to tetrathyridia. By in situ hybridization, McCrisp2 expression was localized mainly at the larvae apical region of tetrathyridia and in the proglottids of segmented worms. Taken together our results suggest a possible role for M. corti CRISP proteins as ES products, potentially involved in differentiation processes as proposed for homologs in other organisms.

  12. Genome segment 6 of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus encodes a structural protein with ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Ghorai, Suvankar; Roy, Sobhan; Das, Amit K.; Ghosh, Ananta K.

    2008-07-20

    The genome segment 6 (S6) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus was converted into cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S6 consisted of 1944 nucleotides with an ORF of 607 amino acids and could encode a protein of 68 kDa, termed P68. Motif scan and molecular docking analysis of P68 showed the presence of two cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) domains and ATP binding sites. The ORF of AmCPV S6 was expressed in E. coli as His-tag fusion protein and polyclonal antibody was raised. Immunoblot analysis of virus infected gut cells and purified polyhedra using raised anti-p68 polyclonal antibody showed that S6 encodes a viral structural protein. Fluorescence and ATPase assay of soluble P68 produced in Sf-9 cells via baculovirus expression system showed its ability to bind and cleave ATP. These results suggest that P68 may bind viral RNA through CBS domains and help in replication and transcription through ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  13. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  14. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Lu, Ming-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker), is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens. PMID:25514417

  15. MCD4 Encodes a Conserved Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Protein Essential for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Synthesis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, Erin C.; Mondésert, Guillaume; Grimme, Stephen J.; Reed, Steve I.; Orlean, Peter; Emr, Scott D.

    1999-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are cell surface-localized proteins that serve many important cellular functions. The pathway mediating synthesis and attachment of the GPI anchor to these proteins in eukaryotic cells is complex, highly conserved, and plays a critical role in the proper targeting, transport, and function of all GPI-anchored protein family members. In this article, we demonstrate that MCD4, an essential gene that was initially identified in a genetic screen to isolate Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective for bud emergence, encodes a previously unidentified component of the GPI anchor synthesis pathway. Mcd4p is a multimembrane-spanning protein that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and contains a large NH2-terminal ER lumenal domain. We have also cloned the human MCD4 gene and found that Mcd4p is both highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and has two yeast homologues. Mcd4p’s lumenal domain contains three conserved motifs found in mammalian phosphodiesterases and nucleotide pyrophosphases; notably, the temperature-conditional MCD4 allele used for our studies (mcd4–174) harbors a single amino acid change in motif 2. The mcd4–174 mutant (1) is defective in ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins (i.e., Gas1p) while other proteins (i.e., CPY) are unaffected; (2) secretes and releases (potentially up-regulated cell wall) proteins into the medium, suggesting a defect in cell wall integrity; and (3) exhibits marked morphological defects, most notably the accumulation of distorted, ER- and vesicle-like membranes. mcd4–174 cells synthesize all classes of inositolphosphoceramides, indicating that the GPI protein transport block is not due to deficient ceramide synthesis. However, mcd4–174 cells have a severe defect in incorporation of [3H]inositol into proteins and accumulate several previously uncharacterized [3H]inositol-labeled lipids whose properties are consistent with their being GPI precursors

  16. An Apicoplast Localized Ubiquitylation System Is Required for the Import of Nuclear-encoded Plastid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ponts, Nadia; van Dooren, Giel G.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Brooks, Carrie F.; Rodrigues, Elisadra M.; Tan, John C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Striepen, Boris; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for numerous important human diseases including toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and most importantly malaria. There is a constant need for new antimalarials, and one of most keenly pursued drug targets is an ancient algal endosymbiont, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is essential for parasite survival, and several aspects of its metabolism and maintenance have been validated as targets of anti-parasitic drug treatment. Most apicoplast proteins are nuclear encoded and have to be imported into the organelle. Recently, a protein translocon typically required for endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) has been proposed to act in apicoplast protein import. Here, we show ubiquitylation to be a conserved and essential component of this process. We identify apicoplast localized ubiquitin activating, conjugating and ligating enzymes in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum and observe biochemical activity by in vitro reconstitution. Using conditional gene ablation and complementation analysis we link this activity to apicoplast protein import and parasite survival. Our studies suggest ubiquitylation to be a mechanistic requirement of apicoplast protein import independent to the proteasomal degradation pathway. PMID:23785288

  17. Endogenous murine leukemia virus-encoded proteins in radiation leukemias of BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, E.; Pierotti, M.; DeLeo, A.B.; O'Donnell, P.V.; Fleissner, E.

    1982-02-01

    To explore the role of endogenous retroviruses in radiation-induced leukemogenesis in the mouse, we have examined virus-encoded proteins in nine BALB/c leukemias by pulsechase labeling procedures and serological typing with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. The major gag precursor protein, Pr65/sup gag/, was observed in all cases, but only three leukemias expressed detectable amounts of the glycosylated gag species, gP95/sup gag/, or its precursor, Pr75/sup gag/. No evidence was found for synthesis of gag-host fusion proteins. None of the leukemias released infectious xenotropic or dualtropic virus, but all nine expressed at least one env protein with xenotropic properties. In two instances a monoclonal antibody, 35/56, which is specific for the NuLV G/sub IX/ antigen, displayed a distinctive reactivity with this class of env protein, although this antibody is unreactive with replicating xenotropic viruses. An ecotropic/xenotropic recombinant env protein with the same 35/56 phenotype was observed in a leukemia induced by a strongly leukemogenic virus isolated from a BALB/c radiation leukemia.

  18. mRNA sequence of three respiratory syncytial virus genes encoding two nonstructural proteins and a 22K structural protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    An mRNA sequence of two human respiratory syncytial viral nonstructural protein genes and of a gene for a 22,000-molecular-weight (22K) protein was obtained by cDNA cloning and DNA sequencing. Sequences corresponding to the 5' ends of the respective transcripts were deduced directly by primer extension and dideoxy nucleotide sequencing of the mRNAs. The availability of a bicistronic clone (pRSC6) confirmed the gene order for this portion of the genome. Contrary to other unsegmented negative-stranded RNA viruses, a 19-nucleotide intercistronic sequence was present between the NS1 and NS2 genes. The translation of cloned viral sequences in the bicistronic and monocistronic clones (pRSNS1 and pRSNS2) revealed two moderately hydrophobic proteins of 15,568 and 14,703 daltons. Their similarity in molecular size explained our earlier inability to resolve these proteins. A DNA sequence of an additional recombinant plasmid (pRSA2) revealed a long open reading frame encoding a 22,156-dalton protein containing 194 amino acids. It was relatively basic and moderately hydrophobic. A protein of this size was readily translated in vitro from a viral mRNA hybrid selected by this plasmid and corresponded to an unglycosylated 22K protein seen in purified extracellular virus but not associated with detergent- and salt-resistant cores. A second open reading frame of 90 amino acids partially overlapping with the C terminus of the 22K protein was also present within this sequence. This was reminiscent of the viral matrix protein gene which was previously shown by us to contain two overlapping reading frames. The finding of three additional viral transcripts encoding at least three identifiable proteins in human respiratory syncytial virus was a novel departure from the usual genetic organization of paramyxoviruses. The 5' ends of all three transcripts had a 5'NGGGCAAAU sequence that is common to all viral transcripts analyzed so far. Although there was no obvious homology immediately

  19. Activation of protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase increases phosphorylation of the c-erbA-encoded thyroid hormone receptor and of the v-erbA-encoded protein.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Y; Glineur, C; Gesquière, J C; Ricouart, A; Sap, J; Vennström, B; Ghysdael, J

    1988-01-01

    The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone (T3), which is believed to stimulate transcription from specific target promoters upon binding to cis-acting DNA sequence elements. The v-erbA oncogene of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) encodes a ligand-independent version of this nuclear receptor. The v-erbA product inhibits terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts, presumably by affecting the transcription of specific genes. We show here that the c-erbA-encoded nuclear receptor (p46c-erbA) is phosphorylated on serine residues on two distinct sites. One of these sites, defined by the limit tryptic phosphopeptide 28SSQCLVK, is retained on the v-erbA-encoded P75gag-v-erbA protein. This site is located in the amino-terminal domain of these molecules, 21 amino acids upstream of the DNA-binding region. Phosphorylation of this site in both p46c-erbA and P75gag-v-erbA is enhanced 10-fold following treatment of cells with activators of either protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates both p46c-erbA and P75gag-v-erbA in vitro at the same site as that observed in vivo, at least part of the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of erbA molecules in cells could result from direct phosphorylation by this enzyme. The possible role phosphorylation may play in the function of the erbA-encoded transcriptional factors is discussed. Images PMID:2903825

  20. Expression of Agrobacterium Homolog Genes Encoding T-complex Recruiting Protein under Virulence Induction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wu, Meixia; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Minliang; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    The proteins encoded by three Agrobacterial genes, atu5117, atu4860, and atu4856, are highly homologous to each other in amino acid sequence. All three proteins can bind to VirD2 and are named VBP1, VBP2, and VBP3 (VirD2-binding protein), respectively. VBP is involved in T-DNA transfer by recruiting the T-complex from the cytosol to the polar transport apparatus T4SS (type IV secretion system) and is defined as the “T-complex recruiting protein.” However, it remains unknown how these three homologous genes co-exist in a relatively small prokaryotic genome. To understand whether these three homologous genes are expressed differentially under virulence induction conditions, we examined the effects of virulence induction conditions, including various pH values, temperatures and acetosyringone (AS, an effective virulence inducer to Agrobacterium tumefaciens) concentrations, on the expression of the three VBP-encoding genes. Our data showed that vbp1 (atu5117) and vbp3 (atu4856) maintained constant expression under the tested induction conditions, whereas the expression of vbp2 (atu4860) was affected by the conditions. Culture conditions favorable to the expression of vbp2 differed from the reported induction conditions for other virulence proteins. In particular, the pH value was a crucial factor for the expression of vbp2. In addition, the deletion of vbp1 affected the expression of vbp2. Taken together, these results suggest that the mechanisms regulating the expression of these three homologous genes are different from the virulence induction mechanism and that VBP homologs are presumably involved in other biological processes in addition to T-complex recruitment. PMID:26696988

  1. Expression of Agrobacterium Homolog Genes Encoding T-complex Recruiting Protein under Virulence Induction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wu, Meixia; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Minliang; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    The proteins encoded by three Agrobacterial genes, atu5117, atu4860, and atu4856, are highly homologous to each other in amino acid sequence. All three proteins can bind to VirD2 and are named VBP1, VBP2, and VBP3 (VirD2-binding protein), respectively. VBP is involved in T-DNA transfer by recruiting the T-complex from the cytosol to the polar transport apparatus T4SS (type IV secretion system) and is defined as the "T-complex recruiting protein." However, it remains unknown how these three homologous genes co-exist in a relatively small prokaryotic genome. To understand whether these three homologous genes are expressed differentially under virulence induction conditions, we examined the effects of virulence induction conditions, including various pH values, temperatures and acetosyringone (AS, an effective virulence inducer to Agrobacterium tumefaciens) concentrations, on the expression of the three VBP-encoding genes. Our data showed that vbp1 (atu5117) and vbp3 (atu4856) maintained constant expression under the tested induction conditions, whereas the expression of vbp2 (atu4860) was affected by the conditions. Culture conditions favorable to the expression of vbp2 differed from the reported induction conditions for other virulence proteins. In particular, the pH value was a crucial factor for the expression of vbp2. In addition, the deletion of vbp1 affected the expression of vbp2. Taken together, these results suggest that the mechanisms regulating the expression of these three homologous genes are different from the virulence induction mechanism and that VBP homologs are presumably involved in other biological processes in addition to T-complex recruitment. PMID:26696988

  2. Molecular and genetic analysis of the gene encoding the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strand exchange protein Sep1.

    PubMed

    Tishkoff, D X; Johnson, A W; Kolodner, R D

    1991-05-01

    Vegetatively grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells contain an activity that promotes a number of homologous pairing reactions. A major portion of this activity is due to strand exchange protein 1 (Sep1), which was originally purified as a 132,000-Mr species (R. Kolodner, D. H. Evans, and P. T. Morrison, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:5560-5564, 1987). The gene encoding Sep1 was cloned, and analysis of the cloned gene revealed a 4,587-bp open reading frame capable of encoding a 175,000-Mr protein. The protein encoded by this open reading frame was overproduced and purified and had a relative molecular weight of approximately 160,000. The 160,000-Mr protein was at least as active in promoting homologous pairing as the original 132,000-Mr species, which has been shown to be a fragment of the intact 160,000-Mr Sep1 protein. The SEP1 gene mapped to chromosome VII within 20 kbp of RAD54. Three Tn10LUK insertion mutations in the SEP1 gene were characterized. sep1 mutants grew more slowly than wild-type cells, showed a two- to fivefold decrease in the rate of spontaneous mitotic recombination between his4 heteroalleles, and were delayed in their ability to return to growth after UV or gamma irradiation. Sporulation of sep1/sep1 diploids was defective, as indicated by both a 10- to 40-fold reduction in spore formation and reduced spore viability of approximately 50%. The majority of sep1/sep1 diploid cells arrested in meiosis after commitment to recombination but prior to the meiosis I cell division. Return-to-growth experiments showed that sep1/sep1 his4X/his4B diploids exhibited a five- to sixfold greater meiotic induction of His+ recombinants than did isogenic SEP1/SEP1 strains. sep1/sep1 mutants also showed an increased frequency of exchange between HIS4, LEU2, and MAT and a lack of positive interference between these markers compared with wild-type controls. The interaction between sep1, rad50, and spo13 mutations suggested that SEP1 acts in meiosis in a pathway that is

  3. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  4. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies. PMID:25805993

  5. Genetic variability in the sable (Martes zibellina L.) with respect to genes encoding blood proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.N.; Kazakova, T.I.

    1995-02-01

    Electrophoresis of blood proteins was used to determine, for the first time, the level of genetic variability of certain loci in the sable (Martes zibellina L., Mustelidae). Variation of 23 blood proteins encoded by 25 genes was analyzed. Polymorphism was revealed in six genes. The level of heterozygosity was estimated at 0.069; the proportion of polymorphic loci was 24%. Data on the history of the sable population maintained at the farm, on geographical distribution of natural sable populations, and on the number of animals selected for reproduction in captivity is presented. The great number of animals studies and the extensive range of natural sable populations, on the basis of which the population maintained in captivity was obtained, suggest that the results of this work can be used for estimating the variability of the gene pool of sable as a species. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. EPR Distance Measurements in Native Proteins with Genetically Encoded Spin Labels.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Moritz J; Fedoseev, Artem; Bücker, Dennis; Borbas, Julia; Peter, Christine; Drescher, Malte; Summerer, Daniel

    2015-12-18

    The genetic encoding of nitroxide amino acids in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) distance measurements enables precise structural studies of native proteins, i.e. without the need for mutations to create unique reactive sites for chemical labeling and thus with minimal structural perturbation. We here report on in vitro DEER measurements in native E. coli thioredoxin (TRX) that establish the nitroxide amino acid SLK-1 as a spectroscopic probe that reports distances and conformational flexibilities in the enzyme with nonmutated catalytic centers that are not accessible by the use of the traditional methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL). We generated a rotamer library for SLK-1 that in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation enables predictions of distance distributions between two SLK-1 labels incorporated into a target protein. Toward a routine use of SLK-1 for EPR distance measurements in proteins and the advancement of the approach to intracellular environments, we study the stability of SLK-1 in E. coli cultures and lysates and establish guidelines for protein expression and purification that offer maximal nitroxide stability. These advancements and insights provide new perspectives for facile structural studies of native, endogenous proteins by EPR distance measurements.

  7. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  8. KNQ1, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene encoding a transmembrane protein, may be involved in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Emmanuela; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    The original purpose of the experiments described in this article was to identify, in the biotechnologically important yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, gene(s) that are potentially involved in oxidative protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which often represents a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. Because treatment with the membrane-permeable reducing agent dithiothreitol inhibits disulfide bond formation and mimics the reducing effect that the normal transit of folding proteins has in the ER environment, the strategy was to search for genes that conferred higher levels of resistance to dithiothreitol when present in multiple copies. We identified a gene (KNQ1) encoding a drug efflux permease for several toxic compounds that in multiple copies conferred increased dithiothreitol resistance. However, the KNQ1 product is not involved in the excretion of dithiothreitol or in recombinant protein secretion. We generated a knq1 null mutant, and showed that both overexpression and deletion of the KNQ1 gene resulted in increased resistance to dithiothreitol. KNQ1 amplification and deletion resulted in enhanced transcription of iron transport genes, suggesting, for the membrane-associated protein Knq1p, a new, unexpected role in iron homeostasis on which dithiothreitol tolerance may depend.

  9. The structural basis of germline-encoded VH3 immunoglobulin binding to staphylococcal protein A

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The ability of human VH3 immunoglobulins (Ig) to bind to staphylococcal protein A (SPA) via their Fab region is analogous to the binding of bacterial superantigens to T cell receptors. The present report establishes the structural basis for the interaction of SPA and VH3 Ig. We have studied a panel of 27 human monoclonal IgM that were derived from fetal B lymphocytes. As such, these IgM were expected to be encoded by unmutated germline genes. Binding to SPA in ELISA occurred with 15 of 15 VH3 IgM, but none of 12 IgM from the VH1, VH4, VH5, or VH6 families. The VH sequences of the 27 IgM were derived from 20 distinct VH elements, including 11 from the VH3 family. Use of D, JH, and CL genes was similar among VH3 and non-VH3 IgM. A comparison of the corresponding VH protein sequences, and those of previously studied IgM, identified a probable site for SPA binding that includes VH3 residues in framework region 3 (FR3), and perhaps FR1 and 3' complementary determining region 2. The results thus demonstrate that among human IgM, specificity for SPA is encoded by at least 11 different VH3 germline genes. Furthermore, like the T cell superantigens, SPA likely binds to residues in the VH framework region, outside the classical antigen-binding site of the hypervariable loops. PMID:8315388

  10. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  11. A Multifunctional Protein Encoded by Turkey Herpesvirus Suppresses RNA Silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana▿

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xiu-li; Fan, Mei-na; Jia, Gang; Liu, Lan-wei; Ma, Lin; Zheng, Cheng-chao; Zhu, Xiao-ping; Liu, Hong-mei; Wang, Xiao-yun

    2011-01-01

    Many plant and animal viruses counteract RNA silencing-mediated defense by encoding diverse RNA silencing suppressors. We characterized HVT063, a multifunctional protein encoded by turkey herpesvirus (HVT), as a silencing suppressor in coinfiltration assays with green fluorescent protein transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c. Our results indicated that HVT063 could strongly suppress both local and systemic RNA silencing induced by either sense RNA or double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). HVT063 could reverse local silencing, but not systemic silencing, in newly emerging leaves. The local silencing suppression activity of HVT063 was also verified using the heterologous vector PVX. Further, single alanine substitution of arginine or lysine residues of the HVT063 protein showed that each selected single amino acid contributed to the suppression activity of HVT063 and region 1 (residues 138 to 141) was more important, because three of four single amino acid mutations in this region could abolish the silencing suppressor activity of HVT063. Moreover, HVT063 seemed to induce a cell death phenotype in the infiltrated leaf region, and the HVT063 dilutions could decrease the silencing suppressor activity and alleviate the cell death phenotype. Collectively, these results suggest that HVT063 functions as a viral suppressor of RNA silencing that targets a downstream step of the dsRNA formation in the RNA silencing process. Positively charged amino acids in HVT063, such as arginine and lysine, might contribute to the suppressor activity by boosting the interaction between HVT063 and RNA, since HVT063 has been demonstrated to be an RNA binding protein. PMID:21957299

  12. DNA polymerase III accessory proteins. I. holA and holB encoding delta and delta'.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z; Onrust, R; Skangalis, M; O'Donnell, M

    1993-06-01

    The genes encoding the delta and delta' subunits of the 10-subunit Escherichia coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, have been identified and sequenced. The holA gene encoding delta is located downstream of rlpB at 15.2 min and predicts a 38.7 kda protein. The holB gene encoding delta' is located at 24.3 min and predicts a 36.9-kDa protein. Hence the delta and delta' subunits are unrelated proteins encoded by separate genes. The genes have been used to express and purify delta and delta' in quantity. The predicted amino acid sequence of delta' is homologous to the sequences of the tau and gamma subunits revealing a large amount of structural redundancy within the holoenzyme.

  13. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  14. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  15. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS gene encodes two secreted proteins required for genetic transformation of plants.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Larry D; Lee, Lan-Ying; McNett, Henry; Gelvin, Stanton B; Ream, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are related pathogens that cause crown gall and hairy root diseases, which result from integration and expression of bacterial genes in the plant genome. Single-stranded DNA (T strands) and virulence proteins are translocated into plant cells by a type IV secretion system. VirD2 nicks a specific DNA sequence, attaches to the 5' end, and pilots the DNA into plant cells. A. tumefaciens translocates single-stranded DNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it likely binds T strands and may aid in targeting them into the nucleus. Although some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2, they transfer T strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation. Unlike VirE2, full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. GALLS-FL and VirE2 contain nuclear localization signals (NLS) and secretion signals. Mutations in any of these domains abolish the ability of the GALLS gene to substitute for virE2. Here, we show that the GALLS gene encodes two proteins from one open reading frame: GALLS-FL and a protein comprised of the C-terminal domain, which initiates at an internal in-frame start codon. On some hosts, both GALLS proteins were required to substitute for VirE2. GALLS-FL tagged with yellow fluorescent protein localized to the nucleus of tobacco cells in an NLS-dependent manner. In plant cells, the GALLS proteins interacted with themselves, VirD2, and each other. VirD2 interacted with GALLS-FL and localized inside the nucleus, where its predicted helicase activity may pull T strands into the nucleus. PMID:18952790

  16. Chimeras taking shape: Potential functions of proteins encoded by chimeric RNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Lacroix, Vincent; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Prilusky, Jaime; del Pozo, Angela; Tress, Michael; Johnson, Rory; Guigo, Roderic; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs comprise exons from two or more different genes and have the potential to encode novel proteins that alter cellular phenotypes. To date, numerous putative chimeric transcripts have been identified among the ESTs isolated from several organisms and using high throughput RNA sequencing. The few corresponding protein products that have been characterized mostly result from chromosomal translocations and are associated with cancer. Here, we systematically establish that some of the putative chimeric transcripts are genuinely expressed in human cells. Using high throughput RNA sequencing, mass spectrometry experimental data, and functional annotation, we studied 7424 putative human chimeric RNAs. We confirmed the expression of 175 chimeric RNAs in 16 human tissues, with an abundance varying from 0.06 to 17 RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million mapped reads). We show that these chimeric RNAs are significantly more tissue-specific than non-chimeric transcripts. Moreover, we present evidence that chimeras tend to incorporate highly expressed genes. Despite the low expression level of most chimeric RNAs, we show that 12 novel chimeras are translated into proteins detectable in multiple shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Furthermore, we confirm the expression of three novel chimeric proteins using targeted mass spectrometry. Finally, based on our functional annotation of exon organization and preserved domains, we discuss the potential features of chimeric proteins with illustrative examples and suggest that chimeras significantly exploit signal peptides and transmembrane domains, which can alter the cellular localization of cognate proteins. Taken together, these findings establish that some chimeric RNAs are translated into potentially functional proteins in humans. PMID:22588898

  17. Solution Structure of Ribosomal Protein L40E, a Unique C4 Zinc Finger Protein Encoded by Archaeon Sulfolobus Solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bin; Lukin, Jonathan A.; Yee, Adelinda; Lemak, Alexander; Semesi, Anthony; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2008-01-31

    The ribosomal protein L40E from archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is a component of the 50S ribosomal subunit. L40E is a 56-residue, highly basic protein that contains a C4 zinc finger motif, CRKC_X10_CRRC. Homologs are found in both archaea and eukaryotes but are not present in bacteria. Eukaryotic genomes encode L40E as a ubiquitin-fusion protein. L40E was absent from the crystal structure of euryarchaeota 50S ribosomal subunit. Here we report the three-dimensional solution structure of L40E by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of L40E is a three-stranded b-sheet with a simple b2b1b3 topology. There are two unique characteristics revealed by the structure. First, a large and ordered b2–b3 loop twists to pack across the one side of the protein. L40E contains a buried polar cluster comprising Lys19, Lys20, Cys22, Asn29, and Cys36. Second, the surface of L40E is almost entirely positively charged. Ten conserved basic residues are positioned on the two sides of the surface. It is likely that binding of zinc is essential in stabilizing the tertiary structure of L40E to act as a scaffold to create a broad positively charged surface for RNA and/or protein recognition. A portion of this work was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Facility, a DOE national scientific user facility.

  18. The Zebrafish pob Gene Encodes a Novel Protein Required for Survival of Red Cone Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael R.; Kikkawa, Satoshi; Diez-Juan, Antonio; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Kawakami, Koichi; Carmeliet, Peter; Brockerhoff, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    The zebrafish mutant, partial optokinetic response b (pob), was isolated using an N-ethyl N-nitrosourea (ENU)-based screening strategy designed to identify larvae with defective optokinetic responses in red but not white light. Previous studies showed that red-light blindness in pob is due to the specific loss of long-wavelength photoreceptor cells via an apoptotic mechanism. Here, we used positional cloning to identify the mutated pob gene. We find that pob encodes a highly conserved 30-kDa protein of unknown function. To demonstrate that the correct gene was isolated, we used the Tol2 transposon system to generate transgenic animals and rescue the mutant phenotype. The Pob protein contains putative transmembrane regions and protein-sorting signals. It is localized to the inner segment and synapse in photoreceptor cells, and when expressed in COS-7 cells it localizes to intracellular compartments. We also show that the degeneration of red cone photoreceptors in the mutants occurs independently of light. On the basis of our findings, we propose that Pob is not involved in phototransduction but rather plays an essential role in protein sorting and/or trafficking. PMID:15716502

  19. Nucleoid-associated proteins encoded on plasmids: Occurrence and mode of function.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Masaki; Suzuki-Minakuchi, Chiho; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) play a role in changing the shape of microbial DNA, making it more compact and affecting the regulation of transcriptional networks in host cells. Genes that encode NAPs include H-NS family proteins (H-NS, Ler, MvaT, BpH3, Bv3F, HvrA, and Lsr2), FIS, HU, IHF, Lrp, and NdpA, and are found in both microbial chromosomes and plasmid DNA. In the present study, NAP genes were distributed among 442 plasmids out of 4602 plasmid sequences, and many H-NS family proteins, and HU, IHF, Lrp, and NdpA were found in plasmids of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, while HvrA, Lsr2, HU, and Lrp were found in other classes including Actinobacteria and Bacilli. Larger plasmids frequently carried multiple NAP genes. In addition, NAP genes were more frequently found in conjugative plasmids than non-transmissible plasmids. Several host cells carried the same types of H-NS family proteins on both their plasmids and chromosome(s), while this was not observed for other NAPs. Recent studies have shown that NAP genes on plasmids and chromosomes play important roles in the physical and regulatory integration of plasmids into the host cell.

  20. Characterization of KfrA proteins encoded by a plasmid of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T

    PubMed Central

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Mon, Hiroaki; Mori, Kazuki; Mitsudome, Takumi; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Tashiro, Kousuke; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2015-01-01

    A scaffold obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T shares partial homology with plasmids found in other strains of P. popilliae. PCR and sequencing for gap enclosure indicated that the scaffold originated from a 15,929-bp circular DNA. The restriction patterns of a plasmid isolated from P. popilliae ATCC 14706T were identical to those expected from the sequence; thus, this circular DNA was identified as a plasmid of ATCC 14706T and designated pPOP15.9. The plasmid encodes 17 putative open reading frames. Orfs 1, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are homologous to Orfs 11, 12, 15, 16, and 17, respectively. Orf1 and Orf11 are annotated as replication initiation proteins. Orf8 and Orf16 are homologs of KfrA, a plasmid-stabilizing protein in Gram-negative bacteria. Recombinant Orf8 and Orf16 proteins were assessed for the properties of KfrA. Indeed, they formed multimers and bound to inverted repeat sequences in upstream regions of both orf8 and orf16. A phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of Orf8, Orf16 and Kfr proteins did not correlate with species lineage. PMID:25853059

  1. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    PubMed

    Silby, Mark W; Levy, Stuart B

    2008-06-13

    The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  2. Identification of a cDNA encoding a novel small secretory protein, neurosecretory protein GL, in the chicken hypothalamic infundibulum.

    PubMed

    Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Taniuchi, Shusuke; Bessho, Yuki; Maejima, Sho; Masuda, Keiko; Shikano, Kenshiro; Kondo, Kunihiro; Furumitsu, Megumi; Tachibana, Tetsuya

    2014-03-28

    To find novel neuropeptide and/or peptide hormone precursors in the avian brain, we performed a cDNA subtractive screen of the chicken hypothalamic infundibulum, which contains one of the feeding and neuroendocrine centers. After sequencing 596 clones, we identified a novel cDNA encoding a previously unknown protein. The deduced precursor protein consisted of 182 amino acid residues, including one putative small secretory protein of 80 amino acid residues. This small protein was flanked at the N-terminus by a signal peptide and at the C-terminus by a glycine amidation signal and a dibasic amino acid cleavage site. Because the predicted C-terminal amino acids of the small protein were Gly-Leu-NH2, the small protein was named neurosecretory protein GL (NPGL). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated specific expression of the NPGL precursor mRNA in the hypothalamic infundibulum. Furthermore, the mRNA levels in the hypothalamic infundibulum increased during post-hatching development. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the cells containing the NPGL precursor mRNA were localized in the medial mammillary nucleus and infundibular nucleus within the hypothalamic infundibulum of 8- and 15-day-old chicks. Subcutaneous infusion of NPGL in chicks increased body weight gain without affecting food intake. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the identification and localization of the NPGL precursor mRNA and the function of its translated product in animals. Our findings indicate that NPGL may participate in the growth process in chicks.

  3. Single mage gene in the chicken genome encodes CMage, a protein with functional similarities to mammalian type II Mage proteins.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Noelia; González-Fernández, Zaira; Niinobe, Michio; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Frade, José María

    2007-07-18

    In mammals, the type II melanoma antigen (Mage) protein family is constituted by at least 10 closely related members that are expressed in different tissues, including the nervous system. These proteins are believed to regulate cell cycle withdrawal, neuronal differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the analysis of their specific function has been complicated by functional redundancy. In accordance with previous studies in teleosts and Drosophila, we present evidence that only one mage gene exists in genomes from protists, fungi, plants, nematodes, insects, and nonmammalian vertebrates. We have identified the chicken mage gene and cloned the cDNA encoding the chick Mage protein (CMage). CMage shares close homology with the type II Mage protein family, and, as previously shown for the type II Mage proteins Necdin and Mage-G1, it can interact with the transcription factor E2F-1. CMage is expressed in specific regions of the developing nervous system including the retinal ganglion cell layer, the ventral horn of the spinal cord, and the dorsal root ganglia, coinciding with the expression of the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)) in these regions. We show that the intracellular domain of p75(NTR) can interact with both CMage and Necdin, thus preventing the binding of the latter proteins to the transcription factor E2F-1, and facilitating the proapoptotic activity of E2F-1 in N1E-115 differentiating neurons. The presence of a single mage gene in the chicken genome, together with the close functional resemblance between CMage and Necdin, makes this species ideal to further analyze signal transduction through type II Mage proteins.

  4. The hmc operon of Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a potential transmembrane redox protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M; Pollock, W B; Reij, M W; Keon, R G; Fu, R; Voordouw, G

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the hmc operon from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough indicated the presence of eight open reading frames, encoding proteins Orf1 to Orf6, Rrf1, and Rrf2. Orf1 is the periplasmic, high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) containing 16 c-type hemes and described before (W. B. R. Pollock, M. Loutfi, M. Bruschi, B. J. Rapp-Giles, J. D. Wall, and G. Voordouw, J. Bacteriol. 173:220-228, 1991). Orf2 is a transmembrane redox protein with four iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to DmsB from Escherichia coli. Orf3, Orf4, and Orf5 are all highly hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins with similarities to subunits of NADH dehydrogenase or cytochrome c reductase. Orf6 is a cytoplasmic redox protein containing two iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to the ferredoxin domain of [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio species. Rrf1 belongs to the family of response regulator proteins, while the function of Rrf2 cannot be derived from the gene sequence. The expression of individual genes in E. coli with the T7 system confirmed the open reading frames for Orf2, Orf6, and Rrf1. Deletion of 0.4 kb upstream from orf1 abolished the expression of Hmc in D. desulfuricans G200, indicating this region to contain the hmc operon promoter. The expression of two truncated hmc genes in D. desulfuricans G200 resulted in stable periplasmic c-type cytochromes, confirming the domain structure of Hmc. We propose that Hmc and Orf2 to Orf6 form a transmembrane protein complex that allows electron flow from the periplasmic hydrogenases to the cytoplasmic enzymes that catalyze the reduction of sulfate. The domain structure of Hmc may be required to allow interaction with multiple hydrogenases. Images PMID:8335628

  5. Dimorphism in genes encoding sexual-stage proteins of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri☆

    PubMed Central

    Oguike, Mary C.; Sutherland, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri are distinct species of malaria parasite which are sympatric throughout the tropics, except for the Americas. Despite this complete overlap in geographic range, these two species do not recombine. Although morphologically very similar, the two taxa must possess distinct characters which prevent recombination between them. We hypothesised that proteins required for sexual reproduction have sufficiently diverged between the two species to prevent recombination in any mosquito blood meal in which gametocytes of both species are ingested. In order to investigate possible barriers to inter-species mating between P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri, homologues of genes encoding sexual stage proteins in other plasmodia were identified and compared between the two species. Database searches with motifs for 6-cysteine, Limulus Coagulation factor C domain-containing proteins and other relevant sexual stage proteins in the genus Plasmodium were performed in the available P. ovale curtisi partial genome database (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK). Sequence fragments obtained were used as the basis for PCR walking along each gene of interest in reference isolates of both P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. Sequence alignment of the homologues of each gene in each species showed complete dimorphism across all isolates. In conclusion, substantial divergence between sexual stage proteins in the two P. ovale spp. was observed, providing further evidence that these do not recombine in nature. Incompatibility of proteins involved in sexual development and fertilisation thus remains a plausible explanation for the observed lack of natural recombination between P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. PMID:25817462

  6. Dimorphism in genes encoding sexual-stage proteins of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri.

    PubMed

    Oguike, Mary C; Sutherland, Colin J

    2015-06-01

    Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri are distinct species of malaria parasite which are sympatric throughout the tropics, except for the Americas. Despite this complete overlap in geographic range, these two species do not recombine. Although morphologically very similar, the two taxa must possess distinct characters which prevent recombination between them. We hypothesised that proteins required for sexual reproduction have sufficiently diverged between the two species to prevent recombination in any mosquito blood meal in which gametocytes of both species are ingested. In order to investigate possible barriers to inter-species mating between P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri, homologues of genes encoding sexual stage proteins in other plasmodia were identified and compared between the two species. Database searches with motifs for 6-cysteine, Limulus Coagulation factor C domain-containing proteins and other relevant sexual stage proteins in the genus Plasmodium were performed in the available P. ovale curtisi partial genome database (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK). Sequence fragments obtained were used as the basis for PCR walking along each gene of interest in reference isolates of both P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. Sequence alignment of the homologues of each gene in each species showed complete dimorphism across all isolates. In conclusion, substantial divergence between sexual stage proteins in the two P. ovale spp. was observed, providing further evidence that these do not recombine in nature. Incompatibility of proteins involved in sexual development and fertilisation thus remains a plausible explanation for the observed lack of natural recombination between P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri.

  7. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zemin; Tan, Jianjie; Shi, Zhenying; Xie, Qingjun; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-06-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3' untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  8. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  9. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  10. Distribution of Genes Encoding Nucleoid-Associated Protein Homologs in Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Toshiharu; Yun, Choong-Soo; Shintani, Masaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) form nucleoprotein complexes and influence the expression of genes. Recent studies have shown that some plasmids carry genes encoding NAP homologs, which play important roles in transcriptional regulation networks between plasmids and host chromosomes. In this study, we determined the distributions of the well-known NAPs Fis, H-NS, HU, IHF, and Lrp and the newly found NAPs MvaT and NdpA among the whole-sequenced 1382 plasmids found in Gram-negative bacteria. Comparisons between NAP distributions and plasmid features (size, G+C content, and putative transferability) were also performed. We found that larger plasmids frequently have NAP gene homologs. Plasmids with H-NS gene homologs had less G+C content. It should be noted that plasmids with the NAP gene homolog also carried the relaxase gene involved in the conjugative transfer of plasmids more frequently than did those without the NAP gene homolog, implying that plasmid-encoded NAP homologs positively contribute to transmissible plasmids. PMID:21350637

  11. Regulation of the transposase of Tn4652 by the transposon-encoded protein TnpC.

    PubMed

    Hõrak, R; Kivisaar, M

    1999-10-01

    Transposition is a DNA reorganization reaction potentially deleterious for the host. The frequency of transposition is limited by the amount of transposase. Therefore, strict regulation of a transposase is required to keep control over the destructive multiplication of the mobile element. We have shown previously that the expression of the transposase (tnpA) of the Pseudomonas putida PaW85 transposon Tn4652 is positively affected by integration host factor. Here, we present evidence that the amount of the transposase of Tn4652 in P. putida cells is controlled by the transposon-encoded protein (TnpC). Sequence analysis of the 120-amino-acid-long TnpC, coded just downstream of the tnpA gene, showed that it has remarkable similarity to the putative polypeptide encoded by the mercury resistance transposon Tn5041. As determined by quantitative Western blot analysis, the abundance of TnpA was reduced up to 10-fold in the intact tnpC background. In vivo experiments using transcriptional and translational fusions of the tnpA gene and the reporter gene gusA indicated that TnpC operates in the regulation of the transposase of Tn4652 at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:10515920

  12. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, G; Swami, Shelesh Kumar; Dahiya, Shyam Singh; Sivakumar, G; Tuteja, F C; Narnaware, S D; Mehta, S C; Singh, Raghvendar; Patil, N V

    2014-03-01

    The dsRNA binding protein (RBP) encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs) from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV) from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV) shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV) from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5-71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV) in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV). PMID:25685494

  13. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution. PMID:17666027

  14. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution.

  15. Ring finger protein 10 is a novel synaptonuclear messenger encoding activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Margarita C; Guzzetti, Francesca; Karpova, Anna; Lim, Dmitry; Mitro, Nico; Musardo, Stefano; Mellone, Manuela; Marcello, Elena; Stanic, Jennifer; Samaddar, Tanmoy; Burguière, Adeline; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Kreutz, Michael R; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Luca, Monica Di

    2016-01-01

    Synapses and nuclei are connected by bidirectional communication mechanisms that enable information transfer encoded by macromolecules. Here, we identified RNF10 as a novel synaptonuclear protein messenger. RNF10 is activated by calcium signals at the postsynaptic compartment and elicits discrete changes at the transcriptional level. RNF10 is enriched at the excitatory synapse where it associates with the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs and induction of long term potentiation (LTP) lead to the translocation of RNF10 from dendritic segments and dendritic spines to the nucleus. In particular, we provide evidence for importin-dependent long-distance transport from synapto-dendritic compartments to the nucleus. Notably, RNF10 silencing prevents the maintenance of LTP as well as LTP-dependent structural modifications of dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12430.001 PMID:26977767

  16. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin.

  17. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  18. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  19. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; et al

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  20. Characterization of Durham virus, a novel rhabdovirus that encodes both a C and SH protein

    PubMed Central

    Allison, A. B.; Palacios, G.; Rosa, A. Travassos da; Popov, V. L.; Lu, L.; Xiao, S. Y.; DeToy, K.; Briese, T.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Keel, M. K.; Stallknecht, D. E.; Bishop, G. R.; Tesh, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae is a diverse group of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses that are distributed worldwide and infect a wide range of hosts including vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Of the 114 currently recognized vertebrate rhabdoviruses, relatively few have been well characterized at both the antigenic and genetic level; hence, the phylogenetic relationships between many of the vertebrate rhabdoviruses remain unknown. The present report describes a novel rhabdovirus isolated from the brain of a moribund American coot (Fulica americana) that exhibited neurological signs when found in Durham County, North Carolina, in 2005. Antigenic characterization of the virus revealed that it was serologically unrelated to 68 other known vertebrate rhabdoviruses. Genomic sequencing of the virus indicated that it shared the highest identity to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TUPV), and as only previously observed in TUPV, the genome encoded a putative C protein in an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of the phosphoprotein gene and a small hydrophobic protein located in a novel ORF between the matrix and glycoprotein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of partial amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein and polymerase proteins indicated that, in addition to TUPV, the virus was most closely related to avian and small mammal rhabdoviruses from Africa and North America. In this report, we present the morphological, pathological, antigenic, and genetic characterization of the new virus, tentatively named Durham virus (DURV), and discuss its potential evolutionary relationship to other vertebrate rhabdoviruses. PMID:20863863

  1. Monoclonal antibody against a putative myristoylated membrane protein encoded by grouper iridovirus 59L gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-04-01

    Groupers (Epinephelus spp.) are economically important fish species worldwide, and ranaviruses are major viral pathogens causing heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. In this study, the 59L gene of grouper iridovirus (GIV-59L) was cloned and characterized. This gene is 1521 bp and encodes a protein of 506 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 53.9 kDa. Interestingly, GIV-59L and its homologs are found in all genera of the family Iridoviridae. A mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the C-terminal domain (amino acid positions 254-506) of the GIV-59L protein, GIV-59L(760-1518)-MAb-21, was produced and proved to be well suited for use in a number of GIV immunoassays. RT-PCR, Western blotting, and cycloheximide and cytosine arabinoside drug inhibition analyses indicated that GIV-59L is a viral late gene in GIV-infected grouper kidney cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that GIV-59L protein mainly accumulates in the cytoplasm of infected cells and is finally packed into a whole virus particle. The GIV-59L(760-1518)-MAb-21 characterized in this study could have widespread application in GIV immunodiagnostics and other research on GIV. In addition, the results presented here offer important insights into the pathogenesis of GIV. PMID:25850399

  2. Characterization of Durham virus, a novel rhabdovirus that encodes both a C and SH protein.

    PubMed

    Allison, A B; Palacios, G; Travassos da Rosa, A; Popov, V L; Lu, L; Xiao, S Y; DeToy, K; Briese, T; Lipkin, W I; Keel, M K; Stallknecht, D E; Bishop, G R; Tesh, R B

    2011-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae is a diverse group of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses that are distributed worldwide and infect a wide range of hosts including vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Of the 114 currently recognized vertebrate rhabdoviruses, relatively few have been well characterized at both the antigenic and genetic level; hence, the phylogenetic relationships between many of the vertebrate rhabdoviruses remain unknown. The present report describes a novel rhabdovirus isolated from the brain of a moribund American coot (Fulica americana) that exhibited neurological signs when found in Durham County, North Carolina, in 2005. Antigenic characterization of the virus revealed that it was serologically unrelated to 68 other known vertebrate rhabdoviruses. Genomic sequencing of the virus indicated that it shared the highest identity to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TUPV), and as only previously observed in TUPV, the genome encoded a putative C protein in an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of the phosphoprotein gene and a small hydrophobic (SH) protein located in a novel ORF between the matrix and glycoprotein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of partial amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein and polymerase protein indicated that, in addition to TUPV, the virus was most closely related to avian and small mammal rhabdoviruses from Africa and North America. In this report, we present the morphological, pathological, antigenic, and genetic characterization of the new virus, tentatively named Durham virus (DURV), and discuss its potential evolutionary relationship to other vertebrate rhabdoviruses.

  3. spn-F encodes a novel protein that affects oocyte patterning and bristle morphology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Abdu, Uri; Bar, Dikla; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2006-04-01

    The anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes of the Drosophila embryo are established during oogenesis through the activities of Gurken (Grk), a Tgfalpha-like protein, and the Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr). spn-F mutant females produce ventralized eggs similar to the phenotype produced by mutations in the grk-Egfr pathway. We found that the ventralization of the eggshell in spn-F mutants is due to defects in the localization and translation of grk mRNA during mid-oogenesis. Analysis of the microtubule network revealed defects in the organization of the microtubules around the oocyte nucleus. In addition, spn-F mutants have defective bristles. We cloned spn-F and found that it encodes a novel coiled-coil protein that localizes to the minus end of microtubules in the oocyte, and this localization requires the microtubule network and a Dynein heavy chain gene. We also show that Spn-F interacts directly with the Dynein light chain Ddlc-1. Our results show that we have identified a novel protein that affects oocyte axis determination and the organization of microtubules during Drosophila oogenesis. PMID:16540510

  4. Aeromonas salmonicida possesses two genes encoding homologs of the major outer membrane protein, OmpA.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, G M; Vipond, R; MacIntyre, S

    1996-01-01

    Two homologs of the outer membrane protein OmpA were identified in Aeromonas salmonicida by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and amino-terminal sequence analyses. An A. salmonicida genomic DNA library was constructed by using lambda GEM-11 and recombinant phage carrying both genes ompAI and ompAII) selected by immunoscreening. A 5.0-kb BamHI fragment containing the two genes in tandem was subcloned in pBluescript and used for further subcloning and sequencing of the genes. The encoded proteins (Mr = 33,564 and 32,536 for mature OmpAI and OmpAII, respectively) had only 64% identity with each other and otherwise had the highest level of homology to OmpA proteins from the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Based on the Escherichia coli OmpA model, an eight-stranded amphipathic beta-barrel model for the membrane assembly of the N-terminal half of OmpAI and OmpAII was predicted. Most variation between the two proteins was localized to the predicted surface loops and periplasmic turns, while the transmembrane strands and C-terminals domains were highly conserved. Expression of ompAI and ompAII separately in E. coli indicated that both genes could be independently transcribed from their own promoters and that both gene products were assembled into the E. coli outer membrane. A survey of different Aeromonas spp. by PCR revealed that possession of two tandem ompA genes was widespread among this genus. This is the first report of any bacterial species possessing two genes for homologs of this major outer membrane protein. PMID:8626290

  5. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  6. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Scott, Ken; Meffin, Rebecca; Rainey, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    Background DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans). Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here) in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Results Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst). psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc). Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum) in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (ΔhxcR). A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB) essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Conclusion Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion system, whose expression is

  7. Viroids: how to infect a host and cause disease without encoding proteins.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Beatriz; Gisel, Andreas; Rodio, Maria-Elena; Delgado, Sonia; Flores, Ricardo; Di Serio, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Despite being composed by a single-stranded, circular, non-protein-coding RNA of just 246-401 nucleotides (nt), viroids can incite in their host plants symptoms similar to those caused by DNA and RNA viruses, which have genomes at least 20-fold bigger and encode proteins. On the other hand, certain non-protein-coding plant satellite RNAs display structural similarities with viroids but for replication and transmission they need to parasitize specific helper viruses (modifying concomitantly the symptoms they induce). While phenotypic alterations accompanying infection by viruses may partly result from expressing the proteins they code for, how the non-protein-coding viroids (and satellite RNAs) cause disease remains a conundrum. Initial ideas on viroid pathogenesis focused on a direct interaction of the genomic RNA with host proteins resulting in their malfunction. With the advent of RNA silencing, it was alternatively proposed that symptoms could be produced by viroid-derived small RNAs (vd-sRNAs) -generated by the host defensive machinery- targeting specific host mRNA or DNA sequences for post-transcriptional or transcriptional gene silencing, respectively, a hypothesis that could also explain pathogenesis of non-protein-coding satellite RNAs. Evidence sustaining this view has been circumstantial, but recent data provide support for it in two cases: i) the yellow symptoms associated with a specific satellite RNA result from a 22-nt small RNA (derived from the 24-nt fragment of the satellite genome harboring the pathogenic determinant), which is complementary to a segment of the mRNA of the chlorophyll biosynthetic gene CHLI and targets it for cleavage by the RNA silencing machinery, and ii) two 21-nt vd-sRNAS containing the pathogenic determinant of the albino phenotype induced by a chloroplast-replicating viroid target for cleavage the mRNA coding for the chloroplastic heat-shock protein 90 via RNA silencing too. This evidence, which is compelling for the

  8. Flower-enhanced expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial respiratory protein is associated with changes in mitochondrion number.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Struck, F; Matzinger, D F; Levings, C S

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein is an obligatory component of the respiratory electron transport chain that is encoded by a single-copy gene in mammals and fungi. In contrast, this protein is encoded by a small gene family in dicotyledonous tobacco and monocotyledonous maize. We cloned four cDNAs from tobacco that encode the mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein. These clones, along with a previously isolated cDNA, represent five independent members of the gene family that can be divided into three subfamilies. All of these genes were derived from the two progenitor species and were expressed in amphidiploid tobacco. The proteins encoded by these five genes are probably functional because they all contain the universally conserved hexyl peptides necessary for the 2Fe-2S cluster formation. The expression of the Rieske protein gene family is differentially regulated; a 6- to 11-fold higher level of steady state transcripts was found in flowers than in leaves, stems, and roots. Members of at least two subfamilies were preferentially expressed in flowers, indicating that they share a common cis-regulatory element(s), which can respond to a flower-specific signal(s). Although approximately 10 times more transcripts occurred in flowers than in leaves, flower and leaf mitochondria contained a similar amount of the Rieske protein. Flowers, however, contained seven times more Rieske proteins than leaves. These results indicated an increase in mitochondrion number in flowers. High-energy demands during anther development might bring about an increase in mitochondrion numbers in flowers and the flower-enhanced expression of the Rieske protein gene family. Our results suggested that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory proteins could sense and respond to changes in energy metabolism and/or changes in mitochondrion numbers. PMID:8180500

  9. First description of small proteins encoded by spRNAs in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Daniela; Thomsen, Jens; De Santis, Rebecca; Muntel, Jan; Becher, Dörte; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2015-10-01

    In Methanosarcina mazei several small RNAs have been identified containing a small putative open reading frame (sORF) and thus classified as spRNAs. Here, we report on the first detection of three small proteins in M. mazei encoded by spRNAs using LC-MS/MS analysis of total protein extracts of cells grown under various stress conditions. Each spRNA shows high conservation in Methanosarcina species with regard to the sORF and the flanking non-coding RNA regions, moreover the predicted RNA structures are as well highly conserved. Characterizing the respective transcript levels in response to several stress conditions by northern blots demonstrated an enormous decrease of spRNA36 and spRNA44 during stationary growth (to less than 5%), and a significant increase of spRNA36 (2.5-fold) in response to nitrogen limitation. spRNA41, however, was only detected by RNA-Seq approaches. Quantification of the small proteins by LC-MS/MS using synthetic stable isotope labeled oligopeptides as standards indicated that the concentration of oligopetide36 and 41 in mid exponential phase is induced under nitrogen limitation, which in case of oligopeptide36 is in accordance with its transcript level. The relative amount of the three oligopeptides did not change upon entering stationary growth phase, even though the transcript levels decreased dramatically. Additional production of the oligopeptides in M. mazei did not result in any evident phenotype under standard or nitrogen limiting growth conditions. However, overall the transcript levels of several genes involved in carbon metabolism or in heat shock response were reduced 2-3 fold due to the overproduction, though no sORF specific change was observed. Based on our findings we hypothesize that oligopeptide36 might have a regulatory function in nitrogen metabolism by modulating the activity of a yet unknown target protein involved in the central nitrogen metabolism. PMID:25890157

  10. A nerve growth factor-regulated messenger RNA encodes a new intermediate filament protein

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Differential screening of a cDNA library from the PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line previously revealed a clone, clone 73, whose corresponding mRNA is induced by nerve growth factor (NGF). Induction parallels NGF-stimulated PC12 differentiation from a chromaffinlike phenotype to a sympathetic neuronlike phenotype. We report that DNA sequence analysis reveals that clone 73 mRNA encodes an intermediate filament (IF) protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is distinct from the known sequences of other members of the IF protein family. The sequence has highest homology with desmin and vimentin and includes the highly conserved central alpha-helical rod domain with the characteristic heptad repeat of hydrophobic residues, but has lower homology in the amino-terminal head and carboxyl-terminal tail domains. The head domain contains a large number of serine residues which are potential phosphorylation sites. The expression of clone 73 in vivo in the nervous system of the adult rat was investigated by in situ hybridization of clone 73 probes to tissue sections. The mRNA is expressed at high levels in ganglia of the peripheral nervous system, including the superior cervical ganglion (sympathetic), ciliary ganglion (parasympathetic), and dorsal root ganglion (sensory). In the central nervous system, motor nuclei of cranial nerves III, IV, V, VI, VII, X, and XII as well as ventral horn motor neurons and a restricted set of other central nervous system nuclei express the clone 73 mRNA. Tissues apart from those of the nervous system did not in general express the mRNA, with only very low levels detected in adrenal gland. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanism of NGF- induced PC12 cell differentiation, the pathways of neuronal development in vivo, and the possible function of the clone 73 IF protein and its relationship to other IF proteins. PMID:3339087

  11. Identification and exploration of pollen tube small proteins encoded by pollination-induced transcripts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jong-Chin; Chang, Liang-Chi; Wang, Min-Long; Guo, Cian-Ling; Chung, Mei-Chu; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2011-09-01

    Pollination is composed of cell-cell communication and complicated signaling cascades that regulate pollen tube growth and guidance toward the ovules for double fertilization, and is critical for successful sexual reproduction. Exploring expression profiles of in vivo grown pollen tubes is important. Nevertheless, it is difficult to obtain accessible pollen tubes for profiling studies in most model plants. By taking advantage of the hollow styles of lily (Lilium longiflorum), in vivo pollen tubes harvested from pollinated styles which had been cut open were used here to study their protein and transcript profiles. Pollination quantitatively and qualitatively altered the total protein composition of elongating pollen tubes. cDNAs generated and amplified from total RNAs of 24 h in vivo grown and 12 h in vitro cultured pollen tubes were used for suppression subtractive hybridization analyses and preparation of home-made array chips. Microarray analyses conducted with different probe sets revealed 16 transcripts specifically present and/or enriched in in vivo pollen tubes. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and Northern blotting were applied to validate their unique pollination-induced expression features. Interestingly, several transcripts were simultaneously detected on the stylar transmitting tract epidermis, where in vivo pollen tubes tightly adhered during pollination. Their deduced amino acid sequences showed that most of them encoded small proteins and could be classified into several families. Transient assay revealed filament-like structures decorated by these proteins and one probably localized in the generative cell. These small peptides might be critical for pollen tube growth during pollination, and further exploration of their biological functions and mechanisms of action are of great interest.

  12. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  13. Site-Specific Glycoconjugation of Protein via Bioorthogonal Tetrazine Cycloaddition with a Genetically Encoded trans-Cyclooctene or Bicyclononyne.

    PubMed

    Machida, Takuya; Lang, Kathrin; Xue, Lin; Chin, Jason W; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-05-20

    Efficient access to proteins modified site-specifically with glycans is important in glycobiology and for therapeutic applications. Herein, we report a biocompatible protein glycoconjugation by inverse demand Diels-Alder reaction between tetrazine and trans-cyclooctene. Tetrazine functionalized glycans were obtained in one step by CuAAC (Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition) between glycosyl azide and an alkyne-tetrazine adduct. Site-specific glycoconjugation was performed chemoselectively on a target protein in which a trans-cyclooctene derivatized lysine was genetically encoded. Glycoconjugation proceeded to completion on purified protein and was shown to be selective for the target protein in E. coli.

  14. Mapping and Serodiagnostic Application of a Dominant Epitope within the Human Herpesvirus 8 ORF 65-Encoded Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Chou-Pong; Lam, Lee L.; Spira, Thomas J.; Black, Jodi B.; Stewart, John A.; Pellett, Philip E.; Respess, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    A dominant epitope within the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) ORF 65-encoded protein was mapped to an 8-amino-acid (aa) sequence (RKPPSGKK [aa 162 to 169]) by an amino acid replacement method. Using a 14-aa peptide (P4) encompassing this epitope as the antigen, we developed an enzyme immunoassay for HHV8 antibodies. The presence of P4 antibodies in a panel of 61 human serum specimens was highly correlated with biopsy-confirmed Kaposi’s sarcoma. The homologous Epstein-Barr virus peptide derived from BFBR3-encoded protein did not interfere with the assay, suggesting that P4 is specific for HHV8. PMID:9620379

  15. TANG1, Encoding a Symplekin_C Domain-Contained Protein, Influences Sugar Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leiying; Shang, Li; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Yan; Smith, Caroline; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Yunhai; Jing, Hai-Chun

    2015-07-01

    Sugars not only serve as energy and cellular carbon skeleton but also function as signaling molecules regulating growth and development in plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in sugar signaling pathways will provide more information for improving plant growth and development. Here, we describe a sugar-hypersensitive recessive mutant, tang1. Light-grown tang1 mutants have short roots and increased starch and anthocyanin contents when grown on high-sugar concentration medium. Dark-grown tang1 plants exhibit sugar-hypersensitive hypocotyl elongation and enhanced dark development. The tang1 mutants also show an enhanced response to abscisic acid but reduced response to ethylene. Thus, tang1 displays a range of alterations in sugar signaling-related responses. The TANG1 gene was isolated by a map-based cloning approach and encodes a previously uncharacterized unique protein with a predicted Symplekin tight-junction protein C terminus. Expression analysis indicates that TANG1 is ubiquitously expressed at moderate levels in different organs and throughout the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) life cycle; however, its expression is not affected by high-sugar treatment. Genetic analysis shows that PRL1 and TANG1 have additive effects on sugar-related responses. Furthermore, the mutation of TANG1 does not affect the expression of genes involved in known sugar signaling pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that TANG1, a unique gene, plays an important role in sugar responses in Arabidopsis.

  16. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Multiple Spidroin 1 Genes Encoding Major Ampullate Silk Proteins in Nephila clavipes

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, William A.; Marcotte, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by non-repetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We have experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species. PMID:18828837

  18. tassel-less1 encodes a boron channel protein required for inflorescence development in maize.

    PubMed

    Leonard, April; Holloway, Beth; Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary; Yu, GongXin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Meeley, Robert; Llaca, Victor; Butler, Karlene; Stefani, Tony; Jaqueth, Jennifer; Li, Bailin

    2014-06-01

    tassel-less1 (tls1) is a classical maize (Zea mays) inflorescence mutant. Homozygous mutant plants have no tassels or very small tassels, and ear development is also impaired. Using a positional cloning approach, ZmNIP3;1 (a NOD26-like intrinsic protein) was identified as the candidate gene for tls1. The ZmNIP3;1 gene is completely deleted in the tls1 mutant genome. Two Mutator-insertional TUSC alleles of ZmNIP3;1 exhibited tls1-like phenotypes, and allelism tests confirmed that the tls1 gene encodes ZmNIP3;1. Transgenic plants with an RNA interference (RNAi) construct to down-regulate ZmNIP3;1 also showed tls1-like phenotypes, further demonstrating that TLS1 is ZmNIP3;1. Sequence analysis suggests that ZmNIP3;1 is a boron channel protein. Foliar application of boron could rescue the tls1 phenotypes and restore the normal tassel and ear development. Gene expression analysis indicated that in comparison with that of the wild type or tls1 plants treated with boron, the transition from the vegetative to reproductive phase or the development of the floral meristem is impaired in the shoot apical meristem of the tls1 mutant plants. It is concluded that the tls1 mutant phenotypes are caused by impaired boron transport, and boron is essential for inflorescence development in maize.

  19. Characterization of two cDNAs encoding auxin-binding proteins in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, N; Roux, C; Pradier, J M; Perrot-Rechenmann, C

    1997-03-01

    The isolation and the characterization of two tobacco cDNAs, Nt-ERabp1 and Nt-ERabp2, homologous to Zm-ERabp1, encoding the major auxin-binding protein from maize coleoptiles, are described. Their predicted amino acid sequences correspond to proteins of ca. 21 kDa, in which the characteristic regions common to ABP1-related polypeptides are well-conserved. Southern analysis indicates that the genes corresponding to Nt-ERabp1 cDNA and Nt-ERabp2 cDNA derive respectively from Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris, the diploid progenitors of Nicotiana tabacum. Analysis of mRNA distribution in tobacco plants indicates that these two genes are preferentially expressed in flowers and growing seedlings. Whatever the tissue tested, Nt-ERabp1 mRNA is more abundant than Nt-ERabp2 mRNA. Furthermore, RT-PCR reveals developmental and organ-specific expression of these two genes in flower parts of tobacco plants. In particular, regulation of Nt-ERabp1 mRNA accumulation appears to be correlated with elongation growth of each floral organ. Recombinant Nt-ERabp1, produced in Escherichia coli, is recognized by antibodies raised against Zm-ERabp1.

  20. Developmental expression of tobacco pistil-specific genes encoding novel extensin-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M H; Pezzotti, M; Seurinck, J; Mariani, C

    1992-01-01

    We have sought to identify pistil-specific genes that can be used as molecular markers to study pistil development. For this purpose, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA extracted from tobacco stigmas and styles at different developmental stages. Differential screening of this library led to the isolation of cDNA clones that correspond to genes preferentially or specifically expressed in the pistil. Seven of these cDNA clones encode proteins containing repetitions of the pentapeptide Ser-Pro4, which is a typical motif found in extensins. Unlike extensin genes, the extensin-like genes described here are not induced under stress conditions. RNA gel blot hybridizations demonstrated the organ-specific expression of the extensin-like genes and their temporal regulation during pistil development. After pollination, the transcript levels of the pistil-specific extensin-like genes change relative to levels in unpollinated pistils. In situ hybridization experiments showed that at least one of these pistil-specific genes is specifically expressed in cells of the transmitting tissue. The possible roles of the extensin-like proteins in pistils are discussed. PMID:1392607

  1. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia.

  2. TANG1, Encoding a Symplekin_C Domain-Contained Protein, Influences Sugar Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leiying; Shang, Li; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Yan; Smith, Caroline; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Yunhai; Jing, Hai-Chun

    2015-07-01

    Sugars not only serve as energy and cellular carbon skeleton but also function as signaling molecules regulating growth and development in plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in sugar signaling pathways will provide more information for improving plant growth and development. Here, we describe a sugar-hypersensitive recessive mutant, tang1. Light-grown tang1 mutants have short roots and increased starch and anthocyanin contents when grown on high-sugar concentration medium. Dark-grown tang1 plants exhibit sugar-hypersensitive hypocotyl elongation and enhanced dark development. The tang1 mutants also show an enhanced response to abscisic acid but reduced response to ethylene. Thus, tang1 displays a range of alterations in sugar signaling-related responses. The TANG1 gene was isolated by a map-based cloning approach and encodes a previously uncharacterized unique protein with a predicted Symplekin tight-junction protein C terminus. Expression analysis indicates that TANG1 is ubiquitously expressed at moderate levels in different organs and throughout the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) life cycle; however, its expression is not affected by high-sugar treatment. Genetic analysis shows that PRL1 and TANG1 have additive effects on sugar-related responses. Furthermore, the mutation of TANG1 does not affect the expression of genes involved in known sugar signaling pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that TANG1, a unique gene, plays an important role in sugar responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26002908

  3. BET3 encodes a novel hydrophilic protein that acts in conjunction with yeast SNAREs.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, G; Kolstad, K; Stone, S; Palluault, F; Ferro-Novick, S

    1995-01-01

    Here we report the identification of BET3, a new member of a group of interacting genes whose products have been implicated in the targeting and fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi transport vesicles with their acceptor compartment. A temperature-sensitive mutant in bet3-1 was isolated in a synthetic lethal screen designed to identify new genes whose products may interact with BET1, a type II integral membrane protein that is required for ER to Golgi transport. At 37 degrees C, bet3-1 fails to transport invertase, alpha-factor, and carboxypeptidase Y from the ER to the Golgi complex. As a consequence, this mutant accumulates dilated ER and small vesicles. The SNARE complex, a docking/fusion complex, fails to form in this mutant. Furthermore, BET3 encodes an essential 22-kDa hydrophilic protein that is conserved in evolution, which is not a component of this complex. These findings support the hypothesis that Bet3p may act before the assembly of the SNARE complex. Images PMID:8590804

  4. Rapid comparison of protein binding site surfaces with Property Encoded Shape Distributions (PESD)

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Kokardekar, Arshad

    2009-01-01

    Patterns in shape and property distributions on the surface of binding sites are often conserved across functional proteins without significant conservation of the underlying amino-acid residues. To explore similarities of these sites from the viewpoint of a ligand, a sequence and fold-independent method was created to rapidly and accurately compare binding sites of proteins represented by property-mapped triangulated Gauss-Connolly surfaces. Within this paradigm, signatures for each binding site surface are produced by calculating their property-encoded shape distributions (PESD), a measure of the probability that a particular property will be at a specific distance to another on the molecular surface. Similarity between the signatures can then be treated as a measure of similarity between binding sites. As postulated, the PESD method rapidly detected high levels of similarity in binding site surface characteristics even in cases where there was very low similarity at the sequence level. In a screening experiment involving each member of the PDBBind 2005 dataset as a query against the rest of the set, PESD was able to retrieve a binding site with identical E.C. (Enzyme Commission) numbers as the top match in 79.5% of cases. The ability of the method in detecting similarity in binding sites with low sequence conservations were compared with state-of-the-art binding site comparison methods. PMID:19919089

  5. Nopaline-type Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium encodes a VirF-like functional F-box protein

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    During Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of plants, several bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins are translocated into the host cell to facilitate infection. One of the most important of such translocated factors is VirF, an F-box protein produced by octopine strains of Agrobacterium, which presumably facilitates proteasomal uncoating of the invading T-DNA from its associated proteins. The presence of VirF also is thought to be involved in differences in host specificity between octopine and nopaline strains of Agrobacterium, with the current dogma being that no functional VirF is encoded by nopaline strains. Here, we show that a protein with homology to octopine VirF is encoded by the Ti plasmid of the nopaline C58 strain of Agrobacterium. This protein, C58VirF, possesses the hallmarks of functional F-box proteins: it contains an active F-box domain and specifically interacts, via its F-box domain, with SKP1-like (ASK) protein components of the plant ubiquitin/proteasome system. Thus, our data suggest that nopaline strains of Agrobacterium have evolved to encode a functional F-box protein VirF. PMID:26586289

  6. Genomics and Physiology of a Marine Flavobacterium Encoding a Proteorhodopsin and a Xanthorhodopsin-Like Protein

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Tomasch, Jürgen; Martin, Madeleine; Jarek, Michael; González, José M.; Spring, Stefan; Rohlfs, Meike; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Cypionka, Heribert; Göker, Markus; Fiebig, Anne; Klein, Johannes; Goesmann, Alexander; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) photoheterotrophy in the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 has previously been investigated, showing no growth stimulation in the light at intermediate carbon concentrations. Here we report the genome sequence of strain PRO95 and compare it to two other PR encoding Dokdonia genomes: that of strain 4H-3-7-5 which shows the most similar genome, and that of strain MED134 which grows better in the light under oligotrophic conditions. Our genome analysis revealed that the PRO95 genome as well as the 4H-3-7-5 genome encode a protein related to xanthorhodopsins. The genomic environment and phylogenetic distribution of this gene suggest that it may have frequently been recruited by lateral gene transfer. Expression analyses by RT-PCR and direct mRNA-sequencing showed that both rhodopsins and the complete β-carotene pathway necessary for retinal production are transcribed in PRO95. Proton translocation measurements showed enhanced proton pump activity in response to light, supporting that one or both rhodopsins are functional. Genomic information and carbon source respiration data were used to develop a defined cultivation medium for PRO95, but reproducible growth always required small amounts of yeast extract. Although PRO95 contains and expresses two rhodopsin genes, light did not stimulate its growth as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient poor seawater medium that mimics its natural environment, confirming previous experiments at intermediate carbon concentrations. Starvation or stress conditions might be needed to observe the physiological effect of light induced energy acquisition. PMID:23526944

  7. Genomics and physiology of a marine flavobacterium encoding a proteorhodopsin and a xanthorhodopsin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Tomasch, Jürgen; Martin, Madeleine; Jarek, Michael; González, José M; Spring, Stefan; Rohlfs, Meike; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Cypionka, Heribert; Göker, Markus; Fiebig, Anne; Klein, Johannes; Goesmann, Alexander; Fuhrman, Jed A; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) photoheterotrophy in the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 has previously been investigated, showing no growth stimulation in the light at intermediate carbon concentrations. Here we report the genome sequence of strain PRO95 and compare it to two other PR encoding Dokdonia genomes: that of strain 4H-3-7-5 which shows the most similar genome, and that of strain MED134 which grows better in the light under oligotrophic conditions. Our genome analysis revealed that the PRO95 genome as well as the 4H-3-7-5 genome encode a protein related to xanthorhodopsins. The genomic environment and phylogenetic distribution of this gene suggest that it may have frequently been recruited by lateral gene transfer. Expression analyses by RT-PCR and direct mRNA-sequencing showed that both rhodopsins and the complete β-carotene pathway necessary for retinal production are transcribed in PRO95. Proton translocation measurements showed enhanced proton pump activity in response to light, supporting that one or both rhodopsins are functional. Genomic information and carbon source respiration data were used to develop a defined cultivation medium for PRO95, but reproducible growth always required small amounts of yeast extract. Although PRO95 contains and expresses two rhodopsin genes, light did not stimulate its growth as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient poor seawater medium that mimics its natural environment, confirming previous experiments at intermediate carbon concentrations. Starvation or stress conditions might be needed to observe the physiological effect of light induced energy acquisition. PMID:23526944

  8. Non-human lnc-DC orthologs encode Wdnm1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Johannes M.; Ballingall, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication in Science, Wang et al. found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expressed in human dendritic cells (DC), which they designated lnc-DC. Based on lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in human and murine systems, they concluded that lnc-DC is important in differentiation of monocytes into DC. However, Wang et al. did not mention that their so-called “mouse lnc-DC ortholog” gene was already designated “ Wdnm1-like” and is known to encode a small secreted protein.  We found that incapacitation of the Wdnm1-like open reading frame (ORF) is very rare among mammals, with all investigated primates except for hominids having an intact ORF. The null-hypothesis by Wang et al. therefore should have been that the human lnc-DC transcript might only represent a non-functional relatively young evolutionary remnant of a protein coding locus.  Whether this null-hypothesis can be rejected by the experimental data presented by Wang et al. depends in part on the possible off-target (immunogenic or otherwise) effects of their RNAi procedures, which were not exhaustive in regard to the number of analyzed RNAi sequences and control sequences.  If, however, the conclusions by Wang et al. on their human model are correct, and they may be, current knowledge regarding the Wdnm1-like locus suggests an intriguing combination of different functions mediated by transcript and protein in the maturation of several cell types at some point in evolution. We feel that the article by Wang et al. tends to be misleading without the discussion presented here. PMID:25309733

  9. ANKRD1, the Gene Encoding Cardiac Ankyrin Repeat Protein, Is a Novel Dilated Cardiomyopathy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moulik, Mousumi; Vatta, Matteo; Witt, Stephanie H.; Arola, Anita M.; Murphy, Ross T.; McKenna, William J.; Boriek, Aladin M.; Oka, Kazuhiro; Labeit, Siegfried; Bowles, Neil E.; Arimura, Takuro; Kimura, Akinori; Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated ankyrin repeat domain 1 (ANKRD1), the gene encoding cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), as a novel candidate gene for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) through mutation analysis of a cohort of familial or idiopathic DCM patients, based on the hypothesis that inherited dysfunction of mechanical stretch-based signaling is present in a subset of DCM patients. Background CARP, a transcription coinhibitor, is a member of the titin-N2A mechanosensory complex and translocates to the nucleus in response to stretch. It is up-regulated in cardiac failure and hypertrophy and represses expression of sarcomeric proteins. Its overexpression results in contractile dysfunction. Methods In all, 208 DCM patients were screened for mutations/variants in the coding region of ANKRD1 using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and direct deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. In vitro functional analyses of the mutation were performed using yeast 2-hybrid assays and investigating the effect on stretch-mediated gene expression in myoblastoid cell lines using quantitative real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results Three missense heterozygous ANKRD1 mutations (P105S, V107L, and M184I) were identified in 4 DCM patients. The M184I mutation results in loss of CARP binding with Talin 1 and FHL2, and the P105S mutation in loss of Talin 1 binding. Intracellular localization of mutant CARP proteins is not altered. The mutations result in differential stretch-induced gene expression compared with wild-type CARP. Conclusions ANKRD1 is a novel DCM gene, with mutations present in 1.9% of DCM patients. The ANKRD1 mutations may cause DCM as a result of disruption of the normal cardiac stretch-based signaling. PMID:19608030

  10. Mutations in POFUT1, Encoding Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, Cause Generalized Dowling-Degos Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Cheng, Ruhong; Liang, Jianying; Yan, Heng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Lijia; Li, Chengrang; Jiao, Qingqing; Lu, Zhiyong; He, Jianhui; Ji, Jin; Shen, Zhu; Li, Chunqi; Hao, Fei; Yu, Hong; Yao, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD), or reticular pigmented anomaly of the flexures, is a type of rare autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticular hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation of the flexures, such as the neck, axilla, and areas below the breasts and groin, and shows considerable heterogeneity. Loss-of-function mutations of keratin 5 (KRT5) have been identified in DDD individuals. In this study, we collected DNA samples from a large Chinese family affected by generalized DDD and found no mutation of KRT5. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis of this family and mapped generalized DDD to a region between rs1293713 and rs244123 on chromosome 20. By exome sequencing, we identified nonsense mutation c.430G>T (p.Glu144∗) in POFUT1, which encodes protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, in the family. Study of an additional generalized DDD individual revealed the heterozygous deletion mutation c.482delA (p.Lys161Serfs∗42) in POFUT1. Knockdown of POFUT1 reduces the expression of NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HES1, and KRT5 in HaCaT cells. Using zebrafish, we showed that pofut1 is expressed in the skin and other organs. Morpholino knockdown of pofut1 in zebrafish produced a phenotype characteristic of hypopigmentation at 48 hr postfertilization (hpf) and abnormal melanin distribution at 72 hpf, replicating the clinical phenotype observed in our DDD individuals. At 48 and 72 hpf, tyrosinase activities decreased by 33% and 45%, respectively, and melanin protein contents decreased by 20% and 25%, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that POFUT1 mutations cause generalized DDD. These results strongly suggest that the protein product of POFUT1 plays a significant and conserved role in melanin synthesis and transport. PMID:23684010

  11. Expression of the immediate-early gene-encoded protein Egr-1 (zif268) during in vitro classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink classical conditioning. The results showed that Egr-1 protein expression as determined by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis rapidly increased during the early stages of conditioning and remained elevated during the later stages. Further, expression of Egr-1 protein required NMDA receptor activation as it was blocked by bath application of AP-5. These findings suggest that the IEG-encoded proteins such as Egr-1 are activated during relatively simple forms of learning in vertebrates. In this case, Egr-1 may have a functional role in the acquisition phase of conditioning as well as in maintaining expression of conditioned responses.

  12. Information propagation from IP 3 to target protein: A combined model for encoding and decoding of Ca 2+ signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Ming; Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng

    2009-10-01

    It is well known that information is encoded in the frequency or amplitude of Ca 2+ signal and then decoded by target protein. However, few models considered both the encoding and decoding procedures of Ca 2+ signal. In this work, a minimal Li-Rinzel model is coupled with a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle model, which is used to investigate information transmissions from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3) to target proteins and their relations. We found that the mean target protein activity increases with the IP 3 concentration, and at a low level of stimulation, the target protein can be more efficiently activated by an oscillatory signal than a constant signal of the same average calcium if Ca 2+ acts cooperatively on the kinase. The internal noise resulting from the finite system size is also taken into account in the combined model.

  13. Expression of the Immediate-Early Gene-Encoded Protein Egr-1 ("zif268") during in Vitro Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink…

  14. Red-shifted fluorescent proteins mPlum and mRaspberry and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Tsien, Roger Y.; Wang, Lei

    2008-07-01

    Methods using somatic hypermutation (SHM) for producing polypeptide and nucleic acid variants, and nucleic acids encoding such polypeptide variants are disclosed. Such variants may have desired properties. Also disclosed are novel polypeptides, such as improved fluorescent proteins, produced by the novel methods, and nucleic acids, vectors, and host cells comprising such vectors.

  15. Cloning and expression analysis of mouse Cclp1, a new gene encoding a coiled-coil-like protein.

    PubMed

    Noben-Trauth, K; Naggert, J K; Nishina, P M

    1997-05-30

    Here we describe the nucleotide sequence and expression pattern of a novel gene termed Coiled-coil-like protein 1 (Cclp1). A 2646bp open reading frame encodes a 882 amino acid protein with a predicted coiled-coil domain at the amino terminus. Cclp1 is expressed in a variety of adult tissues and during different stages of embryogenesis. The broad expression pattern suggests a general cellular function of CCLP1. PMID:9199242

  16. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  17. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  18. Optogenetic Reporters: Fluorescent Protein-Based Genetically-Encoded Indicators of Signaling and Metabolism in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tantama, Mathew; Hung, Yin Pun; Yellen, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent protein technology has evolved to include genetically-encoded biosensors that can monitor levels of ions, metabolites, and enzyme activities as well as protein conformation and even membrane voltage. They are well suited to live-cell microscopy and quantitative analysis, and they can be used in multiple imaging modes, including one or two-photon fluorescence intensity or lifetime microscopy. Although not nearly complete, there now exists a substantial set of genetically-encoded reporters that can be used to monitor many aspects of neuronal and glial biology, and these biosensors can be used to visualize synaptic transmission and activity-dependent signaling in vitro and in vivo. In this review we present an overview of design strategies for engineering biosensors, including sensor designs using circularly-permuted fluorescent proteins and using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins. We also provide examples of indicators that sense small ions (e.g., pH, chloride, zinc), metabolites (e.g., glutamate, glucose, ATP, cAMP, lipid metabolites), signaling pathways (e.g., G protein coupled receptors, Rho GTPases), enzyme activities (e.g., protein kinase A, caspases), and reactive species. We focus on examples where these genetically-encoded indicators have been applied to brain-related studies and used with live-cell fluorescence microscopy. PMID:22341329

  19. Enhancement of initial equivalency for protein structure alignment based on encoded local structures.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth; Wang, Jui-Chih; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Tsai, Kun-Nan; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Most alignment algorithms find an initial equivalent residue pair followed by an iterative optimization process to explore better near-optimal alignments in the surrounding solution space of the initial alignment. It plays a decisive role in determining the alignment quality since a poor initial alignment may make the final alignment trapped in an undesirable local optimum even with an iterative optimization. We proposed a vector-based alignment algorithm with a new initial alignment approach accounting for local structure features called MIRAGE-align. The new idea is to enhance the quality of the initial alignment based on encoded local structural alphabets to identify the protein structure pair whose sequence identity falls in or below twilight zone. The statistical analysis of alignment quality based on Match Index (MI) and computation time demonstrated that MIRAGE-align algorithm outperformed four previously published algorithms, i.e., the residue-based algorithm (CE), the vector-based algorithm (SSM), TM-align, and Fr-TM-align. MIRAGE-align yields a better estimate of initial solution to enhance the quality of initial alignment and enable the employment of a non-iterative optimization process to achieve a better alignment. PMID:22717522

  20. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the HIV pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life were identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth. PMID:22179038

  1. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Fernanda dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  2. Oral administration with attenuated Salmonella encoding a Trichinella cystatin-like protein elicited host immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, X D; Wang, X L; Bai, X; Liu, X L; Wu, X P; Zhao, Y; Sun, S M; Yu, L; Su, X Z; Wang, Z Q; Wang, F; Liu, M Y

    2014-06-01

    Trichinellosis is a public health problem and is regarded as an emergent/re-emergent disease in various countries. The cDNA encoding a cystatin-like protein (Ts-cystatin) was identified by immunoscreening intestinal muscle larvae cDNA libraries with serum from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae. To study its impact on host immunity, we chose a eukaryotic expression system based on several comparisons of immunogenicity between the two Salmonella typhimurium administration schemes, which indicated that the eukaryotic expression system was superior. Humoral IgG and mucosal IgA were measured to determine the antibody response. To explore whether Th1 and Th2 responses were responsible for the induced protection, Th1- and Th2-specific cellular transcription factors and the cytokine profile were examined. Changes in the T lymphocyte and macrophage populations were detected by flow cytometry. Lastly, parasitological examination was examined. The results showed that Ts-cystatin induced a Th1/Th2-mixed type of immune response and decreased STAT6 transcription. The intestinal adult recovery increased by 10.9% in the Ts-cystatin group, the Ts-cystatin group fecundity rate was decreased by 91%. Furthermore, the number of muscle larvae did not change compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that Ts-cystatin plays an important role in Trichinella resistance to rapid expulsion by the host and is worth further study.

  3. The HTLV-1-encoded protein HBZ directly inhibits the acetyl transferase activity of p300/CBP

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Torsten; Wright, Diana G.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The homologous cellular coactivators p300 and CBP contain intrinsic lysine acetyl transferase (termed HAT) activity. This activity is responsible for acetylation of several sites on the histones as well as modification of transcription factors. In a previous study, we found that HBZ, encoded by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), binds to multiple domains of p300/CBP, including the HAT domain. In this study, we found that HBZ inhibits the HAT activity of p300/CBP through the bZIP domain of the viral protein. This effect correlated with a reduction of H3K18 acetylation, a specific target of p300/CBP, in cells expressing HBZ. Interestingly, lower levels of H3K18 acetylation were detected in HTLV-1 infected cells compared to non-infected cells. The inhibitory effect of HBZ was not limited to histones, as HBZ also inhibited acetylation of the NF-κB subunit, p65, and the tumor suppressor, p53. Recent studies reported that mutations in the HAT domain of p300/CBP that cause a defect in acetylation are found in certain types of leukemia. These observations suggest that inhibition of the HAT activity by HBZ is important for the development of adult T-cell leukemia associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:22434882

  4. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity.

  5. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  6. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  7. A human papilloma virus type 11 transcript encoding an E1--E4 protein.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, M; Hirochika, R; Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    1987-08-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with a genital wart (condyloma acuminatum) was determined to be type 11. The majority of the viral DNA molecules were monomeric circles present in the cells at high copy number, as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional agarose gell electrophoretic separation followed by Southern blot analysis. A cDNA library in phage lambda gt11 was constructed from poly(A)-selected mRNA recovered from the tissue. Recombinant clones corresponding to the most abundant 1.2-kb viral mRNA species detected by Northern blot hybridization and by electron microscopic analysis of R loops were isolated and their nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison to the prototype HPV-11 DNA sequence revealed that this message consisted of two exons. The promotor-proximal exon spanned nucleotides 716 through 847 and the distal exon included nucleotides 3325 through 4390 or 4392. The mRNAs were alternatively polyadenylated after either of these latter two sites, in both cases following a G and preceding a U residue. Fourteen or sixteen bases upstream from the poly(A) was the hexanucleotide AGUAAA, which apparently serves as the signal for cleavage and polyadenylation of the nascent message. The splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the usual /GU. . .AG/pattern. The exons joined open reading frame (ORF) E1, which contributed the initiation codon and four additional triplets, to ORF E4, which specified 85 amino acids to encode a protein of 10,022 Da. The cDNA also contained the ORFs E5a and E5b toward the 3' end. The complete sequence of the cDNA revealed three single-base changes from the prototype HPV-11, two resulting in altered amino acids in E4. Neither affects the coding potential of the overlapping E2 ORF. The function of the E1--E4 protein is unknown. PMID:2887066

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis efpA encodes an efflux protein of the QacA transporter family.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, J L; Pang, Y; Mdluli, K E; Moran, A J; Victor, T C; Stokes, R W; Mahenthiralingam, E; Kreiswirth, B N; Butt, J L; Baron, G S; Treit, J D; Kerr, V J; Van Helden, P D; Roberts, M C; Nano, F E

    1997-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv efpA gene encodes a putative efflux protein, EfpA, of 55,670 Da. The deduced EfpA protein was similar in secondary structure to Pur8, MmrA, TcmA, LfrA, EmrB, and other members of the QacA transporter family (QacA TF) which mediate antibiotic and chemical resistance in bacteria and yeast. The predicted EfpA sequence possessed all transporter motifs characteristic of the QacA TF, including those associated with proton-antiport function and the motif considered to be specific to exporters. The 1,590-bp efpA open reading frame was G+C rich (65%), whereas the 40-bp region immediately upstream had an A+T bias (35% G+C). Reverse transcriptase-PCR assays indicated that efpA was expressed in vitro and in situ. Putative promoter sequences were partially overlapped by the A+T-rich region and by a region capable of forming alternative secondary structures indicative of transcriptional regulation in analogous systems. PCR single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis demonstrated that these upstream flanking sequences and the 231-bp, 5' coding region are highly conserved among both drug-sensitive and multiply-drug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis. The efpA gene was present in the slow-growing human pathogens M. tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium bovis and in the opportunistic human pathogens Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellular. However, efpA was not present in 17 other opportunistically pathogenic or nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. PMID:9008277

  9. Diverse circular replication-associated protein encoding viruses circulating in invertebrates within a lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Dayaram, Anisha; Galatowitsch, Mark L; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R; van Bysterveldt, Katherine; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Harding, Jon S; Roumagnac, Philippe; Martin, Darren P; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Over the last five years next-generation sequencing has become a cost effective and efficient method for identifying known and unknown microorganisms. Access to this technique has dramatically changed the field of virology, enabling a wide range of environmental viral metagenome studies to be undertaken of organisms and environmental samples from polar to tropical regions. These studies have led to the discovery of hundreds of highly divergent single stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus-like sequences encoding replication-associated proteins. Yet, few studies have explored how viruses might be shared in an ecosystem through feeding relationships. Here we identify 169 circular molecules (160 CRESS DNA molecules, nine circular molecules) recovered from a New Zealand freshwater lake, that we have tentatively classified into 51 putatively novel species and five previously described species (DflaCV-3, -5, -6, -8, -10). The CRESS DNA viruses identified in this study were recovered from molluscs (Echyridella menzeisii, Musculium novaezelandiae, Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Physella acuta) and insect larvae (Procordulia grayi, Xanthocnemis zealandica, and Chironomus zealandicus) collected from Lake Sarah, as well as from the lake water and benthic sediments. Extensive diversity was observed across most CRESS DNA molecules recovered. The putative capsid protein of one viral species was found to be most similar to those of members of the Tombusviridae family, thus expanding the number of known RNA-DNA hybrid viruses in nature. We noted a strong association between the CRESS DNA viruses and circular molecules identified in the water and browser organisms (C. zealandicus, P. antipodarum and P. acuta), and between water sediments and undefended prey species (C. zealandicus). However, we were unable to find any significant correlation of viral assemblages to the potential feeding relationships of the host aquatic invertebrates. PMID:26873065

  10. Lipopolysaccharide phosphorylating enzymes encoded in the genomes of Gram-negative bacteria are related to the eukaryotic protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, A.; Srinivasan, N.

    2002-01-01

    By means of profile-matching procedures, conservation of functionally important residues, and fold-recognition techniques, we show that two distinct families of lipopolysaccharide kinases encoded in the genomes of Gram-negative bacteria are related to each other and to two distinct classes of proteins, namely eukaryotic protein kinases and right open reading frame (RIO1). Members of one of the lipopolysaccharide kinase families are identified only in pathogenic bacteria. Phosphorylation by these enzymes is relevant in the construction of outer membrane, immune response, and pathogenic virulence. The class of proteins called RIO1, also related to eukaryotic protein kinases and previously known to occur only in archaea and eukaryotes, are now identified in eubacteria as well. It has been suggested here that RIO1 proteins are intermediately related to lipopolysaccharide kinases and eukaryotic protein kinases implying an evolutionary relationship between the three classes of proteins. PMID:12021457

  11. Opaque1 Encodes a Myosin XI Motor Protein That Is Required for Endoplasmic Reticulum Motility and Protein Body Formation in Maize Endosperm[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifeng; Wang, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhong, Mingyu; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Dianbin; Tang, Yuanping; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are encoded by multigene families and are involved in many basic biological processes. However, their functions in plants remain poorly understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of maize (Zea mays) opaque1 (o1), which encodes a myosin XI protein. o1 is a classic maize seed mutant with an opaque endosperm phenotype but a normal zein protein content. Compared with the wild type, o1 endosperm cells display dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structures and an increased number of smaller, misshapen protein bodies. The O1 gene was isolated by map-based cloning and was shown to encode a member of the plant myosin XI family (myosin XI-I). In endosperm cells, the O1 protein is associated with rough ER and protein bodies. Overexpression of the O1 tail domain (the C-terminal 644 amino acids) significantly inhibited ER streaming in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggested an association between O1 and the ER through a heat shock protein 70–interacting protein. In summary, this study indicated that O1 influences protein body biogenesis by affecting ER morphology and motility, ultimately affecting endosperm texture. PMID:22892319

  12. The Fungus Tremella mesenterica Encodes the Longest Metallothionein Currently Known: Gene, Protein and Metal Binding Characterization.

    PubMed

    Iturbe-Espinoza, Paul; Gil-Moreno, Selene; Lin, Weiyu; Calatayud, Sara; Palacios, Òscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2016-01-01

    Fungal Cu-thioneins, and among them, the paradigmatic Neurospora crassa metallothionein (MT) (26 residues), were once considered as the shortest MTs--the ubiquitous, versatile metal-binding proteins--among all organisms, and thus representatives of their primeval forms. Nowadays, fungal MTs of diverse lengths and sequence features are known, following the huge heterogeneity of the Kingdom of Fungi. At the opposite end of N. crassa MT, the recently reported Cryptococcus neoformans CnMT1 and CnMT2 (122 and 186 aa) constitute the longest reported fungal MTs, having been identified as virulence factors of this pathogen. CnMTs are high-capacity Cu-thioneins that appear to be built by tandem amplification of a basic unit, a 7-Cys segment homologous to N. crassa MT. Here, we report the in silico, in vivo and in vitro study of a still longer fungal MT, belonging to Tremella mesenterica (TmMT), a saprophytic ascomycete. The TmMT gene has 10 exons, and it yields a 779-bp mature transcript that encodes a 257 residue-long protein. This MT is also built by repeated fragments, but of variable number of Cys: six units of the 7-Cys building blocks--CXCX3CSCPPGXCXCAXCP-, two fragments of six Cys, plus three Cys at the N-terminus. TmMT metal binding abilities have been analyzed through the spectrophotometric and spectrometric characterization of its recombinant Zn-, Cd- and Cu-complexes. Results allow it to be unambiguous classified as a Cu-thionein, also of extraordinary coordinating capacity. According to this feature, when the TmMT cDNA is expressed in MT-devoid yeast cells, it is capable of restoring a high Cu tolerance level. Since it is not obvious that T. mesenterica shares the same physiological needs for a high capacity Cu-binding protein with C. neoformans, the existence of this peculiar MT might be better explained on the basis of a possible role in Cu-handling for the Cu-enzymes responsible in lignin degradation pathways. PMID:26882011

  13. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    PubMed

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  14. The Fungus Tremella mesenterica Encodes the Longest Metallothionein Currently Known: Gene, Protein and Metal Binding Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiyu; Calatayud, Sara; Palacios, Òscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2016-01-01

    Fungal Cu-thioneins, and among them, the paradigmatic Neurospora crassa metallothionein (MT) (26 residues), were once considered as the shortest MTs -the ubiquitous, versatile metal-binding proteins- among all organisms, and thus representatives of their primeval forms. Nowadays, fungal MTs of diverse lengths and sequence features are known, following the huge heterogeneity of the Kingdom of Fungi. At the opposite end of N. crassa MT, the recently reported Cryptococcus neoformans CnMT1 and CnMT2 (122 and 186 aa) constitute the longest reported fungal MTs, having been identified as virulence factors of this pathogen. CnMTs are high-capacity Cu-thioneins that appear to be built by tandem amplification of a basic unit, a 7-Cys segment homologous to N. crassa MT. Here, we report the in silico, in vivo and in vitro study of a still longer fungal MT, belonging to Tremella mesenterica (TmMT), a saprophytic ascomycete. The TmMT gene has 10 exons, and it yields a 779-bp mature transcript that encodes a 257 residue-long protein. This MT is also built by repeated fragments, but of variable number of Cys: six units of the 7-Cys building blocks-CXCX3CSCPPGXCXCAXCP-, two fragments of six Cys, plus three Cys at the N-terminus. TmMT metal binding abilities have been analyzed through the spectrophotometric and spectrometric characterization of its recombinant Zn-, Cd- and Cu-complexes. Results allow it to be unambiguous classified as a Cu-thionein, also of extraordinary coordinating capacity. According to this feature, when the TmMT cDNA is expressed in MT-devoid yeast cells, it is capable of restoring a high Cu tolerance level. Since it is not obvious that T. mesenterica shares the same physiological needs for a high capacity Cu-binding protein with C. neoformans, the existence of this peculiar MT might be better explained on the basis of a possible role in Cu-handling for the Cu-enzymes responsible in lignin degradation pathways. PMID:26882011

  15. Ribosomal protein L10 is encoded in the mitochondrial genome of many land plants and green algae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genomes of plants generally encode 30-40 identified protein-coding genes and a large number of lineage-specific ORFs. The lack of wide conservation for most ORFs suggests they are unlikely to be functional. However, an ORF, termed orf-bryo1, was recently found to be conserved among bryophytes suggesting that it might indeed encode a functional mitochondrial protein. Results From a broad survey of land plants, we have found that the orf-bryo1 gene is also conserved in the mitochondria of vascular plants and charophycean green algae. This gene is actively transcribed and RNA edited in many flowering plants. Comparative sequence analysis and distribution of editing suggests that it encodes ribosomal protein L10 of the large subunit of the ribosome. In several lineages, such as crucifers and grasses, where the rpl10 gene has been lost from the mitochondrion, we suggest that a copy of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast-derived rpl10 gene may serve as a functional replacement. Conclusion Despite the fact that there are now over 20 mitochondrial genome sequences for land plants and green algae, this gene has remained unidentified and largely undetected until now because of the unlikely coincidence that most of the earlier sequences were from the few lineages that lack the intact gene. These results illustrate the power of comparative sequencing to identify novel genomic features. PMID:19917118

  16. Identification and characterization of a cDNA encoding mouse CAP: a homolog of the yeast adenylyl cyclase associated protein.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, A B; Cooper, J A

    1993-07-01

    CAP, an adenylyl cyclase associated protein, is present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In both organisms, CAP is bifunctional: the N-terminal domain binds to adenylyl cyclase, thereby enabling adenylyl cyclase to respond appropriately to upstream regulatory signals, such as RAS in S. cerevisiae; the C-terminal domain is required for cellular morphogenesis. Here, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding a CAP homolog from a higher eukaryote. The mouse CAP cDNA contains an open reading frame capable of encoding a 474 amino acid protein. The protein encoded by the mouse CAP cDNA shows extensive homology to the yeast CAP proteins, particularly in the central poly-proline rich region and in the C-terminal domain. By northern analysis, the CAP message appears to be ubiquitous, but not uniform. By indirect immunofluorescence, ectopically expressed mouse CAP protein is found in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and, in migrating cells, at the leading edge. Expression of the mouse CAP cDNA in S. cerevisiae complements defects associated with loss of the yeast CAP carboxy-terminal domain. Hence, the function of the CAP carboxy-terminal domain has been conserved from yeast to mouse.

  17. Cyanobacterial flv4-2 Operon-Encoded Proteins Optimize Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) complexes drive the water-splitting reaction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. However, too much light can damage and disrupt PSII. In cyanobacteria, the flv4-2 operon encodes three proteins (Flv2, Flv4, and Sll0218), which safeguard PSII activity under air-level CO2 and in high light conditions. However, the exact mechanism of action of these proteins has not been clarified yet. We demonstrate that the PSII electron transfer properties are influenced by the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins. Accelerated secondary charge separation kinetics was observed upon expression/overexpression of the flv4-2 operon. This is likely induced by docking of the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer in the vicinity of the QB pocket of PSII, which, in turn, increases the QB redox potential and consequently stabilizes forward electron transfer. The alternative electron transfer route constituted by Flv2/Flv4 sequesters electrons from QB(-) guaranteeing the dissipation of excess excitation energy in PSII under stressful conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that in the absence of the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins, about 20% of the phycobilisome antenna becomes detached from the reaction centers, thus decreasing light harvesting. Phycobilisome detachment is a consequence of a decreased relative content of PSII dimers, a feature observed in the absence of the Sll0218 protein.

  18. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  19. A nuclear-encoded protein of prokaryotic origin is essential for the stability of photosystem II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, J; Plücken, H; Kowallik, K V; Westhoff, P

    1998-01-01

    To understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of photosystem II (PSII) we have characterized the nuclear mutant hcf136 of Arabidopsis thaliana and isolated the affected gene. The mutant is devoid of any photosystem II activity, and none of the nuclear- and plastome-encoded subunits of this photosystem accumulate to significant levels. Protein labelling studies in the presence of cycloheximide showed that the plastome-encoded PSII subunits are synthesized but are not stable. The HCF136 gene was isolated by virtue of its T-DNA tag, and its identity was confirmed by complementation of homozygous hcf136 seedlings. Immunoblot analysis of fractionated chloroplasts showed that the HCF136 protein is a lumenal protein, found only in stromal thylakoid lamellae. The HCF136 protein is produced already in dark-grown seedlings and its levels do not increase dramatically during light-induced greening. This accumulation profile confirms the mutational data by showing that the HCF136 protein must be present when PSII complexes are made. HCF136 homologues are found in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC6803 (slr2034) and the cyanelle genome of Cyanophora paradoxa (ORF333), but are lacking in the plastomes of chlorophytes and metaphytes as well as from those of rhodo- and chromophytes. We conclude that HCF136 encodes a stability and/or assembly factor of PSII which dates back to the cyanobacterial-like endosymbiont that led to the plastids of the present photosynthetic eukaryotes. PMID:9736608

  20. Cyanobacterial flv4-2 Operon-Encoded Proteins Optimize Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) complexes drive the water-splitting reaction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. However, too much light can damage and disrupt PSII. In cyanobacteria, the flv4-2 operon encodes three proteins (Flv2, Flv4, and Sll0218), which safeguard PSII activity under air-level CO2 and in high light conditions. However, the exact mechanism of action of these proteins has not been clarified yet. We demonstrate that the PSII electron transfer properties are influenced by the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins. Accelerated secondary charge separation kinetics was observed upon expression/overexpression of the flv4-2 operon. This is likely induced by docking of the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer in the vicinity of the QB pocket of PSII, which, in turn, increases the QB redox potential and consequently stabilizes forward electron transfer. The alternative electron transfer route constituted by Flv2/Flv4 sequesters electrons from QB(-) guaranteeing the dissipation of excess excitation energy in PSII under stressful conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that in the absence of the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins, about 20% of the phycobilisome antenna becomes detached from the reaction centers, thus decreasing light harvesting. Phycobilisome detachment is a consequence of a decreased relative content of PSII dimers, a feature observed in the absence of the Sll0218 protein. PMID:25704162

  1. A substrate of the centisome 63 type III protein secretion system of Salmonella typhimurium is encoded by a cryptic bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Hardt, W D; Urlaub, H; Galán, J E

    1998-03-01

    Salmonella enterica has evolved a type III protein secretion system that allows these enteropathogens to translocate effector molecules directly into the host cell cytoplasm. These effectors mediate a variety of responses, including cytoskeletal rearrangements, cytokine production, and in certain cells, the induction of apoptosis. We report here the characterization of a substrate of this secretion system in S. enterica serovar typhimurium (Salmonella typhimurium) that is homologous to the SopE protein of Salmonella dublin implicated in bacterial entry into cultured epithelial cells. The sopE locus is located within a cluster of genes that encode tail and tail fiber proteins of a cryptic P2-like prophage, outside of the centisome 63 pathogenicity island that encodes the invasion-associated type III secretion system. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that sopE is present in only a subset of S. enterica serovars and that the flanking bacteriophage genes are also highly polymorphic. Encoding effector proteins that are delivered through type III secretion systems in highly mobile genetic elements may allow pathogens to adapt rapidly by facilitating the assembly of an appropriate set of effector proteins required for successful replication in a new environment.

  2. Characterization of five subgroups of the sieve element occlusion gene family in Glycine max reveals genes encoding non-forisome P-proteins, forisomes and forisome tails.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Sascia; Ernst, Antonia M; Hawat, Susan; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2014-09-01

    P-proteins are structural phloem proteins discussed to be involved in the rapid sealing of injured sieve elements. P-proteins are found in all dicotyledonous and some monocotyledonous plants, but additional crystalloid P-proteins, known as forisomes, have evolved solely in the Fabaceae. Both types are encoded by members of the sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, which comprises seven phylogenetic subgroups. The Fabaceae-specific subgroup 1 contains genes encoding forisome subunits in e.g. Medicago truncatula, Vicia faba, Dipteryx panamensis and Canavalia gladiata whereas basal subgroup 5 encodes P-proteins in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The function of remaining subgroups is still unknown. We chose Glycine max (soybean) as a model to investigate SEO proteins representing different subgroups in one species. We isolated native P-proteins to determine the SEO protein composition and analyzed the expression pattern, localization and structure of the G. max SEO proteins representing five of the subgroups. We found that subgroup 1 GmSEO genes encode forisome subunits, a member of subgroup 5 encodes a non-forisome P-protein and subgroup 2 GmSEO genes encode the components of forisome tails, which are present in a restricted selection of Fabaceaen species. We therefore present the first molecular characterization of a Fabaceae non-forisome P-protein and the first evidence that forisome tails are encoded by a phylogenetically-distinct branch of the SEO gene family.

  3. The pim-1 oncogene encodes two related protein-serine/threonine kinases by alternative initiation at AUG and CUG.

    PubMed Central

    Saris, C J; Domen, J; Berns, A

    1991-01-01

    The pim-1 gene is frequently found activated by proviral insertion in murine T cell lymphomas. Overexpression of pim-1 in lymphoid cells by transgenesis formally proved its oncogenic potential. The pim-1 cDNA sequence predicts that both murine and human pim-1 encode a 34 kd protein with homology to protein kinases. In this study, we show that the murine pim-1 gene encodes a 44 kd protein in addition to the predicted 34 kd protein. The 44 kd protein is an amino-terminal extension of the 34 kd protein and is synthesized by alternative translation initiation at an upstream CUG codon. Contrary to previous findings by others, we provide evidence that both murine and human pim-1 gene products are protein-serine/threonine kinases. Murine 44 kd and 34 kd pim-1 proteins exhibit comparable in vitro kinase activity and are both mainly cytoplasmic, but they differ in in vivo association state and half-life. Images PMID:1825810

  4. Identification of a novel protein encoded by the BamHI A region of the Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, K L; Sculley, T B; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Rajadurai, P; Sadler, R H; Raab-Traub, N

    1997-01-01

    An unusual set of 3' coterminal, spliced mRNAs transcribed through the BamHI A fragment have been previously identified in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues. These RNAs have also been detected at low levels in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes. Sequence analyses of clones from a cDNA library derived from the C15 NPC tumor indicated that the primary transcripts are differentially spliced, giving rise to a family of related transcripts, all of which encompass the BARF0 open reading frame (ORF) at the 3' end of the transcripts. One cDNA was identified that extended the BARF0 ORF at the 5' end, forming the RK-BARF0 ORF. In this study, a rabbit antiserum to a synthetic peptide representing an amino acid sequence encoded by the BARF0 ORF was prepared. This antiserum detected a glutathione S-transferase-BARF0 fusion protein and both BARF0 and RK-BARF0 proteins expressed from transfected constructs in H1299 cells. The serum also immunoprecipitated the 20-kDa BARF0 and 30-kDa RK-BARF0 in vitro-translated proteins. Immunoblot analyses identified a protein doublet of 30 and 35 kDa in all of the EBV-infected cell lines tested. Cellular fractionation studies revealed that the proteins were membrane associated. The sizes of the proteins detected in cell lines and their association with membranes suggests that they are likely encoded by the RK-BARF0 transcript, which is predicted to contain a membrane localization signal. The proteins were also detected in protein extracts prepared from NPC biopsies and a BL biopsy but not from hairy leukoplakia, a permissive EBV infection. These results reveal that the rightward RNA transcripts from the BamHI A region of EBV encode one or more proteins that are expressed in latently infected cells and in tumor tissue. PMID:9060630

  5. Mucosal Human Papillomaviruses Encode Four Different E5 Proteins Whose Chemistry and Phylogeny Correlate with Malignant or Benign Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Ignacio G.; Alonso, Ángel

    2004-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic study of the E2-L2 region of human mucosal papillomaviruses (PVs) and of the proteins therein encoded. Hitherto, proteins codified in this region were known as E5 proteins. We show that many of these proteins could be spurious translations, according to phylogenetic and chemical coherence criteria between similar protein sequences. We show that there are four separate families of E5 proteins, with different characteristics of phylogeny, chemistry, and rate of evolution. For the sake of clarity, we propose a change in the present nomenclature. E5α is present in groups A5, A6, A7, A9, and A11, PVs highly associated with malignant carcinomas of the cervix and penis. E5β is present in groups A2, A3, A4, and A12, i.e., viruses associated with certain warts. E5γ is present in group A10, and E5δ is encoded in groups A1, A8, and A10, which are associated with benign transformations. The phylogenetic relationships between mucosal human PVs are the same when considering the oncoproteins E6 and E7 and the E5 proteins and differ from the phylogeny estimated for the structural proteins L1 and L2. Besides, the protein divergence rate is higher in early proteins than in late proteins, increasing in the order L1 < L2 < E6 ≈ E7 < E5. Moreover, the same proteins have diverged more rapidly in viruses associated with malignant transformations than in viruses associated with benign transformations. The E5 proteins display, therefore, evolutionary characteristics similar to those of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins. This could reflect a differential involvement of the E5 types in the transformation processes. PMID:15564472

  6. The PreA4(695) precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease A4 amyloid is encoded by 16 exons.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, H G; Salbaum, J M; Multhaup, G; Kang, J; Bayney, R M; Unterbeck, A; Beyreuther, K; Müller-Hill, B

    1989-01-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cerebral deposition of fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid A4 protein. Complementary DNA's coding for the precursor of the amyloid A4 protein have been described. In order to identify the structure of the precursor gene relevant clones from several human genomic libraries were isolated. Sequence analysis of the various clones revealed 16 exons to encode the 695 residue precursor protein (PreA4(695] of Alzheimer's disease amyloid A4 protein. The DNA sequence coding for the amyloid A4 protein is interrupted by an intron. This finding supports the idea that amyloid A4 protein arises by incomplete proteolysis of a larger precursor, and not by aberrant splicing.

  7. The Bean pod mottle virus RNA2-encoded 58-kilodalton protein P58 is required in cis for RNA2 accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is a bipartite, positive sense (+) RNA plant virus in the Secoviridae family. Its RNA1 encodes proteins required for genome replication, whereas RNA2 primarily encodes proteins needed for virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement. However, the function of a 58 kilo-dalto...

  8. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  9. Structure and expression of chicken protein kinase PITSLRE-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Grenet, J; Valentine, M; Lahti, J M; Kidd, V J

    1995-02-14

    The human PITSLRE protein kinases (PK), members of the p34cdc2 kinase family named according to the single amino acid (aa) code of an important (PSTAIRE) regulatory region [Meyerson et al., EMBO J. 11 (1992) 2909-2917], are candidate tumor suppressor gene(s) localized to human chromosome 1p36.2 and a syntenic region of mouse chromosome 4 [Lahti et al., Nature Genet. 7 (1994) 370-375; Mock et al., Mammal. Genome 5 (1994) 191-192]. At least ten isoforms of this PK family are expressed from three duplicated and tandemly linked genes in humans [Xiang et al., J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 15786-15794]. We have now isolated two different species of PITSLRE PK cDNAs from chicken that encode identical polypeptides, but are clearly expressed from different genes, based on nucleotide (nt) differences. Isolation of one of the corresponding chicken PITSLRE PK genes confirms that only one of the two species of PITSLRE mRNA is expressed from this gene. Comparison of the predicted avian PITSLRE PK aa sequence to human and mouse sequences shows a high degree of sequence identity (> 91%). Like humans, the PITSLRE PK genes in chickens must be closely linked, based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) localization of these genes to a single chicken microchromosome. PITSLRE PK mRNAs are expressed in two avian B- and T-cell lines. These results suggest that the PITSLRE PK gene family has been well conserved evolutionarily, that the gene duplication observed in humans is not a recent event, and that expression of redundant PITSLRE mRNAs is observed in different vertebrate species.

  10. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  11. Identification and Expression Profiles of Six Transcripts Encoding Carboxylesterase Protein in Vitis flexuosa Infected with Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Zaherul; Yun, Hae Keun

    2016-08-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogen attacks via several mechanisms, including hypersensitive cell death. Recognition of pathogen attack by the plant resistance gene triggers expression of carboxylesterase genes associated with hypersensitive response. We identified six transcripts of carboxylesterase genes, Vitis flexuosa carboxylesterase 5585 (VfCXE5585), VfCXE12827, VfCXE13132, VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674, which showed different expression patterns upon transcriptome analysis of V. flexuosa inoculated with Elsinoe ampelina. The lengths of genes ranged from 1,098 to 1,629 bp, and their encoded proteins consisted of 309 to 335 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed hydrolase like domains in all six transcripts and contained two conserved motifs, GXSXG of serine hydrolase characteristics and HGGGF related to the carboxylesterase family. The deduced amino acid sequence also contained a potential catalytic triad consisted of serine, aspartic acid and histidine. Of the six transcripts, VfCXE12827 showed upregulated expression against E. ampelina at all time points. Three genes (VfCXE5585, VfCXE12827, and VfCXE13132) showed upregulation, while others (VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674) were down regulated in grapevines infected with Botrytis cinerea. All transcripts showed upregulated expression against Rhizobium vitis at early and later time points except VfCXE12827, and were downregulated for up to 48 hours post inoculation (hpi) after upregulation at 1 hpi in response to R. vitis infection. All tested genes showed high and differential expression in response to pathogens, indicating that they all may play a role in defense pathways during pathogen infection in grapevines. PMID:27493610

  12. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver.

    PubMed

    Babich, Polina S; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and Apc(Min) mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver.

  13. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  14. Exon Skipping in the RET Gene Encodes Novel Isoforms That Differentially Regulate RET Protein Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Gabreski, Nicole A; Vaghasia, Janki K; Novakova, Silvia S; McDonald, Neil Q; Pierchala, Brian A

    2016-07-29

    Rearranged during transfection (RET), a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs), plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system and additionally is required for kidney development and spermatogenesis. RET encodes a transmembrane receptor that is 20 exons long and produces two known protein isoforms differing in C-terminal amino acid composition, referred to as RET9 and RET51. Studies of human pheochromocytomas identified two additional novel transcripts involving the skipping of exon 3 or exons 3, 4, and 5 and are referred to as RET(Δ) (E3) and RET(Δ) (E345), respectively. Here we report the presence of Ret(Δ) (E3) and Ret(Δ) (E345) in zebrafish, mice, and rats and show that these transcripts are dynamically expressed throughout development of the CNS, peripheral nervous system, and kidneys. We further explore the biochemical properties of these isoforms, demonstrating that, like full-length RET, RET(ΔE3) and RET(ΔE345) are trafficked to the cell surface, interact with all four GFRα co-receptors, and have the ability to heterodimerize with full-length RET. Signaling experiments indicate that RET(ΔE3) is phosphorylated in a similar manner to full-length RET. RET(ΔE345), in contrast, displays higher baseline autophosphorylation, specifically on the catalytic tyrosine, Tyr(905), and also on one of the most important signaling residues, Tyr(1062) These data provide the first evidence for a physiologic role of these isoforms in RET pathway function.

  15. Mutations in NEBL encoding the cardiac Z-disk protein nebulette are associated with various cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tomasov, Pavol; Villard, Eric; Faludi, Reka; Melacini, Paola; Lossie, Janine; Lohmann, Nadine; Richard, Pascale; De Bortoli, Marzia; Angelini, Annalisa; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Sperling, Silke R.; Simor, Tamás; Veselka, Josef; Özcelik, Cemil; Charron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated NEBL, encoding the cardiac-specific Z-disk protein nebulette, develop severe cardiac phenotypes. Since cardiomyopathies are commonly familial and because mutations in a single gene may result in variable phenotypes, we tested the hypothesis that NEBL mutations are associated with cardiomyopathy. Material and methods We analyzed 389 patients, including cohorts of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC). The 28 coding exons of the NEBL gene were sequenced. Further bioinformatic analysis was used to distinguish variants. Results In total, we identified six very rare heterozygous missense mutations in NEBL in 7 different patients (frequency 1.8%) in highly conserved codons. The mutations were not detectable in 320 Caucasian sex-matched unrelated individuals without cardiomyopathy and 192 Caucasian sex-matched blood donors without heart disease. Known cardiomyopathy genes were excluded in these patients. The mutations p.H171R and p.I652L were found in 2 HCM patients. Further, p.Q581R and p.S747L were detected in 2 DCM patients, while the mutation p.A175T was identified independently in two unrelated patients with DCM. One LVNC patient carried the mutation p.P916L. All HCM and DCM related mutations were located in the nebulin-like repeats, domains responsible for actin binding. Interestingly, the mutation associated with LVNC was located in the C-terminal serine-rich linker region. Conclusions Our data suggest that NEBL mutations may cause various cardiomyopathies. We herein describe the first NEBL mutations in HCM and LVNC. Our findings underline the notion that the cardiomyopathies are true allelic diseases. PMID:27186169

  16. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment.

  17. Diversity and Impact of Rare Variants in Genes Encoding the Platelet G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF ≥ 1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  18. HPP1: A transmembrane protein-encoding gene commonly methylated in colorectal polyps and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanne; Biden, Kelli G.; Simms, Lisa A.; Huggard, Phillip; Karamatic, Rozemary; Eyre, Helen J.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Herath, Nirmitha; Barker, Melissa; Anderson, Gregory J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Ramm, Grant A.; Jass, Jeremy R.; Leggett, Barbara A.

    2001-01-01

    Adenomas are the precursors of most colorectal cancers. Hyperplastic polyps have been linked to the subset of colorectal cancers showing DNA microsatellite instability, but little is known of their underlying genetic etiology. Using a strategy that isolates differentially methylated sequences from hyperplastic polyps and normal mucosa, we identified a 370-bp sequence containing the 5′ untranslated region and the first exon of a gene that we have called HPP1. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to isolate HPP1 from normal mucosa. Using reverse transcription–PCR, HPP1 was expressed in 28 of 30 (93%) normal colonic samples but in only seven of 30 (23%) colorectal cancers (P < 0.001). The 5′ region of HPP1 included a CpG island containing 49 CpG sites, of which 96% were found to be methylated by bisulfite sequencing of DNA from colonic tumor samples. By COBRA analysis, methylation was detected in six of nine (66%) adenomas, 17 of 27 (63%) hyperplastic polyps, and 46 of 55 (84%) colorectal cancers. There was an inverse relationship between methylation level and mRNA expression in cancers (r = −0.67; P < 0.001), and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment restored HPP1 expression in two colorectal cancer cell lines. In situ hybridization of HPP1 indicated that expression occurs in epithelial and stromal elements in normal mucosa but is silenced in both cell types in early colonic neoplasia. HPP1 is predicted to encode a transmembrane protein containing follistatin and epidermal growth factor-like domains. Silencing of HPP1 by methylation may increase the probability of neoplastic transformation. PMID:11120884

  19. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Polina S.; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V.; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V.; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and ApcMin mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver. PMID:23792645

  20. Identification and Expression Profiles of Six Transcripts Encoding Carboxylesterase Protein in Vitis flexuosa Infected with Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Zaherul; Yun, Hae Keun

    2016-01-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogen attacks via several mechanisms, including hypersensitive cell death. Recognition of pathogen attack by the plant resistance gene triggers expression of carboxylesterase genes associated with hypersensitive response. We identified six transcripts of carboxylesterase genes, Vitis flexuosa carboxylesterase 5585 (VfCXE5585), VfCXE12827, VfCXE13132, VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674, which showed different expression patterns upon transcriptome analysis of V. flexuosa inoculated with Elsinoe ampelina. The lengths of genes ranged from 1,098 to 1,629 bp, and their encoded proteins consisted of 309 to 335 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed hydrolase like domains in all six transcripts and contained two conserved motifs, GXSXG of serine hydrolase characteristics and HGGGF related to the carboxylesterase family. The deduced amino acid sequence also contained a potential catalytic triad consisted of serine, aspartic acid and histidine. Of the six transcripts, VfCXE12827 showed upregulated expression against E. ampelina at all time points. Three genes (VfCXE5585, VfCXE12827, and VfCXE13132) showed upregulation, while others (VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674) were down regulated in grapevines infected with Botrytis cinerea. All transcripts showed upregulated expression against Rhizobium vitis at early and later time points except VfCXE12827, and were downregulated for up to 48 hours post inoculation (hpi) after upregulation at 1 hpi in response to R. vitis infection. All tested genes showed high and differential expression in response to pathogens, indicating that they all may play a role in defense pathways during pathogen infection in grapevines. PMID:27493610

  1. Casein kinase I-like protein kinases encoded by YCK1 and YCK2 are required for yeast morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, L C; Menold, M M; Garrett, S; Culbertson, M R

    1993-01-01

    Casein kinase I is an acidotropic protein kinase class that is widely distributed among eukaryotic cell types. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the casein kinase I isoform encoded by the gene pair YCK1 and YCK2 is a 60- to 62-kDa membrane-associated form. The Yck proteins perform functions essential for growth and division; either alone supports growth, but loss of function of both is lethal. We report here that casein kinase I-like activity is associated with a soluble Yck2-beta-galactosidase fusion protein in vitro and that thermolabile protein kinase activity is exhibited by a protein encoded by fusion of a temperature-sensitive yck2 allele with lacZ. Cells carrying the yck2-2ts allele arrest at restrictive temperature with multiple, elongated buds containing multiple nuclei. This phenotype suggests that the essential functions of the Yck proteins include roles in bud morphogenesis, possibly in control of cell growth polarity, and in cytokinesis or cell separation. Further, a genetic relationship between the yck2ts allele and deletion of CDC55 indicates that the function of Yck phosphorylation may be related to that of protein phosphatase 2A activity. Images PMID:8474447

  2. Characterization of a gene encoding a DNA binding protein with specificity for a light-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, P M; Memelink, J; Hiratsuka, K; Kay, S A; Chua, N H

    1992-01-01

    The sequence element of box II (GTGTGGTTAATATG) is a regulatory component of a light-responsive element present within the upstream region of pea rbcS-3A. The nuclear protein GT-1 was defined previously as a DNA binding activity that interacts with box II. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA sequences that encode a DNA binding protein with specificity for this element. The recombinant protein, tobacco GT-1a, shows similar sequence requirements for DNA binding to nuclear GT-1, as assayed by its ability to interact with previously defined 2-bp scanning mutations of box II, and is shown to be immunologically related to nuclear GT-1. The predicted structure of the 43-kD protein derived from the cDNA sequence suggests the presence of a novel helix-helix-turn-helix (HHTH) motif. Comparison between the predicted protein sequence encoded by the tobacco GT-1a cDNA and that of another GT binding protein, rice GT-2, reveals strong amino acid conservation over the HHTH region; this motif appears to be involved in the interaction between the recombinant protein and box II. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated the presence of a small gene family of related sequences within the tobacco nuclear genome. RNA gel blot analysis of tobacco mRNA using the isolated cDNA as a probe showed that transcripts are present in several tissues, including both light-grown and dark-adapted leaves. PMID:1392598

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A performs an essential cellular function and is encoded by two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, A A; Cohen, P T; Stark, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two genes (PPH21 and PPH22) encoding the yeast homologues of protein serine-threonine phosphatase 2A have been cloned from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library using a rabbit protein phosphatase 2A cDNA as a hybridization probe. The PPH genes are genetically linked on chromosome IV and are predicted to encode polypeptides each with 74% amino acid sequence identity to rabbit type 2A protein phosphatase, indicating once again the extraordinarily high degree of sequence conservation shown by protein-phosphatases from different species. The two PPH genes show less than 10% amino acid sequence divergence from each other and while disruption of either PPH gene alone is without any major effect, the double disruption is lethal. This indicates that protein phosphatase 2A activity is an essential cellular function in yeast. Measurement of type 2A protein phosphatase activity in yeast strains lacking one or other of the genes indicates that they account for most, if not all, protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2176150

  4. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted. PMID:24928741

  5. Successful Interference with Cellular Immune Responses to Immunogenic Proteins Encoded by Recombinant Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Sarukhan, Adelaida; Camugli, Sabine; Gjata, Bernard; von Boehmer, Harald; Danos, Olivier; Jooss, Karin

    2001-01-01

    Vectors derived from the adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been successfully used for the long-term expression of therapeutic genes in animal models and patients. One of the major advantages of these vectors is the absence of deleterious immune responses following gene transfer. However, AAV vectors, when used in vaccination studies, can result in efficient humoral and cellular responses against the transgene product. It is therefore important to understand the factors which influence the establishment of these immune responses in order to design safe and efficient procedures for AAV-based gene therapies. We have compared T-cell activation against a strongly immunogenic protein, the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is synthesized in skeletal muscle following gene transfer with an adenovirus (Ad) or an AAV vector. In both cases, cellular immune responses resulted in the elimination of transduced muscle fibers within 4 weeks. However, the kinetics of CD4+ T-cell activation were markedly delayed when AAV vectors were used. Upon recombinant Ad (rAd) gene transfer, T cells were activated both by direct transduction of dendritic cells and by cross-presentation of the transgene product, while upon rAAV gene transfer T cells were only activated by the latter mechanism. These results suggested that activation of the immune system by the transgene product following rAAV-mediated gene transfer might be easier to control than that following rAd-mediated gene transfer. Therefore, we tested protocols aimed at interfering with either antigen presentation by blocking the CD40/CD40L pathway or with the T-cell response by inducing transgene-specific tolerance. Long-term expression of the AAV-HA was achieved in both cases, whereas immune responses against Ad-HA could not be prevented. These data clearly underline the importance of understanding the mechanisms by which vector-encoded proteins are recognized by the immune system in order to specifically interfere with them and

  6. Characterization of the Single Stranded DNA Binding Protein SsbB Encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Eveline; Siewering, Katja; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; van der Does, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in genetic islands of different proteobacteria. This cluster encodes DNA-processing enzymes such as the ParA and ParB partitioning proteins, the TopB topoisomerase, and four conserved hypothetical proteins. The SsbB homologs found in these clusters form a family separated from other ssDNA binding proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings In contrast to most other SSBs, SsbB did not complement the Escherichia coli ssb deletion mutant. Purified SsbB forms a stable tetramer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence titration assays, as well as atomic force microscopy demonstrate that SsbB binds ssDNA specifically with high affinity. SsbB binds single-stranded DNA with minimal binding frames for one or two SsbB tetramers of 15 and 70 nucleotides. The binding mode was independent of increasing Mg2+ or NaCl concentrations. No role of SsbB in ssDNA secretion or DNA uptake could be identified, but SsbB strongly stimulated Topoisomerase I activity. Conclusions/Significance We propose that these novel SsbBs play an unknown role in the maintenance of genetic islands. PMID:22536367

  7. Synthetic antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to transiently suppress different nucleus- and chloroplast-encoded proteins of higher plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Dinç, Emine; Tóth, Szilvia Z; Schansker, Gert; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Kovács, László; Dudits, Dénes; Garab, Gyozo; Bottka, Sándor

    2011-12-01

    Selective inhibition of gene expression by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) is widely applied in gene function analyses; however, experiments with ODNs in plants are scarce. In this work, we extend the use of ODNs in different plant species, optimizing the uptake, stability, and efficiency of ODNs with a combination of molecular biological and biophysical techniques to transiently inhibit the gene expression of different chloroplast proteins. We targeted the nucleus-encoded phytoene desaturase (pds) gene, encoding a key enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, the chlorophyll a/b-binding (cab) protein genes, and the chloroplast-encoded psbA gene, encoding the D1 protein. For pds and psbA, the in vivo stability of ODNs was increased by phosphorothioate modifications. After infiltration of ODNs into juvenile tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves, we detected a 25% to 35% reduction in mRNA level and an approximately 5% decrease in both carotenoid content and the variable fluorescence of photosystem II. In detached etiolated wheat (Triticum aestivum) leaves, after 8 h of greening, the mRNA level, carotenoid content, and variable fluorescence were inhibited up to 75%, 25%, and 20%, respectively. Regarding cab, ODN treatments of etiolated wheat leaves resulted in an up to 59% decrease in the amount of chlorophyll b, a 41% decrease of the maximum chlorophyll fluorescence intensity, the cab mRNA level was reduced to 66%, and the protein level was suppressed up to 85% compared with the control. The psbA mRNA and protein levels in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves were inhibited by up to 85% and 72%, respectively. To exploit the potential of ODNs for photosynthetic genes, we propose molecular design combined with fast, noninvasive techniques to test their functional effects.

  8. Identification of the gene encoding the 65-kilodalton DNA-binding protein of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Parris, D.S. Institute of Virology, Glasgow ); Cross, A.; Orr, A.; Frame, M.C.; Murphy, M.; McGeoch, D.J.; Marsden, H.S. ); Haarr, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Hybrid arrest of in vitro translation was used to localize the region of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome encoding the 65-kilodalton DNA-binding protein (65K{sub DBP}) to between genome coordinates 0.592 and 0.649. Knowledge of the DNA sequence of this region allowed us to identify three open reading frames as likely candidates for the gene encoding 65K{sub DBP}. Two independent approaches were used to determine which of these three open reading frames encoded the protein. For the first approach a monoclonal antibody, MAb 6898, which reacted specifically with 65K{sub DBP}, was isolated. This antibody was used, with the techniques of hybrid arrest of in vitro translation and in vitro translation of selected mRNA, to identify the gene encoding 65K{sub DBP}. The second approach involved preparation of antisera directed against oligopeptides corresponding to regions of the predicted amino acid sequence of this gene. These antisera reacted specifically with 65K{sub DBP}, thus confirming the gene assignment.

  9. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt8 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein That Is Functionally Related to Spt3 and Tata-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, D. M.; Chapon, C.; Roberts, S. M.; Dollard, C.; Winston, F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPT8 gene were previously isolated as suppressors of retrotransposon insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Mutations in SPT8 confer phenotypes similar to those caused by particular mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA-binding protein (TBP). These phenotypes are also similar to those caused by mutations in the SPT3 gene, which encodes a protein that directly interacts with TBP. We have now cloned and sequenced the SPT8 gene and have shown that it encodes a predicted protein of 602 amino acids with an extremely acidic amino terminus. In addition, the predicted SPT8 amino acid sequence contains one copy of a sequence motif found in multiple copies in a number of other eukaryotic proteins, including the β subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. To investigate further the relationship between SPT8, SPT3 and TBP, we have analyzed the effect of an spt8 null mutation in combination with different spt3 and spt15 mutations. This genetic analysis has shown that an spt8 deletion mutation is suppressed by particular spt3 alleles. Taken together with previous results, these data suggest that the SPT8 protein is required, directly or indirectly, for TBP function at particular promoters and that the role of SPT8 may be to promote a functional interaction between SPT3 and TBP. PMID:8088510

  10. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering. PMID:26211362

  11. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering.

  12. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals. PMID:26384977

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein GCaMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Akerboom, Jasper; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-07-01

    The genetically encoded fluorescent calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. Fluorescent proteins and their engineered variants have played an important role in the study of biology. The genetically encoded calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 comprises a circularly permuted fluorescent protein coupled to the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and a calmodulin target peptide, M13, derived from the intracellular calmodulin target myosin light-chain kinase and has been used to image calcium transients in vivo. To aid rational efforts to engineer improved variants of GCaMP2, this protein was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.1, b = 47.1, c = 68.8 Å, β = 100.5° and one GCaMP2 molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure was phased by molecular replacement and refinement is currently under way.

  14. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals.

  15. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts.

  16. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin G reactive with a recombinant protein expressed from the gene encoding the 116-kilodalton protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M F; Whithear, K G; Noormohammadi, A H; Markham, P F; Catton, M; Leydon, J; Browning, G F

    1999-04-01

    Serology remains the method of choice for laboratory diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Currently available serological tests employ complex cellular fractions of M. pneumoniae as antigen. To improve the specificity of M. pneumoniae diagnosis, a recombinant protein was assessed as a serodiagnostic reagent. A panel of recombinant proteins were expressed from a cloned M. pneumoniae gene that encodes a 116-kDa surface protein antigen. The recombinant proteins were assessed for reactivity with patient sera and the most antigenic was further assessed for its serodiagnostic potential by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA based on the recombinant protein was equivalent in sensitivity to the commercial test (Serodia Myco II; Fujirebio Inc.) to which it was compared. Southern and Western blotting data suggested that the recombinant protein derived from the 116-kDa protein of M. pneumoniae could provide a species-specific diagnostic tool, although further assessment is required.

  17. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  18. Protection of Mice from Fatal Measles Encephalitis by Vaccination with Vaccinia Virus Recombinants Encoding Either the Hemagglutinin or the Fusion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillien, Robert; Spehner, Daniele; Kirn, Andre; Giraudon, Pascale; Buckland, Robin; Wild, Fabian; Lecocq, Jean-Pierre

    1988-02-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants encoding the hemagglutinin or fusion protein of measles virus have been constructed. Infection of cell cultures with the recombinants led to the synthesis of authentic measles proteins as judged by their electrophoretic mobility, recognition by antibodies, glycosylation, proteolytic cleavage, and presentation on the cell surface. Mice vaccinated with a single dose of the recombinant encoding the hemagglutinin protein developed antibodies capable of both inhibiting hemagglutination activity and neutralizing measles virus, whereas animals vaccinated with the recombinant encoding the fusion protein developed measles neutralizing antibodies. Mice vaccinated with either of the recombinants resisted a normally lethal intracerebral inoculation of a cell-associated measles virus subacute sclerosing panencephalitis strain.

  19. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--cloning, sequencing, and active expression of the gene encoding the corrinoid protein.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-10-15

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase from the strictly anaerobic homoacetogen Acetobacterium dehalogenans catalyses the methyltransfer from 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzoate (vanillate) to tetrahydrofolate. In the first step a vanillate :corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediates the methylation of a 25-kDa corrinoid protein with the cofactor reduced to cob(I)alamin. The methyl group is then transferred to tetrahydrofolate by the action of a methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase (methyltransferase II). Using primers derived from the amino-terminal sequences of the corrinoid protein and the vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I), a 723-bp fragment was amplified by PCR, which contained the gene odmA encoding the corrinoid protein of O-demethylase. Downstream of odmA, part of the odmB gene encoding methyltransferase I was identified. The amino acid sequence deduced from odmA showed about 60% similarity to the cobalamin-binding domain of methionine synthase from Escherichia coli (MetH) and to corrinoid proteins of methyltransferase systems involved in methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines. The sequence contained the DXHXXG consensus sequence typical for displacement of the dimethylbenzimidazole base of the corrinoid cofactor by a histidine from the protein. Heterologous expression of odmA in E. coli yielded a colourless, oxygen-insensitive apoprotein, which was able to bind one mol cobalamin or methylcobalamin/mol protein. Both of these reconstituted forms of the protein were active in the overall O-demethylation reaction. OdmA reconstituted with hydroxocobalamin and reduced by titanium(III) citrate to the cob(I)alamin form was methylated with vanillate by methyltransferase I in an irreversible reaction. Methylcobalamin carrying OdmA served as methyl group donor for the methylation of tetrahydrofolate by methyltransferase II. This reaction was found to be reversible, since methyltranSferase II

  20. Identification of genes encoding zinc finger proteins, non-histone chromosomal HMG protein homologue, and a putative GTP phosphohydrolase in the genome of Chilo iridescent virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, P; Hug, M; Handermann, M; Janssen, W; Koonin, E V; Delius, H; Darai, C

    1994-01-01

    Five RNA transcripts of about 1.2 to 1.7 kilobases were mapped to a part of the genome of insect iridescent virus type 6 (Chilo iridescent virus; CIV) between genome coordinates 0.832 and 0.856 within the EcoRI DNA fragment F. The nucleotide sequence of this particular region (5702 base pairs) of the CIV genome was determined. The DNA sequence contains a number of perfect direct, inverted, and palindromic repeats including three clusters of tandemly organized repetitive DNA elements located between the nucleotide positions 1534 to 1566, 3720 to 3780, and 4350 to 4450. Eight long open reading frames (ORFs; EF1 to 8) were detected in the sequenced region of the CIV genome. ORF EF1 encodes a putative protein of 221 amino acid residues (aa) that is closely related to eukaryotic nonhistone chromosomal proteins of the high mobility group (HMG) superfamily. Virus encoded homologues of HMG proteins have not been reported so far. The EF2 gene product (145 aa) contains a specific zinc finger motif and belongs to a distinct group of identified and putative zinc finger proteins including a second putative protein (239 aa) of CIV encoded in the EcoRI DNA fragment Y (1984 bp; 0.381 to 0.391 viral map units). The product of EF6 (127 aa) is related to D250 ORF product of African swine fever virus (ASFV) and belongs to the recently described protein family sharing a highly conserved sequence motif with bacterial antimutator GTP phosphohydrolase MutT. Thus the sequenced region of the CIV genome encodes three putative proteins which may be directly involved in the replication and/or transcription of the viral DNA. Images PMID:8121799

  1. Characterization of the DNA binding protein encoded by the N-specific filamentous Escherichia coli phage IKe. Binding properties of the protein and nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed

    Peeters, B P; Konings, R N; Schoenmakers, J G

    1983-09-01

    A DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous single-stranded DNA phage IKe has been isolated from IKe-infected Escherichia coli cells. Fluorescence and in vitro binding studies have shown that the protein binds co-operatively and with a high specificity to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. From titration of the protein to poly(dA) it has been calculated that approximately four bases of the DNA are covered by one monomer of protein. These binding characteristics closely resemble those of gene V protein encoded by the F-specific filamentous phages M13 and fd. The nucleotide sequence of the gene specifying the IKe DNA binding protein has been established. When compared to the nucleotide sequence of gene V of phage M13 it shows an homology of 58%, indicating that these two phages are evolutionarily related. The IKe DNA binding protein is 88 amino acids long which is one amino acid residue larger than the gene V protein sequence. When the IKe DNA binding protein sequence is compared with that of gene V protein it was found that 39 amino acid residues have identical positions in both proteins. The positions of all five tyrosine residues, a number of which are known to be involved in DNA binding, are conserved. Secondary structure predictions indicate that the two proteins contain similar structural domains. It is proposed that the tyrosine residues which are involved in DNA binding are the ones in or next to a beta-turn, at positions 26, 41 and 56 in gene V protein and at positions 27, 42 and 57 in the IKe DNA binding protein.

  2. The chvH locus of Agrobacterium encodes a homologue of an elongation factor involved in protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Peng, W T; Banta, L M; Charles, T C; Nester, E W

    2001-01-01

    The virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens depends on both chromosome- and Ti plasmid-encoded gene products. In this study, we characterize a chromosomal locus, chvH, previously identified by TnphoA mutagenesis and shown to be required for tumor formation. Through DNA sequencing and comparison of the sequence with identified sequences in the database, we show that this locus encodes a protein similar in sequence to elongation factor P, a protein thought to be involved in peptide bond synthesis in Escherichia coli. The analysis of vir-lacZ and vir-phoA translational fusions as well as Western immunoblotting revealed that the expression of Vir proteins such as VirE2 was significantly reduced in the chvH mutant compared with the wild-type strain. The E. coli efp gene complemented detergent sensitivity, virulence, and expression of VirE2 in the chvH mutant, suggesting that chvH and efp are functionally homologous. As expected, ChvH exerts its activity at the posttranscriptional level. Southern analysis suggests that the gene encoding this elongation factor is present as a single copy in A. tumefaciens. We constructed a chvH deletion mutant in which a 445-bp fragment within its coding sequence was deleted and replaced with an omega fragment. On complex medium, this mutant grew more slowly than the wild-type strain, indicating that elongation factor P is important but not essential for the growth of Agrobacterium. PMID:11114898

  3. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K+ channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K+ channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K+ channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K+ channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K+ channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K+ channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions. PMID:23918407

  4. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion.

    PubMed

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Hertel, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K(+) channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K(+) channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K(+) channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K(+) channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K(+) channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K(+) channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions.

  5. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Design Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Participants Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. Setting The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Main Outcome Measures The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. Results We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. Conclusion This technique can now be extended to the study

  6. Molecular characterization and evolution of the SPRR family of keratinocyte differentiation markers encoding small proline-rich proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.; Fijneman, R.; Wiegant, J.; Van De Putte, P.; Backendorf, C. ); Van Kessel, A.D. )

    1993-06-01

    SPRR genes (formerly SPR) encode a novel class of polypeptides (small proline rich proteins) that are strongly induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo. Recently the authors found that the N- and C-terminal domains of these proteins show strong sequence homology to loricrin and involucrin, suggesting that SPRR proteins constitute a new class of cornified envelope precursor proteins. Here they show that SPRR proteins are encoded by closely related members of a gene family, consisting of two genes for SPRR1, approximately seven genes for SPRR2, and a single gene for SPRR3. All SPRR genes are closely linked within a 300-kb DNA segment on human chromosome 1 band q21-q22, a region where the related loricrin and involucrin genes have also been mapped. The most characteristic feature of the SPRR gene family resides in the structure of the central segments of the encoded polypeptides that are built up from tandemly repeated units of either eight (SPRR1 and SPRR3) or nine (SPRR2) amino acids with the general consensus *K*PEP**. Sequencing data of the different members, together with their clustered chromosomal organization, strongly suggest that this gene family has evolved from a single progenitor gene by multiple intra- and intergenic duplications. Analysis of the different SPRR subfamilies reveals a gene-specific bias to either intra- or intergenic duplication. The authors propose that a process of homogenization has acted on the different members of one subfamily, whereas the different subfamilies appear to have diverged from each other, at the levels of both protein structure and gene regulation. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tab.

  7. Effects of actin-like proteins encoded by two Bacillus pumilus phages on unstable lysogeny, revealed by genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yihui; Peng, Qin; Wu, Dandan; Kou, Zheng; Wu, Yan; Liu, Pengming; Gao, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    We characterized two newly isolated myoviruses, Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T, infecting the ginger rhizome rot disease pathogen Bacillus pumilus GR8. The plaque of Bp8p-T exhibited a clear center with a turbid rim, suggesting that Bp8p-T could transform into latent phage. Lysogeny assays showed that both the two phages could form latent states, while Bp8p-T could form latent phage at a higher frequency and stability than Bp8p-C. The genomes of Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T were 151,417 and 151,419 bp, respectively; both encoded 212 putative proteins, and only differed by three nucleotides. Moreover, owing to this difference, Bp8p-C encoded a truncated, putative actin-like plasmid segregation protein Gp27-C. Functional analysis of protein Gp27 showed that Gp27-T encoded by Bp8p-T exhibited higher ATPase activity and assembly ability than Gp27-C. The results indicate that the difference in Gp27 affected the phage lysogenic ability. Structural proteome analysis of Bp8p-C virion resulted in the identification of 14 structural proteins, among which a pectin lyase-like protein, a putative poly-gamma-glutamate hydrolase, and three proteins with unknown function, were firstly identified as components of the phage virion. Both phages exhibited specific lytic ability to the host strain GR8. Bp8p-C showed better control effect on the pathogen in ginger rhizome slices than Bp8p-T, suggesting that Bp8p-C has a potential application in bio-control of ginger rhizome rot disease. PMID:25344242

  8. Effects of Actin-Like Proteins Encoded by Two Bacillus pumilus Phages on Unstable Lysogeny, Revealed by Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yihui; Peng, Qin; Wu, Dandan; Kou, Zheng; Wu, Yan; Liu, Pengming

    2014-01-01

    We characterized two newly isolated myoviruses, Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T, infecting the ginger rhizome rot disease pathogen Bacillus pumilus GR8. The plaque of Bp8p-T exhibited a clear center with a turbid rim, suggesting that Bp8p-T could transform into latent phage. Lysogeny assays showed that both the two phages could form latent states, while Bp8p-T could form latent phage at a higher frequency and stability than Bp8p-C. The genomes of Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T were 151,417 and 151,419 bp, respectively; both encoded 212 putative proteins, and only differed by three nucleotides. Moreover, owing to this difference, Bp8p-C encoded a truncated, putative actin-like plasmid segregation protein Gp27-C. Functional analysis of protein Gp27 showed that Gp27-T encoded by Bp8p-T exhibited higher ATPase activity and assembly ability than Gp27-C. The results indicate that the difference in Gp27 affected the phage lysogenic ability. Structural proteome analysis of Bp8p-C virion resulted in the identification of 14 structural proteins, among which a pectin lyase-like protein, a putative poly-gamma-glutamate hydrolase, and three proteins with unknown function, were firstly identified as components of the phage virion. Both phages exhibited specific lytic ability to the host strain GR8. Bp8p-C showed better control effect on the pathogen in ginger rhizome slices than Bp8p-T, suggesting that Bp8p-C has a potential application in bio-control of ginger rhizome rot disease. PMID:25344242

  9. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  10. Identification of a mouse brain cDNA that encodes a protein related to the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid beta protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Wasco, W; Bupp, K; Magendantz, M; Gusella, J F; Tanzi, R E; Solomon, F

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid beta protein precursor (APP). This 653-amino acid protein, which we have termed the amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP), appears to be similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are concentrated within three distinct regions of the two proteins where the identities are 47%, 54%, and 56%. The APLP cDNA hybridizes to two messages of approximately 2.4 and 1.6 kilobases that are present in mouse brain and neuroblastoma cells. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a peptide derived from the C terminus of APLP stain the cytoplasm in a pattern reminiscent of Golgi staining. In addition to APP, APLP also displays significant homology to the Drosophila APP-like protein APPL and a rat testes APP-like protein. These data indicate that the APP gene is a member of a strongly conserved gene family. Studies aimed at determining the functions of the proteins encoded by this gene family should provide valuable clues to their potential role in Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Images PMID:1279693

  11. Biarsenical labeling of vesicular stomatitis virus encoding tetracysteine-tagged m protein allows dynamic imaging of m protein and virus uncoating in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Subash C; Panda, Debasis; Nayak, Debasis; Pattnaik, Asit K

    2009-03-01

    A recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-PeGFP-M-MmRFP) encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein fused in frame with P (PeGFP) in place of P and a fusion matrix protein (monomeric red fluorescent protein fused in frame at the carboxy terminus of M [MmRFP]) at the G-L gene junction, in addition to wild-type (wt) M protein in its normal location, was recovered, but the MmRFP was not incorporated into the virions. Subsequently, we generated recombinant viruses (VSV-PeGFP-DeltaM-Mtc and VSV-DeltaM-Mtc) encoding M protein with a carboxy-terminal tetracysteine tag (Mtc) in place of the M protein. These recombinant viruses incorporated Mtc at levels similar to M in wt VSV, demonstrating recovery of infectious rhabdoviruses encoding and incorporating a tagged M protein. Virions released from cells infected with VSV-PeGFP-DeltaM-Mtc and labeled with the biarsenical red dye (ReAsH) were dually fluorescent, fluorescing green due to incorporation of PeGFP in the nucleocapsids and red due to incorporation of ReAsH-labeled Mtc in the viral envelope. Transport and subsequent association of M protein with the plasma membrane were shown to be independent of microtubules. Sequential labeling of VSV-DeltaM-Mtc-infected cells with the biarsenical dyes ReAsH and FlAsH (green) revealed that newly synthesized M protein reaches the plasma membrane in less than 30 min and continues to accumulate there for up to 2 1/2 hours. Using dually fluorescent VSV, we determined that following adsorption at the plasma membrane, the time taken by one-half of the virus particles to enter cells and to uncoat their nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm is approximately 28 min.

  12. Cloning of a Cryptococcus neoformans gene, GPA1, encoding a G-protein alpha-subunit homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Tolkacheva, T; McNamara, P; Piekarz, E; Courchesne, W

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated a gene, GPA1, from Cryptococcus neoformans by the PCR technique. DNA sequencing of the GPA1 clone suggested that it encodes a protein homologous to the G-protein alpha-subunit family. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the GPA1-encoded protein revealed that it is about 45% identical to several mammalian Gi alpha subunits and 48% identical to the G alpha protein Gpa2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. G alpha proteins are known to be involved in mating of other yeasts, such as S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Southern analysis demonstrated that GPA1 is present in a single copy within the Cryptococcus genome. Isolation of the cDNA for GPA1 confirmed that the gene contains six introns within the coding region. The GPA1 transcript was identified by Northern (RNA) analysis as a 1.6-kb RNA present in exponentially growing cells of both the alpha and a mating types. Moreover, the abundance of this transcript increased in cells shifted to starvation medium. Coincubation of alpha and a cells on starvation medium is required for mating of cryptococcal cells. Thus, our results are consistent with the involvement of C. neoformans GPA1 in mating. Images PMID:8005675

  13. The Nuclear Protein Encoded by the Drosophila Neurogenic Gene Mastermind Is Widely Expressed and Associates with Specific Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. PMID:8725234

  14. An Id-related helix-loop-helix protein encoded by a growth factor-inducible gene.

    PubMed Central

    Christy, B A; Sanders, L K; Lau, L F; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Nathans, D

    1991-01-01

    An mRNA encoding a helix-loop-helix protein that we have named HLH462 is induced in mouse 3T3 cells as part of the immediate early transcriptional response to growth factors and other signaling agents. The RNA is present in a number of mouse tissues and in the developing mouse fetus. The HLH462 gene has been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis to the distal region of mouse chromosome 4. In its helix-loop-helix region HLH462 is closely related to the Id protein and the Drosophila emc protein. Like Id, HLH462 lacks a basic region required for DNA binding, and it inhibits the DNA-binding activities of other helix-loop-helix proteins. On the basis of its structural and functional similarity to Id, we suggest that HLH462 may inhibit the activities of helix-loop-helix transcription factors during the cellular growth response and during development. Images PMID:2000388

  15. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Citovsky, V; Knorr, D; Zambryski, P

    1991-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 358 RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. We propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex. Images PMID:11607169

  16. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  17. Construct synthetic gene encoding artificial spider dragline silk protein and its expression in milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Fan, Bao-Liang; Yu, Shu-Yang; Huang, Yin-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Lian, Zheng-Xing; Dai, Yun-Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Liu, Zhao-Liang; Fei, Jing; Li, Ning

    2007-01-01

    Based on the known partial cDNA sequence of dragline silk protein an artificial gene monomer, a 360 bp sequence, was designed and polymerized to encode an analog of dragline silk protein. Six tandem copies of monomer were cloned into pBC1 vector and microinjected into the pronuclei of fertilized Kunming White eggs. Transgenic mice were screened by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Southern blot which revealed that 10 mice (5 male, 5 female) among 58 mice were transgenic positive. Milk of five F0 mice and eight F1 mice was analyzed by Western blot, and two F0 mice and seven F1 mice expressed recombinant dragline silk protein. In transgenic mice milk a maximum of concentration of recombinant dragline silk protein was 11.7 mg/L by radioimmunoassay. PMID:17364439

  18. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Biosynthesis and properties of the adenovirus 2 L1-encoded 52,000- and 55,000-Mr proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2 L1 region, which is located at 30.7 to 39.2 map units on the viral genome, is transcribed from the major late promoter during both early and late stages of virus replication, and a 52,000-Mr (52K) protein-55K protein doublet has been translated in vitro on L1-specific RNA. To investigate the biosynthesis and properties of the L1 52K and 55K proteins, we prepared antibody against a synthetic peptide encoded near the predicted N terminus. As determined by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, the antipeptide antibody recognized major 52K and 55K proteins synthesized in adenovirus type 2-infected cells that appeared to be identical to the 52K-55K doublet translated in vitro. The immunoprecipitated 52K and 55K proteins were very closely related, as shown by a peptide map analysis. Both L1 proteins were phosphorylated, and they were phosphorylated at similar sites. No precursor-product relationship was detected between the 52K and 55K proteins by a pulse-chase analysis. Biosynthesis of the L1 52K and 55K proteins began about 6 to 7 h postinfection, after biosynthesis of the early region 1A and early region 1B 19K (175R) T antigens, and reached a maximum rate at about 15 h; the maximum rate was maintained until at least 25 h postinfection. At all times, the 55K protein appeared to be synthesized at a severalfold-higher level than the 52K protein. Both proteins were quite stable and accumulated until late times after infection. Viral DNA replication was not essential for formation of the L1 proteins. Thus, the L1 52K-55K gene appears to be regulated in a manner different from the classical early and late viral genes but similar to the protein encoded by the i-leader (Symington et al., J. Virol. 57:849-856, 1986). The L1 proteins were detected in the cell nucleus by immunofluorescence microscopy with antipeptide antibody and were found to be primarily associated with the nuclear membrane by an immunoblot analysis of subcellular fractions

  2. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. )

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  3. HCF243 Encodes a Chloroplast-Localized Protein Involved in the D1 Protein Stability of the Arabidopsis Photosystem II Complex1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyuan; Zhou, Gongke; Liu, Bingbing; Kong, Yingzhen; Chen, Na; Qiu, Qiang; Yin, Hongju; An, Jiaxing; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Fan

    2011-01-01

    Numerous auxiliary nuclear factors have been identified to be involved in the dynamics of the photosystem II (PSII) complex. In this study, we characterized the high chlorophyll fluorescence243 (hcf243) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which shows higher chlorophyll fluorescence and is severely deficient in the accumulation of PSII supercomplexes compared with the wild type. The amount of core subunits was greatly decreased, while the outer antenna subunits and other subunits were hardly affected in hcf243. In vivo protein-labeling experiments indicated that the synthesis rate of both D1 and D2 proteins decreased severely in hcf243, whereas no change was found in the rate of other plastid-encoded proteins. Furthermore, the degradation rate of the PSII core subunit D1 protein is higher in hcf243 than in the wild type, and the assembly of PSII is retarded significantly in the hcf243 mutant. HCF243, a nuclear gene, encodes a chloroplast protein that interacts with the D1 protein. HCF243 homologs were identified in angiosperms with one or two copies but were not found in lower plants and prokaryotes. These results suggest that HCF243, which arose after the origin of the higher plants, may act as a cofactor to maintain the stability of D1 protein and to promote the subsequent assembly of the PSII complex. PMID:21862668

  4. dbHT-Trans: An Efficient Tool for Filtering the Protein-Encoding Transcripts Assembled by RNA-Seq According to Search for Homologous Proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Feilong; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In RNA-Seq studies, there are still many challenges for reliably assembling transcripts. Both genome-guided and de novo methods always produce too many false transcripts because of known and unknown factors. Therefore, the postassembly quality filtering is necessary before performing downstream analyses. Here, we present an automatic and efficient tool of dbHT-Trans for filtering the protein-encoding transcripts assembled by RNA-Seq. For each candidate transcript, we first deduced all potential open reading frames and translated them into amino acid sequences. By searching against the reference protein database, a transcript would be predicted a false one when it has no homologous sequence. Using this method, it is expected to filter out the falsely assembled transcripts of protein-encoding genes. Application of dbHT-Trans to the annotated transcriptome of mouse revealed that the sensitivity was almost 90% for recalling protein-encoding transcripts. After this quality filtering, the numbers of assembled genes became more consistent between Cufflinks and Trinity tools. To significantly decrease the data storage, we transformed all intermediate data into descriptive metadata and stored by the MySQL database, which will be utilized by downstream analyses in a real-time style. The source codes, example data, and manual of dbHT-Trans are freely available on the GitHub repository.

  5. dbHT-Trans: An Efficient Tool for Filtering the Protein-Encoding Transcripts Assembled by RNA-Seq According to Search for Homologous Proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Feilong; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In RNA-Seq studies, there are still many challenges for reliably assembling transcripts. Both genome-guided and de novo methods always produce too many false transcripts because of known and unknown factors. Therefore, the postassembly quality filtering is necessary before performing downstream analyses. Here, we present an automatic and efficient tool of dbHT-Trans for filtering the protein-encoding transcripts assembled by RNA-Seq. For each candidate transcript, we first deduced all potential open reading frames and translated them into amino acid sequences. By searching against the reference protein database, a transcript would be predicted a false one when it has no homologous sequence. Using this method, it is expected to filter out the falsely assembled transcripts of protein-encoding genes. Application of dbHT-Trans to the annotated transcriptome of mouse revealed that the sensitivity was almost 90% for recalling protein-encoding transcripts. After this quality filtering, the numbers of assembled genes became more consistent between Cufflinks and Trinity tools. To significantly decrease the data storage, we transformed all intermediate data into descriptive metadata and stored by the MySQL database, which will be utilized by downstream analyses in a real-time style. The source codes, example data, and manual of dbHT-Trans are freely available on the GitHub repository. PMID:26484655

  6. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the alpha-subunit of CAAX-prenyltransferases from Catharanthus roseus and the expression of the active recombinant protein farnesyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Courdavault, Vincent; Burlat, Vincent; St-Pierre, Benoit; Gantet, Pascal; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Crfta/ggt_Ia (AF525030), a cDNA encoding the ?-subunit of the two types of CaaX-prenyltransferase (CaaX-PTase), i.e. protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) and type I protein geranylgeranyltransferase, was cloned from Catharanthus roseus via a PCR strategy. Crfta/ggt_Ia is 1381-bp long and bears a 999-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 332 residues (FTA) that shares 66% identity with its Lycopersicon esculentum orthologue. Southern blot analysis revealed that FTA is encoded by a single gene copy per haploid genome. Co-expression of Crfta/ggt_Ia and Crftb encoding the beta-subunit of PFT yielded purified active recombinant PFT. This enzyme is able to prenylate proteins from C. roseus, and could be used as a potent tool for prenylated protein identification.

  7. Development of an automated fluorescence microscopy system for photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins (optogenetics) in live cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Nobukazu; Ikeda, Yuka; Kato, Takuma; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Egami, Youhei; Miyake, Katsuya; Tsurumaki, Nobuhide; Yamaguchi, Mitsunari

    2014-06-01

    Photomanipulation of genetically encoded light-sensitive protein activity, also known as optogenetics, is one of the most innovative recent microscopy techniques in the fields of cell biology and neurobiology. Although photomanipulation is usually performed by diverting the photobleaching mode of a confocal laser microscope, photobleaching by the laser scanning unit is not always suitable for photoactivation. We have developed a simple automated wide-field fluorescence microscopy system for the photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins in live cells. An electrically automated fluorescence microscope can be controlled through MetaMorph imaging software, making it possible to acquire time-lapse, multiwavelength images of live cells. Using the journal (macro recording) function of MetaMorph, we wrote a macro program to change the excitation filter for photoactivation and illumination area during the intervals of image acquisition. When this program was run on the wide-field fluorescence microscope, cells expressing genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac1, which is activated under blue light, showed morphological changes such as lamellipodial extension and cell surface ruffling in the illuminated region. Using software-based development, we successfully constructed a fully automated photoactivation microscopy system for a mercury lamp-based fluorescence microscope.

  8. Genome organisation and expression profiling of ABC protein-encoding genes in Heterobasidion annosum s.l. complex.

    PubMed

    Baral, Bikash; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2016-03-01

    Members of Heterobasidion annosum species complex are widely regarded as the most destructive fungal pathogens of conifer trees in the boreal and temperate zones of Northern hemisphere. To invade and colonise their host trees, Heterobasidion fungi must overcome components of host chemical defence, including terpenoid oleoresin and phenolic compounds. ABC transporters may play an important role in this process participating in the export of toxic host metabolites and maintaining their intracellular concentration below the critical level. We have identified and phylogenetically classified Heterobasidion genes encoding ABC transporters and closely related ABC proteins. The number of ABC proteins in the Heterobasidion genome is one of the lowest among analysed species of Agaricomycotina. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have analysed transcriptional response of Heterobasidion ABC transporter-encoding genes to monoterpenes as well as their expression profile during growth on pine wood in comparison to the growth on defined media. Several ABC transporters were up-regulated during growth on pine wood. The ABC-transporter encoding gene ABCG1.1 was induced both during growth of H. annosum on pine wood and upon exposure to monoterpenes. Our experimental data demonstrate the differential responses of Heterobasidion ABC genes to growth conditions and chemical stressors. The presented results suggest a potential role of Heterobasidion ABC-G transporters in the resistance to the components of conifer chemical defence. PMID:26895866

  9. The Complete Set of Genes Encoding Major Intrinsic Proteins in Arabidopsis Provides a Framework for a New Nomenclature for Major Intrinsic Proteins in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Urban; Karlsson, Maria; Johansson, Ingela; Gustavsson, Sofia; Sjövall, Sara; Fraysse, Laure; Weig, Alfons R.; Kjellbom, Per

    2001-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the passive transport of small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs constitute a very old family of proteins and different forms have been found in all kinds of living organisms, including bacteria, fungi, animals, and plants. In the genomic sequence of Arabidopsis, we have identified 35 different MIP-encoding genes. Based on sequence similarity, these 35 proteins are divided into four different subfamilies: plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, tonoplast intrinsic proteins, NOD26-like intrinsic proteins also called NOD26-like MIPs, and the recently discovered small basic intrinsic proteins. In Arabidopsis, there are 13 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, 10 tonoplast intrinsic proteins, nine NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, and three small basic intrinsic proteins. The gene structure in general is conserved within each subfamily, although there is a tendency to lose introns. Based on phylogenetic comparisons of maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis MIPs (AtMIPs), it is argued that the general intron patterns in the subfamilies were formed before the split of monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Although the gene structure is unique for each subfamily, there is a common pattern in how transmembrane helices are encoded on the exons in three of the subfamilies. The nomenclature for plant MIPs varies widely between different species but also between subfamilies in the same species. Based on the phylogeny of all AtMIPs, a new and more consistent nomenclature is proposed. The complete set of AtMIPs, together with the new nomenclature, will facilitate the isolation, classification, and labeling of plant MIPs from other species. PMID:11500536

  10. [Expression and cloning of cDNA encoding 43 kD rubber particle membrane protein of Hevea brasiliensis].

    PubMed

    Peng, Shi-Qing; Chen, Shou-Cai

    2004-06-01

    A rubber particle protein with apparent molecular mass of 43 kD as determined by SDS-PAGE was purified. A degenerate oligonucleotide primer based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of this purified protein was used to amplify a 1385 bp cDNA by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'RACE). The cDNA contains five repeats in a head-to-tail arrangement without intervening sequences, each encoding a ubiquitin unit of 76 amino acids. The last ubiquitin unit is followed by an extraphenylanaline residue at the carboxyl-terminal end. The structure of the cDNA is consistent with the structure of other known polyubiquitin genes. Western blot demonstrated that 43 kD rubber particle protein might be a polyubiquitin. Southern blot analysis revealed that there were multiple copies of gene encoding 43 kD rubber particle protein in Hevea brasiliensis. The results of Northern blot analysis indicated that the gene was expressed in latex, young leaves and bark tissue. PMID:15599030

  11. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  12. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    PubMed

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification.

  13. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based 'adaptors/connectors' with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties. PMID:25813537

  14. ngs (notochord granular surface) gene encodes a novel type of intermediate filament family protein essential for notochord maintenance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiangjun; Xia, Zhidan; Zu, Yao; Telfer, Helena; Hu, Jing; Yu, Jingyi; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-25

    The notochord is an important organ involved in embryonic patterning and locomotion. In zebrafish, the mature notochord consists of a single stack of fully differentiated, large vacuolated cells called chordocytes, surrounded by a single layer of less differentiated notochordal epithelial cells called chordoblasts. Through genetic analysis of zebrafish lines carrying pseudo-typed retroviral insertions, a mutant exhibiting a defective notochord with a granular appearance was isolated, and the corresponding gene was identified as ngs (notochord granular surface), which was specifically expressed in the notochord. In the mutants, the notochord started to degenerate from 32 hours post-fertilization, and the chordocytes were then gradually replaced by smaller cells derived from chordoblasts. The granular notochord phenotype was alleviated by anesthetizing the mutant embryos with tricaine to prevent muscle contraction and locomotion. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ngs encodes a new type of intermediate filament (IF) family protein, which we named chordostatin based on its function. Under the transmission electron microcopy, bundles of 10-nm-thick IF-like filaments were enriched in the chordocytes of wild-type zebrafish embryos, whereas the chordocytes in ngs mutants lacked IF-like structures. Furthermore, chordostatin-enhanced GFP (EGFP) fusion protein assembled into a filamentous network specifically in chordocytes. Taken together, our work demonstrates that ngs encodes a novel type of IF protein and functions to maintain notochord integrity for larval development and locomotion. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of notochord structural maintenance, as well as the evolution and biological function of IF family proteins.

  15. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  16. Drosophila Syncrip modulates the expression of mRNAs encoding key synaptic proteins required for morphology at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Suzanne M.; Yang, Lu; Halstead, James M.; Hamilton, Russell S.; Meignin, Carine

    2014-01-01

    Localized mRNA translation is thought to play a key role in synaptic plasticity, but the identity of the transcripts and the molecular mechanism underlying their function are still poorly understood. Here, we show that Syncrip, a regulator of localized translation in the Drosophila oocyte and a component of mammalian neuronal mRNA granules, is also expressed in the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction, where it regulates synaptic growth. We use RNA-immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing and qRT-PCR to show that Syncrip associates with a number of mRNAs encoding proteins with key synaptic functions, including msp-300, syd-1, neurexin-1, futsch, highwire, discs large, and α-spectrin. The protein levels of MSP-300, Discs large, and a number of others are significantly affected in syncrip null mutants. Furthermore, syncrip mutants show a reduction in MSP-300 protein levels and defects in muscle nuclear distribution characteristic of msp-300 mutants. Our results highlight a number of potential new players in localized translation during synaptic plasticity in the neuromuscular junction. We propose that Syncrip acts as a modulator of synaptic plasticity by regulating the translation of these key mRNAs encoding synaptic scaffolding proteins and other important components involved in synaptic growth and function. PMID:25171822

  17. Cloning and characterization of CSP37, a novel gene encoding a putative membrane protein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, M; Nieto, A; Iborra, A; Elorza, M V; Ponton, J; Fonzi, W A; Sentandreu, R

    1997-01-01

    In the course of an analysis of the functions and assembly of the cell wall of Candida albicans, we have cloned and characterized a gene, which we designated CSP37 (cell surface protein), encoding a 37-kDa polypeptide which is a membrane-associated protein. The gene was isolated by immunological screening of a DNA library constructed from mycelial cells with a polyclonal serum raised against cell walls of this morphology. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a corresponding genomic DNA fragment revealed a single open reading frame which encodes a predicted protein of 321 amino acids with no significant homology to others in the databases. Disruption of the CSP37 gene by the method described by Fonzi and Irwin (Genetics 134:717-728, 1993) eliminated expression of the Csp37 protein. The mutant strains showed no apparent defect in cell viability, growth, or cell wall assembly but displayed attenuated virulence in systemic infections induced in mice and reduced the ability to adhere to polystyrene. PMID:9244249

  18. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  19. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of F-box protein-encoding genes in the Malus domestica genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Zheng-Rong; Lv, Wei; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-08-01

    The F-box protein family is a large family that is characterized by conserved F-box domains of approximately 40-50 amino acids in the N-terminus. F-box proteins participate in diverse cellular processes, such as development of floral organs, signal transduction and response to stress, primarily as a component of the Skp1-cullin-F-box (SCF) complex. In this study, using a global search of the apple genome, 517 F-box protein-encoding genes (F-box genes for short) were identified and further subdivided into 12 groups according to the characterization of known functional domains, which suggests the different potential functions or processes that they were involved in. Among these domains, the galactose oxidase domain was analyzed for the first time in plants, and this domain was present with or without the Kelch domain. The F-box genes were distributed in all 17 apple chromosomes with various densities and tended to form gene clusters. Spatial expression profile analysis revealed that F-box genes have organ-specific expression and are widely expressed in all organs. Proteins that contained the galactose oxidase domain were highly expressed in leaves, flowers and seeds. From a fruit ripening expression profile, 166 F-box genes were identified. The expressions of most of these genes changed little during maturation, but five of them increased significantly. Using qRT-PCR to examine the expression of F-box genes encoding proteins with domains related to stress, the results revealed that F-box proteins were up- or down-regulated, which suggests that F-box genes were involved in abiotic stress. The results of this study helped to elucidate the functions of F-box proteins, especially in Rosaceae plants.

  20. STP1, a gene involved in pre-tRNA processing, encodes a nuclear protein containing zinc finger motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S S; Stanford, D R; Silvers, C D; Hopper, A K

    1992-01-01

    STP1 is an unessential yeast gene involved in the removal of intervening sequences from some, but not all, families of intervening sequence-containing pre-tRNAs. Previously, we proposed that STP1 might encode a product that generates pre-tRNA conformations efficiently recognized by tRNA-splicing endonuclease. To test the predictions of this model, we have undertaken a molecular analysis of the STP1 gene and its products. The STP1 locus is located on chromosome IV close to at least two other genes involved in RNA splicing: PRP3 and SPP41. The STP1 open reading frame (ORF) could encode a peptide of 64,827 Da; however, inspection of putative transcriptional and translational regulatory signals and mapping of the 5' ends of mRNA provide evidence that translation of the STP1 ORF usually initiates at a second AUG to generate a protein of 58,081 Da. The STP1 ORF contains three putative zinc fingers. The first of these closely resembles both the DNA transcription factor consensus and the Xenopus laevis p43 RNA-binding protein consensus. The third motif more closely resembles the fingers found in spliceosomal proteins. Employing antisera to the endogenous STP1 protein and to STP1-LacZ fusion proteins, we show that the STP1 protein is localized to nuclei. The presence of zinc finger motifs and the nuclear location of the STP1 protein support the model that this gene product is involved directly in pre-tRNA splicing. Images PMID:1588961

  1. An Agrobacterium gene involved in tumorigenesis encodes an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y H; Li, L P; Hou, Q M; Pan, Shen Q

    2002-02-01

    A gene designated as aopB was identified which was involved in tumorigenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. aopB is located on the circular chromosome as a single copy. This gene shares high homology with ropB, a Rhizobium leguminosarum gene encoding an outer membrane protein. A transposon mutant CGI1 containing a gfp-tagged transposon insertion at aopB caused attenuated tumors on plants when inoculated at a low cell concentration (5x10(7) cells/ml). The mutation did not affect the bacterial growth on different media. A broad host range plasmid containing the wild type aopB could restore the tumor formation ability of CGI1 to the wild type level. When both aopB-gfp and aopB-phoA fusions were used to study the aopB gene expression, we found that the aopB gene was inducible by acidic pH but not by plant phenolic compound acetosyringone. aopB encodes a putative protein of 218 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 22.8 kDa. TnphoA transposon mutagenesis of aopB, subcellular fractionation and whole cell ELISA experiments indicated that AopB is an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface. It appeared that AopB was exclusively present in the outer membrane and not in other fractions. The vir gene induction assays showed that the aopB gene was not required for the expression of the Ti plasmid encoded vir genes that are essential for tumorigenesis. The C-terminal half of AopB is slightly homologous to some of the bacterial porin proteins and some of plant dehydrins. The role of AopB in Agrobacterium-plant interaction is discussed. PMID:11891052

  2. Empty pericarp5 encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat protein that is required for mitochondrial RNA editing and seed development in maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jun; Xiu, Zhi-Hui; Meeley, Robert; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2013-03-01

    In flowering plants, RNA editing is a posttranscriptional mechanism that converts specific cytidines to uridines in both mitochondrial and plastidial transcripts, altering the information encoded by these genes. Here, we report the molecular characterization of the empty pericarp5 (emp5) mutants in maize (Zea mays). Null mutation of Emp5 results in abortion of embryo and endosperm development at early stages. Emp5 encodes a mitochondrion-targeted DYW subgroup pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. Analysis of the mitochondrial transcripts revealed that loss of the EMP5 function abolishes the C-to-U editing of ribosomal protein L16 at the rpl16-458 site (100% edited in the wild type), decreases the editing at nine sites in NADH dehydrogenase9 (nad9), cytochrome c oxidase3 (cox3), and ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), and surprisingly increases the editing at five sites of ATP synthase F0 subunit a (atp6), apocytochrome b (cob), nad1, and rpl16. Mutant EMP5-4 lacking the E+ and DYW domains still retains the substrate specificity and editing function, only at reduced efficiency. This suggests that the E+ and DYW domains of EMP5 are not essential to the EMP5 editing function but are necessary for efficiency. Analysis of the ortholog in rice (Oryza sativa) indicates that rice EMP5 has a conserved function in C-to-U editing of the rice mitochondrial rpl16-458 site. EMP5 knockdown expression in transgenics resulted in slow growth and defective seeds. These results demonstrate that Emp5 encodes a PPR-DYW protein that is required for the editing of multiple transcripts in mitochondria, and the editing events, particularly the C-to-U editing at the rpl16-458 site, are critical to the mitochondrial functions and, hence, to seed development in maize. PMID:23463776

  3. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  4. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  5. The Marek’s disease virus (MDV) protein encoded by the UL17 ortholog is essential for virus growth

    PubMed Central

    Chbab, Najat; Chabanne-Vautherot, Danièle; Francineau, Annick; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Denesvre, Caroline; Vautherot, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Marek’s disease virus type 1 (MDV-1) shows a strict dependency on the direct cell-to-cell spread for its propagation in cell culture. As MDV-1 shows an impaired nuclear egress in cell culture, we wished to address the characterization of capsid/tegument genes which may intervene in the maturation of intranuclear capsids. Orthologs of UL17 are present in all herpesviruses and, in all reported case, were shown to be essential for viral growth, playing a role in capsid maturation and DNA packaging. As only HSV-1 and PrV UL17 proteins have been characterized so far, we wished to examine the role of MDV-1 pUL17 in virus replication. To analyze MDV-1 UL17 gene function, we created deletion mutants or point mutated the open reading frame (ORF) to interrupt its coding phase. We established that a functional ORF UL17 is indispensable for MDV-1 growth. We chose to characterize the virally encoded protein by tagging the 729 amino-acid long protein with a repeat of the HA peptide that was fused to its C-terminus. Protein pUL17 was identified in infected cell extracts as an 82 kDa protein which localized to the nucleus, colocalizing with VP5, the major capsid protein, and VP13/14, a major tegument protein. By using green fluorescent protein fusion and HA tagged proteins expressed under the cytomegalovirus IE gene enhancer/promoter (PCMV IE), we showed that MDV-1 pUL17 nuclear distribution in infected cells is not an intrinsic property. Although our results strongly suggest that another viral protein retains (or relocate) pUL17 to the nucleus, we report that none of the tegument protein tested so far were able to mediate pUL17 relocation to the nucleus. PMID:19284966

  6. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development.

    PubMed

    Naested, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Harris, Cassandra A; Beale, Michael H; Andersen, Mathias; Mant, Alexandra; Scheller, Henrik; Camara, Bilal; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2004-09-15

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3 protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates that pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development.

  7. lingerer, a Drosophila gene involved in initiation and termination of copulation, encodes a set of novel cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kuniyoshi, Hisato; Baba, Kotaro; Ueda, Ryu; Kondo, Shunzo; Awano, Wakae; Juni, Naoto; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to uncover genetic components underlying the courtship behavior of Drosophila melanogaster, we have characterized a novel gene, lingerer (lig), mutations of which result in abnormal copulation. Males carrying a hypomorphic mutation in lig fail to withdraw their genitalia upon termination of copulation, but display no overt abnormalities in their genitalia. A severe reduction in the dosage of the lig gene causes repeated attempted copulations but no successful copulations. Complete loss of lig function results in lethality during early pupal stages. lig is localized to polytene segment 44A on the second chromosome and encodes three alternatively spliced transcripts that generate two types of 150-kD proteins, Lig-A and Lig-B, differing only at the C terminus. Lig proteins show no similarity to known proteins. However, a set of homologous proteins in mammals suggest that Drosophila Lig belongs to a family of proteins that share five highly conserved domains. Lig is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), imaginal discs, and gonads. Lig-A expression is selectively reduced in lig mutants and the ubiquitous supply of this protein at the beginning of metamorphosis restores the copulatory defects of the lig mutant. We propose that lig may act in the nervous system to mediate the control of copulatory organs during courtship. PMID:12524348

  8. Identification and characterization of a tumor necrosis factor receptor like protein encoded by Singapore grouper iridovirus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Cai, Jia; Wei, Shina; Gao, Ren; Qin, Qiwei

    2013-12-26

    Virus encoded tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFRs) have been demonstrated to facilitate virus to escape from apoptosis or other host immune response for viral replication. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a large DNA virus which belongs to genus Ranavirus, is a major pathogen resulting in heavy economic losses to grouper aquaculture. Here, SGIV ORF096 (VP96) encoding a putative homolog of TNFR was identified and characterized. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that SGIV-VP96 contained two extracellular cysteine-rich domains (CRDs) with conserved four or six cysteine residues, but lacked the transmembrane domain at the C-terminus. SGIV-VP96 was identified as an early (E) gene and localized in the cytoplasm in transfected or infected cells. Overexpression of SGIV-VP96 in vitro enhanced cell proliferation, and improved cell survival against SGIV infection. Furthermore, virus infection induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were inhibited in SGIV-VP96 expressing FHM cells compared to the control cells. Taken together, our results suggested that SGIV might utilize virus encoded TNFR like genes to modulate the host apoptotic response for effective virus replication.

  9. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of the Bacillus subtilis gene (infB) encoding protein synthesis initiation factor 2.

    PubMed Central

    Shazand, K; Tucker, J; Chiang, R; Stansmore, K; Sperling-Petersen, H U; Grunberg-Manago, M; Rabinowitz, J C; Leighton, T

    1990-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of Bacillus subtilis cell extracts detected two proteins that cross-reacted with monospecific polyclonal antibody raised against Escherichia coli initiation factor 2 alpha (IF2 alpha). Subsequent Southern blot analysis of B. subtilis genomic DNA identified a 1.3-kilobase (kb) HindIII fragment which cross-hybridized with both E. coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus IF2 gene probes. This DNA was cloned from a size-selected B. subtilis plasmid library. The cloned HindIII fragment, which was shown by DNA sequence analysis to encode the N-terminal half of the B. subtilis IF2 protein and 0.2 kb of upstream flanking sequence, was utilized as a homologous probe to clone an overlapping 2.76-kb ClaI chromosomal fragment containing the entire IF2 structural gene. The HindIII fragment was also used as a probe to obtain overlapping clones from a lambda gt11 library which contained additional upstream and downstream flanking sequences. Sequence comparisons between the B. subtilis IF2 gene and the other bacterial homologs from E. coli, B. stearothermophilus, and Streptococcus faecium displayed extensive nucleic acid and protein sequence homologies. The B. subtilis infB gene encodes two proteins, IF2 alpha (78.6 kilodaltons) and IF2 beta (68.2 kilodaltons); both were expressed in B. subtilis and E. coli. These two proteins cross-reacted with antiserum to E. coli IF2 alpha and were able to complement in vivo an E. coli infB gene disruption. Four-factor recombination analysis positioned the infB gene at 145 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, between the polC and spcB loci. This location is distinct from those of the other major ribosomal protein and rRNA gene clusters of B. subtilis. Images PMID:2110148

  10. Vaccinia virus gene H5R encodes a protein that is phosphorylated by the multisubstrate vaccinia virus B1R protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Beaud, G; Beaud, R; Leader, D P

    1995-01-01

    Vaccinia virus gene B1R encodes a protein kinase, the previously identified substrates of which include the proteins S2 and Sa of 40S ribosomal subunits. This work characterizes another substrate of the B1R kinase: a 36-kDa protein induced at the early stage of infection. Partially purified 36-kDa protein, eluted from a single-stranded DNA-cellulose column by 0.5 M NaCl, was separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Phosphorylation in vitro yielded multiple forms of the 36-kDa protein with approximate isoelectric points (pI) of 5.5, 5.7, 5.9, and 6.3, in addition to the apparently unphosphorylated form with a pI of approximately 6.8. The tryptic peptides derived from 36-kDa proteins with pI values of 5.7, 5.9, and 6.3 yielded almost identical high-pressure liquid chromatography profiles, strongly suggesting that the 36-kDa protein was modified by the phosphorylation of at least four sites, which were characterized as threonine residues. The amino acid sequence of several tryptic peptides derived from the 36-kDa protein showed that the 36-kDa protein was encoded by gene H5R of vaccinia virus. Consistent with this, the B1R kinase--either expressed in Escherichia coli or highly purified from HeLa cells--phosphorylated a recombinant trpE-H5R fusion protein in vitro. Fingerprints of the trpE-H5R and 36-kDa proteins phosphorylated by recombinant B1R kinase revealed common sites of phosphorylation, although some tryptic peptides were specific to either protein. Comparison was made of fingerprints of tryptic phosphopeptides derived from 36-kDa single-stranded DNA-binding protein labelled in vivo or in vitro. A common subset of peptides was observed, suggesting that some sites on H5R protein are phosphorylated by the B1R kinase in infected cells. These results suggest that some of the multiple threonine sites in the H5R protein are phosphorylated in vivo by the B1R protein kinase. PMID:7853522

  11. Characterization of Raphanus sativus pentatricopeptide repeat proteins encoded by the fertility restorer locus for Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Uyttewaal, M; Arnal, N; Quadrado, M; Martin-Canadell, A; Vrielynck, N; Hiard, S; Gherbi, H; Bendahmane, A; Budar, F; Mireau, H

    2008-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility is a maternally inherited trait in higher plants that prevents the production of functional pollen. Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility in radish (Raphanus sativus) is regulated by the orf138 mitochondrial locus. Male fertility can be restored when orf138 accumulation is suppressed by the nuclear Rfo locus, which consists of three genes putatively encoding highly similar pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR-A, -B, and -C). We produced transgenic rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants separately expressing PPR-A and PPR-B and demonstrated that both encoded proteins accumulated preferentially in the anthers of young flower buds. Immunodetection of ORF138 showed that, unlike PPR-B, PPR-A had no effect on the synthesis of the sterility protein. Moreover, immunolocalization experiments indicated that complete elimination of ORF138 from the tapetum of anthers correlated with the restoration of fertility. Thus, the primary role of PPR-B in restoring fertility is to inhibit ORF138 synthesis in the tapetum of young anthers. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed, at the cellular level, that PPR-B has no effect on the accumulation of orf138 mRNA. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PPR-B, but not PPR-A, is associated with the orf138 RNA in vivo, linking restoration activity with the ability to directly or indirectly interact with the orf138 RNA. Together, our data support a role for PPR-B in the translational regulation of orf138 mRNA.

  12. RanBP2/Nup358 Potentiates the Translation of a Subset of mRNAs Encoding Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Akef, Abdalla; Cui, Xianying A.; Gueroussov, Serge; Cenik, Can; Roth, Frederick P.; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, most mRNAs that encode secreted or membrane-bound proteins contain elements that promote an alternative mRNA nuclear export (ALREX) pathway. Here we report that ALREX-promoting elements also potentiate translation in the presence of upstream nuclear factors. These RNA elements interact directly with, and likely co-evolved with, the zinc finger repeats of RanBP2/Nup358, which is present on the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore. Finally we show that RanBP2/Nup358 is not only required for the stimulation of translation by ALREX-promoting elements, but is also required for the efficient global synthesis of proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and likely the mitochondria. Thus upon the completion of export, mRNAs containing ALREX-elements likely interact with RanBP2/Nup358, and this step is required for the efficient translation of these mRNAs in the cytoplasm. ALREX-elements thus act as nucleotide platforms to coordinate various steps of post-transcriptional regulation for the majority of mRNAs that encode secreted proteins. PMID:23630457

  13. Characterization of Raphanus sativus pentatricopeptide repeat proteins encoded by the fertility restorer locus for Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Uyttewaal, M; Arnal, N; Quadrado, M; Martin-Canadell, A; Vrielynck, N; Hiard, S; Gherbi, H; Bendahmane, A; Budar, F; Mireau, H

    2008-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility is a maternally inherited trait in higher plants that prevents the production of functional pollen. Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility in radish (Raphanus sativus) is regulated by the orf138 mitochondrial locus. Male fertility can be restored when orf138 accumulation is suppressed by the nuclear Rfo locus, which consists of three genes putatively encoding highly similar pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR-A, -B, and -C). We produced transgenic rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants separately expressing PPR-A and PPR-B and demonstrated that both encoded proteins accumulated preferentially in the anthers of young flower buds. Immunodetection of ORF138 showed that, unlike PPR-B, PPR-A had no effect on the synthesis of the sterility protein. Moreover, immunolocalization experiments indicated that complete elimination of ORF138 from the tapetum of anthers correlated with the restoration of fertility. Thus, the primary role of PPR-B in restoring fertility is to inhibit ORF138 synthesis in the tapetum of young anthers. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed, at the cellular level, that PPR-B has no effect on the accumulation of orf138 mRNA. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PPR-B, but not PPR-A, is associated with the orf138 RNA in vivo, linking restoration activity with the ability to directly or indirectly interact with the orf138 RNA. Together, our data support a role for PPR-B in the translational regulation of orf138 mRNA. PMID:19098270

  14. Characterization and expression of a cDNA encoding a tubuliform silk protein of the golden web spider Nephila antipodiana.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Lin, Z; Sin, Y M; Li, D; Gong, Z; Yang, D

    2006-07-01

    Spider silks are renowned for their excellent mechanical properties. Although several spider fibroin genes, mainly from dragline and capture silks, have been identified, there are still many members in the spider fibroin gene family remain uncharacterized. In this study, a novel silk cDNA clone from the golden web spider Nephila antipodiana was isolated. It is serine rich and contains two almost identical fragments with one varied gap region and one conserved spider fibroin-like C-terminal domain. Both in situ hybridization and immunoblot analyses have shown that it is specifically expressed in the tubuliform gland. Thus, it likely encodes the silk fibroin from the tubuliform gland, which supplies the main component of the inner egg case. Unlike other silk proteins, the protein encoded by the novel cDNA in water solution exhibits the characteristic of an alpha-helical protein, which implies the distinct property of the egg case silk, though the fiber of tubuliform silk is mainly composed of beta-sheet structure. Its sequence information facilitates elucidation of the evolutionary history of the araneoid fibroin genes.

  15. Alleles of the maize P gene with distinct tissue specificities encode Myb-homologous proteins with C-terminal replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S; Athma, P; Peterson, T

    1996-01-01

    The maize P gene is a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis in the pathway leading to the production of a red phlobaphene pigment. Multiple alleles of the P gene confer distinct patterns of pigmentation to specific floral organs, such as the kernel pericarp and cob tissues. To determine the basis of allele-specific pigmentation, we have characterized the gene products and transcript accumulation patterns of the P-wr allele, which specifies colorless pericarps and red cob tissues. RNA transcripts of P-wr are present in colorless pericarps as well as in the colored cob tissues; however, the expression of P-wr in pericarp does not induce the accumulation of transcripts from the C2 and A1 genes, which encode enzymes for flavonoid pigment biosynthesis. The coding sequences of P-wr were compared with the P-rr allele, which specifies red pericarp and red cob. The P-wr and P-rr cDNA sequences are very similar in their 5' regions. There are only two nucleotide changes that result in amino acid differences; both are outside of the Myb-homologous DNA binding domain. In contrast, the 3' coding region of P-rr is replaced by a unique 210-bp sequence in P-wr. The predicted P-wr protein has a C-terminal sequence resembling a cysteine-containing metal binding domain that is not present in the P-rr protein. These results indicate that the differential pericarp pigmentation specified by the P-rr and P-wr alleles does not result from an absence of P-wr transcripts in pericarps. Rather, the allele-specific patterns of P-rr and P-wr pigmentation may be associated with structural differences in the proteins encoded by each allele. PMID:8768374

  16. Comparing the predicted and observed properties of proteins encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Link, A J; Robison, K; Church, G M

    1997-08-01

    Mining the emerging abundance of microbial genome sequences for hypotheses is an exciting prospect of "functional genomics". At the forefront of this effort, we compared the predictions of the complete Escherichia coli genomic sequence with the observed gene products by assessing 381 proteins for their mature N-termini, in vivo abundances, isoelectric points, molecular masses, and cellular locations. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Edman sequencing were combined to sequence Coomassie-stained 2-DE spots representing the abundant proteins of wild-type E. coli K-12 strains. Greater than 90% of the abundant proteins in the E. coli proteome lie in a small isoelectric point and molecular mass window of 4-7 and 10-100 kDa, respectively. We identified several highly abundant proteins, YjbJ, YjbP, YggX, HdeA, and AhpC, which would not have been predicted from the genomic sequence alone. Of the 223 uniquely identified loci, 60% of the encoded proteins are proteolytically processed. As previously reported, the initiator methionine was efficiently cleaved when the penultimate amino acid was serine or alanine. In contrast, when the penultimate amino acid was threonine, glycine, or proline, cleavage was variable, and valine did not signal cleavage. Although signal peptide cleavage sites tended to follow predicted rules, the length of the putative signal sequence was occassionally greater than the consensus. For proteins predicted to be in the cytoplasm or inner membrane, the N-terminal amino acids were highly constrained compared to proteins localized to the periplasm or outer membrane. Although cytoplasmic proteins follow the N-end rule for protein stability, proteins in the periplasm or outer membrane do not follow this rule; several have N-terminal amino acids predicted to destabilize the proteins. Surprisingly, 18% of the identified 2-DE spots represent isoforms in which protein products of the same gene have different observed pI and M(r), suggesting they are

  17. Overexpression of Pa_1_10620 encoding a mitochondrial Podospora anserina protein with homology to superoxide dismutases and ribosomal proteins leads to lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Böhl, Lena; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-02-01

    In biological systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent 'double edged swords': as signaling molecules they are essential for proper development, as reactive agents they cause molecular damage and adverse effects like degeneration and aging. A well-coordinated control of ROS is therefore of key importance. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are enzymes active in the detoxification of superoxide. The number of isoforms of these proteins varies among species. Here we report the characterization of the putative protein encoded by Pa_1_10620 that has been previously annotated to code for a mitochondrial ribosomal protein but shares also sequence domains with SODs. We report that the gene is transcribed in P. anserina cultures of all ages and that the encoded protein localizes to mitochondria. In strains overexpressing Pa_1_10620 in a genetic background in which PaSod3, the mitochondrial MnSOD of P. anserina, is deleted, no SOD activity could be identified in isolated mitochondria. However, overexpression of the gene leads to lifespan extension suggesting a pro-survival function of the protein in P. anserina. PMID:25151510

  18. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  19. Identification and purification of a protein encoded by the human adenovirus type 2 transforming region.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Matsuo, T

    1982-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) transforming genes are located in early regions E1a (map position 1.3 to 4.5) and E1b (map position 4.6 to 11.2). We have identified and purified to near homogeneity a major 20,000-molecular-weight (20K) protein and have shown that it is coded by E1b. Using an Ad2-transformed cell antiserum which contained antibody to E1b-coded proteins, we immunoprecipitated 53K and 19K proteins from the nucleoplasm and 53K, 19K, and 20K proteins from the cytoplasmic S-100 fraction of Ad2 productively infected and Ad2-transformed cells. The 19K protein was present in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, whereas the 20K protein was found only in the cytoplasm. The 53K and 19K proteins are known Ad2 E1b-coded proteins. The 20K protein was purified to near homogeneity in 20 to 50% yields by sequential DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified 20K protein shares most of its methionine-labeled tryptic peptides with E1b-53K, as shown by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and therefore is closely related to the 53K protein. The 19K protein does not appear to share tryptic peptides with either 20K or 53K protein. To provide more direct evidence that 20K protein is virus-coded, we translated E1b-specific mRNA in vitro. Both immunoprecipitation analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography purification of the translated product identified a 20K protein that has the same tryptic peptides as the 20K protein isolated from infected and from transformed cells. These findings suggest that the Ad2 20K protein is a primary translation product of an Ad2 E1b mRNA. Images PMID:7045392

  20. Identification and purification of a protein encoded by the human adenovirus type 2 transforming region.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Matsuo, T

    1982-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) transforming genes are located in early regions E1a (map position 1.3 to 4.5) and E1b (map position 4.6 to 11.2). We have identified and purified to near homogeneity a major 20,000-molecular-weight (20K) protein and have shown that it is coded by E1b. Using an Ad2-transformed cell antiserum which contained antibody to E1b-coded proteins, we immunoprecipitated 53K and 19K proteins from the nucleoplasm and 53K, 19K, and 20K proteins from the cytoplasmic S-100 fraction of Ad2 productively infected and Ad2-transformed cells. The 19K protein was present in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, whereas the 20K protein was found only in the cytoplasm. The 53K and 19K proteins are known Ad2 E1b-coded proteins. The 20K protein was purified to near homogeneity in 20 to 50% yields by sequential DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified 20K protein shares most of its methionine-labeled tryptic peptides with E1b-53K, as shown by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and therefore is closely related to the 53K protein. The 19K protein does not appear to share tryptic peptides with either 20K or 53K protein. To provide more direct evidence that 20K protein is virus-coded, we translated E1b-specific mRNA in vitro. Both immunoprecipitation analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography purification of the translated product identified a 20K protein that has the same tryptic peptides as the 20K protein isolated from infected and from transformed cells. These findings suggest that the Ad2 20K protein is a primary translation product of an Ad2 E1b mRNA.

  1. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  2. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods.

  3. The growth factor-inducible immediate-early gene 3CH134 encodes a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C H; Sun, H; Lau, L F; Tonks, N K

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of fibroblasts with serum growth factors results in the rapid activation of a set of immediate-early genes, among them 3CH134. We have purified a bacterially expressed form of the 3CH134-encoded polypeptide and demonstrated that it has intrinsic protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (PTPase; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48) activity in vitro. This activity is optimal at pH 7.5, is sensitive to vanadate and cysteinyl modifying agents, and is insensitive to a panel of serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors. Purified 3CH134 protein displays a high degree of selectivity among the tyrosine-phosphorylated polypeptide substrates tested. Under our assay conditions, the rates of dephosphorylation are in the order EDNDYINASL peptide < myelin basic protein < reduced, carboxyamidomethylated, and maleylated lysozyme (RCML) < p42mapk. There is a 200-fold range in rates for these substrates, with p42mapk dephosphorylated 15-fold more rapidly than RCML. Although 3CH134 is most closely related to the tyrosine/serine dual-specificity phosphatase VH1, we failed to detect any 3CH134-directed activity on casein or RCML phosphorylated on serine/threonine residues by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since 3CH134 expression is controlled transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally, it may represent a class of PTPases whose activity is regulated at the level of protein synthesis and degradation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8389479

  4. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods. PMID:25463695

  5. A distinct single-stranded DNA-binding protein encoded by the Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage bIL67.

    PubMed

    Szczepanska, Agnieszka K; Bidnenko, Elena; Płochocka, Danuta; McGovern, Stephen; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Bardowski, Jacek; Polard, Patrice; Chopin, Marie-Christine

    2007-06-20

    Single-stranded binding proteins (SSBs) are found to participate in various processes of DNA metabolism in all known organisms. We describe here a SSB protein encoded by the Lactococcus lactis phage bIL67 orf14 gene. It is the first noted attempt at characterizing a SSB protein from a lactococcal phage. The purified Orf14(bIL67) binds unspecifically to ssDNA with the same high affinity as the canonical Bacillus subtilis SSB. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays performed with mutagenized Orf14(bIL67) protein derivatives suggest that ssDNA-binding occurs via a putative OB-fold structure predicted by three-dimensional modeling. The native Orf14(bIL67) forms homotetramers as determined by gel filtration studies. These results allow distinguishing the first lactococcal phage protein with single-strand binding affinity, which defines a novel cluster of phage SSBs proteins. The possible role of Orf14(bIL67) in phage multiplication cycle is also discussed.

  6. Brassica rapa has three genes that encode proteins associated with different neutral lipids in plastids of specific tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, H U; Wu, S S; Ratnayake, C; Huang, A H

    2001-05-01

    Plastid lipid-associated protein (PAP), a predominant structural protein associated with carotenoids and other non-green neutral lipids in plastids, was shown to be encoded by a single nuclear gene in several species. Here we report three PAP genes in the diploid Brassica rapa; the three PAPs are associated with different lipids in specific tissues. Pap1 and Pap2 are more similar to each other (84% amino acid sequence identity) than to Pap3 (46% and 44%, respectively) in the encoded mature proteins. Pap1 transcript was most abundant in the maturing anthers (tapetum) and in lesser amounts in leaves, fruit coats, seeds, and sepals; Pap2 transcript was abundant only in the petals; and Pap3 transcript had a wide distribution, but at minimal levels in numerous organs. Immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that most organs had several nanograms of PAP1 or PAP2 per milligram of total protein, the highest amounts being in the anthers (10.9 microg x mg(-1) PAP1) and petals (6.6 microg x mg(-1) PAP2), and that they had much less PAP3 (<0.02 microg x mg(-1)). In these organs PAP was localized in isolated plastid fractions. Plants were subjected to abiotic stresses; drought and ozone reduced the levels of the three Pap transcripts, whereas mechanical wounding and altering the light intensity enhanced their levels. We conclude that the PAP gene family consists of several members whose proteins are associated with different lipids and whose expressions are controlled by distinct mechanisms. Earlier reports of the expression of one Pap gene in various organs in a species need to be re-examined.

  7. Proteins encoded in genomic regions associated with immune-mediated disease physically interact and suggest underlying biology.

    PubMed

    Rossin, Elizabeth J; Lage, Kasper; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Xavier, Ramnik J; Tatar, Diana; Benita, Yair; Cotsapas, Chris; Daly, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more densely connected than chance expectation. To confirm biological relevance, we show that the components of the networks tend to be expressed in similar tissues relevant to the phenotypes in question, suggesting the network indicates common underlying processes perturbed by risk loci. Furthermore, we show that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in

  8. Brassica rapa Has Three Genes That Encode Proteins Associated with Different Neutral Lipids in Plastids of Specific Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Wu, Sherry S.H.; Ratnayake, Chandra; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2001-01-01

    Plastid lipid-associated protein (PAP), a predominant structural protein associated with carotenoids and other non-green neutral lipids in plastids, was shown to be encoded by a single nuclear gene in several species. Here we report three PAP genes in the diploid Brassica rapa; the three PAPs are associated with different lipids in specific tissues. Pap1 and Pap2 are more similar to each other (84% amino acid sequence identity) than to Pap3 (46% and 44%, respectively) in the encoded mature proteins. Pap1 transcript was most abundant in the maturing anthers (tapetum) and in lesser amounts in leaves, fruit coats, seeds, and sepals; Pap2 transcript was abundant only in the petals; and Pap3 transcript had a wide distribution, but at minimal levels in numerous organs. Immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that most organs had several nanograms of PAP1 or PAP2 per milligram of total protein, the highest amounts being in the anthers (10.9 μg mg−1 PAP1) and petals (6.6 μg mg−1 PAP2), and that they had much less PAP3 (<0.02 μg mg−1). In these organs PAP was localized in isolated plastid fractions. Plants were subjected to abiotic stresses; drought and ozone reduced the levels of the three Pap transcripts, whereas mechanical wounding and altering the light intensity enhanced their levels. We conclude that the PAP gene family consists of several members whose proteins are associated with different lipids and whose expressions are controlled by distinct mechanisms. Earlier reports of the expression of one Pap gene in various organs in a species need to be re-examined. PMID:11351096

  9. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by the t(8;21)-, t(12;21)-, and inv(16)-encoded fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Heibert, S W; Lutterbach, B; Durst, K; Wang, L; Linggi, B; Wu, S; Wood, L; Amann, J; King, D; Hou, Y

    2001-08-01

    AML-1 is one of the most frequently translocated genes in human leukemia. AML-1 binds DNA and activates or represses transcription, while the chromosomal translocation fusion proteins in acute myeloid leukemia subvert these functions. The t(8;21) is the second most frequent translocation in acute myeloid leukemia and creates a fusion between the DNA binding domain of AML-1 and the ETO (also known as MTG8) corepressor. The t(12;21) is found in up to 25% of pediatric B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias and fuses the ETS family transcription factor TEL to the amino terminus of AML-1. In addition, the inv(16), the most frequent translocation in acute myeloid leukemia, fuses the AML-1 cofactor CBFbeta to the smooth muscle myosin heavy chain MYH11. Both the t(8;21) and t(12;21) create transcriptional repressors that impair AML-1 target gene expression. We demonstrated that the fusion proteins encoded by these translocations contact the nuclear hormone corepressors (N-CoR/SMRT), mSin3A, and histone deacetylases. We have also found that both TEL and AML-1 interact with mSin3A. TEL also binds N-CoR and histone deacetylase-3, indicating that wild-type TEL is a transcriptional repressor. The t(12;21) fuses the mSin3A interaction domain of TEL to AML-1 to transform AML-1 from a regulated to an unregulated transcriptional repressor. The recognition that AML-1 interacts with mSin3A to repress transcription suggested that the inv(16) fusion protein might also repress the transcription of AML-1-target genes. In fact, the inv(16) encodes a protein that cooperates with AML-1 to repress transcription. The inv(16) fusion protein was found in a ternary complex with AML-1 and mSin3A, suggesting that the inv(16) also acts by recruiting transcriptional corepressors and histone deacetylases. PMID:11587363

  10. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding equine infectious anemia virus tat and putative Rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R M; Derse, D; Rice, N R

    1990-01-01

    We isolated and characterized six cDNA clones from an equine infectious anemia virus-infected cell line that displays a Rev-defective phenotype. With the exception of one splice site in one of the clones, all six cDNAs exhibited the same splicing pattern and consisted of four exons. Exon 1 contained the 5' end of the genome; exon 2 contained the tat gene from mid-genome; exon 3 consisted of a small section of env, near the 5' end of the env gene; and exon 4 contained the putative rev open reading frame from the 3' end of the genome. The structures of the cDNAs predict a bicistronic message in which Tat is encoded by exons 1 and 2 and the presumptive Rev protein is encoded by exons 3 and 4. tat translation appears to be initiated at a non-AUG codon within the first 15 codons of exon 1. Equine infectious anemia virus-specific tat activity was expressed in transient transfections with cDNA expression plasmids. The predicted wild-type Rev protein contains 30 env-derived amino acids and 135 rev open reading frame residues. All of the cDNAs had a frameshift in exon 4, leading to a truncated protein and thus providing a plausible explanation for the Rev-defective phenotype of the original cells. We used peptide antisera to detect the faulty protein, thus confirming the cDNA sequence, and to detect the normal protein in productively infected cells. Images PMID:2164593

  11. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  12. Expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins regulated by the algal cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Suzuki, Kenji; Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Chloroplasts have evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and their continuity has been maintained by chloroplast division, which is performed by the constriction of a ring-like division complex at the division site. It is believed that the synchronization of the endosymbiotic and host cell division events was a critical step in establishing a permanent endosymbiotic relationship, such as is commonly seen in existing algae. In the majority of algal species, chloroplasts divide once per specific period of the host cell division cycle. In order to understand both the regulation of the timing of chloroplast division in algal cells and how the system evolved, we examined the expression of chloroplast division genes and proteins in the cell cycle of algae containing chloroplasts of cyanobacterial primary endosymbiotic origin (glaucophyte, red, green, and streptophyte algae). The results show that the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins of both cyanobacterial and eukaryotic host origin are expressed specifically during the S phase, except for FtsZ in one graucophyte alga. In this glaucophyte alga, FtsZ is persistently expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas the expression of the nucleus-encoded MinD and MinE as well as FtsZ ring formation are regulated by the phases of the cell cycle. In contrast to the nucleus-encoded division genes, it has been shown that the expression of chloroplast-encoded division genes is not regulated by the host cell cycle. The endosymbiotic gene transfer of minE and minD from the chloroplast to the nuclear genome occurred independently on multiple occasions in distinct lineages, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded MIND and MINE is regulated by the cell cycle in all lineages examined in this study. These results suggest that the timing of chloroplast division in algal cell cycle is restricted by the cell cycle-regulated expression of some but not all of the chloroplast division genes. In addition, it is

  13. MpAsr encodes an intrinsically unstructured protein and enhances osmotic tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin-Ran; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Hai-yan; He, Yan-ming; Qi, Kang-biao; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2011-07-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress- and ripening (ASR) -induced proteins are plant-specific proteins whose expression is up-regulated under abiotic stresses or during fruit ripening. In this study, we characterized an ASR protein from plantain to explore its physiological roles under osmotic stress. The expression pattern of MpAsr gene shows that MpAsr gene changed little at the mRNA level, while the MpASR protein accumulates under osmotic treatment. Through bioinformatic-based predictions, circular dichroism spectrometry, and proteolysis and heat-stability assays, we determined that the MpASR protein is an intrinsically unstructured protein in solution. We demonstrated that the hydrophilic MpASR protein could protect L: -lactate dehydrogenase (L: -LDH) from cold-induced aggregation. Furthermore, heterologous expression of MpAsr in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance of transformants to osmotic stress. Transgenic 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis seeds had a higher germination frequency than wild-type seeds under unfavorable conditions. At the physiological level, 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis showed increased soluble sugars and decreased cell membrane damage under osmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that the MpASR protein may act as an osmoprotectant and water-retaining molecule to help cell adjustment to water deficit caused by osmotic stress. PMID:21327389

  14. Reengineering of a fluorescent zinc sensor protein yields the first genetically encoded cadmium probe.

    PubMed

    Vinkenborg, Jan L; van Duijnhoven, Sander M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2011-11-21

    Introduction of a (Cys)(4) metal binding site at the dimerization interface of two fluorescent protein domains yields a chelating FRET sensor protein that shows a 2500-fold selectivity for Cd(2+) over Zn(2+) by taking advantage of their different ionic radii. PMID:21986860

  15. Poxviruses Encode a Reticulon-Like Protein that Promotes Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Karl J.; Bisht, Himani; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Hyun, Seong-In; Hansen, Bryan T.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Moss, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Poxviruses are enveloped DNA viruses that replicate within the cytoplasm. The first viral structures are crescents and spherical particles with a lipoprotein membrane bilayer thought to be derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We determined that A17, a conserved viral transmembrane protein essential for crescent formation, forms homo-oligomers and shares topological features with cellular reticulon-like proteins, which promote membrane curvature and contribute to the tubular structure of the ER. When the purified A17 protein was incorporated into liposomes, 25 nm diameter vesicles and tubules formed at low and high A17 concentrations, respectively. In addition, intracellular expression of A17, in the absence of other viral structural proteins, transformed the ER into aggregated 3-dimensional tubular networks. We suggest that A17 is a viral reticulon-like protein that contributes to curvature during biogenesis of the poxvirus membrane. PMID:26923595

  16. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  17. Identification and characterization of a prawn white spot syndrome virus gene that encodes an envelope protein VP31

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Xie Xixian; Yang Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-09-15

    Based on a combination of SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa (termed as VP31) was identified from purified shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope fraction. The resulting amino acid (aa) sequence matched an open reading frame (WSV340) of the WSSV genome. This ORF contained 783 nucleotides (nt), encoding 261 aa. A fragment of WSV340 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with a 6His-tag, and then specific antibody was raised. Western blot analysis and the immunoelectron microscope method (IEM) confirmed that VP31 was present exclusively in the viral envelope fraction. The neutralization experiment suggested that VP31 might play an important role in WSSV infectivity.

  18. A tumour necrosis factor receptor-like protein encoded by Singapore grouper iridovirus modulates cell proliferation, apoptosis and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yepin; Huang, Youhua; Wei, Shina; Li, Pengfei; Zhou, Lingli; Ni, Songwei; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologues encoded by viruses are usually involved in virus immune evasion by regulating the host immune response or mediating apoptotic cell death. Here, a novel TNFR-like protein encoded by Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV VP51) was cloned and characterized. Amino acid analysis showed that VP51 contained three cysteine-rich domains (CRDs) and a transmembrane domain at its C terminus. The expression of VP51 in vitro enhanced cell proliferation, and affected cell cycle progression via altering the G1/S transition. Furthermore, VP51 overexpression improved cell viability during SGIV infection via inhibiting virus-induced apoptosis, evidenced by the reduction of apoptotic bodies and the decrease of caspase-3 activation. In addition, overexpression of VP51 increased viral titre and the expression of viral structural protein gene MCP and cell proliferation promoting gene ICP-18. In contrast, the expression of the viral apoptosis inducing gene, LITAF, was significantly decreased. Although all three CRDs were essential for the action of VP51, CRD2 and CRD3 exerted more crucial roles on virus-induced apoptosis, viral gene transcription and virus production, while CRD1 was more crucial for cell proliferation. Together, SGIV TNFR-like products not only affected cell cycle progression and enhanced cell growth by increasing the expression of the virus encoded cell proliferation gene, but also inhibited virus-induced apoptotic cell death by decreasing the expression of the viral apoptosis inducing gene. Our results provided new insights into understanding the underlying mechanism by which iridovirus regulated the apoptotic pathway to complete its life cycle.

  19. Complex Formation among Murine Cytomegalovirus US22 Proteins Encoded by Genes M139, M140, and M141

    PubMed Central

    Karabekian, Zaruhi; Hanson, Laura K.; Slater, Jacquelyn S.; Krishna, Neel K.; Bolin, Lisa L.; Kerry, Julie A.; Campbell, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) proteins encoded by US22 genes M139, M140, and M141 function, at least in part, to regulate replication of this virus in macrophages. Mutant MCMV having one or more of these genes deleted replicates poorly in macrophages in culture and in the macrophage-dense environment of the spleen. In this report, we demonstrate the existence of stable complexes formed by the products of all three of these US22 genes, as well as a complex composed of the products of M140 and M141. These complexes form in the absence of other viral proteins; however, the pM140/pM141 complex serves as a requisite binding partner for the M139 gene products. Products from all three genes colocalize to a perinuclear region of the cell juxtaposed to or within the cis-Golgi region but excluded from the trans-Golgi region. Interestingly, expression of pM141 redirects pM140 from its predominantly nuclear residence to the perinuclear, cytoplasmic locale where these US22 proteins apparently exist in complex. Thus, complexing of these nonessential, early MCMV proteins likely confers a function(s) independent of each individual protein and important for optimal replication of MCMV in its natural host. PMID:15731247

  20. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  1. Peptide linkage mapping of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens vir-encoded type IV secretion system reveals protein subassemblies.

    PubMed

    Ward, Doyle V; Draper, Olga; Zupan, John R; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2002-08-20

    Numerous bacterial pathogens use type IV secretion systems (T4SS) to deliver virulence factors directly to the cytoplasm of plant, animal, and human host cells. Here, evidence for interactions among components of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens vir-encoded T4SS is presented. The results derive from a high-resolution yeast two-hybrid assay, in which a library of small peptide domains of T4SS components was screened for interactions. The use of small peptides overcomes problems associated with assaying for interactions involving membrane-associated proteins. We established interactions between VirB11 (an inner membrane pore-forming protein), VirB9 (a periplasmic protein), and VirB7 (an outer membrane-associated lipoprotein and putative pilus component). We provide evidence for an interaction pathway, among conserved members of a T4SS, spanning the A. tumefaciens envelope and including a potential pore protein. In addition, we have determined interactions between VirB1 (a lytic transglycosylase likely involved in the local remodeling of the peptidoglycan) and primarily VirB8, but also VirB4, VirB10, and VirB11 (proteins likely to assemble the core structure of the T4SS). VirB4 interacts with VirB8, VirB10, and VirB11, also establishing a connection to the core components. The identification of these interactions suggests a model for assembly of the T4SS. PMID:12177441

  2. The genome of the amoeba symbiont "Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus" encodes an afp-like prophage possibly used for protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Penz, Thomas; Horn, Matthias; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the obligate intracellular amoeba symbiont 'Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus' is unique among prokaryotic genomes due to its extremely large fraction of genes encoding proteins harboring eukaryotic domains such as ankyrin-repeats, TPR/SEL1 repeats, leucine-rich repeats, as well as F- and U-box domains, most of which likely serve in the interaction with the amoeba host. Here we provide evidence for the presence of additional proteins which are presumably presented extracellularly and should thus also be important for host cell interaction. Surprisingly, we did not find homologues of any of the well-known protein secretion systems required to translocate effector proteins into the host cell in the A. asiaticus genome, and the type six secretion systems seems to be incomplete. Here we describe the presence of a putative prophage in the A. asiaticus genome, which shows similarity to the antifeeding prophage from the insect pathogen Serratia entomophila. In S. entomophila this system is used to deliver toxins into insect hosts. This putative antifeeding-like prophage might thus represent the missing protein secretion apparatus in A. asiaticus. PMID:21178499

  3. EARLY SENESCENCE1 Encodes a SCAR-LIKE PROTEIN2 That Affects Water Loss in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Yuchun; Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Jie; Li, Xiaojing; Leng, Yujia; Dai, Liping; Huang, Lichao; Shao, Guosheng; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Jiang; Guo, Longbiao; Pan, Jianwei; Zeng, Dali

    2015-01-01

    The global problem of drought threatens agricultural production and constrains the development of sustainable agricultural practices. In plants, excessive water loss causes drought stress and induces early senescence. In this study, we isolated a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, designated as early senescence1 (es1), which exhibits early leaf senescence. The es1-1 leaves undergo water loss at the seedling stage (as reflected by whitening of the leaf margin and wilting) and display early senescence at the three-leaf stage. We used map-based cloning to identify ES1, which encodes a SCAR-LIKE PROTEIN2, a component of the suppressor of cAMP receptor/Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous complex involved in actin polymerization and function. The es1-1 mutants exhibited significantly higher stomatal density. This resulted in excessive water loss and accelerated water flow in es1-1, also enhancing the water absorption capacity of the roots and the water transport capacity of the stems as well as promoting the in vivo enrichment of metal ions cotransported with water. The expression of ES1 is higher in the leaves and leaf sheaths than in other tissues, consistent with its role in controlling water loss from leaves. GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-ES1 fusion proteins were ubiquitously distributed in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Collectively, our data suggest that ES1 is important for regulating water loss in rice. PMID:26243619

  4. Identification of cDNA clones encoding HMG 2, a major protein of the mexican axolotl hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    de Guerra, A; Guillet, F; Charlemagne, J; Fellah, J S

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and analyzed cDNA clones encoding a major 26 kDa protein of the HMG1-2 family which is abundant in the cytoplasm and nucleus of axolotl hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes. The axolotl HMG2 protein is very similar to proteins belonging to the HMG1-2 family, from teleost fish to mammals. All the molecular features of the HMG1-2 proteins are conserved, including the high proportion of basic and aromatic residues, and the characteristic acidic C-terminus tail. The 3'-untranslated region of the HMG2 axolotl cDNA is also similar to the avian and mammalian HMG2 3'-UT sequences, suggesting that some selective events have acted at the DNA level to conserve this region, which could be important in the differential expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes. The axolotl HMG2 protein contains the two well conserved HMG boxes which are thought to be the DNA-binding domains of the molecule. Axolotl thymocytes and spleen cells contain almost identical amounts of HMG2 mRNAs but HMG2 polypeptide is undetectable in spleen cells using anti-26 kDa antibodies. The reason for the accumulation of HMG1-2 molecules in vertebrate hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes is discussed, as well as their possible role in apoptosis. PMID:8654668

  5. The PXL1 Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Encodes a Paxillin-like Protein Functioning in Polarized Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Nancy A.; Sousou, Tarek J.; Erdman, Scott E.

    2004-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YKR090w encodes a predicted protein displaying similarity in organization to paxillin, a scaffolding protein that organizes signaling and actin cytoskeletal regulating activities in many higher eucaryotic cell types. We found that YKR090w functions in a manner analogous to paxillin as a mediator of polarized cell growth; thus, we have named this gene PXL1 (Paxillin-like protein 1). Analyses of pxl1Δ strains show that PXL1 is required for the selection and maintenance of polarized growth sites during vegetative growth and mating. Genetic analyses of strains lacking both PXL1 and the Rho GAP BEM2 demonstrate that such cells display pronounced growth defects in response to different conditions causing Rho1 pathway activation. PXL1 also displays genetic interactions with the Rho1 effector FKS1. Pxl1p may therefore function as a modulator of Rho-GTPase signaling. A GFP::Pxl1 fusion protein localizes to sites of polarized cell growth. Experiments mapping the localization determinants of Pxl1p demonstrate the existence of localization mechanisms conserved between paxillin and Pxl1p and indicate an evolutionarily ancient and conserved role for LIM domain proteins in acting to modulate cell signaling and cytoskeletal organization during polarized growth. PMID:14767053

  6. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors.

  7. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  8. Using promoter libraries to reduce metabolic burden due to plasmid-encoded proteins in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Martina; Fernández-Castané, Alfred; Jaramillo, Alfonso; de Mas, Carles; Caminal, Gloria; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-01-25

    The over-expression of proteins in recombinant host cells often requires a significant amount of resources causing an increase in the metabolic load for the host. This results in a variety of physiological responses leading to altered growth parameters, including growth inhibition or activation of secondary metabolism pathways. Moreover, the expression of other plasmid-encoded genes such as antibiotic resistance genes or repressor proteins may also alter growth kinetics. In this work, we have developed a second-generation system suitable for Escherichia coli expression with an antibiotic-free plasmid maintenance mechanism based on a glycine auxotrophic marker (glyA). Metabolic burden related to plasmid maintenance and heterologous protein expression was minimized by tuning the expression levels of the repressor protein (LacI) and glyA using a library of promoters and applying synthetic biology tools that allow the rapid construction of vectors. The engineered antibiotic-free expression system was applied to the L-fuculose phosphate aldolase (FucA) over-production, showing an increase in production up to 3.8-fold in terms of FucA yield (mg g(-1)DCW) and 4.5-fold in terms of FucA activity (AU g(-1)DCW) compared to previous expression. Moreover, acetic acid production was reduced to 50%, expressed as gAc gDCW(-1). Our results showed that the aforementioned approaches are of paramount importance in order to increment the protein production in terms of mass and activity.

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS2 Encodes a Membrane Protein Localized at the Spindle Pole Body and the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, María de la Cruz; McBratney, Susan; Monterrosa, Antonio; Byers, Breck; Mann, Carl; Winey, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The MPS2 (monopolar spindle two) gene is one of several genes required for the proper execution of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Winey et al., 1991). We report here that the MPS2 gene encodes an essential 44-kDa protein with two putative coiled-coil regions and a hydrophobic sequence. Although MPS2 is required for normal mitotic growth, some null strains can survive; these survivors exhibit slow growth and abnormal ploidy. The MPS2 protein was tagged with nine copies of the myc epitope, and biochemical fractionation experiments show that it is an integral membrane protein. Visualization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) Mps2p fusion protein in living cells and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of 9xmyc-Mps2p revealed a perinuclear localization with one or two brighter foci of staining corresponding to the SPB. Additionally, immunoelectron microscopy shows that GFP-Mps2p localizes to the SPB. Our analysis suggests that Mps2p is required as a component of the SPB for insertion of the nascent SPB into the nuclear envelope. PMID:10397772

  10. Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV) RNA Binding Protein Encoded by Segment 8 ORF2 and Its Interaction with ISAV and Intracellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Christel M.; Markussen, Turhan; Thiede, Bernd; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus infecting salmonid fish. The virus is adapted to low temperature and has a replication optimum between 10–15 °C. In this study the subcellular localization and protein interactions for the protein encoded by the largest open reading frame of gene segment 8 (s8ORF2) were investigated. In ISAV infected cells the s8ORF2 protein was found mainly in the cytosol but a minor fraction of cells expressed the protein in the nucleus as well. Green fluorescent protein-tagged s8ORF2 did not leak out of the cell when the plasma membrane was permeabilized, suggesting interactions with intracellular structural components. The s8ORF2 protein exists both as monomer and homodimer, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments strongly suggests it binds to the ISAV fusion-, nucleo- and matrix proteins. Two versions of s8ORF2 were detected with apparent molecular weights of 24–26 and 35 kDa in lysates of infected cells. The 35 kDa type is an early viral protein while the smaller version appears during the later phases of infection. The 24–26 kDa type was also the predominant form in viral particles. The s8ORF2 protein has previously been shown to bind RNA and interfere with interferon induction and signaling. Here we found that a fraction of the s8ORF2 protein pool in infected cells is likely to be conjugated to the interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and ubiquitin. Furthermore, several endogenous proteins pulled down by the s8ORF2 protein were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). PMID:26901217

  11. Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV) RNA Binding Protein Encoded by Segment 8 ORF2 and Its Interaction with ISAV and Intracellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Christel M; Markussen, Turhan; Thiede, Bernd; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-02-18

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus infecting salmonid fish. The virus is adapted to low temperature and has a replication optimum between 10-15 °C. In this study the subcellular localization and protein interactions for the protein encoded by the largest open reading frame of gene segment 8 (s8ORF2) were investigated. In ISAV infected cells the s8ORF2 protein was found mainly in the cytosol but a minor fraction of cells expressed the protein in the nucleus as well. Green fluorescent protein-tagged s8ORF2 did not leak out of the cell when the plasma membrane was permeabilized, suggesting interactions with intracellular structural components. The s8ORF2 protein exists both as monomer and homodimer, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments strongly suggests it binds to the ISAV fusion-, nucleo- and matrix proteins. Two versions of s8ORF2 were detected with apparent molecular weights of 24-26 and 35 kDa in lysates of infected cells. The 35 kDa type is an early viral protein while the smaller version appears during the later phases of infection. The 24-26 kDa type was also the predominant form in viral particles. The s8ORF2 protein has previously been shown to bind RNA and interfere with interferon induction and signaling. Here we found that a fraction of the s8ORF2 protein pool in infected cells is likely to be conjugated to the interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and ubiquitin. Furthermore, several endogenous proteins pulled down by the s8ORF2 protein were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  12. A novel lily anther-specific gene encodes adhesin-like proteins associated with exine formation during anther development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Yang, Cheng-Shou; Wang, Co-Shine

    2014-01-01

    The anther-specific gene LLA1271 isolated from lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) anthers is novel and exists in two forms. The protein encoded by LLA1271 may represent an adhesin-like protein first found in higher plants. The protein contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide followed by a highly conserved repeat domain. The LLA1271 gene is temporally expressed at the phase of microspore development. RNA blot and RNA in situ hybridization analyses demonstrated that the gene was expressed both in the tapetum and in the microspore. The gene is endo- and exogenously induced by gibberellin. Studies with the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor uniconazole and an inhibitor of ethylene activity, 2,5-norbornadien (NBD), revealed that LLA1271 is negatively regulated by ethylene, and a cross-talk of regulation between gibberellin and ethylene occurs in young anthers. The treatment with NBD caused the tapetum to become densely cytoplasmic and highly polarized, whereas uniconazole arrested tapetal development in a state close to that of a tapetum without treatment. The LLA1271 protein is heat stable and heterogeneous. An immunoblot of separated protein fractions of the anther revealed that the LLA1271 protein was detected in protein fraction of the microspore released from the cell wall by treatment with either 0.5% or 2% Triton X-100. Ectopic expression of LLA1271 resulted in impaired stamen and low pollen germination. Scanning electron microscopy of TAP::LLA1271 pollen showed distorted exine formation and patterning. The LLA1271 protein once synthesized in both the tapetum and microspore is secreted and deposited on the surface of microspores, moderately affecting exine formation and patterning. PMID:24591055

  13. Refined structure, DNA binding studies, and dynamics of the bacteriophage Pf3 encoded single-stranded DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Folmer, R H; Nilges, M; Papavoine, C H; Harmsen, B J; Konings, R N; Hilbers, C W

    1997-07-29

    The solution structure of the 18-kDa single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous Pseudomonas bacteriophage Pf3 has been refined using 40 ms 15N- and 13C-edited NOESY spectra and many homo- and heteronuclear J-couplings. The structures are highly precise, but some variation was found in the orientation of the beta-hairpin denoted the DNA binding wing with respect to the core of the protein. Backbone dynamics of the protein was investigated in the presence and absence of DNA by measuring the R1 and R2 relaxation rates of the 15N nuclei and the 15N-1H NOE. It was found that the DNA binding wing is much more flexible than the rest of the protein, but its mobility is largely arrested upon binding of the protein to d(A)6. This confirms earlier hypotheses on the role of this hairpin in the function of the protein, as will be discussed. Furthermore, the complete DNA binding domain of the protein has been mapped by recording two-dimensional TOCSY spectra of the protein in the presence and absence of a small amount of spin-labeled oligonucleotide. The roles of specific residues in DNA binding were assessed by stoichiometric titration of d(A)6, which indicated for instance that Phe43 forms base stacking interactions with the single-stranded DNA. Finally, all results were combined to form a set of experimental restraints, which were subsequently used in restrained molecular dynamics calculations aimed at building a model for the Pf3 nucleoprotein complex. Implying in addition some similarities to the well-studied M13 complex, a plausible model could be constructed that is in accordance with the experimental data.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding an alternative oxidase protein of Sauromatum guttatum (Schott).

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, D M; McIntosh, L

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that recognize the 35-, 36-, and 37-kDa alternative oxidase proteins of Sauromatum guttatum (Schott) were used to isolate a cDNA clone, pAOSG81, from an S. guttatum cDNA expression library. A fusion protein with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa was expressed from a pUC119 derivative of pAOSG81 (pAOSG81-119) in Escherichia coli cells and was recognized by the monoclonal antibodies. When the in vitro translated and immunoprecipitated products made from mRNA hybrid-selected by pAOSG81 were analyzed, a single band corresponding to a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa was observed. DNA sequence characterization showed that pAOSG81 contains the entire coding region of a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 38.9 kDa, a putative 63-amino acid transit peptide, and a 9-amino acid match to the authentic N-terminal sequence of the 36-kDa alternative oxidase protein. Analyses of the deduced amino acid sequence indicate: (i) that the transit peptide is predicted to form amphiphilic helices, and (ii) that three regions of the processed protein are likely to form transmembrane alpha-helices. We conclude from these data that pAOSG81 represents a nuclear gene, aox1, encoding a precursor protein of one or more of the alternative oxidase proteins of S. guttatum. Images PMID:1706518

  15. Solution NMR Structure of Hypothetical Protein CV_2116 Encoded by a Viral Prophage Element in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    CV_2116 is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids from the Gram-negative coccobacillus Chromobacterium violaceum. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV_2116 sequence as a query identified only one hit (E = 2e−07) corresponding to a hypothetical protein OR16_04617 from Cupriavidus basilensis OR16, which failed to provide insight into the function of CV_2116. The CV_2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid, transformed into E. coli, and 13C- and 15N-labeled NMR samples of CV_2116 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting high-quality solution NMR structure of CV_2116 revealed a novel α + β fold containing two anti-parallel β-sheets in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein and one α-helix in the C-terminal third of the protein. CV_2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence family and a Dali search indicated that no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. Although no function of CV_2116 could be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches, the neighboring genes of CV_2116 encode various proteins annotated as similar to bacteriophage tail assembly proteins. Interestingly, C. violaceum exhibits an extensive network of bacteriophage tail-like structures that likely result from lateral gene transfer by incorporation of viral DNA into its genome (prophages) due to bacteriophage infection. Indeed, C. violaceum has been shown to contain four prophage elements and CV_2116 resides in the fourth of these elements. Analysis of the putative operon in which CV_2116 resides indicates that CV_2116 might be a component of the bacteriophage tail-like assembly that occurs in C. violaceum. PMID:22837698

  16. Novel dimeric structure of phage φ29-encoded protein p56: insights into uracil-DNA glycosylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Juan Luis; Pérez-Lago, Laura; Lázaro, José M; González, Carlos; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Salas, Margarita

    2011-12-01

    Protein p56 encoded by the Bacillus subtilis phage φ29 inhibits the host uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity. To get insights into the structural basis for this inhibition, the NMR solution structure of p56 has been determined. The inhibitor defines a novel dimeric fold, stabilized by a combination of polar and extensive hydrophobic interactions. Each polypeptide chain contains three stretches of anti-parallel β-sheets and a helical region linked by three short loops. In addition, microcalorimetry titration experiments showed that it forms a tight 2:1 complex with UDG, strongly suggesting that the dimer represents the functional form of the inhibitor. This was further confirmed by the functional analysis of p56 mutants unable to assemble into dimers. We have also shown that the highly anionic region of the inhibitor plays a significant role in the inhibition of UDG. Thus, based on these findings and taking into account previous results that revealed similarities between the association mode of p56 and the phage PBS-1/PBS-2-encoded inhibitor Ugi with UDG, we propose that protein p56 might inhibit the enzyme by mimicking its DNA substrate.

  17. Inactivation of the Neurospora Crassa Gene Encoding the Mitochondrial Protein Import Receptor Mom19 by the Technique of ``sheltered Rip''

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, TAA.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Schneider, H.; Lill, R.; Neupert, W.; Nargang, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a technique referred to as ``sheltered RIP'' (repeat induced point mutation) to create mutants of the mom-19 gene of Neurospora crassa, which encodes an import receptor for nuclear encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. Sheltered RIP permits the isolation of a mutant gene in one nucleus, even if that gene is essential for the survival of the organism, by sheltering the nucleus carrying the mutant gene in a heterokaryon with an unaffected nucleus. Furthermore, the nucleus harboring the RIPed gene contains a selectable marker so that it is possible to shift nuclear ratios in the heterokaryons to a state in which the nucleus containing the RIPed gene predominates in cultures grown under selective conditions. This results in a condition where the target gene product should be present at very suboptimal levels and allows the study of the mutant phenotype. One allele of mom-19 generated by this method contains 44 transitions resulting in 18 amino acid substitutions. When the heterokaryon containing this allele was grown under conditions favoring the RIPed nucleus, no MOM19 protein was detectable in the mitochondria of the strain. Homokaryotic strains containing the RIPed allele exhibit a complex and extremely slow growth phenotype suggesting that the product of the mom-19 gene is important in N. crassa. PMID:8138148

  18. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Lage, Kasper; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Tatar, Diana; Benita, Yair

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more densely connected than chance expectation. To confirm biological relevance, we show that the components of the networks tend to be expressed in similar tissues relevant to the phenotypes in question, suggesting the network indicates common underlying processes perturbed by risk loci. Furthermore, we show that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in

  19. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides.

  20. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  1. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments.

  2. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments. PMID:26758293

  3. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Patry, Robert T; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-12-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  4. cDNAs encoding for storage proteins in the tubers of taro (Colocasia esculenta Schott).

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Nakamura, K; Imai, T; Sato, T

    1993-06-01

    Two major protein groups of taro (Colocasia esculenta) tuber were purified, and their antisera were used for the screening of the cDNA library constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of taro tuber. A cDNA clone obtained by screening with an anti-12 kD protein antiserum had an insert 1058 bp-long, and an open reading frame for a peptide of 268 amino acids. The analyses of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and in vitro translation product suggested that the protein was synthesized as a peptide with a molecular weight of 27 kD, and then processed into two mature peptides with a molecular weight of 12.5 and 13.9 kD and an extra peptide with a molecular weight of 0.6 kD. The cDNA clones obtained using the anti-25 kD protein antiserum were highly homologous with each other. One of them had an insert 958 bp-long and an open reading frame for a peptide with 209 amino acids. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of this clone indicated that the 25 kD proteins were homologous to the trypsin inhibitors of soybean and winged bean as well as sporamins, the storage proteins of sweet potato.

  5. The Drosophila odz/ten-m gene encodes a type I, multiply cleaved heterodimeric transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Dgany, Orly; Wides, Ron

    2002-05-01

    The product of the Drosophila melanogaster odd Oz (odz)/Tenascin-major (ten-m) pair-rule gene consists of eight epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats followed by a novel 1800 amino acid polypeptide stretch unique to proteins of the Odz/Ten-m family. The structure and membrane orientation of this large enigmatic protein was characterized by raising and employing antibodies directed against discrete Odz polypeptide regions. Protein-modifying reagents impermeable to the plasma membrane were used in concert with the battery of antibodies to demonstrate that Odz is a type I transmembrane protein with the vast C-terminal portion in the intracellular space, and with the EGF repeats deployed extracellularly. The polypeptide was shown to undergo multiple cleavages at discrete intracellular and extracellular sites, and its extreme C-terminus was shown to undergo either processing at a very large number of sites or programmed degradation. The polypeptide is presented at the cell surface with additional post-translational modifications, and as two subunits of previously cleaved Odz joined by cysteine disulphide bridges maintaining their association. The model derived for the Odz protein is discussed in light of other models proposed for proteins of the Odz/Ten-m family, and in terms of functional implications.

  6. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  8. The two yeast histone H2A genes encode similar protein subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, J; Kolodrubetz, D; Grunstein, M

    1982-01-01

    The sequences of the two histones H2A genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined. These genes encode two histone H2A subtypes which are 131 amino acids in length but differ at 2 amino acid positions: an Ala leads to Thr and a Thr leads to Ala change at positions 124 and 125. Thus, the two histone H2A subtypes have identical amino acid compositions. The coding regions of the two H2A genes are homologous at 369 of 393 bases (94%), with all but 2 of the 24 changes being silent. There is only 30% homology in the 5' flanking sequences of the two H2A genes. Like other eukaryotic histone genes, the yeast H2A genes are not interrupted by intervening sequences. When the yeast H2A histones are compared to those from other eukaryotes, there is at least 80% homology in amino acid sequence. PMID:7041122

  9. Heterologous Protection Against Influenza by Injection of DNA Encoding a Viral Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Donnelly, John J.; Parker, Suezanne E.; Rhodes, Gary H.; Felgner, Philip L.; Dwarki, V. J.; Gromkowski, Stanislaw H.; Deck, R. Randall; Dewitt, Corrille M.; Friedman, Arthur; Hawe, Linda A.; Leander, Karen R.; Martinez, Douglas; Perry, Helen C.; Shiver, John W.; Montgomery, Donna L.; Liu, Margaret A.

    1993-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for conserved viral antigens can respond to different strains of virus, in contrast to antibodies, which are generally strain-specific. The generation of such CTLs in vivo usually requires endogenous expression of the antigen, as occurs in the case of virus infection. To generate a viral antigen for presentation to the immune system without the limitations of direct peptide delivery or viral vectors, plasmid DNA encoding influenza A nucleoprotein was injected into the quadriceps of BALB/c mice. This resulted in the generation of nucleoprotein-specific CTLs and protection from a subsequent challenge with a heterologous strain of influenza A virus, as measured by decreased viral lung titers, inhibition of mass loss, and increased survival.

  10. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis.

  11. The sll1951 Gene Encodes the Surface Layer Protein of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Sll1951 is the surface layer (S-layer) protein of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. This large, hemolysin-like protein was found in the supernatant of a strain that was deficient in S-layer attachment. An sll1951 deletion mutation was introduced into Synechocystis and was easily segregated to homozygosity under laboratory conditions. By thin-section and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy, a ∼30-nm-wide S-layer lattice covering the cell surface was readily visible in wild-type cells but was absent in the Δsll1951 strain. Instead, the Δsll1951 strain displayed a smooth lipopolysaccharide surface as its most peripheral layer. In the presence of chaotropic agents, the wild type released a large (>150-kDa) protein into the medium that was identified as Sll1951 by mass spectrometry of trypsin fragments; this protein was missing in the Δsll1951 strain. In addition, Sll1951 was prominent in crude extracts of the wild type, indicating that it is an abundant protein. The carotenoid composition of the cell wall fraction of the Δsll1951 strain was similar to that of the wild type, suggesting that the S-layer does not contribute to carotenoid binding. Although the photoautotrophic growth rate of the Δsll1951 strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, the viability of the Δsll1951 strain was reduced upon exposure to lysozyme treatment and hypo-osmotic stress, indicating a contribution of the S-layer to the integrity of the Synechocystis cell wall. This work identifies the S-layer protein in Synechocystis and shows that, at least under laboratory conditions, this very abundant, large protein has a supportive but not a critical role in the function of the cyanobacterium. PMID:24078613

  12. Characterization of the novel antifungal protein PgAFP and the encoding gene of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Andrea; Acosta, Raquel; Liddell, Susan; Núñez, Félix; Benito, M José; Asensio, Miguel A

    2010-04-01

    The strain RP42C from Penicillium chrysogenum produces a small protein PgAFP that inhibits the growth of some toxigenic molds. The molecular mass of the protein determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was 6 494Da. PgAFP showed a cationic character with an estimated pI value of 9.22. Upon chemical and enzymatic treatments of PgAFP, no evidence for N- or O-glycosylations was obtained. Five partial sequences of PgAFP were obtained by Edman degradation and by ESI-MS/MS after trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions. Using degenerate primers from these peptide sequences, a segment of 70bp was amplified by PCR from pgafp gene. 5'- and 3'-ends of pgafp were obtained by RACE-PCR with gene-specific primers designed from the 70bp segment. The complete pgafp sequence of 404bp was obtained using primers designed from 5'- and 3'-ends. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences revealed a 279bp coding region interrupted by two introns of 63 and 62bp. The precursor of the antifungal protein consists of 92 amino acids and appears to be processed to the mature 58 amino acids PgAFP. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein shares 79% identity to the antifungal protein Anafp from Aspergillus niger. PgAFP is a new protein that belongs to the group of small, cysteine-rich, and basic proteins with antifungal activity produced by ascomycetes. Given that P. chrysogenum is regarded as safe mold commonly found in foods, PgAFP may be useful to prevent growth of toxigenic molds in food and agricultural products.

  13. Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against purified SLSG and polyclonal antisera were raised against purified trpE/SLR1 fusion proteins. MAbH8 reacts with a protein epitope on SLSG. MAbH8 and the anit-SLR1 antisera were used with immunogold labeling to show SLSG and SLR1 proteins are localized in papillar cell walls in the stigma. MAbH8 reacts with SLSG from CRM+ cells but not CRM-cells; amino acid sequence identity between the two classes was only 65%, vs. 80% within the CRM+ class. SLSG is necessary but not sufficient for self-incompatibility. Variable molecular weight (MW) SLSG proteins are derived from the same SLG gene. MW variations in both SLSG and SLR1 are due to changes in glycosylation and phosphorylation state. SLSG is not detectable in mature pollen, but is expressed during microspore development. Using a SLG probe, a gene for a putative receptor with protein kinase activity was identified.

  14. Isolation of genomic and cDNA clones encoding bovine poly(A) binding protein II.

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, A; Krause, S; Blank, D; Jenny, A; Jenö, P; Lustig, A; Wahle, E

    1995-01-01

    cDNA clones for bovine poly(A) binding protein II (PAB II) were isolated. Their sequence predicts a protein of 32.8 kDa, revising earlier estimates of molecular mass. The protein contains one putative RNA-binding domain of the RNP type, an acidic N-terminal and a basic C-terminal domain. Analyses of authentic PAB II were in good agreement with all predictions from the cDNA sequence except that a number of arginine residues appeared to be post-translationally modified. Poly(A) binding protein II expressed in Escherichia coli was active in poly(A) binding and reconstitution of processive polyadenylation, including poly(A) tail length control. The cDNA clones showed a number of potential PAB II binding sites in the 3' untranslated sequence. Bovine poly(A)+RNA contained two mRNAs hybridizing to a PAB II-specific probe. Analysis of a genomic clone revealed six introns in the coding sequence. The revised molecular mass led to a demonstration of PAB II oligomer formation and a reinterpretation of earlier data concerning the protein's binding to poly(A). Images PMID:7479061

  15. Structure and transforming potential of the human cot oncogene encoding a putative protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, J; Higashi, T; Mukai, H; Ohuchi, T; Kakunaga, T

    1991-01-01

    A new transforming gene has been molecularly cloned from hamster SHOK cells transformed with DNA extracted from a human thyroid carcinoma cell line and named the cot (cancer Osaka thyroid) oncogene. cDNA sequencing disclosed that this oncogene codes for a protein with 415 amino acid residues, and computer matching showed 42 to 48% similarity matches with serine protein kinases. Its gene product was identified as a 52-kDa protein by transcription and translation in vitro. Expression of cot cDNA under transcriptional control by a retroviral long terminal repeat induced morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as well as SHOK cells. Protein kinase activity associated with constructed p60gag-cot was detected by immune complex kinase assay with anti-gag antiserum. The cot oncogene was overexpressed in transformed SHOK cells and found to have a rearranged 3' end in the last coding exon, which probably resulted in a deletion and an altered C' terminus in the transforming protein. This DNA rearrangement appeared to have occurred during transfection of the tumor DNA into hamster SHOK cells and not in the original thyroid tumor. Images PMID:2072910

  16. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Haryanto, Aris; Ermawati, Ratna; Wati, Vera; Irianingsih, Sri Handayani; Wijayanti, Nastiti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE) is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2) encoding gene of AE virus (AEV) from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/µl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with sample code 499

  17. Human Genome Encodes Many Proteins with Charge Periodicity of 28 Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Runcong; Sakiyama, Noriyuki; Sawada, Ryusuke; Sonoyama, Masashi; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2007-09-01

    The human genome includes more than 36,000 open reading frames that are translated to amino acid sequences of proteins. When the charge distribution in amino acid sequences from the total human genome was analyzed by the autocorrelation function, a surprisingly sharp periodicity of 28 residues was observed. Every protein with the charge periodicity of 28 residues (PCP28) could be discriminated by a simple algorithm, and the number of PCP28 amounted to about 3% of the total open reading frames of the human genome. The net charge of most PCP28 was highly positive. The possible structural and functional features of this type of protein were discussed in terms of the electric repulsion within molecules.

  18. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Detection and abundance of mRNA and protein encoded by transposable element activator (Ac) in maize.

    PubMed

    Fusswinkel, H; Schein, S; Courage, U; Starlinger, P; Kunze, R

    1991-02-01

    The 3.5 kb long mRNA of the maize transposable element Ac contains an open reading frame (ORFa) which encodes a polypeptide of 807 amino acids, the putative transposase of Ac. The Ac mRNA is a rare transcript: we now estimate the fraction of Ac mRNA in wx-m7::Ac seedlings to be 2-13 x 10(-5) of the polyA RNA. Assuming that maize cells contain similar amounts of polyA RNA as another monocot (0.16 pg/cell), this is equivalent to 1.5-10 transcripts in each cell. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 112 kDa is detected, by five antisera directed against different segments of ORFa, exclusively in nuclear extracts from Ac-containing maize. This protein is most likely the full-length Ac ORFa protein. We estimate its concentration to be in the range of 3 x 10(-7) of the nuclear proteins, or about 1000 molecules per triploid endosperm cell containing one Ac element. PMID:1848648

  20. Sequencing and Modification of the Gene Encoding the 42-Kilodalton Protein in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Synechococcus PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Tatsuo; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ogawa, Teruo; Pierce, John

    1990-01-01

    A 42-kilodalton cytoplasmic membrane protein is synthesized when high CO2-grown cells of Synechococcus PCC 7942 (Anacystis nidulans R2) are exposed to low CO2. The structural gene for this protein (cmpA) has been cloned and sequenced and shown to encode a 450 amino acid polypeptide with a molecular mass of 49 kilodalton. A deletion mutant lacking the 42-kilodalton protein was obtained by transformation of Synechococcus PCC 7942 following in vitro mutagenesis of the cloned gene. There were no significant differences between the mutant and wild-type cells in their growth rates under either low or high CO2 conditions. The activity of inorganic carbon (Ci) transport in the mutant was as high as that in the wild-type strain. In both types of cells, CO2 was the main species of Ci transported and the activities of CO2 and HCO3− transport increased when high CO2-grown cells were exposed to low CO2. We conclude that the 42-kilodalton protein is not directly involved in the Ci-accumulating mechanism of Synechococcus PCC 7942. Images Figure 3 PMID:16667451

  1. Molecular characterization of the gene encoding an 18-kilodalton small heat shock protein associated with the membrane of Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Jobin, M P; Delmas, F; Garmyn, D; Diviès, C; Guzzo, J

    1997-01-01

    In Leuconostoc oenos, different stresses such as heat, ethanol, and acid shocks dramatically induce the expression of an 18-kDa small heat shock protein called Lo 18. The corresponding gene (hsp18) was cloned from a genomic library of L. oenos constructed in Escherichia coli. A 2.3-kb DNA fragment carrying the hsp18 gene was sequenced. The hsp18 gene encodes a polypeptide of 148 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 16,938 Da. The Lo18 protein has a significant identity with small heat shock proteins of the alpha-crystallin family. The transcriptional start site was determined by primer extension. This experiment allowed us to identify the promoter region exhibiting high similarity to consensus promoter sequences of gram-positive bacteria, as well as E. coli. Northern blot analysis showed that hsp18 consists of a unique transcription unit of 0.6 kb. Moreover, hsp18 expression seemed to be controlled at the transcriptional level. This small heat shock protein was found to be peripherally associated with the membrane of L. oenos. PMID:9023938

  2. Mutations in DNAJC5, Encoding Cysteine-String Protein Alpha, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosková, Lenka; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Ivánek, Robert; Hůlková, Helena; Jahnová, Helena; van der Zee, Julie; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Tyynelä, Jaana; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Nijssen, Peter C.G.; Mole, Sara E.; Elleder, Milan; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent storage material in neural tissues and neurodegeneration and has an age of onset in the third decade of life or later. The genetic and molecular basis of the disease has remained unknown for many years. We carried out linkage mapping, gene-expression analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate-gene sequencing in affected individuals from 20 families and/or individuals with simplex cases; we identified in five individuals one of two disease-causing mutations, c.346_348delCTC and c.344T>G, in DNAJC5 encoding cysteine-string protein alpha (CSPα). These mutations—causing a deletion, p.Leu116del, and an amino acid exchange, p.Leu115Arg, respectively—are located within the cysteine-string domain of the protein and affect both palmitoylation-dependent sorting and the amount of CSPα in neuronal cells. The resulting depletion of functional CSPα might cause in parallel the presynaptic dysfunction and the progressive neurodegeneration observed in affected individuals and lysosomal accumulation of misfolded and proteolysis-resistant proteins in the form of characteristic ceroid deposits in neurons. Our work represents an important step in the genetic dissection of a genetically heterogeneous group of ANCLs. It also confirms a neuroprotective role for CSPα in humans and demonstrates the need for detailed investigation of CSPα in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses and other neurodegenerative diseases presenting with neuronal protein aggregation. PMID:21820099

  3. Characterization of a novel anther-specific gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat protein in petunia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Y Z; Sun, J; Huang, X; Peng, H; Liu, G F; Hu, H R

    2014-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida 'Fantasy Red', a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene referred to as PhLRR, was identified in a flower bud cDNA library. The open reading frame sequence of PhLRR was 1251 bp, encoding a putative 46.2-kDa protein of 416 amino acids. The PhLRR protein showed high similarity to members of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs), contained 11 conserved LRR domains, and was an extracellular localization protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PhLRR belonged to the same PGIPs subfamily as SHY, indicating that PhLRR may be involved in the development of pollen-like SHY. Expression analysis revealed that PhLRR was abundantly expressed during early stages of flower bud and anther development, while it was not detected in any other examined organs, such as sepals, petals, pistils, roots, stems, leaves, or open flowers. Furthermore, many cis-acting elements (such as AGAAA and GTGA) related to anther-specific gene expression were identified in the PhLRR gene promoter region, indicating that the promoter is also anther-specific. These results suggested that PhLRR is a novel anther-specific gene that may be essential for the early development of anthers. PMID:25501199

  4. Two novel heat shock genes encoding proteins produced in response to heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Allen, S P; Polazzi, J O; Gierse, J K; Easton, A M

    1992-11-01

    In Escherichia coli high-level production of some heterologous proteins (specifically, human prorenin, renin, and bovine insulin-like growth factor 2) resulted in the induction of two new E. coli heat shock proteins, both of which have molecular masses of 16 kDa and are tightly associated with inclusion bodies formed during heterologous protein production. We named these inclusion body-associated proteins IbpA and IbpB. The coding sequences for IbpA and IbpB were identified and isolated from the Kohara E. coli gene bank. The genes for these proteins (ibpA and ibpB) are located at 82.5 min on the chromosome. Nucleotide sequencing of the two genes revealed that they are transcribed in the same direction and are separated by 110 bp. Putative Shine-Dalgarno sequences are located upstream from the initiation codons of both genes. A putative heat shock promoter is located upstream from ibpA, and a putative transcription terminator is located downstream from ibpB. A temperature upshift experiment in which we used a wild-type E. coli strain and an isogenic rpoH mutant strain indicated that a sigma 32-containing RNA polymerase is involved in the regulation of expression of these genes. There is 57.5% identity between the genes at the nucleotide level and 52.2% identity at the amino acid level. A search of the protein data bases showed that both of these 16-kDa proteins exhibit low levels of homology to low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins from eukaryotic species.

  5. Inactivation of genes encoding plastoglobuli-like proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 leads to a light-sensitive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Francis X; Tice, Ashley B; Pham, Christina; Gantt, Elisabeth

    2010-03-01

    Plastoglobulins (PGL) are the predominant proteins of lipid globules in the plastids of flowering plants. Genes encoding proteins similar to plant PGL are also present in algae and cyanobacteria but in no other organisms, suggesting an important role for these proteins in oxygenic photosynthesis. To gain an understanding of the core and fundamental function of PGL, the two genes that encode PGL-like polypeptides in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (pgl1 and pgl2) were inactivated individually and in combination. The resulting mutants were able to grow under photoautotrophic conditions, dividing at rates that were comparable to that of the wild-type (WT) under low-light (LL) conditions (10 microeinsteins x m(-2) x s(-1)) but lower than that of the WT under moderately high-irradiance (HL) conditions (150 microeinsteins x m(-2) x s(-1)). Under HL, each Deltapgl mutant had less chlorophyll, a lower photosystem I (PSI)/PSII ratio, more carotenoid per unit of chlorophyll, and very much more myxoxanthophyll (a carotenoid symptomatic of high light stress) per unit of chlorophyll than the WT. Large, heterogeneous inclusion bodies were observed in cells of mutants inactivated in pgl2 or both pgl2 and pgl1 under both LL and HL conditions. The mutant inactivated in both pgl genes was especially sensitive to the light environment, with alterations in pigmentation, heterogeneous inclusion bodies, and a lower PSI/PSII ratio than the WT even for cultures grown under LL conditions. The WT cultures grown under HL contained 2- to 3-fold more PGL1 and PGL2 per cell than cultures grown under LL conditions. These and other observations led us to conclude that the PGL-like polypeptides of Synechocystis play similar but not identical roles in some process relevant to the repair of photooxidative damage.

  6. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Encodes a Type II Protein Secretion System That Promotes Detrimental Effects on Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karaba, Sara M.; White, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is increasingly identified as a multidrug-resistant pathogen, being associated with pneumonia, among other infections. Despite this increasing clinical problem, the genetic and molecular basis of S. maltophilia virulence is quite minimally defined. We now report that strain K279a, the first clinical isolate of S. maltophilia to be sequenced, encodes a functional type II protein secretion (T2S) system. Indeed, mutants of K279a that contain a mutation in the xps locus exhibit a loss of at least seven secreted proteins and three proteolytic activities. Unlike culture supernatants from the parental K279a, supernatants from multiple xps mutants also failed to induce the rounding, detachment, and death of A549 cells, a human lung epithelial cell line. Supernatants of the xps mutants were also unable to trigger a massive rearrangement in the host cell's actin cytoskeleton that was associated with K279a secretion. In all assays, a complemented xpsF mutant behaved as the wild type did, demonstrating that Xps T2S is required for optimal protein secretion and the detrimental effects on host cells. The activities that were defined as being Xps dependent in K279a were evident among other respiratory isolates of S. maltophilia. Utilizing a similar type of genetic analysis, we found that a second T2S system (Gsp) encoded by the K279a genome is cryptic under all of the conditions tested. Overall, this study represents the first examination of T2S in S. maltophilia, and the data obtained indicate that Xps T2S likely plays an important role in S. maltophilia pathogenesis. PMID:23774603

  7. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter–β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. PMID:26188204

  8. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-10-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter-β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged.

  9. Growing Slowly 1 locus encodes a PLS-type PPR protein required for RNA editing and plant development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tingting; Chen, Dan; Wu, Jian; Huang, Xiaorong; Wang, Yifan; Tang, Keli; Li, Jiayang; Sun, Mengxiang; Peng, Xiongbo

    2016-01-01

    Most pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are involved in organelle post-transcriptional processes, including RNA editing. The PPR proteins include the PLS subfamily, containing characteristic triplets of P, L, and S motifs; however, their editing mechanisms and roles in developmental processes are not fully understood. In this study, we isolated the Arabidopsis thaliana Growing slowly 1 (AtGRS1) gene and showed that it functions in RNA editing and plant development. Arabidopsis null mutants of grs1 exhibit slow growth and sterility. Further analysis showed that cell division activity was reduced dramatically in the roots of grs1 plants. We determined that GRS1 is a nuclear-encoded mitochondria-localized PPR protein, and is a member of the PLS subfamily. GRS1 is responsible for the RNA editing at four specific sites of four mitochondrial mRNAs: nad1-265, nad4L-55, nad6-103, and rps4-377. The first three of these mRNAs encode for the subunits of complex I of the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Thus, the activity of complex I is strongly reduced in grs1. Changes in RPS4 editing in grs1 plants affect mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis. Expression of the alternative respiratory pathway and the abscisic acid response gene ABI5 were up-regulated in grs1 mutant plants. Genetic analysis revealed that ABI5 is involved in the short root phenotype of grs1. Taken together, our results indicate that AtGRS1 regulates plant development by controlling RNA editing in Arabidopsis. PMID:27670716

  10. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-10-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter-β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. PMID:26188204

  11. Identification and regulation of expression of a gene encoding a filamentous hemagglutinin-related protein in Bordetella holmesii

    PubMed Central

    Link, Stefanie; Schmitt, Karin; Beier, Dagmar; Gross, Roy

    2007-01-01

    Background Bordetella holmesii is a human pathogen closely related to B. pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough. It is able to cause disease in immunocompromised patients, but also whooping cough-like symptoms in otherwise healthy individuals. However, virtually nothing was known so far about the underlying virulence mechanisms and previous attempts to identify virulence factors related to those of B. pertussis were not successful. Results By use of a PCR approach we were able to identify a B. holmesii gene encoding a protein with significant sequence similarities to the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) of B. avium and to a lesser extent to the FHA proteins of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. bronchiseptica. For these human and animal pathogens FHA is a crucial virulence factor required for successful colonization of the host. Interestingly, the B. holmesii protein shows a relatively high overall sequence similarity with the B. avium protein, while sequence conservation with the FHA proteins of the human and mammalian pathogens is quite limited and is most prominent in signal sequences required for their export to the cell surface. In the other Bordetellae expression of the fhaB gene encoding FHA was shown to be regulated by the master regulator of virulence, the BvgAS two-component system. Recently, we identified orthologs of BvgAS in B. holmesii, and here we show that this system also contributes to regulation of fhaB expression in B. holmesii. Accordingly, the purified BvgA response regulator of B. holmesii was shown to bind specifically in the upstream region of the fhaB promoter in vitro in a manner similar to that previously described for the BvgA protein of B. pertussis. Moreover, by deletion analysis of the fhaB promoter region we show that the BvgA binding sites are relevant for in vivo transcription from this promoter in B. holmesii. Conclusion The data reported here show that B. holmesii is endowed with a factor highly related to

  12. The T protein encoded by Brachyury is a tissue-specific transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kispert, A; Koschorz, B; Herrmann, B G

    1995-01-01

    The mouse Brachyury (T) gene is required for differentiation of the notochord and formation of mesoderm during posterior development. Homozygous embryos lacking T activity do not develop a trunk and tail and die in utero. The T gene is specifically expressed in notochord and early mesoderm cells in the embryo. recent data have demonstrated that the T protein is localized in the cell nucleus and specifically binds to a palindrome of 20 bp (the T site) in vitro. We show that the T protein activates expression of a reporter gene in HeLa cells through binding to the T site. Thus T is a novel tissue-specific transcription factor. It consists of a large N-terminal DNA binding domain (amino acids 1-229) and two pairs of transactivation and repression domains in the C-terminal protein half. T can also transactivate transcription through variously oriented and spaced T sites, a fact that may be relevant in the search for genes controlled by T protein and important in mesoderm development. Images PMID:7588606

  13. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae BAR1 gene encodes an exported protein with homology to pepsin.

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, V L; Welch, S K; Insley, M Y; Manney, T R; Holly, J; Saari, G C; Parker, M L

    1988-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae a cells secrete an extracellular protein, called "barrier" activity, that acts as an antagonist of alpha factor, the peptide mating pheromone produced by mating-type alpha cells. We report here the DNA sequence of BAR1, the structural gene for barrier activity. The deduced primary translation product of 587 amino acids has a putative signal peptide, nine potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites, and marked sequence similarity of the first two-thirds of the protein with pepsin-like proteases. Barrier activity was abolished by in vitro mutation of an aspartic acid predicted from this sequence homology to be in the active site. Therefore, barrier protein is probably a protease that cleaves alpha factor. The sequence similarity suggests that the first two-thirds of the barrier protein is organized into two distinct structural domains like those of the pepsin-like proteases. However, the BAR1 gene product has a third carboxyl-terminal domain of unknown function; deletion of at least 166 of the 191 amino acids of this region has no significant effect on barrier activity. Images PMID:3124102

  15. The yeast telomere length regulator TEL2 encodes a protein that binds to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kota, R S; Runge, K W

    1998-01-01

    TEL2 is required for telomere length regulation and viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the mechanism by which Tel2p regulates telomere length, the majority (65%) of the TEL2 ORF was fused to the 3'-end of the gene for maltose binding protein, expressed in bacteria and the purified protein used in DNA binding studies. Rap1p, the major yeast telomere binding protein, recognizes a 13 bp duplex site 5'-GGTGTGTGGGTGT-3' in yeast telomeric DNA with high affinity. Gel shift experiments revealed that the MBP-Tel2p fusion binds the double-stranded yeast telomeric Rap1p site in a sequence-specific manner. Analysis of mutated sites showed that MBP-Tel2p could bind 5'-GTGTGTGG-3' within this 13 bp site. Methylation interference analysis revealed that Tel2p contacts the 5'-terminal guanine in the major groove. MBP-Tel2p did not bind duplex telomeric DNA repeats from vertebrates, Tetrahymena or Oxytricha. These results suggest that Tel2p is a DNA binding protein that recognizes yeast telomeric DNA. PMID:9490802

  16. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Leptospira species.

    PubMed

    Buyuktimkin, Bora; Saier, Milton H

    2016-09-01

    Select species of the bacterial genus Leptospira are causative agents of leptospirosis, an emerging global zoonosis affecting nearly one million people worldwide annually. We examined two Leptospira pathogens, Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai str. 56601 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo-bovis str. L550, as well as the free-living leptospiral saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc str. 'Patoc 1 (Ames)'. The transport proteins of these leptospires were identified and compared using bioinformatics to gain an appreciation for which proteins may be related to pathogenesis and saprophytism. L. biflexa possesses a disproportionately high number of secondary carriers for metabolite uptake and environmental adaptability as well as an increased number of inorganic cation transporters providing ionic homeostasis and effective osmoregulation in a rapidly changing environment. L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii possess far fewer transporters, but those that they all have are remarkably similar, with near-equivalent representation in most transporter families. These two Leptospira pathogens also possess intact sphingomyelinases, holins, and virulence-related outer membrane porins. These virulence-related factors, in conjunction with decreased transporter substrate versatility, indicate that pathogenicity arose in Leptospira correlating to progressively narrowing ecological niches and the emergence of a limited set of proteins responsible for host invasion. The variability of host tropism and mortality rates by infectious leptospires suggests that small differences in individual sets of proteins play important physiological and pathological roles. PMID:27296707

  17. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Transport Proteins Encoded Within the Genomes of Leptospira Species

    PubMed Central

    Buyuktimkin, Bora; Saier, Milton H.

    2015-01-01

    Select species of the bacterial genus Leptospira are causative agents of leptospirosis, an emerging global zoonosis affecting nearly one million people worldwide annually. We examined two Leptospira pathogens, L. interrogans serovar Lai str. 56601 and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo-bovis str. L550, as well as the free-living leptospiral saprophyte, L. biflexa serovar Patoc str. ‘Patoc 1 (Ames)’. The transport proteins of these leptospires were identified and compared using bioinformatics to gain an appreciation for which proteins may be related to pathogenesis and saprophytism. L. biflexa possesses a disproportionately high number of secondary carriers for metabolite uptake and environmental adaptability as well as an increased number of inorganic cation transporters providing ionic homeostasis and effective osmoregulation in a rapidly changing environment. L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii possess far fewer transporters, but those that they have are remarkably similar, with near-equivalent representation in most transporter families. These two Leptospira pathogens also possess intact sphingomyelinases, holins, and virulence-related outer membrane porins. These virulence-related factors, in conjunction with decreased transporter substrate versatility, indicate that pathogenicity was accompanied by progressively narrowing ecological niches and the emergence of a limited set of proteins responsible for host invasion. The variability of host tropism and mortality rates by infectious leptospires suggests that small differences in individual sets of proteins play important physiological and pathological roles. PMID:26247102

  18. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  19. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  20. Bioinformatic Analyses of Integral Membrane Transport Proteins Encoded Within the Genome of the Planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica

    PubMed Central

    Paparoditis, Philipp; Vastermark, Ake; Le, Andrew J.; Fuerst, John A.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica (R. baltica) is a Planctomycete, known to have intracellular membranes. Because of its unusual cell structure and ecological significance, we have conducted comprehensive analyses of its transmembrane transport proteins. The complete proteome of R. baltica was screened against the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB) to identify recognizable integral membrane transport proteins. 342 proteins were identified with a high degree of confidence, and these fell into several different classes. R. baltica encodes in its genome channels (12%), secondary carriers (33%), and primary active transport proteins (41%) in addition to classes represented in smaller numbers. Relative to most non-marine bacteria, R. baltica possesses a larger number of sodium-dependent symporters but fewer proton-dependent symporters, and it has dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl-amine-oxide (TMAO) reductases, consistent with its Na+-rich marine environment. R. baltica also possesses a Na+-translocating NADH:quinone dehydrogenase (Na+-NDH), a Na+ efflux decarboxylase, two Na+-exporting ABC pumps, two Na+-translocating F-type ATPases, two Na+:H+ antiporters and two K+:H+ antiporters. Flagellar motility probably depends on the sodium electrochemical gradient. Surprisingly, R. baltica also has a complete set of H+-translocating electron transport complexes similar to those present in β-proteobacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria. The transport proteins identified proved to be typical of the bacterial domain with little or no indication of the presence of eukaryotic-type transporters. However, novel functionally uncharacterized multispanning membrane proteins were identified, some of which are found only in Rhodopirellula species, but others of which are widely distributed in bacteria. The analyses lead to predictions regarding the physiology, ecology and evolution of R. baltica. PMID:23969110

  1. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  2. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianjie; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3′ untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  3. Nucleotide sequence of dengue 2 RNA and comparison of the encoded proteins with those of other flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Y S; Galler, R; Hunkapiller, T; Dalrymple, J M; Strauss, J H; Strauss, E G

    1988-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the RNA of dengue 2 virus (S1 candidate vaccine strain derived from the PR-159 isolate) with the exception of about 15 nucleotides at the 5' end. The genome organization is the same as that deduced earlier for other flaviviruses and the amino acid sequences of the encoded dengue 2 proteins show striking homology to those of other flaviviruses. The overall amino acid sequence similarity between dengue 2 and yellow fever virus is 44.7%, whereas that between dengue 2 and West Nile virus is 50.7%. These viruses represent three different serological subgroups of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Comparison of the amino acid sequences shows that amino acid sequence homology is not uniformly distributed among the proteins; highest homology is found in some domains of nonstructural protein NS5 and lowest homology in the hydrophobic polypeptides ns2a and 2b. In general the structural proteins are less well conserved than the nonstructural proteins. Hydrophobicity profiles, however, are remarkably similar throughout the translated region. Comparison of the dengue 2 PR-159 sequence to partial sequence data from dengue 4 and another strain of dengue 2 virus reveals amino acid sequence homologies of about 64 and 96%, respectively, in the structural protein region. Thus as a general rule for flaviviruses examined to date, members of different serological subgroups demonstrate 50% or less amino acid sequence homology, members of the same subgroup average 65-75% homology, and strains of the same virus demonstrate greater than 95% amino acid sequence similarity.

  4. Bioinformatic analyses of integral membrane transport proteins encoded within the genome of the planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica.

    PubMed

    Paparoditis, Philipp; Västermark, Ake; Le, Andrew J; Fuerst, John A; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica (R. baltica) is a Planctomycete, known to have intracellular membranes. Because of its unusual cell structure and ecological significance, we have conducted comprehensive analyses of its transmembrane transport proteins. The complete proteome of R. baltica was screened against the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB) to identify recognizable integral membrane transport proteins. 342 proteins were identified with a high degree of confidence, and these fell into several different classes. R. baltica encodes in its genome channels (12%), secondary carriers (33%), and primary active transport proteins (41%) in addition to classes represented in smaller numbers. Relative to most non-marine bacteria, R. baltica possesses a larger number of sodium-dependent symporters but fewer proton-dependent symporters, and it has dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl-amine-oxide (TMAO) reductases, consistent with its Na(+)-rich marine environment. R. baltica also possesses a Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone dehydrogenase (Na(+)-NDH), a Na(+) efflux decarboxylase, two Na(+)-exporting ABC pumps, two Na(+)-translocating F-type ATPases, two Na(+):H(+) antiporters and two K(+):H(+) antiporters. Flagellar motility probably depends on the sodium electrochemical gradient. Surprisingly, R. baltica also has a complete set of H(+)-translocating electron transport complexes similar to those present in α-proteobacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria. The transport proteins identified proved to be typical of the bacterial domain with little or no indication of the presence of eukaryotic-type transporters. However, novel functionally uncharacterized multispanning membrane proteins were identified, some of which are found only in Rhodopirellula species, but others of which are widely distributed in bacteria. The analyses lead to predictions regarding the physiology, ecology and evolution of R. baltica. PMID:23969110

  5. Cloning, expression analysis and recombinant expression of a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Feng, Chao; Wang, Jing; Kong, Fanyu; Sun, Wenxiu; Wang, Fenglong

    2016-05-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are major defensive proteins produced by plant cell walls that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance by reducing polygalacturonase (PG) activity. In the present study, a novel PGIP gene was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), hereafter referred as NtPGIP. A full-length NtPGIP cDNA of 1,412 bp with a 186 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and 209 bp 3'-UTR was cloned from tobacco, NtPGIP is predicted to encode a protein of 338 amino acids. The NtPGIP sequence from genomic DNA showed no introns and sequence alignments of NtPGIP's deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with known PGIPs from other plant species. Moreover, the putative NtPGIP protein was closely clustered with several Solanaceae PGIPs. Further, the expression profile of NtPGIP was examined in tobacco leaves following stimulation with the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae and other stressors, including salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and cold treatment. The results showed that all of the treatments up-regulated the expression of NtPGIP at different times. To understand the biochemical activity of NtPGIP gene, a full-length NtPGIP cDNA sequence was subcloned into a pET28a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Recombinant proteins were successfully induced by 1.0 nmol/L IPTG and the purified proteins effectively inhibited Phytophthora capsici PG activity. The results of this study suggest that NtPGIP may be a new candidate gene with properties that could be exploited in plant breeding. PMID:27441281

  6. Chromosome 6 encoded RNaseT2 protein is a cell growth regulator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglan; Zhawar, Vikramjit K; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kaur, G Pal; DeRiel, Jon Kimball; Kandpal, Raj P; Athwal, Raghbir S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown by chromosome transfer technique that chromosome 6 alters the phenotype of a variety of tumour cells and SV40 immortalized cells. We present here the phenotypic effects of the ectopic expression of RNaseT2, a highly conserved ribonuclease encoded by chromosome 6q27, in SV40 immortalized cell lines. We contrast our findings with those reported for ovarian carcinoma cell lines and an SV40 immortalized cell line transfected with RNaseT2. Although RNaseT2 expression is elevated in normal diploid fibroblasts approaching senescence (passage 64), forced expression of the gene in immortalized cells does not cause them to senesce. A significant reduction was observed in colony forming efficiency, anchorage independence and growth rate of cells transfected with RNaseT2. The levels of transcripts involved in Akt signalling pathway, cell cycle control and pathways related to cell proliferation decreased 2–10-folds in SV40 immortalized cells in response to RNaseT2 expression. Interestingly, some immortalized cells expressed alternatively spliced transcript variants instead of the full-length RNaseT2 transcript. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that RNaseT2 is a cell growth regulator and it does not induce senescence in SV40 immortalized cell lines. PMID:19382914

  7. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  8. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  9. A cDNA clone encoding an IgE-binding protein from Brassica anther has significant sequence similarity to Ca(2+)-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, K; Okada, T; Watanabe, M; Ide, T; Ashida, T; Xu, H; Singh, M B

    1995-12-01

    Thirteen cDNA clones encoding IgE-binding proteins were isolated from expression libraries of anthers of Brassica rapa L. and B. napus L. using serum IgE from a patient who was specifically allergic to Brassica pollen. These clones were divided into two groups, I and II, based on the sequence similarity. All the group I cDNAs predicted the same protein of 79 amino acids, while the group II predicted a protein of 83 amino acids with microheterogeneity. Both of the deduced amino acid sequences contained two regions with sequence similarity to Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin. However flanking sequences were distinct from that of calmodulin or other Ca(2+)-binding proteins. RNA-gel blot analysis showed the genes of group I and II were preferentially expressed in anthers at the later developmental stage and in mature pollen. The recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli was recognized in immunoblot analysis by the IgE of a Brassica pollen allergic patient, but not by the Ige of a non-allergic patient. The cDNA clones reported here, therefore, represent pollen allergens of Brassica species.

  10. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  11. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  12. Putative multiadhesive protein from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium: cloning of the cDNA encoding a fibronectin-, an SRCR-, and a complement control protein module.

    PubMed

    Pahler, S; Blumbach, B; Müller, I; Müller, W E

    1998-10-15

    Sponges (Porifera) representing the simplest metazoan phylum so far have been thought to possess no basal lamina tissue structures. One major extracellular matrix protein that is also a constitutive glycoprotein of the basal lamina is fibronectin. It was the aim of the present study to identify the native protein from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium and to isolate the corresponding cDNA. In crude extracts from this sponge protein(s) of M(r) of approximately 230 and approximately 210 kDa could be visualized by Western-blotting using an anti-fibronectin [human] antibody. By PCR cloning from a cDNA library of G. cydonium we isolated a cDNA comprising one element of fibronectin, the type-III (FN3) module. The cDNA (2.3 kb long), encoding a 701 amino acid [aa] long putative "multiadhesive protein" termed MAP_GEOCY, was found to contain (i) a fibronectin-, (ii) a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich [SRCR]-, and (iii) a short consensus repeat [SCR] module. The 89 aa long fibronectin module comprises the characteristic topology and conserved aa found in fibronectin type-III (FN3) elements. The SRCR module (101 aa) features the characteristics of group B SRCR molecules. The predominant proteins belonging to this group are the mammalian WC1-, M130-, CD6- and CD5 antigens that probably are involved in immunological reactions. The SCR module (54 aa) shows the characteristics of type III SCR modules found in complement receptors. Phylogenetic analyses performed with all three building blocks of the "multiadhesive protein" showed that the respective sponge modules form independent, possibly basal, lineages in trees that include the corresponding modules from higher metazoan animals. In summary, these data demonstrate for the first time that the phylogenetically oldest Metazoa, the sponges, contain protein modules seen in higher animals in proteins of the extracellular matrix and in molecules involved in cell-mediated immune reactions in vertebrates. PMID:9755483

  13. Nucleotide sequence of a Dictyostelium discoideum gene encoding a protein homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31.

    PubMed

    Hoja, U; Hofmann, J; Marschalek, R; Dingermann, T

    1993-01-15

    A cDNA clone has been isolated whose coding potential is significantly homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31. The single copy genomic gene contains a 271 bp intron immediately downstream from the ATG translation initiation codon and is flanked by cannonical exon/intron junctions. The intron carries a CAATCAAT motif which has been described as inducer element for discoidin I gamma expression and which has also been found within the intron of the rp29 gene form D. discoideum. The deduced protein contains 110 amino acids and is slightly basic. PMID:7916591

  14. The Arabidopsis abscisic acid response locus ABI4 encodes an APETALA 2 domain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, R R; Wang, M L; Lynch, T J; Rao, S; Goodman, H M

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive abi4 mutants have pleiotropic defects in seed development, including decreased sensitivity to ABA inhibition of germination and altered seed-specific gene expression. This phenotype is consistent with a role for ABI4 in regulating seed responses to ABA and/or seed-specific signals. We isolated the ABI4 gene by positional cloning and confirmed its identity by complementation analysis. The predicted protein product shows homology to a plant-specific family of transcriptional regulators characterized by a conserved DNA binding domain, the APETALA 2 domain. The single mutant allele identified has a single base pair deletion, resulting in a frameshift that should disrupt the C-terminal half of the protein but leave the presumed DNA binding domain intact. Expression analyses showed that despite the seed-specific nature of the mutant phenotype, ABI4 expression is not seed specific. PMID:9634591

  15. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Ross, Kevin D.; Seidner, Glen A.; Gorman, Michael R.; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Patricia N.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Joiner, William J.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes. PMID:26131556

  16. Semi-supervised Prediction of Protein Interaction Sentences Exploiting Semantically Encoded Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polajnar, Tamara; Girolami, Mark

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) identification is an integral component of many biomedical research and database curation tools. Automation of this task through classification is one of the key goals of text mining (TM). However, labelled PPI corpora required to train classifiers are generally small. In order to overcome this sparsity in the training data, we propose a novel method of integrating corpora that do not contain relevance judgements. Our approach uses a semantic language model to gather word similarity from a large unlabelled corpus. This additional information is integrated into the sentence classification process using kernel transformations and has a re-weighting effect on the training features that leads to an 8% improvement in F-score over the baseline results. Furthermore, we discover that some words which are generally considered indicative of interactions are actually neutralised by this process.

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi )

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Structure and localization of the gene encoding human peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Takahashi, Ei-Ichi ); Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1993-11-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) is a small, basic, and cytoplasmic lipid-binding protein of peripheral myelin. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PMP2 gene. The gene is about 8 kb long and consists of four exons. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box) and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human PMP2 was assigned to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1 by spot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Involvement of RNA2-encoded proteins in the specific transmission of Grapevine fanleaf virus by its nematode vector Xiphinema index.

    PubMed

    Belin, C; Schmitt, C; Demangeat, G; Komar, V; Pinck, L; Fuchs, M

    2001-12-01

    The nepovirus Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) is specifically transmitted by the nematode Xiphinema index. To identify the RNA2-encoded proteins involved in X. index-mediated spread of GFLV, chimeric RNA2 constructs were engineered by replacing the 2A, 2B(MP), and/or 2C(CP) sequences of GFLV with their counterparts in Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), a closely related nepovirus which is transmitted by Xiphinema diversicaudatum but not by X. index. Among the recombinant viruses obtained from transcripts of GFLV RNA1 and chimeric RNA2, only those which contained the 2C(CP) gene (504 aa) and 2B(MP) contiguous 9 C-terminal residues of GFLV were transmitted by X. index as efficiently as natural and synthetic wild-type GFLV, regardless of the origin of the 2A and 2B(MP) genes. As expected, ArMV was not transmitted probably because it is not retained by X. index. These results indicate that the determinants responsible for the specific spread of GFLV by X. index are located within the 513 C-terminal residues of the polyprotein encoded by RNA2.

  20. Modulation of expression of genes encoding nuclear proteins following exposure to JANUS neutrons or {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1994-05-01

    Previous work has shown that exposure of cells to ionizing radiations causes modulation of a variety of genes, including those encoding c-fos, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, and cytoskeletal elements. The experiments reported herein were designed to examine the effects of either JANUS neutron or {gamma}-ray exposure on expression of genes encoding nucleus-associated proteins (H4-histone, c-jun, c-myc, Rb, and p53). Cycling Syrian hamster embryo cells were irradiated with varying doses and dose rates of either JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons or {gamma}-rays; after incubation of the cell cultures for 1 h following radiation exposure, mRNA was harvested and analyzed by Northern blot. Results revealed induction of transcripts for c-jun, H4-histone, and (to a lesser extent) Rb following {gamma}-ray but not following neutron exposure. Expression of p53 and c-myc genes was unaffected by radiation exposure. Radiations at different doses and dose rates were compared for each of the genes studied.

  1. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) encoded SGIV-miR-13 attenuates viral infection via modulating major capsid protein expression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yang; Guo, Chuanyu; Ni, Songwei; Wei, Jingguang; Li, Pengfei; Wei, Shina; Cui, Huachun; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-07-01

    Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) encodes a number of microRNAs (miRNAs) during infection. Among these, SGIV-miR-13 has robust expression at early stage after SGIV inoculation, raising a huge possibility that it participates in the viral infection. In the present study, we found that SGIV-miR-13 overexpression led to a significant reduction in viral load in cultured fish cells with SGIV infection, as demonstrated by less level of viral transcripts, viral-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) and assembled viral particles. In silico analysis showed that SGIV-miR-13 maps antisense to the coding region of SGIV major capsid protein (SGIV-MCP), suggesting it to be a potential target of SGIV-miR-13. Coincidently, SGIV-miR-13 showed an inverted expression profile with SGIV-MCP during SGIV infection, and luciferase reporter assay further demonstrated SGIV-MCP as the direct target of SGIV-miR-13. Functionally, overexpression of SGIV-miR-13 inhibited, whereas knockdown of SGIV-miR-13 restored the expression of SGIV-MCP during viral infection, resulting in altered viral progeny emergences. In conclusion, our data suggest that SGIV-miR-13 functions in a negative regulatory mechanism to restrict early viral replication, and thus prevents excessive cellular antiviral responses during SGIV infection. The detailed investigation of SGIV encoded miRNAs may provide new insights into the mechanism of iridovirus pathogenesis.

  2. The two paralogue phoN (phosphinothricin acetyl transferase) genes of Pseudomonas putida encode functionally different proteins.

    PubMed

    Páez-Espino, A David; Chavarría, Max; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-09-01

    Phosphinothricin (PPT) is a non-specific inhibitor of glutamine synthetase that has been employed as herbicide for selection of transgenic plants expressing cognate resistance genes. While the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has been generally considered PPT-sensitive, inspection of its genome sequence reveals the presence of two highly similar open reading frames (PP_1924 and PP_4846) encoding acetylases with a potential to cause tolerance to the herbicide. To explore this possibility, each of these genes (named phoN1 and phoN2) was separately cloned and their activities examined in vivo and in vitro. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that phoN1 encodes a bona fide PPT-acetyl transferase, the expression of which suffices to make P. putida tolerant to high concentrations of the herbicide. In contrast, PhoN2 does not act on PPT but displays instead activity against methionine sulfoximine (MetSox), another glutamine synthetase inhibitor. When the geometry of the substrate-binding site of PhoN1 was grafted with the equivalent residues of the predicted PhoN2 structure, the resulting protein increased significantly MetSox resistance of the expression host concomitantly with the loss of activity on PPT. These observations uncover intricate biochemical and genetic interactions among soil microorganisms and how they can be perturbed by exposure to generic herbicides in soil. PMID:25684119

  3. Molecular cloning and sequence determination of the genomic regions encoding protease and genome-linked protein of three picornaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, G; Rosenwirth, B; Bauer, E; Seifert, J M; Werner, F J; Besemer, J

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the degree of similarity between picornavirus proteases, we cloned the genomic cDNAs of an enterovirus, echovirus 9 (strain Barty), and two rhinoviruses, serotypes 1A and 14LP, and determined the nucleotide sequence of the region which, by analogy to poliovirus, encodes the protease. The nucleotide sequence of the region encoding the genome-linked protein VPg, immediately adjacent to the protease, was also determined. Comparison of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences with other available picornavirus sequences showed remarkable homology in proteases and among VPgs. Three highly conserved peptide regions were identified in the protease; one of these is specific for human picornaviruses and has no obvious counterpart in encephalomyocarditis virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, or cowpea mosaic virus proteases. Within the other two peptide regions two conserved amino acids, Cys 147 and His 161, could be the reactive residues of the active site. We used a statistical method to predict certain features of the secondary structures, such as alpha helices, beta sheets, and turns, and found many of these conformations to be conserved. The hydropathy profiles of the compared proteases were also strikingly similar. Thus, the proteases of human picornaviruses very probably have a similar three-dimensional structure. Images PMID:3512851

  4. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W; Ehigiator, Humphrey N; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2011-11-15

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response.

  5. Influence of cyclic AMP, agmatine, and a novel protein encoded by a flanking gene on speB (agmatine ureohydrolase) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Szumanski, M B; Boyle, S M

    1992-01-01

    The speB gene of Escherichia coli encodes agmatine ureohydrolase (AUH), a putrescine biosynthetic enzyme. The speB gene is transcribed either from its own promoter or as a polycistronic message from the promoter of the speA gene encoding arginine decarboxylase. Two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2) are present on the strand complementary to speB; approximately 90% of ORF2 overlaps the speB coding region. Analysis of transcriptional and translational fusions of ORF1 or ORF2 to lacZ revealed that ORF1 encoded a novel protein while ORF2 was not transcribed. Deletion of ORF1 from a plasmid containing ORF1, ORF2, and speB reduced the activity of AUH by 83%. In contrast, the presence of plasmid-encoded ORF1 caused an 86% increase in chromosomally encoded AUH activity. ORF1 did not stimulate alkaline phosphatase expressed from a phi(speB-phoA) transcriptional fusion encoded on the same plasmid. Western analysis (immunoblot) of a phi(ORF1-lacZ) translational fusion revealed that ORF1 encodes a 25.3-kDa protein. Agmatine induced transcription of phi(speB-phoA) but not phi(speA-phoA) fusions. Consequently, agmatine affects selection between the monocistronic and the polycistronic modes of speB transcription. In contrast, cyclic AMP (cAMP) repressed AUH activity of chromosomally encoded AUH but had no effect on plasmid-borne speB nor phi(speB-phoA). It is concluded that ORF1 encodes a protein which is a posttranscriptional regulator of speB, agmatine induces speB independent of speA, and cAMP regulates speB indirectly. Images PMID:1310091

  6. Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in gene transfer experiments using the soybean seed storage protein gene. The sequencing of gene Gmg ..cap alpha..' 17.1 has been completed. Several deletion mutants of this gene are being prepared for experiments to transfer the gene into the Ti-plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The purpose is to determine which, if any, of the upstream sequences are those which regulate the developmental expression of the gene. (ACR)

  7. Yeti, an essential Drosophila melanogaster gene, encodes a protein required for chromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Messina, Giovanni; Damia, Elisabetta; Fanti, Laura; Atterrato, Maria Teresa; Celauro, Emanuele; Mariotti, Francesca Romana; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Walther, Matthias; Vernì, Fiammetta; Picchioni, Daria; Moschetti, Roberta; Caizzi, Ruggiero; Piacentini, Lucia; Cenci, Giovanni; Giordano, Ennio; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2014-06-01

    The evolutionarily conserved family of Bucentaur (BCNT) proteins exhibits a widespread distribution in animal and plants, yet its biological role remains largely unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism, we investigated the in vivo role of the Drosophila BCNT member called YETI. We report that loss of YETI causes lethality before pupation and defects in higher-order chromatin organization, as evidenced by severe impairment in the association of histone H2A.V, nucleosomal histones and epigenetic marks with polytene chromosomes. We also find that YETI binds to polytene chromosomes through its conserved BCNT domain and interacts with the histone variant H2A.V, HP1a and Domino-A (DOM-A), the ATPase subunit of the DOM/Tip60 chromatin remodeling complex. Furthermore, we identify YETI as a downstream target of the Drosophila DOM-A. On the basis of these results, we propose that YETI interacts with H2A.V-exchanging machinery, as a chaperone or as a new subunit of the DOM/Tip60 remodeling complex, and acts to regulate the accumulation of H2A.V at chromatin sites. Overall, our findings suggest an unanticipated role of YETI protein in chromatin organization and provide, for the first time, mechanistic clues on how BCNT proteins control development in multicellular organisms.

  8. Sec59 encodes a membrane protein required for core glycosylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, M; Kepes, F; Schekman, R

    1989-01-01

    When incubated at a restrictive temperature, Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec59 mutant cells accumulate inactive and incompletely glycosylated forms of secretory proteins. Three different secretory polypeptides (invertase, pro-alpha-factor, and pro-carboxypeptidase Y) accumulated within a membrane-bounded organelle, presumably the endoplasmic reticulum, and resisted proteolytic degradation unless the membrane was permeabilized with detergent. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analysis of the SEC59 gene predicted an extremely hydrophobic protein product of 59 kilodaltons. This prediction was confirmed by reconstitution of the sec59 defect in vitro. The alpha-factor precursor, which was translated in a soluble fraction from wild-type cells, was translocated into, but inefficiently glycosylated within, membranes from sec59 mutant cells. Residual glycosylation activity of membranes of sec59 cells was thermolabile compared with the activity of wild-type membranes. Partial restoration of glycosylation was obtained in reactions that were supplemented with mannose or GDP-mannose, but not those supplemented with other sugar nucleotides. These results were consistent with a role for the Sec59 protein in the transfer of mannose to dolichol-linked oligosaccharide. Images PMID:2657387

  9. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea Gene Transiently Expressed in planta, Encodes a Mitochondrial Protein

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Eslava, Arturo P.; van Kan, Jan A. L.; Benito, Ernesto P.

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of reactive oxygen species, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor. PMID:26952144

  10. Sycamore amyloplasts can import and process precursors of nuclear encoded chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, K; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Watanabe, A; Akazawa, T

    1987-12-16

    Amyloplasts isolated from white-wild suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) are found to import and process the precursor of the small subunit (pS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach, but they lack the ability to form its holoenzyme due to the absence of both the large subunit and its binding-protein. They also import the precursor of the 33-kDa extrinsic protein (p33-kDa) of the O2-evolving complex of Photosystem II from spinach, but process is only to an intermediate form (i33-kDa). Chloroplasts from green-mutant cells of sycamore process p33-kDa to its mature form in this heterologous system. These results suggest that the thylakoid-associated protease responsible for the second processing step of p33-kDa is missing in amyloplasts, possibly due to the absence of thylakoid-membranes. In contrast, the apparent import of the precursor of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding apoprotein (pLHCP) from spinach was not detected. Sycamore amyloplasts may lack the ability to import this particular thylakoid-protein, or rapidly degrade the imported molecules in the absence of thylakoid-membranes for their proper insertion.

  11. Cloning and Expression of a DNA Sequence Encoding a 41-Kilodalton Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Wall Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark C.; Trout, Jim; Murphy, Charles; Harp, James A.; Higgins, Jim; Wergin, William; Fayer, Ron

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to produce a recombinant species-specific oocyst wall protein of Cryptosporidium parvum. Antigens unique to C. parvum were identified by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of oocyst proteins from several different Cryptosporidium species. Antiserum was then prepared against a 41-kDa antigen unique to C. parvum and used to identify a recombinant DNA clone, designated rCP41. Expression of CP41 mRNA in C. parvum oocysts was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Although the CP41 sequence was shown by PCR to be present in the genome of C. baileyi, CP41 mRNA was not detected in this species by RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence staining with antiserum against recombinant CP41 detected native CP41 antigen on the surface of C. parvum oocysts but failed to detect CP41 on C. baileyi oocysts. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that native CP41 was distributed unevenly on the C. parvum oocyst surface and was associated with amorphous oocyst wall material. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, purified rCP41 performed as well as native C. parvum oocyst protein in measuring the serological responses of young calves and adult cows to experimental and natural C. parvum infections. These results indicate that recombinant CP41 antigen may have potential in the immunodiagnosis of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10548585

  12. Mutations in FBXL4, Encoding a Mitochondrial Protein, Cause Early-Onset Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Xiaowu; Ghezzi, Daniele; Johnson, Mark A.; Biagosch, Caroline A.; Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Haack, Tobias B.; Reyes, Aurelio; Tsukikawa, Mai; Sheldon, Claire A.; Srinivasan, Satish; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S.; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Polyak, Erzsebet; Place, Emily; Consugar, Mark; Ostrovsky, Julian; Vidoni, Sara; Robinson, Alan J.; Wong, Lee-Jun; Sondheimer, Neal; Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jishi, Emtethal; Raab, Christopher P.; Bean, Charles; Furlan, Francesca; Parini, Rossella; Lamperti, Costanza; Mayr, Johannes A.; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Huemer, Martina; Pierce, Eric A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Freisinger, Peter; Sperl, Wolfgang; Prokisch, Holger; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Falk, Marni J.; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing and autozygosity mapping studies, independently performed in subjects with defective combined mitochondrial OXPHOS-enzyme deficiencies, identified a total of nine disease-segregating FBXL4 mutations in seven unrelated mitochondrial disease families, composed of six singletons and three siblings. All subjects manifested early-onset lactic acidemia, hypotonia, and developmental delay caused by severe encephalomyopathy consistently associated with progressive cerebral atrophy and variable involvement of the white matter, deep gray nuclei, and brainstem structures. A wide range of other multisystem features were variably seen, including dysmorphism, skeletal abnormalities, poor growth, gastrointestinal dysmotility, renal tubular acidosis, seizures, and episodic metabolic failure. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency was present in muscle or fibroblasts of all tested individuals, together with markedly reduced oxygen consumption rate and hyperfragmentation of the mitochondrial network in cultured cells. In muscle and fibroblasts from several subjects, substantially decreased mtDNA content was observed. FBXL4 is a member of the F-box family of proteins, some of which are involved in phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and/or G protein receptor coupling. We also demonstrate that FBXL4 is targeted to mitochondria and localizes in the intermembrane space, where it participates in an approximately 400 kDa protein complex. These data strongly support a role for FBXL4 in controlling bioenergetic homeostasis and mtDNA maintenance. FBXL4 mutations are a recurrent cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy onset in early infancy. PMID:23993194

  13. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source. PMID:18686036

  14. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  15. The TITAN5 gene of Arabidopsis encodes a protein related to the ADP ribosylation factor family of GTP binding proteins.

    PubMed

    McElver, J; Patton, D; Rumbaugh, M; Liu, C; Yang, L J; Meinke, D

    2000-08-01

    The titan (ttn) mutants of Arabidopsis exhibit dramatic alterations in mitosis and cell cycle control during seed development. Endosperm development in these mutants is characterized by the formation of giant polyploid nuclei with enlarged nucleoli. Embryo development is accompanied by significant cell enlargement in some mutants (ttn1 and ttn5) but not others (ttn2 and ttn3). We describe here the molecular cloning of TTN5 using a T-DNA-tagged allele. A second allele with a similar phenotype contains a nonsense mutation in the same coding region. The predicted protein is related to ADP ribosylation factors (ARFs), members of the RAS family of small GTP binding proteins that regulate various cellular functions in eukaryotes. TTN5 is most closely related in sequence to the ARL2 class of ARF-like proteins isolated from humans, rats, and mice. Although the cellular functions of ARL proteins remain unclear, the ttn5 phenotype is consistent with the known roles of ARFs in the regulation of intracellular vesicle transport.

  16. Membrane trafficking. The specificity of vesicle traffic to the Golgi is encoded in the golgin coiled-coil proteins.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mie; Munro, Sean

    2014-10-31

    The Golgi apparatus is a multicompartment central sorting station at the intersection of secretory and endocytic vesicular traffic. The mechanisms that permit cargo-loaded transport vesicles from different origins to selectively access different Golgi compartments are incompletely understood. We developed a rerouting and capture assay to investigate systematically the vesicle-tethering activities of 10 widely conserved golgin coiled-coil proteins. We find that subsets of golgins with distinct localizations on the Golgi surface have capture activities toward vesicles of different origins. These findings demonstrate that golgins act as tethers in vivo, and hence the specificity we find to be encoded in this tethering is likely to make a major contribution to the organization of membrane traffic at the Golgi apparatus.

  17. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-10-10

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  18. The Arabidopsis STICHEL Gene Is a Regulator of Trichome Branch Number and Encodes a Novel Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Ilgenfritz, Hilmar; Bouyer, Daniel; Schnittger, Arp; Mathur, Jaideep; Kirik, Victor; Schwab, Birgit; Chua, Nam-Hai; Jürgens, Gerd; Hülskamp, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Here, we analyze the STICHEL (STI) gene, which plays an important role in the regulation of branch number of the unicellular trichomes in Arabidopsis. We have isolated the STI locus by positional cloning and confirmed the identity by sequencing seven independent sti alleles. The STI gene encodes a protein of 1,218 amino acid residues containing a domain with sequence similarity to the ATP-binding eubacterial DNA-polymerase III γ-subunits. Because endoreduplication was found to be normal in sti mutants the molecular function of STI in cell morphogenesis is not linked to DNA replication and, therefore, postulated to represent a novel pathway. Northern-blot analysis shows that STI is expressed in all organs suggesting that STI function is not trichome specific. The analysis of sti alleles and transgenic lines overexpressing STI suggests that STI regulates branching in a dosage-dependent manner. PMID:12586888

  19. OsDEG10 encoding a small RNA-binding protein is involved in abiotic stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Yeon; Kang, In Soon; Han, Ji-Sung; Lee, Choon-Hwan; An, Gynheung; Moon, Yong-Hwan

    2009-03-13

    Excessive light can be harmful to photosynthetic apparatus since it causes photoinhibition and photooxidation, and plants often encounter hypoxic or anoxic environments when they become submerged by heavy rain or an ensuing flood. In this study, Oryza sativa Differentially Expressed Genes (OsDEGs) from rice under photooxidation and anoxia conditions were isolated using DD-PCR. Among them, OsDEG10 is predicted to encode a small RNA-binding protein (RBP) and the transcript levels of OsDEG10 strongly increased under most of abiotic stress treatments such as high light, anoxia, NaCl, ABA, MV and cold. However, the transcript levels of two rice OsDEG10 homologs were not changed under those treatments. OsDEG10 RNAi transgenic plants were more sensitive to high light and cold stresses compared to wild-type plants. Our results suggest that OsDEG10 is a small RBP involved in the response to various abiotic stresses.

  20. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26119090

  2. BRITTLE CULM1, Which Encodes a COBRA-Like Protein, Affects the Mechanical Properties of Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunhai; Qian, Qian; Zhou, Yihua; Yan, Meixian; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Mu; Fu, Zhiming; Wang, Yonghong; Han, Bin; Pang, Xiaoming; Chen, Mingsheng; Li, Jiayang

    2003-01-01

    Plant mechanical strength is an important agronomic trait. To understand the molecular mechanism that controls the plant mechanical strength of crops, we characterized the classic rice mutant brittle culm1 (bc1) and isolated BC1 using a map-based cloning approach. BC1, which encodes a COBRA-like protein, is expressed mainly in developing sclerenchyma cells and in vascular bundles of rice. In these types of cells, mutations in BC1 cause not only a reduction in cell wall thickness and cellulose content but also an increase in lignin level, suggesting that BC1, a gene that controls the mechanical strength of monocots, plays an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell walls of mechanical tissues. PMID:12953108

  3. Immunogenicity of nuclear-encoded LTB:ST fusion protein from Escherichia coli expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Soria-Guerra, Ruth E; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Herrera-Díaz, Areli; Korban, Schuyler S; Alpuche-Solís, Ángel G

    2011-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the main causative agents of diarrhea in infants and for travelers. Inclusion of a heat-stable (ST) toxin into vaccine formulations is mandatory as most ETEC strains can produce both heat-labile (LT) and ST enterotoxins. In this study, a genetic fusion gene encoding for an LTB:ST protein has been constructed and transferred into tobacco via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying the LTB:ST gene are then subjected to GM1-ELISA revealing that the LTB:ST has assembled into pentamers and displays antigenic determinants from both LTB and ST. Protein accumulation of up to 0.05% total soluble protein is detected. Subsequently, mucosal and systemic humoral responses are elicited in mice orally dosed with transgenic tobacco leaves. This has suggested that the plant-derived LTB:ST is immunogenic via the oral route. These findings are critical for the development of a plant-based vaccine capable of eliciting broader protection against ETEC and targeting both LTB and ST. Features of this platform in comparison to transplastomic approaches are discussed.

  4. Tri6 encodes an unusual zinc finger protein involved in regulation of trichothecene biosynthesis in Fusarium sporotrichioides.

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, R H; Hohn, T M; McCormick, S P; Desjardins, A E

    1995-01-01

    In Fusarium sporotrichioides, several genes required for biosynthesis of the trichothecene mycotoxin T-2 toxin are closely linked. Further characterization of this gene cluster has revealed a gene, Tri6, that specifies a 217-amino-acid protein with regions similar to Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins. Temporal expression of Tri6 is similar to that of trichothecene biosynthetic pathway genes. Analysis of Tri6 transcripts indicated that transcription is initiated in two regions and that within each region there may be at least four initiation sites. Disruption of Tri6 resulted in a mutant that did not produce trichothecenes but that did accumulate low levels of the trichothecene precursor trichodiene. The Tri6 mutant was unable to convert six trichothecene biosynthetic intermediates to T-2 toxin, and transcription of two biosynthetic genes, Tri4 and Tri5, was greatly reduced in the mutant relative to the wild type. In addition, the product of Tri6 functioned as a transcriptional activator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when fused to the DNA binding region of GAL4. These results indicate that Tri6 encodes a protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of trichothecene biosynthetic genes in F. sporotrichioides. PMID:7646028

  5. Cloning of a DNA fragment encoding a heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding outer membrane protein from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Ren, Z; Pozsgay, J M; Elkins, C; Whitby, P W; Morton, D J; Stull, T L

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is able to use hemoglobin as a sole source of heme, and heme-repressible hemoglobin binding to the cell surface has been demonstrated. Using an affinity purification methodology, a hemoglobin-binding protein of approximately 120 kDa was isolated from H. influenzae type b strain HI689 grown in heme-restricted but not in heme-replete conditions. The isolated protein was subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and the derived amino acid sequence was used to design corresponding oligonucleotides. The oligonucleotides were used to probe a Southern blot of EcoRI-digested HI689 genomic DNA. A hybridizing band of approximately 4.2 kb was successfully cloned into pUC19. Using a 1.9-kb internal BglII fragment of the 4.2-kb clone as a probe, hybridization was seen in both typeable and nontypeable H. influenzae but not in other bacterial species tested. Following partial nucleotide sequencing of the 4.2-kb insert, a putative open reading frame was subcloned into an expression vector. The host Escherichia coli strain in which the cloned fragment was expressed bound biotinylated human hemoglobin, whereas binding of hemoglobin was not detected in E. coli with the vector alone. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the DNA fragment encoding an approximately 120-kDa heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding protein mediates one step in the acquisition of hemoglobin by H. influenzae in vivo. PMID:8757844

  6. Stress tolerances of nullmutants of function-unknown genes encoding menadione stress-responsive proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Éva; Bálint, Mihály; Miskei, Márton; Orosz, Erzsébet; Szabó, Zsuzsa; Pócsi, István

    2016-07-01

    A group of menadione stress-responsive function-unkown genes of Aspergillus nidulans (Locus IDs ANID_03987.1, ANID_06058.1, ANID_10219.1, and ANID_10260.1) was deleted and phenotypically characterized. Importantly, comparative and phylogenetic analyses of the tested A. nidulans genes and their orthologs shed light only on the presence of a TANGO2 domain with NRDE protein motif in the translated ANID_06058.1 gene but did not reveal any recognizable protein-encoding domains in other protein sequences. The gene deletion strains were subjected to oxidative, osmotic, and metal ion stress and, surprisingly, only the ΔANID_10219.1 mutant showed an increased sensitivity to 0.12 mmol l(-1) menadione sodium bisulfite. The gene deletions affected the stress sensitivities (tolerances) irregularly, for example, some strains grew more slowly when exposed to various oxidants and/or osmotic stress generating agents, meanwhile the ΔANID_10260.1 mutant possessed a wild-type tolerance to all stressors tested. Our results are in line with earlier studies demonstrating that the deletions of stress-responsive genes do not confer necessarily any stress-sensitivity phenotypes, which can be attributed to compensatory mechanisms based on other elements of the stress response system with overlapping functions.

  7. GANP protein encoded on human chromosome 21/mouse chromosome 10 is associated with resistance to mammary tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Phimsen, Suchada; Gondo, Naomi; Yamashita, Hiroko; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Fukushima, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji; Saya, Hideyuki; Kondo, Eisaku; Matsuo, Keitaro; Takeya, Motohiro; Iwase, Hirotaka; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Human chromosome 21 is known to be associated with the high risk of hematological malignancy but with resistance to breast cancer in the study of Down syndrome. In human cancers, we previously observed the significant alterations of the protein expression encoded by the ganp/MCM3AP gene on human chromosome 21q22.3. Here, we investigated GANP protein alterations in human breast cancer samples (416 cases) at various stages by immunohistochemical analysis. This cohort study clearly showed that expression of GANP is significantly decreased in human breast cancer cases with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor (relapse-free survival, hazard ratio = 2.37, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.42, P = 0.007 [univariate analysis]; hazard ratio = 2.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.42-5.13, P = 0.002 [multivariate analysis]). To investigate whether the altered GANP expression is associated with mammary tumorigenesis, we created mutant mice that were conditionally deficient in the ganp/MCM3AP gene using wap-cre recombinase transgenic mice. Mammary gland tumors occurred at a very high incidence in female mammary gland-specific GANP-deficient mice after severe impairment of mammary gland development during pregnancy. Moreover, tumor development also occurred in female post parous GANP-heterodeficient mice. GANP has a significant role in the suppression of DNA damage caused by estrogen in human breast cancer cell lines. These results indicated that the GANP protein is associated with breast cancer resistance. PMID:26749495

  8. Sex-dependent expression of mRNA encoding a major egg protein in the gonochoric coral Galaxea fascicularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, H.; Nakano, Y.; Andoh, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2005-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a major egg protein was cloned in Galaxea fascicularis, a hermatypic coral with a gonochoric breeding system, and gene expression at the transcriptional level was compared between female and functional male colonies. In an electrophoretic analysis, four soluble proteins were present in high abundance in the female egg, but not in the pseudo-eggs of functional males. Partial amino acid sequences of one of the major proteins named GfEP-1 (88 kDa) were determined, and a cDNA fragment of about 2 kb containing a partial GfEP-1 sequence was isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited sequence similarities to vertebrate and invertebrate vitellogenins. GfEP-1 transcripts were detected in both sexes 0 1 month before spawning. However, the mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in functional males. The expression of GfEP-1 may be utilized in sexing and also monitoring effects of environmental and anthropogenic factors on vitellogenesis and sex determination.

  9. A gene (SRPX) encoding a sushi-repeat-containing protein is deleted in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Meindl, A; Carvalho, M R; Herrmann, K; Lorenz, B; Achatz, H; Lorenz, B; Apfelstedt-Sylla, E; Wittwer, B; Ross, M; Meitinger, T

    1995-12-01

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is characterized by retinal degeneration with night blindness and progressive reduction of the visual fields. By linkage and deletion analysis a gene locus (RP3) has been mapped to the short arm of the X chromosome between the genes CYBB and OTC. Analysis of transcript in this region has revealed a gene which is abundantly expressed in human retina and encodes a putative membrane protein with significant homologies to short consensus repeat (SCR/sushi) domains known from selections and complement proteins. The gene termed SRPX (sushi-repeat-containing protein, x chromosome) is deleted in an RP patient who also suffers from chronic granulomatous disease and McLeod syndrome. A 75 kb deletion removing exon 1 of the gene was also found in two brothers of a second XLRP family. However, no further functionally significant mutations were detected by SSCP screening of all 10 exons in 34 unrelated XLRP patients nor by full length RT-PCR sequencing in two RP3 families. The role of this highly conserved retinal gene in the pathogenesis of RP therefore remains to be determined.

  10. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of a necrosis- and ethylene-inducing, protein-encoding gene family from Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bang-Jun; Jia, Pei-Song; Gao, Feng; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2012-07-01

    Verticillium dahliae Kleb. is a hemibiotrophic, phytopathogenic fungus that causes wilt disease in a wide range of crops, including cotton. Successful host colonization by hemibiotrophic pathogens requires the induction of plant cell death to provide the saprophytic nutrition for the transition from the biotrophic to the necrotrophic stage. In this study, we identified a necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein (NPP1) domain-containing protein family containing nine genes in a virulent, defoliating isolate of V. dahliae (V592), named the VdNLP genes. Functional analysis demonstrated that only two of these VdNLP genes, VdNLP1 and VdNLP2, encoded proteins that were capable of inducing necrotic lesions and triggering defense responses in Nicotiana benthamiana, Arabidopsis, and cotton plants. Both VdNLP1 and VdNLP2 induced the wilting of cotton seedling cotyledons. However, gene-deletion mutants targeted by VdNLP1, VdNLP2, or both did not affect the pathogenicity of V. dahliae V592 in cotton infection. Similar expression and induction patterns were found for seven of the nine VdNLP transcripts. Through a comparison of the conserved amino acid residues of VdNLP with different necrosis-inducing activities, combined with mutagenesis-based analyses, we identified several novel conserved amino acid residues, in addition to the known conserved heptapeptide GHRHDWE motif and the cysteine residues of the NPP domain-containing protein, that are indispensable for the necrosis-inducing activity of the VdNLP2 protein.

  11. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  12. Low water potentials affect expression of genes encoding vegetative storage proteins and plasma membrane proton ATPase in soybean.

    PubMed

    Surowy, T K; Boyer, J S

    1991-02-01

    We have examined growth, water status and gene expression in dark-grown soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) seedlings in response to water deficit (low water potentials) during the first days following germination. The genes encoded the plasma membrane proton ATPase and two proteins of 28 kDa and 31 kDa putatively involved in vegetative storage. Water potentials of stems and roots decreased when 2-day-old seedlings were transferred to water-saturated air. Stem growth was inhibited immediately. Root growth continued at control rates for one day and then was totally inhibited when the normal root-stem water potential gradient was reversed. Expression of mRNA for the 28 kDa and 31 kDa proteins, measured independently using specific 3'-end probes, occurred about equally in stems. However, only the mRNA for the 31 kDa protein was detected in roots and at a lower abundance than in stems. Low water potentials increased the mRNA only for the 28 kDa protein in stems and the 31 kDa protein in roots. This differential expression followed the inhibition of stem growth but preceded the inhibition of root growth. The expression of the message for the ATPase, measured using a probe synthesized from a partial oat ATPase clone, was low in stems and roots but there was a 6-fold increase at low water potentials in roots. The increase followed the inhibition of root growth. This appears to be the first instance of regulation of ATPase gene expression in plants and the first demonstration of differential expression of the 28 kDa, 31 kDa, and ATPase messages. The correlation with the differential growth responses of the stems and roots raises the possibility that the differential gene expression could be involved in the growth response to low water potentials.

  13. Rice dwarf phytoreovirus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein has a cell-to-cell movement function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Bao, Yi M; Wei, Chun H; Kang, Zhen S; Zhong, Yong W; Mao, Peng; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhang L; Schiemann, Joachim; Nelson, Richard S

    2004-05-01

    Rice dwarf virus (RDV) is a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, which is composed of viruses with segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. Proteins that support the intercellular movement of these viruses in the host have not been identified. Microprojectile bombardment was used to determine which open reading frames (ORFs) support intercellular movement of a heterologous virus. A plasmid containing an infectious clone of Potato virus X (PVX) defective in cell-to-cell movement and expressing either beta-glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used for cobombardment with plasmids containing ORFs from RDV gene segments S1 through S12 onto leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX was restored by cobombardment with a plasmid containing S6. In the absence of S6, no other gene segment supported movement. Identical results were obtained with Nicotiana tabacum, a host that allows fewer viruses to infect and spread within its tissue. S6 supported the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX in sink and source leaves of N. benthamiana. A mutant S6 lacking the translation start codon did not complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX. An S6 protein product (Pns6)-enhanced GFP fusion was observed near or within cell walls of epidermal cells from N. tabacum. By immunocytochemistry, unfused Pns6 was localized to plasmodesmata in rice leaves infected with RDV. S6 thus encodes a protein with characteristics identical to those of other viral proteins required for the cell-to-cell movement of their genome and therefore is likely required for the cell-to-cell movement of RDV.

  14. Ribosomal protein L7a is encoded by a gene (Surf-3) within the tightly clustered mouse surfeit locus.

    PubMed Central

    Giallongo, A; Yon, J; Fried, M

    1989-01-01

    The mouse Surfeit locus, which contains a cluster of at least four genes (Surf-1 to Surf-4), is unusual in that adjacent genes are separated by no more than 73 base pairs (bp). The heterogeneous 5' ends of Surf-1 and Surf-2 are separated by only 15 to 73 bp, the 3' ends of Surf-1 and Surf-3 are only 70 bp apart, and the 3' ends of Surf-2 and Surf-4 overlap by 133 bp. This very tight clustering suggests a cis interaction between adjacent Surfeit genes. The Surf-3 gene (which could code for a basic polypeptide of 266 amino acids) is a highly expressed member of a pseudogene-containing multigene family. By use of an anti-peptide serum (against the C-terminal nine amino acids of the putative Surf-3 protein) for immunofluorescence and immunoblotting of mouse cell components and by in vitro translation of Surf-3 cDNA hybrid-selected mRNA, the Surf-3 gene product was identified as a 32-kilodalton ribosomal protein located in the 60S ribosomal subunit. From its subunit location, gel migration, and homology with a limited rat ribosomal peptide sequence, the Surf-3 gene was shown to encode the mouse L7a ribosomal protein. The Surf-3 gene is highly conserved through evolution and was detected by nucleic acid hybridization as existing in multiple copies (multigene families) in other mammals and as one or a few copies in birds, Xenopus, Drosophila, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The Surf-3 C-terminal anti-peptide serum detects a 32-kilodalton protein in other mammals, birds, and Xenopus but not in Drosophila and S. pombe. The possible effect of interaction of the Surf-3 ribosomal protein gene with adjacent genes in the Surfeit locus at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level or both levels is discussed. Images PMID:2648130

  15. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  16. A Second Actin-Like MamK Protein in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 Encoded Outside the Genomic Magnetosome Island

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sandrine; Pignol, David; Wu, Long-Fei; Ginet, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are able to swim navigating along geomagnetic field lines. They synthesize ferromagnetic nanocrystals that are embedded in cytoplasmic membrane invaginations forming magnetosomes. Regularly aligned in the cytoplasm along cytoskeleton filaments, the magnetosome chain effectively forms a compass needle bestowing on bacteria their magnetotactic behaviour. A large genomic island, conserved among magnetotactic bacteria, contains the genes potentially involved in magnetosome formation. One of the genes, mamK has been described as encoding a prokaryotic actin-like protein which when it polymerizes forms in the cytoplasm filamentous structures that provide the scaffold for magnetosome alignment. Here, we have identified a series of genes highly similar to the mam genes in the genome of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. The newly annotated genes are clustered in a genomic islet distinct and distant from the known magnetosome genomic island and most probably acquired by lateral gene transfer rather than duplication. We focused on a mamK-like gene whose product shares 54.5% identity with the actin-like MamK. Fila